Page 1

33rd Year

— No.

5

Student eyes Olympics By

Nicole Furlong

Imagine for a moment, a 19-yearold juggling a full-time college

course load, training for the 2000

Olympic

trials

four hours a day,

own

ing on his

home

about an hour and a half from

and trying social

liv-

for the first time

to sustain

some kind of

life.

Maintaining

schedule

this

may

seem unachievable, even to the best of us, but for one Conestoga College general business student, this

Plunge into

SPOKE’S

agenda

Mark

rises at the

Polar spread.

is reality.

Shivers, an Orillia native,

dawn each day

break of

be in the water by 5:30 a.m.

to

Kitchener Waterloo National

at the

Swim

Centre to train with his teammates

on the national Olympic swim team. Practice consists of a combination

of aquatic and on-land exercises,

such as swimming laps and muscular

Shivers then hurries to Conestoga to

spend about seven hours working

on his studies. Because he carries a full course load, he tries to save time by completing his homework on his breaks

when

during the day, because school day

Students prove Doon at

swim

is out, it’s

back

centre for another

the

to the

two hours

RAGE 10

During the evening hours Shivers completes any homework he couldn’t get

done during the day and

hits

the sack as early as possible, as he

has to be up to do

it all

again the

next day.

Occasionally,

Shivers

said,

he

goes out to nightclubs or movies on

weekends, that

is,

when he

doesn’t

it

Shivers said with a smile as if

“It’s life,”

hard to keep an active social

he

though,

keeps

Shivers said to

swim

was a

“I don’t regret

said.

it

child,

his older broth-

to follow

in his footsteps eight years ago.

Because lifestyle

he leads,

time to hold a part-time job. Shivers has been awarded $2,000 from Swim Canada and Swim

Ontario in the

to Friday

the six-foot, 170-pound

or attitude about

swimmer’s

swimming.

way of a

tuition

He

is

also involved in a carding is

a provincial pro-

that grants eligible athletes

money

to

help

also

pay

their

way

through school.

These programs are provided for athletes who meet time require-

A man

approached a Conestoga College student Jan. 26 with a knife in a possible kidnapping

Shivers.

swimming

began

Orillia at a gentler pace,

attempt.

The female student was standing by Door 1, around 9 p.m., when a man entered the door from outside, grabbed her hand and told her he wanted her to come with him. He then produced a knife. The man fled when he saw other

where Shivers’ hue potential shone through and placing fourth in Nationals, he began to be noticed his current

who

has

Boles

coach Dean Boles,

coached recruited

Waterloo, which

Anyone who has information about the incident is encouraged to contact Conestoga College’s

745-5220

ext.

little

Boles said Shivers is a conscienand because of that

had

him

since

is

Shivers

known

to

to har-

modify

to

his

swim

sched-

ule.

“He has amazing

speed,” he said.

“We just have to work on his techniBoles,

coach

who

has been a

swimming

20 years as well as an

for

Olympic coach, said Shivers was overwhelmed at first. “In our program we swim farther,

more

harder and

often,”

Boles

said.

“He

has a big load on his plate, but

he’s

getting better with handling

stress.”

When

comes down

to

if

he

bour some of the fastest swimmers in eastern Canada, and luckily he accepted, because now he is div-

were forced

ing into the experience of a

Shivers immediately chose school.

life-

it

to

and

swimming See Student

time.

-

it,

choose between education.

his

page 2

knife-point

or the Waterloo

police.

a hood and black pants.

cen-

tious student

cal skills.”

After a good showing at a meet

leave the building.

security services, at

in

where he

freestyle.

514,

white male in his early 20s, five foot seven, with light brown hair. He was wearing a black coat with

while to adjust to having so

he’s

by

swim

changed Shivers’ life, and schedule, and he said it took him a

would meet with a coach one-onone whenever it was convenient for both of them to practise his areas of expertise, the butterfly stroke and

students approaching the door to

The student was not injured but was upset by the incident. The suspect is described as a

Training at Waterloo’s tre

time to himself.

Man holds student at By Mike Radatus

sponsor

September 1999.

assistance program.

twice a month.

Monday

demanding Shivers has no

the

of

gram

spirit

has been his goal Olympics since he

when

Two companies Shivers

a former competitive

system, which

This rigorous

it

honest.”

it

in the

er Todd,

me

ments at the Nationals competition, where Shivers placed fourth last year.

doesn’t really phase him.

have a competition, which happens

routine, however, has not squelched

Condor win keeps them in playoff hunt RAGE 15

life,”

swimmer, urged Shivers

of training.

university level.

have much of a social

“I don’t

endurance exercises.

regional

remind people

when someone who

to

be cautious

leaving during late hours,”

looks suspicious or someone that doesn’t look like he/she belongs on campus is asked to report the

he said. Hunter encourages students to walk in pairs and if they have any concerns to use the WalkSafe pro-

person to security services. A1 Hunter, supervisor of security services, said this is the only inci-

WalkSafe teaching building. located by doors 1 and 5.

dent to this effect that has been reported, but whenever anything like this happens it raises concern.

ices

Anyone who

sees

‘This incident gives reason to

gram when leaving

the

main is

Students can go to security servif

they feel uncomfortable night and a WalkSafe

walking

at

member

will

meet them.


Page 2

— SPOKE, Feb.

7,

2000

DSA reminds

students about KPI

By Adam Wilson

of a college’s funding on the outcome of the

KPI It’s

important that students are

when

honest

completing

fair

and

Key

their

students and the college

Performance Indicator student satisfaction

Mike

surveys, according to

“It

DSA

Harris,

surveys.

Harris said the surveys are

good

for both

itself.

gives schools a chance to improve in

areas where they did poorly,” he said, “and

vice-president of education.

it

allows students to voice their opinions and

The annual KPI surveys will be completed by students at Conestoga College beginning

concerns about their school.”

Feb. 7 and are mandatory for each full-time

poorer ranked colleges had to improve in

The

student enrolled in a college program.

surveys will be filled out by students

After last year’s surveys were completed,

hopes of getting more funding, said Harris.

at the

“Our school

Doon, Guelph and Waterloo campuses. KPIs are a method of measuring how well Ontario colleges meet the needs of students.

The independent surveys

“Our

time

vice-president of education, and Jenn Hussey, DSA vicepresident of operations, want to remind students about KPI surveys and how important it is for Conestoga College. (Photo by Adam Wilson)

1

tify the

percentage of students that are

fied with their school’s resources

employment and gradand tied for number 1 in

in graduate

uate satisfaction

es; to identify the

employment;

to their future

In a guide for student governments, the sur-

satis-

the college’s resources and services; and to

and servic-

identify areas of strength or concern to assist

who

colleges

relevant

services.

percentage of students

believe their learning experience

student satisfaction.

percentage of students

who

is

the quality of their education; to identify the

it’s

importance students assign to specific

else that

and the pro-

ele-

ments of their learning experience; to identify the importance students assign to each of

objectives: to iden-

“[When

telling future

he

said.

“Your education

According

forever,”

reflects

you your whole life.” At the Olympic trials, which be held in Montreal

May, Mark

will

end of

compete

will

front crawl (freestyle)

50-metre

at the

on

in

the

is

He

coach would

like

to

however expand

Olympic All in

he

said.

who

opens a few more doors by allowing him to compete in relay races. “I think

make

it

Mark’s goal will be to in

the

finals

(of

the

think Mark’s goal

will

be

make

to

Name

I lie

number

I

“Swimming given

me

a

in lot

Boles,

Waterloo

has

of confidence

the best coaches in the country and

alongside the best

I

swimmers

country as well.”

in the

1

doing well on the KPI sur“we can graduate from the

college in the province.”

was held Jan. 26 and some results are in.

already

who

DSA promotions

rently

Luquin said he

DSA

to a lack of candidates, the

cur-

is

assistant.

will be the first

president that isn’t

in

a

He

business-oriented program.

positions of president, vice-pres-

said the reason business students

ident of education and vice-pres-

typically are involved

of operations are

filled.

for a posi-

dent

affairs.

Mike

-

Harris, vice-president of

DSA

students are

more management

ness student. “I ran for president

few people actually submitted

ter,”

“It

in the

However, Luquin isn’t intimidated by not being a busi-

DSA

nominations.

more

could be because business

minded.

picked up election packages, but

he

because the

getting bigger and bet-

is

said.

Philip LeBeau, a general busi-

could have something to do

ness student, will be vice-presi-

with people realizing the amount

dent of operations.

of work that goes along with the

feels

DSA,” he said. The new president of

the future. the

DSA

he has

“I feel I

He said he many good ideas for

have a

lot

of experience

with student politics and

and we need

good ideas

new

for

I

have

activities

and

projects,” he said

DSA

Suggest a creative name that represents a positive image of our

our community or

education in general and win a $250 Gift Certificate from the bookstore. will also be a

named

Paul Luquin, a robotics and

Mike

There

the

be a major influence down the road.

is

your help.

college,

we were

students recognize that

prez

education, said a lot of people

Radio Slalion

will hit the air this Fall

will

we keep

tion is for vice-president of stu-

because I’m training with one of

and win! Conestoga’s own FM Radio Station

it

“If

candidate meeting

The only competition

trials).”

swimming coach

RADIO CONESTOGA

DSA

The

ident

the finals (of the

Dean

as

in

it

year for the college

automation student,

Due “I

and

the best college in the

By Mike Radatus

into the trials with a time of 23.41

Olympic

I

is

said he hopes

going

is

seconds in the freestyle event, said

it

last

a

is

said.

they’re getting the best education in Ontario

first,]

New DSA

he feels prepared for May.

because

He

about the college,”

lot

a school finishes

government bases two per cent

100-metre

freestyle

“Enrolment was up

veys,” he said,

said the

Shivers,

trials),” all,

completing

college in Ontario

1

based on the fact that students said

province.”

Shivers’ repertoire to include the

and butterfly

sprints.

to Boles, Shivers’ forte

the 50-metre freestyle,

his

in their grading while

survey.

major accomplishment for the college, he

employers and everyone

Conestoga

Student prepares for Sydney 1

KPI

best school,” Harris said.

said Harris.

veys are described as a measure of students’

continued from page “Swimming doesn’t last

and honest the

improving programming and

in

“These surveys say a

to identify the

are satisfied with

satisfaction with their school

gram they’re enrolled in. The survey has six main

like that.”

Harris emphasized that students must be fair

Being the number

for the first

year and Conestoga College placed

last

number

DSA

Mike Harris,

Performance Indicators which are accountability and excellence benchmarks.

The surveys were conducted

above average so we don’t

have to do anything

Key

establish

superior to most,” he said.

is

facilities are

$150

Harris will represent the as

the

vice-president of

education for another year.

i m

“I

decided to run for the same

position so

I

can keep tackling

same things and I think get more accomplished the

w

I

can this

year,” he said.

I

Three people have been nominated for the position of vice-

Gift Certificate for

president

honourable mention.

Ramy

of

student

affairs:

Michael, a broadcasting

Brad Whiteford, a management studies student, and student,

Contest Rules are available

from

Kerri-Lynn Kit, a computer pro-

Room 2A-01

gramming analysis student. The DSA will appoint a

or from the

Broadcasting Program

Room 3B-08

information

be available

following the election.

Contest Closes

m

February 25th

I

The candidates will be making campaign speeches on Feb. 10 in the Sanctuary.

Voting for vice-president of stu-

FEBRUARY >

More

this position will

the election.

on

mtm today

*

vice-

president of entertainment after

11

ONLY IN THEATRES

dent affairs will take place Feb. 15 to Feb. 17.


SPOKE,

Feb. 7, 2000

— Page

3

Hula your way to a degree By Tannis Fenton

completion

Agreements have been reached

final-

Alberta, Buffalo State University

with

Hawaii.

Hawaii Pacific University in the computer programmer analyst and business administration programs, which at

as a degree

important to provide such agree-

studies, accounting

and materials Eleanor

Conlin,

academic

of

research and education services.

The which

articulation is

known

also

involved in terms of fees and

he

said,

what’s available in housing and

are

done primarily

a baccalaureate degree.

accommodations and other general information like that, he

College students.

said.

his energy into things that benefit

we don’t help to

organize

it, it

means every student has to negotiate on their own and that can be very problematic,” said McGregor.

Some

Overtures have been

number of accredited

“It

may, in of

fact,

said

agreements

will

McGregor.

is

Articulation

how

long

University University

courses they have to

campuses they McGregor.

They

also

will attend,

to McGregor, a repfrom the University of Western Sydney came to Conestoga College Feb. 4 to complete negotiations on the possibility of completing the final year of the computer pro-

According

resentative

McGregor.

grammer

“(Negotiations) can take differ-

said

ent

include

system was for the University of

and Barnsley England, said

in

analyst degree online.

These negotiations have taken

amounts of time, depending on

the university and the individual,”

what’s

he’s negoti-

Western Sydney.

in the negotiation stage of artic-

it

takes to complete the degree,

said he wants to put

The only agreement

ulation agreements with Sheffield

what take and what

determine for students

Conestoga

ated for the entire Ontario college

said McGregor, adding Hawaii Pacific University is just one of them. At this point, Conestoga College

depend on the

registrar,”

the

for

Conestoga College students.

to a

universities

tions,

said.

mood

made

adding that negotiations

McGregor

with a variety of types and loca-

universities will give stu-

dents full credit, others don’t, he

Australia

says

chair

in

agreement,

management

management,

University

Northwood and University in Michigan, which was the first agreement reached. Grant McGregor, college principal and dean of academic research and education services, said it’s

include marketing,

to

in Buffalo,

allow students from the college to

degrees

Athabasca

Lake Superior State University in Michigan, Royal Roads University in British Columbia, Saginaw Valley State the University ip Michigan, University of Western Sydney in

ized on July 27 last year, will

complete

ments for students who want

proceed from a college diploma to “If

in

University

The agreement, which was

simi-

ments the college has.

ed an articulation agreement with Pacific

is

lar to other out-of-province agree-

Conestoga College has negotiat-

Hawaii

with

agreement,

Hawaii Pacific University

six to eight

months.

Hey, time to

Larry Rechsteiner, director of college planning,

the

is in

stages of completing the school’s phot ° b v Ra v Bowe (

final

strategic plan.

3

>

Strategic plan near completion The scan

By Ray Bowe

as social

Conestoga College’s Strategic Plan 2000-2005

is

near completion.

The planning task force is awaiting a compilation of numbers and comments submitted in its surveys, also called an environmental scan.

issues,

even questions regarding the aging population. An annual report is drafted regarding the progression toward fulfilling the school’s five-year plan and subsequent changes that may become necessary.

designed to determine the major goals

For instance, the task force has endorsed the writing of more succinct statements in the plan to promote clarity. The task force is composed of students, fac-

is

by CompuStat Consultants, located in Orangeville, who will develop summaries of the scan’s findings and forward them to the school. stages of compilation

CompuStat

preparing a comprehensive package

is

of the accumulated information and

its

completion

is

projected for late February. Completion of the project is

expected by

late June.

The survey was completed by

students, faculty, sup-

port staff, administration, employers, advisory committee members, alumni, the board of governors and

ulty,

support staff and administration. is to shorten the statements so

The challenge

include academic excellence, student success, quali-

human

ty service,

The ed.

resources and fiscal responsibility.

strategic thrust

will

With an

be

and change

the fifth survey,

influx of technology being integrated into

education, Rechsteiner sees the scans as the front line to determining what is important to students and the school.

would

anticipate virtual colleges

of each given scenario, such as the use of Internet for learning, the adequacy of special needs facilities and

essential in the future,”

health issues.

tion technology

The

results

from the scan are used

overall direction of Conestoga, or

The

to

its

determine the

Strategic Plan.

three cornerstones of the Strategic Plan are the

mission statement, the unifying thread that directs the school; the vision, or the image the school wishes to

initiatives survey,

has yet to be complet-

“I

is

he

said,

may become

therefore, informa-

an extremely useful weapon in

combating the unknown future. Linkages and partnerships will not decrease, said Rechsteiner.

With a reduction

in the

amount of funds,

there

is

a

maintain or achieve over the next five years; and val-

high cost to develop such virtual colleges, he said. However, once the virtual environment is construct-

ues, the underlying principles the school’s policies

ed, the operational costs

are based on.

In the previous plan, 1995-2000, “resources were

applied to specific areas in the plan to allow focus in a certain direction,” says Larry Rechsteiner, director of college planning.

become

lower.

This is the same rationale which led to Conestoga becoming the first college to implement International Standards Organization (ISO) guidelines, which strengthen the quality of service through avoiding duplication.

COUNSELLOR

S

CORNER:

Courtesy

observed a student hovering over our receptionist in Student Services huffing and puffing and blowing his chances for any immediate response. She was responding to someone on the phone and he was demanding immediate attention. He wanted to use the phone to verbally abuse one of the College's financial awards officers. In a matter of minutes, he managed to alienate two people who could have helped and usually do. Students are not the only ones resorting to rudeness. Students come into counselling asking how to deal with faculty who are abrupt and

week

Last

caustic

I

class.

in

you don't know program” has become

"If

don’t belong in this

answer

for the next survey regarding (strategic) thrust and initiatives,” said Rechsteiner. The strategic thrusts

This is the fourth survey the college planning department has conducted recently. The first three surveys focused on the mission statement, vision and to rank the importance

it is

to understand

the direction of the school, said Rechsteiner. “The environmental scan numbers will be the basis

which

The scan asked respondents

and outside people

easier for students

the community.

values of the school.

1

trends, including the national

and provincial economies, environmental

to be achieved by the college over the next five years. The information found in the scan is in the final

The plan

1

also accounts for such outside influences

and economic

a i I i I i I i 1 i I 1 ! i 1 13 I 1 1 m

ic

unpopular questions. Faculty

to

you

a popular

are. under terrif-

blame

pressure, but students are not to

that,

lor college cut-

backs and concerns over job security.

q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q a

Whatever the worries may be - financial, family, jobs, marks, mortgage - and a little courtesy could go a long way. When teach a workshop to a class of students who are kicking a pop can I

around and walking in and out for cigarettes, hear understand faculty complaints. When their of front in students insulting faculty about feel ashamed. When administrators peers, memos which communicate only nasty resort to I

I

I

disdain, cy.

I

When

some

long for I

old-fashioned diploma-

watch people shove

in

front of oth-

ers in the cafeteria or leave spilt coffee for the wonder how we lost our digstaff to clean up, I

nity.

courtesy cannot make the February blahs go away, but it could help us get along a little

A

little

better.

A Message from

Student Services

(Room 2B02)


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 4

7,

2000

OSAP By Ray Bowe

modifies guidelines

lower

rates:

Algonquin College

at

15.1 per cent and College Boreal

Program

Assistance

Student

Ontario

receiving

Students

(OSAP) funding should be aware of some changes to OSAP guidelines. The Ontario government has implemented credit screening, income checks and modi-

tighter

fications

to

how

it

handles

“It’s

encouraging that more stu-

dents are paying back their loans, but default rates are said

still

too high,”

Dianne Cunningham, minister

of training, colleges and universia ministry press release.

in

ties,

The worst

default rate belonged

to College des

Grand Lacs

at

Carol Walsh, a financial-aid cer at Conestoga,

its

the

high

to consolidate

payment

is

not made, the loan will be consid-

person will

name of

the

be added to the Ontario

Restricted List, resulting in an inel-

“More can and must be done.” default rate for Ontario col-

igibility for additional

OSAP assis-

was 20.1 per cent in 1999, down from 25.4 per cent in 1998. Conestoga College has one of the lowest default rates compared

tance until the default

is

The leges

to other

Ontario colleges. In 1998,

Conestoga’s default rate was 16.6 per cent.

Only two other colleges had

During

the

year, over

receiving

1998-1999 funding

school

at

a total

$534 million. The government is also running tighter income verifications on

cost of

students applying for

said Walsh.

student debt, the provincial govern-

ment has

OSAP.

also introduced Ontario

Grants

Opportunity

Student

to

more

ensure students do not incur

than $7,000 debt in a single aca-

demic

year.

If students

have been

in arrears

on

more credit items for 90 days or more within the last three three or

and the value of the items

years,

cleared.

190,000 students were

OSAP

income

credit screening,”

by the

affected

their

In an attempt to alleviate the high

contact their bank within the six-

ered in default and the

lowered to what the entitlement

offi-

avoid defaulting, students can

their loans. If the first

have their loan entitlements

been accurately reported. “We’ve had a number of students

job placement percentage.

month grace period

an inaccurate

would have been had

attributes

school’s low-default rate to

cite

their loan applications

45.2

per cent.

To

default situations.

will

per cent.

at 15

who

Students

income on

is

over $1,000, student loans will be denied.

For more information on the new changes, see

OSAP’s Web

site at

www.osap.gov.on.ca or go to the office

financial-aid

in

Carol Walsh, a financial-aid

the stu-

placement rate accounts

says the school’s high joblow loan default rate.

officer,

for the school’s

(Photo by Ray Bowe)

dent/client services building.

College gets media savvy he In the attempt to attract the atten-

of new students, Conestoga

tion

we do this training,”

of training and development, how-

excellent students growing,” said

“We’re excited Conestoga

ever, more commercials promoting other aspects of the college are on

St.

John. “It’s a

ter

mousetrap.”

everyone know

By Laura Czekaj

new

College has launched a

televi-

is

said.

the

number

trying to

By

tell

1

college and we’re

the community.”

telling

the

way, said

their

St.

who

Conestoga

are inter-

advertising

attract a high calibre of students,

ested in full-time enrolment and

Conestoga.

The commercial the high demand

ages 25 to 45.

parents of students.

response to

is in

for information

technology training, says Pat John,

St.

of training

vice-president

hopes

The course being

the

ad

advertised

high school students

will

The

a

is

It

advertising

runs

is

the increasing

and development and continuing education.

graduate with vendor certification.

versities for students.

let

“We

the school

compe-

see

competition

the

for

nors meeting.

TEST

of commercials

pull

mind

student base.

research to find better ways to feel sick to

who

is

copy of your timetable and sign up in STUDENT SERVICES (2B02) by February 10 th register bring a

Common

hours will be selected from

submitted student timetables.

CTV

is

Workshop Facilitator:

Please register in

dislikes

The

STUDENT

S6P-VIC.CS

(POOM

the

pertaining

was presented

to

likes

to the

research target it

its

will

help

commercials

wants to

of

Barb Kraler

governors,

done by

ai

attract.

Sandra Hammer, chair of board

research

Shawna Bernard

said

CTV

the

the

empha

sized an opportunity for the cof

7-&0Z).

If

you

are interested in a workshop but cannot attend at this time, please contact

Facilitator -

.

advertising

done by

board of governors meeting on Jan

the students

th

>jour textbook?

also

research

available

beginning the week of February 14

Understanding the ro\e of

was

Conestoga’s student’s origins,

Conestoga This 4 session group

a

television network.

CTV’s .

24.

Picking out important information? Strategies for retaining information?

make

influence stu-

with

conjunction

possibilities

WITH....

are look-

Research of Conestoga’s students in

,TH

2XH4

“We

dents’ choice of careers.”

and

Workshop

said,

ing at doing research to

test

St.

chair of the marketing

committee, he

goes blank

with

a recent interview

In

John,

ANXIETY WORKSHOP!

POOM

tar-

get potential students.

marketing plan to

To

10-

ized focus groups and conducted

SIGN UP FOR A TEST l4

The

month-old committee has organ-

y experience panicky sensations and before or during a

attempting to com-

is

keting committee to research the

you down

find that your

rather than

pete in this area by forming a mar-

college’s

nervous that you your stomach

MONDAY, feepUAP-Y

the influence

for colleges such as

where they could apply,

FOLLOWING?

'F get so

NEED HELP

24 board of gover-

said at the Jan.

Conestoga.

DO YOU DO THE

marks

private colleges that

are advertising regularly,” Tibbits

Conestoga

F-6ADIN6i

- \%-30

tremendous competition

coming from

DeVry on high school students who may recognize DeVry as a college

complete your work, are successful on assignments, but your test

30

is

for

necessity

a

is

He commented on

TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP

rive

TEXTBOOK

The ad promotes only

television

from other colleges and uni-

tition

an awareness campaign to

behind

reasoning

Conestoga’s foray into

postgraduate, post-diploma, infor-

mation technology course.

“There

12 to 40 weeks and provides the

“It’s

II

Tibbits agrees with St. John that

commercial promoting its school of training and development. sion

to build a bet-

Conestoga College president John

John.

Future commercials will target

community,

way

Shawna Bernard, Student Services.

WORKSHOP

lege to market.

‘Targeting

is

the key,” agrees

John. “The background informatior will help us target our students.”


L

SPOKE,

CBSA

Appraisal

updated Sherri

By Tannis Fenton

Osment

Students going on co-operative

Henhoeffer,

Katie

The revised student

(CBSA)

apprais-

Conestoga Association

Student

Business

vice-president,

al-of-teaching forms will be in

announced

use for the next performance

nominees at the association’s monthly meeting Jan. 27.

review of Conestoga faculty.

executive

position bi-

process for both faculty and

management.

Botter,

are part of an

effort to refine the evaluation

The

revised form

detailed because

more

asks the stu-

to evaluate the instruc-

dents tor’s

it

is

performance throughout

The changes inspired by

promotions co-ordinator;

Sue Carpani and David Bosch, co-ordinator; communications and Matt Zlatko Lakoseljac Levert,

to the

form were

a

semester long, can’t run for executive positions, said Henhoeffer,

who added

member of the

being a

executive requires completion

of

2000

— Page

5

cost approximately $15 and will

include the Biz Bash, which will

allowed to vote.

be held after the banquet.

A

Biz Bash

tions

Stages

at

Henhoeffer said the

will follow the elec-

nightclub

in

CBSA

is

paying for half the cost of both

Kitchener.

events.

Those who buy Biz Bash tickets, which cost $4 in advance and $6 at the door, before Feb. 2 will be

other business, Topping In announced the CBSA raised $1,032 from the Chocolate Blitz, a

said elections will take place Feb.

entered in a draw to win a limou-

fund-raising event that sold boxes

which time nominees will make five-minute speeches in

sine ride to

and from the Biz Bash

of chocolate from Jan. 18 to Jan.

front of the class representatives

Moon

10, at

before they vote.

Nominees should

tell

the repre-

Joe

Bentley,

Anne

Tailleur,

experience and

why

they’re capa-

ble of fulfilling the duties of the

president.

who added

two students from each class are

position, said Topping,

by students on placement. CBSA treasurer Trevor Topping

daily duties that couldn’t be ful-

sentatives about themselves, their

treasurer;

vice-president; and

the course.

are

filled

Zane Culliton and Randy Pelley are running for computer liaison; Hisham Abdul-Ghafoor and Jeff

The new forms

7,

meeting announces nominees work placements, which

By

Feb.

and dinner for two

Howl

at

at the

20

.

Henhoeffer added the

restaurant.

CBSA will

The awards banquet, which has set for April 13, was also dis-

be selling chocolate again Feb. 8

meeting.

chocolate cost $2 each, $3 for five

been

cussed It

at the

will be held at the

Four Points

Hotel in Kitchener. Tickets will

and 9 near Door

3.

Boxes of

and $25 for a case, which contains

20 boxes.

the provincially

mandated Key Performance

In brief

Indicators.

KPIs

are

benchmarks

of

accountability and excellence.

They

are established by inde-

By Adam Wilson

pendent student satisfaction surveys conducted

last

year for the

first

College Conestoga placed number 1 in graduate employment and graduate satisfaction and tied for number 1 time.

The next performance review will take place in March or April, said Edith Torbay, chair

of professional development.

for the

as well.

from

hold

post-convocation

a

reception in the Sanctuary.

The said

committee wanted to have a

convocation they

up Conestoga College will hold a week-long event for students who have applied for a program

Each student who has applied will be invited to the school for

11 p.m. or

an

The event

will be held after the

convocation ceremonies on June 21 and 22. The DSA executive committee agreed to hold the event and

and

information

to

club

services. to sign

help at the booth during the

March

new home

information

about

session

program and a tour of the school on Conestoga’s spring their

break, Feb. 28 to

DSA

March

president Ellen

said she

wanted

to

3.

Menage

have a booth

DSA

of jam club

assistant promotions Michael said the jam club

was looking

a>

for a place to prac-

tise in the school.

The jam club is designed for people who want to play musical instruments to get a chance to do so with fellow students.

how loud

O GO

te <-o

Wednesdays.

Quality Policy

Conestoga College rp

opportunities for improvement to

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

at

night,

they would be. was decided by the executive committee that the jam club could use the Sanctuary between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., or any on p.m. after 9:30 time It

Conestoga College continually seeks

SC

better if the

around 7 or 8 p.m. Michael said he would be present for the first few weeks to get the club settled and to monitor

it?

rs sr

late

The club inquired about holdWednesday nights

Colleger <3

was

be making.

Conestoga

.

it

ing practices

break.

Sanctuary becomes

Ramy

said

practised

because of the noise they would

at the school.

mid-

until

DSA

Menage

to display pictures

She asked for volunteers

licensed event with a DJ, that

would go

group events

about

The Doon Student Association will

night.

in student satisfaction.

help out by serving the alcohol

Potential students invited for tour

at all Ontario’s

community colleges each year. The KPI surveys were conducted

Post-convocation party planned for Sanctuary

and communities.


Page 6

— SPOKE, Feb.

7,

2000

Scholarship gets taxed glance it seemed the federal government was taking on students up to their necks in debt by awarding $2,000 to $4,000 scholarships to recipients of the Ontario Student Assistance Program. The Millennium Scholarship was designed by the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation to assist students in keep-

At

first

pity

ing their personal debts to a minimum. The student assistance program is the largest of its kind in Canada as $2.5 billion has been set aside over the next 10 years.

Canada-wide and each be awarded to students. Some provinces, such as Alberta, handed the money over to

The scholarships province decided

available

are

how

the

money

will

no questions asked. Ontario, however, chose to deposit the money directly into OSAP accounts, therefore lowstudents,

ering the students’ debt load. The first round of scholarships

was given

to about

250

“lucky” Conestoga students in January 2000. When presented with this view of the scholarships, students surely would jump for joy at the chance at a helping hand, but

when

they find out the truth about this “gift” from the prime mood could change.

minister, their

Since 1971 the Canadian Income Tax Act states that any scholarship or bursary over $500 is considered taxable income. Despite a three-fold increase in the cost of living and a nine per

cent increase in tuition between 1992 and 1998, this still applies to recipients of the Millennium Scholarship. Some students will lose as much as half of their scholarship to taxes

and they will have

less access to

programs

like the

Canada Child Tax Benefit, as they will be ineligible because of their additional income from the scholarships. Some students may find they would have been better off refusing the award.

The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) alliance of 17 representative student associations

is

an

Child pornography

unions from across Canada. They are asking all students to contact their members of Parliament to protest taxing of the scholarships. Michael Harris, DSA vice-president of education at Conestoga, says this gift really is going to the government.

they’ll

be say-

sacrifice our children in

ing

women

Possession of child pornography

thing

can’t vote and

blacks have to

after, the single

mother

who depends on money when

she is promised it, finds out she is not eligible to get any money back from the Canada Child Tax Benefit program, because the scholarship makes her ineligible. What a nightmare. What do students have to do to catch a

break these days? How long do our governments really think young adults are going to be able to handle its high demands? If the provincial government had chosen to hand cold cash to the honoraries of this award, students still would have had to give back almost half in tax, but at least they would have

$2,000 in hand. Students need all the help they can get. Mike Harris and Jean Chretien just aren’t getting the message.

person has a right to free-

know

real

“The provincial governments are the ones getting the

feel a

Next you

advantage here,” he said. As soon as they announce “you have won $4,000,” they just as quickly slap your hand and say, “but we’re giving half of it to income tax and the rest is going back to the province.”

Soon

wrong

and student I

dom

What Sharpe has fact that his

of the bus.

be

any more

dis-

to realize

I

can’t

begin to understand his desires, but

I

don’t need

And

to.

whether or not someone should

dren are involved.

have the right to possess child pornography.

Perhaps

Yet the Supreme Court

is

consid-

things that are

deemed

fun-

damentally right and wrong.

The Supreme Court

is

consider-

ing the case of John Robin Sharpe, a 66-year-old retired city planner is

pom

that if posses-

is

prohibited,

it

will lead to oppression.

if

neither

when

chil-

express

it,

but child pornography

unquestionably wrong.

is

The sad

part

is,

he

isn’t the

only one producing or enjoying child pornography.

Another factor

to be considered

should the court rule pos-

pom

of child

session

is

always the chance

there’s

legal, it

will

be circulated in society especially

on the It’s

Internet.

disgusting that

Sharpe

is

exercising his “freedom of expres-

sion”

he had a different

he would have a right to

fetish,

ering the issue. There ought to be

sion of child

the

is

freedom of expression

should anyone else, not

whose argument

so.

lent.”

is that

turbing than having to question

some

doing

detrimental to others.

is

can’t

It

can’t

ethically wrong.

is

the back

sit at

we

of expression but

when

it

involves

child

pornography.

The abuse will prevent children from functioning as healthy It’s a adults later on in life.

Sharpe was charged after police found boxes of child pornography, including photographs of

vicious cycle that will not end

Vancouver

should be done to defend the

naked boys, home.

He

also

in

writes

his

unless

we do something now.

If the

law

young. short

stories,

is

to

be altered,

Desires

of

it

sick

pedophiles should be put on the

which have been described by

back burner and protection of

police as being “extremely vio-

children should

come

first.

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect the

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in

views of

SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Nicole Furlong;

News

Editor: Tannis Fenton;

Student Life Editor: Talisha Matheson Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Adam Wilson; Advertising Manager: Walerian Czarnecki;

Circulation Manager: Mike Radatus; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz

SPOKE’s

address

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario,

out of errors in advertising beyond the

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

amount paid

for the

must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an space. Unsolicited submissions

Production Manager:

Phone: 748-5220,

logo.

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE,

Conestoga looking for No. By Anna

the

How

first

conduct the

how

well Ontario colleges

good and the great compared to

Conestoga

is

teachers are

other Ontario colleges

work

because

establish Key Performance

Indicators

tion.”

tences

When

asked

if

she

felt

anything

the

way one of his

needed more improvement,

what

Armstrong

is

excellence.

The

KPIs two

per

of

cent

never

Harth

funding

more She

to

pay the

col-

employ-

lege’s rate of graduate

added

licensing

the

of

Harth

the

ment, graduate satisfaction, stu-

Sanctuary for

dent satisfaction and employer

special events

was

for

Doon

satisfaction.

Conestoga No.

Student

Gbenga Adeniyi,

a first-year

grad-

1 in

employ-

ment

at

94 per

cent - higher

than the rate Sheridan,

Humber, Mohawk, Fanshawe and Centennial. Conestoga was

random survey conducted

In a

Conestoga Jan. 25, a majority

at

it

Waterloo.” Gbenga Adeniyi,

vey should be considered important because it is a student’s only to voice

any concern or

feels the

atmosphere in the

stu-

dent lounge, the Sanctuary,

“It’s quite serious because the

college gets conclusive results

out

of

KPI and

i

m mediate

is

impractical.

needs

“Conestoga

functions

Adeniyi,

who at

is

a former business

the

University

Waterloo. “The Sanctuary

is

of not

It needs more lively music and a better organization of

functional.

events.

It

needs vibrancy.”

He added the events organized by active

more

inter-

feedback

may

ness

result,”

had

I

she

Chapters,”

is

Wynveen

Foods

because

knows

company

the

students don’t have

access to a fridge and can’t

bring lunch to school.

Wynveen

said she paid

$1.80 for a 500-millilitre carton of chocolate milk.

“By

she

way,”

the

Foods

sets the price, it’s

the college it.

that

And

has to

they do.” price

for

stores is $1.19.

Glenn Lamont, a

third-

year business-accounting

student

to

experi-

the

said

estab-

course

third-semes-

information at

to get a

chance

the years.

Misener

“The the

the college. “I to

of the nursing program. “I think the quality of education

had quite an experience

obtaining a course guide.

me

It

took

whole day to get one because no one knew where they were located,” Jeanine literally a

be working because

things have improved over

ences trying to get

happy

time, please contact “Shawna Bernard, Student “Services.

increases the price of food

The average

busi-

Armstrong, a

is

2.&02-).

she

said

Beaver

her

she

(PDOM

Foods.”

Zsido.

voice her opinion on the quality

‘oCP-VIZU'd

the

lishment of KPIs seems

said

“STUDCNT

said.

“Another concern

student,

student,

in

are interested in a workshop but cannot attend at this

are

ed to describe

Adeniyi

If 'jou

turn to

to

said she want-

nursing

Please register

Shawna Bernard

Doon

the

at

said

ter

Facilitator:

that

Michelle

Megan

Workshop

the item at local Zehrs’

first-year

general

positive

high,

approve

com-

pared to col-

A

survey

preparing before, during and after class

added, “although Beaver

lege events.

the

method, mind mapping or other techniques

atten-

bookstore

believes

university students are

prompt change.

food.

through the Cornell

food services by Beaver

student

A second-year management studies student said the KPI sur-

chance

matters

certain

student

the University of Waterloo,” said

and relevance.

effective note -taking

“Because the prices of

and serious survey gauges program quali-

ty

for.:

Alexis Wynveen, a second-year nursing student, said she

tion.

like

such as house parties and a student centre like the Fed Hall at

because

campus

cost of textbooks and

need

of Doon campus students said they regard the KPI survey as an

important

new STFATe&ies

is

$17 per semester. “Why do I have to pay the fee? If some people want to play sports, then they fund themselves,” Harth said. Other students said they were

are

computer analyst student

for first

2-DI4

seriously because there

Conestoga College also made a

good showing by tying

which

student centre

ate satisfaction with 76 per cent.

P-OOM

required

will consider the survey

University of

place in overall student satisfaction.

is

athletic fee,

textbooks

also first in gradu-

30

1

st

2.1

active listening

unhappy he

also

“Conestoga needs functions such as house parties and a the Fed Hall at the

Armstrong

teAF^j

Wynveen

concerned about things such as the

computer analyst student, said he

was

uate

for

move

Association.

1998,

College

the

a great

\%:30 -

said

is

events.”

MONDAY, FeWJAP-Y

said

he

The surveys measure each

f

really ask-

be organizing

the colleges.

com-

Hi

she

it is

Darren Harth.

ciation should

for

teachers

Jjpfc?

sure

ing,”

student asso-

Zsido

stu-

are clut-

provincial

In

NOTE -TAKING

and

tered and I’m

“The

replied,

AND

sen-

always

of accounta-

affect

Uc>T6NlN6i

unit

“The

in

and

111

tests.

benchmarks

particular

Room 4B14

that the

administration-accounting

poses

are

us in

dent said he has difficulty with

“The KPIs are important to the school if it wants to keep improving the quality of educa-

directly with us,” she

visit

business

first-semester

they

bility

»

A

meet the needs of students and

said.

691 or

should be better

the marketplace. Survey results

which

would be

college personnel

organized.” at

ext.

message

informed

The independent surveys measure

important are the

satis-

faction surveys.

interested in your

said.

“My

second

annual student

SPOKE is

748-5220

KPI surveys to you?

Ontario colleges will

,

mil

Misener

week of February 25

read?

to

*

again

1

What do you want

- Page 7

story ideas or suggestions please call

Sajfert

During

I

Feb. 7, 2000

gym

DSA

services

and

have improved

since the (licensing of the

he

Sanctuary),”

said.

“However, the textbook prices are

still

a

at the college.”

little

steep

(Across

from McDonalds)

622-7774

BURLINGTON

(Canadian Tire Plaza)

893-2464

GUELPH

884-7376

LONDON


Flying high Tom Gawel, a mechanical engineering student, dives into the water for a mean bellyflop.

(Photo by

Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!

Tom Gawel print

climbs out of the pond, leopard fuzzy pants still intact. (Photo by

Adam Wilson)

:*•* ***

By Mike Radatus

ited

number of people were

allowed on the ice

Cold weather of -34

C

with the

at

one time.

Over 100 students stood

in the

chill factor couldn’t stop the

cold to watch as fellow students

DSA’s Polar Plunge 2000 from

dared to jump into the water that

being a success.

had

wind

The event

raised $1,300 for the

Heart and Stroke Foundation, as 21 participants jumped into freezing

water

in

the

Conestoga

to

be cleared of ice a second

time just hours before the event. Patty

Stokes,

College pond outside the main

in the past.

Doon cam-

“We had

teaching building on

Four paramedics, one

really

for this event.

pus. certified

DSA

entertain-

ment manager, said the event raised a similar amount of money

by

CKCO

It

was recorded

live

and was covered by

lifeguard and one nurse were on

CKGL, The Zone

hand for safety reasons and a lim-

FM

in

good coverage

92.9 and Magic

Guelph,” she

said.

v

Adam

Wilson)


i

SPOKE, Feb.

7,

2000

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 9

Taking the plunge Alex Szaefer, a journalism student, took a leap of faith into the freezing water with his boots on. (Photo by Mike Radatus)

Masked men Marauders, Masked The Andrew Dean and Dane Pleau, both robotics students, take the plunge into the icy water. (Photo by

Adam

Wilson)

DSA POLAR PLUNGE

# ifSt. fk*-

I

Survival of the fittest watt* slides and wipes out as he tries to get out of the chilly Jerry Stager, a computer program analysis student, slips,


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 10

7,

2000

Marketing students second By Anna

in

experts, he said.

Sajfert

“There was our chance to make

After 40 hours of intense

personal contact with the industry

work on

and work toward our future jobs, didn’t get back to us,” but the

a project, a team of four third-year

CMA

marketing students from Conestoga

said Boyer.

College finished second in the 1999

received an honorary membership

had only three weeks

covered a

new

magazines. Finlay said he

Paquette

it,

up, screamed and

team members. ‘“Oh my God! our

first

was

like

jumped

reaction,”

Smith

said. “It

winning a World Cup of

won second

Rafael Bazzarella, Scott Boyer, Mark Smith and Richard Paquette (absent) in Toronto, November 1999.

for the

team

to

know they could compete against university students, he said. “This award shows that our college education

is at

the

same

level

with university,” said Bazzarella.

Marketing professor Peter Finlay

team created a wonderful

financial

plan by developing a

break-even strategy, which includ-

ed a

mail system organized to

test

allocate

most profitable customers,

using

the

actual

Kitchener-

Waterloo area.

not

to

was approximately a 40-

to

was hard work,

we were

competition and the college students were up against university

especially

beginning our

dents got together for the next

competition, the group would be

wanted to attend in December. The students wanted

enriched with the right skills to

they

CMA’s

dinner

take

first

banquet because the event fea-

consider

affect

our marks.”

tured a lineup of leading industry

Finlay.

pleted

it,

he

said.

of

lots

take

tapped

the

into

completely interactive job board. Over the next six to eight months, MacDonald plans to add a

eras

month ago. Rob MacDonald, 35, a student in Conestoga’s Webmaster certificate

full

program, says the Web page for Kitchener highlights local attractions. The Web site includes tourism, educational facilities,

products.

entertainment and real estate.

growth.

e-commerce component

as a

service to local businesses that sell retail

and

business-to-business

MacDonald

said he

is

seeking a technology partner and additional employees in the next

few

months

to

facilitate

the

service.

he regularly receives inquiries about Kitchener from various parts of the world and has started to hone his knowledge of the community. quickly “Kitchener.com is said

becoming the

digital pipeline to

Kitchener,” he said.

The unique site has live action footage of Highway 401 and other highways so that browsers can decide whether to attempt a local

V V V V V V V V V V v Mon. Feb. 4 V 8:00pm V v * The Sanctuary V V ^brought you by 1

the

mounted at high traffic areas along the highways to provide the

MacDonald

0

*

MacDonald, who

started

something

is

the

in

to

said

future,”

focuses on Kitchener

or stay home.

MacDonald

to be present at the

place, he said.

“I think this

“Luckily, the project didn’t

Web page for designed a Kitchener which has received 6,000 hits since it was established

to

never returned the stu-

it

said.

Ministry of Transportation’s cam-

development of “The Kitchener.com is an incredibly

Conestoga’s marketing, jour-

nalism and graphic design stu-

com-

ing class but only one group

plans for the future including a

he says.

If

group

year in the program,” Boyer

has

The response has been very pos-

the

final

trip

a

little

students in Finlay’s direct market-

rewarding experience.” MacDonald said he has graduate

with

a

dents’ calls regarding a banquet

because

60-hour

By Tracy Ford Conestoga

behaved

impersonally

it

job, said Finlay.

because

CMA

The

follow

through with the project because

“It

The project first attracted some 70

chose

Others

Web page

itive,

the

(Photo by Anna Sajfert)

Conestoga graduate’s A

in

it

students,” he said.

was a boost

said the

place

national marketing contest

was imporwas a national

the award

because

tant

Soccer!” It

me

“To God!’ was

the group

competition.

hugged the other

Oh my

knew

would do well in the competition, but at the same time he wasn’t expecting anything because it was the students’ first national

the

Canadian Marketing Association, which notified them of their win. After reading

Canadian business

tions to various

dis-

e-mail from

by the

industry, as well as free subscrip-

assignment into a five-page report.

mid-November Paquette

to different

attended

events

social

October to

submit their work. The team decided to revise a former 40-page class

In

student chapter,

which permits access

Mark Smith in

CMA’s

the

in

Rafael Bazzarella, Scott Boyer,

Richard Paquette and

also

students

the

Ironically,

and university marketing Student RSVP Award. college

national

nation

with

board systems in the early days of the Web, has decided to return to Conestoga College to

bulletin

Webmaster

its

program

certification

part time after graduating

12 years ago from two other college programs.

He

has received a certificate

focus his Internet development

knowledge. “I returned to college to seek the

required skills to

become a Web

developer,” he said.

MacDonald

also a part-time

from the machine tool setter operator program and a diploma from

second-year student in a bachelor

the mechanical engineering tech-

of arts program

nician program from Conestoga

of Waterloo.

He

College.

“My

previous course was com-

I have always maintained any computer skills,”

puter driven and

he said. “My objective is a career change that is Web focused.” MacDonald said he began the new Webmaster program at the college last September to help

said

is

University

at the

biggest challenge

his

would be continuously evaluating the latest breakthroughs because is

so easy to get

my

“I think

me

it

behind.

genuine interest in

the Internet and

propelled

left

its

vast usefulness

to continuously read

and study the Internet and the associated technology,” he said.

Student victimized by road rage ByTalisha Matheson

She said

was a mistake

that

because she could see him getting

A Conestoga College student was a victim of road rage on

Doon

Highway 401. Welk said she was

at the lights at

Fountain Street and

Homer Watson

Boulevard

when

incident

the

ahead of

her,

in

the

who was

driving and while he

car

fairly

was stopped

Welk

said.

said she drove

me

curs-

down Doon

Valley Drive to parking lots No. 8

and 9 to the student/client services

where she had

to sign

“I didn’t notice

wasn’t

paying

attention

the light turned green,” she

“We were

there for about 15

seconds and he wasn’t moving, so

beeped him.”

I

at

“If they are

busy reading a paper

or talking on their phone wait.

I

beep

anyone again. just

I’ll

don’t want something like

happen again.” According to a psychology of

that to

May Lome Korman, a psy-

road rage study conducted in

me

chotherapist and researcher for

she said.

the Clark Institute of Psychiatry,

he was behind

until I pulled into the lot,”

hom

1998 by Dr.

papers at the registrar’s office.

young male

more

drivers are

like-

car and began cursing at her and

ly to act out

banging on her window.

sion than the rest of the popula-

She said

she grabbed her cell phone to it

make

look like she was calling the

police and the

the traffic lights.

“He when

driving beside

Welk added the man got out of his

young, was reading while he was

at

lanes.

ing, but I kept driving,” she said.

occurred.

She said the man

said.

she isn’t afraid to

drive, but said she will never

building,

the

mind,” she

said

and changed

“He was

down Fountain Street to get to Doon campus because it is a shorter route from her home than taking

my

Welk

upset as he drove through the lights

Valley Drive Jan. 15.

Sarah Welk, 20, said she drove

losing

Welk

man sped

said she did not report the

incident because

remember

she couldn’t

the licence plate

num-

The study

was so scared

I

thought

I

was

stated road rage

trait

among people

is

a

wl^

tend to have an aggressive al^' tude. It

suggests that one

road rage

ber. “I

tion.

common

off.

on road rage aggres-

tle

is

way

to use the

to avoid

hom

as possible or not at

all.

as

lit-


1

Surprise your valentine with a carnation

Safe Break

“sealed with alumni kisses”

Awareness Week

Feb. 21 to Feb. 25

Monday, February

10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

in

the DSA office

Sponsored by

Doon

Cost: $2.00

Kim

& 4,

Foyers of Doors 3

Volunteers needed, see

2000

14,

MPBflMMWHil :

Coneslogt College

i

The mk has a

Laminating

Candidates’ Speeches Thurs. Feb. 10 The Sanctuary

Mm

12:30pm

Service

EDUCATE YOURSELF BEFORE VOTING

Price

Voting from Feb. 15 to 17

8.5

X

$1 .50

11

GST included Doon Student Association Annual Awards Prices

ate subject to

change without notice

Criteria for

Awards

Certificate of Appreciation - The Recipients of contribution to College Life has been significant.

Award of Distinction - The recipients of College Life has been outstanding.

Mens

is

coming

this

this

award

are

members

award are members of

of the College

the College

Community whose

Community who

recognition and of Excellence - The highest award presented by the Doon Student Association in appreciation of outstanding leadership and involvement in College Life.

Award

to take

Doon Student Association Award Nomination Form

Name

of

Phone

Nominee^

In

tie Cross toads Meeting

Room

D Student

Program:

D Faculty

School:

0 Staff/Administration

Award Nominated

Feb, 7 to Feb, 8:

D

1

30am to 4:30pm

#:

Postal Code:

City:_

Address:

Y ear:

Dept.:

for:

Certificate of Appreciation

° Award D Award

of Distinction of Excellence

The above named nominee has made

Nominator:

the following contributions to College Life at Conestoga.

Phone

#:

to the DSA, attention Becky Boertien Nomination Deadline Friday, February 25, 2000

Please submit your Nomination form

llTSign up

in

contribution

the DSA office

to


1

Page 12

— SPOKE, Feb.

No

7,

*

2000

history recognition

By Talisha Matheson

(WISA) has

events planned for

black history month, but have not

Only

three of six college

and uni-

versity student associations in the

surrounding region have events

planned for black history month.

According to

Kim

Kroker, vice-

president of student affairs of the

Doon at

(DSA) there was

Student Association

Conestoga College,

yet released what the events are.

However, Fanshawe College

London

and

student union

University’s

black

on

month

history

schools and

it

Web

no plans

sites state there are

in

at

for

their

was not mentioned

Mohawk

College’s student asso-

one day planned, but due to the lack of student interest the one day

ciation

event has been cancelled.

comment on

Hamilton would not

in

the issue of

why

they

to

lights different events.

This period was chosen because

included

it

spokesman

for the free

Negro and and

human

rights

Lincoln, former presi-

who

dent of the United States,

wanted slaves

to

be

free.

Days remembered 1923,

of

former

for

fighter

birthdays

the

Douglass,

Fredrick

Abraham

their event calendar.

been

has

encompass the entire month of February and it highexpanded

Laurier

Wilfrid

observance

tional

when

the

are Feb.

13,

black profes-

of Guelph, said there are a series

had nothing planned for February. Black history month is 28 days

sional

of events planned for February.

out of a year designated to the

Renaissance was organized, Feb.

progress, richness and diversity of

9, 1965,

Djims Milius, of the University

From

Feb. 7 to 10 there will be

two workshops on the status of refugee women around the world and one on the black liberation movement and on Feb. 17 there will

be a major panel discussion

with special guests.

The University of Waterloo’s West Indian Student Association

American/Canadian

African

1926, an African American,

Woodson

Carter G.

created and

promoted Negro history week and, in 1976, the month-long celebra-

when Martin Luther King met with President Johnson to

21, 1965, the day Malcolm X, the American black nationalist, was assassinated and Feb. 11, 1990, the day Nelson Mandela was

Today, the national and interna-

prison.

Students learning French eligible for money By Ray Bowe

immersion

oldest

school

in

Canada.

The summer language bursary

students can

cases,

Those who wish

to apply to the

By Walerian Czarnecki

financial-aid office. Applications

must be sent to the provincial co-

The preliminary numbers for the that show semester winter

ordinator before Feb. 15.

Conestoga College has 4,250

cover their tuition

main drawing points of the program is Young Canada Works (YCW) involvement. YCW is offering a number of summer

meals, accommodations,

job placements to students gradu-

ance will be given in

is

available to students

wish to learn French during

five-week sessions at beginner, intermediate and advanced levels.

Students can receive a $1,625

bursary costs,

1999-2000 academic

College enrolment remains the same

summer language program can pick up an application at the

program

who

during the year.

some

In

Royal Bank's Anne Quesnefle (right), personal financial services representative, and SHvana Hall-Ufford, sales manager, were at Conestoga College Jan. 27 promoting Royal's student services such as student Visa cards, credit (Photo by Tannis Fenton) lines and investments.

released from a South African

was implemented.

tion

The

team

basketball

discuss black voting rights, Feb.

achievements. In

Jr.

first

to

and supplies. There are nearly nine million French-speaking Canadians and texts

tution.

One of

ating

the

from the summer language

Notification of bursary acceptlate

March

and, if accepted, applicants should notify their school within three

program.

Conestoga experienced a 3.5 per

From 1998

cent increase.

stu-

dents enrolled, five per cent less

than in the

fall

semester, says Fred

same

the

increase, said Harris.

More

students are staying in their

programs

year and

until the third

graduating, said Harris.

pattern that has

a better retention rate,” he said.

weeks. Otherwise, students could

been happening for the past several

“We’ve had a 2.6 per cent

years,” said Harris.

retention rate.”

offered during

spring sessions at

French, or be at the post-second-

www.pch.gc.on.ca/ycw-jcL

be

The summer language program is administered by the Council of

academic

the crite-

Ministers of Education, and stu-

of those were discontinued from

they can also gain admittance

dents can contact the council on

their

This program

is

throughout

Canada.

Students can study at a variety of

To be must

Western Ontario’s

satellite

cam-

pus in Trois-Pistoles, Que., the

it,

applicants

either

ary level

by the time

the course

begins.

schools, including the University

of Ottawa, or the University of

eligible for

If students ria,

if

do not meet

they have been full-time stu-

dents for at least one semester

YCW

can be reached

935-5555 or

line

at

phone

at

visit their

at 1-800-

Web

site at

www.cmec.ca/olp or by 1-877-866-4242.

Some 150

Feb. 15

Talking

SEX SUE

& 4r

11

:

3Oam

Women s

tbe

DSA

Some

so,

m

enrolment has been

From

new

include

in enrol-

programs

offered and expanding current pro-

gram

capacity, said Harris.

Many

increased programs capacity when they began to offer

business

co-op.

program.

Even

gradually rising for the past three

1997

to

1999,

“The business management program went from 60 to 90 spaces to 120,” said Harris.

There is also a move to increase summer classes. One of the few programs that runs in the sum m er is robotics.

These students have a work semester in the fall or

and come back the

winter semester

to classes during

summer.

Harris said there could be a two-

gram, which will run during the

MOVIE NIGHT

summer, as well as a chef-training program, which will run from

The Sanctuary

&

M

Ufa

|

ni

of

these

students

program, and the

office

does

know

Conestoga, he

“We

don’t

bers, but said. “It’s

that

event

not specified, said Harris.

ties are

their

Guests $4 L icensed

in

universi-

get

exemptions from some courses in

Students $2 V

coming

for students

from other colleges and

Many

8:00pm

May

to October.

Numbers

Resource Group

SLT\ cL

them,

Reasons for the increase

ment

better

year computer programming pro-

The Sanctuary Bromgfbt to you by tbe

suit

it

difficulties, or financial,

Tues. Feb. 8

with

JOHANSON

program did not

health or personal reasons.

years.

Tines.

students have dropped

out for various reasons, whether their

1999

to

was a 4.9 per cent

“In the past two years we’ve had

Harris, the college’s registrar. “It’s

alone, there

lose their bursary acceptance.

fran-

cophones worldwide.

locations

home insti-

be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident and have completed at least Grade 1

250 million

there are over

summer and

transfer credits to their

A

we’d

registrar’s

come

they

to

said.

know

we’d

the exact

like to

num-

know,” he

a hole in the information like to have.”

Enrolment numbers have been increasing in spite of rising tuiti^

The

tuition increases in past

have held steady

at

yesa

10 per cent.

“They’ve had no obvious negative impact,” said Harris.


1

SPOKE, Feb.

2000

7,

— Page

13

Paramedic program gets wheels By Nicole Furlong

the professionals.

Although

paramedic

Conestoga’s

gram has received an opportunity for the

pro-

incredible

in the form of an ambulance from the Region of Waterloo.

paramedic

program,

the

in

Region program has been two years, students to Waterloo

fact the

expanded to will be able to use the vehicle, which is worth several thousand

tor of ambulance services for the Region of Waterloo, late last year knowing the region occasionally

dollars,

to

practise

older vehicles in order to

a

moving

vehicle, as well as loca-

where the students

tion finding, this

have

to plan the quickest route to

for a number of years,” said Pmo, who added students used to

their destination.

graduate from the former one-

year program

year program with only about

to

eight hours of

“With the extension

ambulance experi-

getting

passed by regional council,

was decided

it

has the resource as well. “In a

of Conestoga students, the region

lance

would donate the most well-kept, second-hand ambulance to the

and Sherry Foster, both first year paramedic students, are shown with the program’s new ambulance, which they can use to practise driving skills. (Photo by Nicole Furlong) Jennifer Neilson

(left)

program.

Conestoga

is

one of the few in Ontario

excited about the addition to the

driving

program.

which

have an ambulance, which gives students a leg up when applying for jobs after convoca-

program,” she

tion.

“This

to

Spiegelberg said she

is

is

a real bonus for our

to the course,

back in expe-

students the opportunity to prac-

driving.”

tise clinical

was no

course includes riding with

under 16

course

ing business,

framework governing

ational boating safety in

The one-day

2A507 on Doon campus

recre-

exams

Canada.

which was

will

Room

until April 1.

be written and marked

at the

move on

in

to perform-

ing on patients themselves, with the guidance and assistance

full-

may

operate a 40-horse power

a personal watercraft such as Jet Skis.

Navigation, will run

Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m in

a response to last year’s changes to

is

the regulatory

HeadsUp

eventually

motor but they are prohibited from operating

the British Columbia-based recreational boat-

Conestoga College’s new safe boating

first

work

from

Donating

The new boat operator competency measdrawn in September 1999 require youth,

The

ures

end

bom

after April 1,

1983, to have proof of

before April

1,

The ministry

watercraft, will require proof of competency.

annual boating

Joyce Irving, continuing education program

As of

there are

co-ordinator.

Children

Letters to the Editor '

who

15,

any person operating a

2009,

all

operators will

to reduce the

fatalities

and

acci-

dents in Canada,” Irving said.

number of Canada is 200 and

said the current fatalities in

some 6,000 accidents

annually.

are at least 12 years of age but

Clubs Week Sign

Spoke welcomes

Sept.

annual level of boating 15, 2002,

either

1999, a pleasure craft operator

“The changes are designed

boat fitted with a motor, including a personal

As of Sept.

to operate a boat fitted

on board.

a completed rental-boat safety chec kli st.

accompanied by a person 16 years or older while operating a 10-horse power motor.

exam

will

card from a Canadian Coast Guard course or

Oceans, require children under 12 to be

become

vehicle

proof of having taken a boating safety course

to

material necessary to pass the

it.”

this

The proof of competency can be

certified to operate a watercraft, said

tion Jan. 29, will provide the students with the

the

said. “If I

require proof of competency

with a motor.

as a pilot course through continuing educa-

ambu-

for

reduce on-the-job training time for new paramedics, he said.

The new measures, announced in April 1999 by the federal Ministry of Fisheries and

offered

Pmo

comfortable with

competency on board

first

the

self-serving

were to hire a paramedic graduate from the old program design, I would have to spend the first few weeks training them to drive an ambulance and making sure they felt region,”

of the course.

course,

way donating is

safe boating course

The course, taught by Leslie Head, owner of

Sajfert

at

the back of an ambulance and

work, as part of the

new

offers

During that time students observe paramedics

cent of a paramedic’s job entails

there

time paramedic professionals.

rience, she said.

The hands-on program gives the

said.

Up until this point,

very

component

set students

“Fifty per

Conestoga By Anna

time

component of the

the ambulance, the

in the best interest

community colleges

this as a

With the generous donation of program now

proposal

the

add

to a two-

we now have

course,” Spiegelberg said.

ence.

After

scenarios,

such as performing patient care in

acquire newer models.

“We’ve been talking about

field,

still

Now, thanks and the

approached John Pmo, the direc-

sells

highly effec-

increase students’

remained they were not attaining any driving skills.

the fact

um

a professor

this is a

to

experience in their chosen

new millenni-

Wendy Spiegelberg,

way

tive

up

club or

for

the existing

start

your own.

topical letters that

include the writer’s

name, address and phone number for

Feb. 7 to Feb.

1

Club ideas:

verification.

All letters

must be

signed.

They can be brought

^ No

room 4B14.

to

Pool Sharkey's International

Chess Microwave

e-mail letters

will :

Graphic Design Adrenalin Jam Club Swing Dance

.

be accepted.

\% brouqht to you by the DSA)

no exceptions


Page 14

— Spoke, Feb.

7,

2000

Angela's Ashes barely Angela’s Ashes blazed brightly as a book, but it

couldn’t light a match.

The

who grew up

story

is

set in

1935,

many immigrants by

many

his

leaving

sufferings

and few joys and leads into his early teenage years.

McCourt saying,

starts

“When

I

that eventually kills three of her

their sleep.

in

the hovels of

the tale off by

look back on

my

most successful movies derived from books, the movie followed the book closely and was well acted. However, the Similar

childhood, vived

it

I

wonder how

at all.”

And

I

sur-

as the reader

delves into the story one might

question vive.

and every day food and

did sur-

director,

Alan Parker, who has also

spent in squalor

directed

Evita and Mississippi

how McCourt

His youth

is is

a struggle to get

Burning, conveniently forgets the

book

shelter.

Angela’s Ashes is named after McCourt’s mother, Angela, who

goes through the

to

book trying

to

is

All

had stayed awake they would have watched Oscar winner Emily Watson, who is best known for her performances in Breaking If they

the

deliver.

when

America and returning to their homeland in search of work. The plot follows McCourt as a child, chronicling

stages in his childhood.

The movie version of the book had good intentions, but fails to

in Ireland.

McCourt’s family do the reverse of

as

the audience from catching up on

Ireland.

The book is a memoir written by Frank McCourt, an American teacher

although well done, cannot save

despite the poverty and disease

children’s

seven children

on the silver screen

Frank McCourt

survival

her

ensure

By Laura Czekaj

the screen

lit

Waves and

Hillary and Jackie,

actors

three

to

the

movie, especially Joe Breen

who

makes

his acting

punctuate

classmates

the

book and

Her performance is moving, but nothing seemed to ignite the

of “interfering” with themselves.

life.

flame under

Watson Carlyle

is

as

this

Admittedly, four bare butts lined against a wall

movie.

joined

by

Robert

who

despite his

every cent on alcohol at the local

Michael Legge, Ciaran Owens

and Joe Breen also

star in the film

diffi-

Although engaging in its way, humour in the movie was dif-

imagine but

ly.

extremely at.

the

many

pub, rather than food for his fami-

is

cult not to laugh

Malachy McCourt,

Angela’s husband,

the

fused over too

plot in sight, the acting,

both

movie with episodes

bring the character of Angela to

restrain himself from spending

With no

debut as young

Frank. For instance, Frank and his

obvious good intentions cannot

boring to actually witness.

different

added some

humour

much-needed

a memoir, a detailed diary

that is interesting to

at

In

much time and

too

characters.

summary, read the book, but Some books

avoid the movie. should never be

and

Emily Watson as Angela McCourt

in

this is

made

into movies,

one of them.

Angela’s Ashes. (Internet Photo)


SPOKE,

Condors dethrone

Sir

Conestoga’s men’s varsity hockey team wins By

Sherri

Osment

The

Condors’ goal was

third

scored by Dave Stewart, assisted by

The Conestoga Condors men’s hockey team won

varsity

home game of Jan.

Fleming

on

the season 6-3

against

26,

their final

Sanford

Sir

from

College

Peterborough.

McBrearty

Craig

Condors’

scored

the

goal eight minutes

first

into the first period.

He was

assist-

ed by Jamie Hickey and Steve Wesseling.

The next two Condor goals were scored about 10 minutes into the

Fleming scored

Galbraith.

their

game

goals of the

two

first

with just three

minutes remaining in the

first peri-

od.

“He played

steady,”

head

said

coach Ken Galemo, “and what we needed.”

that’s

two minutes

fourth goal

He was

into the

assisted

by

left in

the second period.

game

assisted

Murray.

Marie Cougars, but a

visit to

had

the doctor confirmed that he

was permitted

not and he

to play.

20

final

home game

first

game

Cambrian on Nov.

against

.

He was

by Traynor and

Sean

use of his

He

wrists

although he feels they are only at 60 per cent. (Turcotte)

character and

I

shows a

lot

of

think that leads the

team,” said Galemo.

Fleming’s 1 1

final

goal was scored

minutes to go in the third

period.

All

of Fleming’s

goals

were

scored on power plays.

“We

got in

some

trouble with our

Galemo. “At you can’t control your

self-discipline,” said

The Condors’

was

goal

final

scored by Thede with 25 seconds

He was

the second period.

left in

be able to play hockey again, but

with

Brent Shantz scored another goal

Saturday, Jan. 22, against the Sault Ste.

game

“He

Galbraith scored the Condors’

Condors with eight minutes

received a concussion in a

This was Turcotte’s

has regained

for the

Thede had

Sanford

since he broke both wrists in a

he’s willing to take a chance.

Bridges and captain Greg Thede. that

— Page 15

by Jon Suckert and Matt

assisted

team.

Traynor and Stewart.

was suspected

2000

Doctors told him he would never

The second goal was scored by Nick Guthro, assisted by Corey It

7,

Turcotte.

The consistent goal-tending of Anthony Gignac was an asset to the

second period.

period.

first

Mike Tray nor and Dave

Feb.

this calibre if

self-discipline,

it

could cost you

games.”

Mike Traynor fqrces his way past three Fleming players as he heads towards the net to make a play during a Jan. 26 game at Conestoga College. The Condors won the game 6-3 in the home season closer. (Photo by Sherri Osment)

Conestoga makes move on second seed Humber By Nicole Furlong

on the road, Gignac said

this

win

will definitely motivate his

Thanks

to a strong

effort,

team for their next game, which is

and out-

equally as important as this one, as

team

relentless determination

standing goaltending, Conestoga’s

men’s varsity hockey team won their second game in a row on Jan. 29 at Humber College in Toronto doubling the second-place team in

Ontario

the

Colleges

Athletic

we

team

in

can beat any

league,”

this

assistant

coach Jason Snyder said, adding

Humber could best

team

very easily be the

OCAA

in the

The Condors

After a scoreless

league.

period,

first

Condor John Suckert

started the

scoring off one minute into the

second period, assisted by Steve Wesseling.

About 10 minutes

Association league, 4-2.

“This shows

every win counts for Conestoga.

responded by

later,'

Humber

puck

firing the

into

Conestoga’s net tying the game.

Then with one second left in the Dave Stewart, assisted by Dave Longerini and Mike second,

are struggling for a

Traynor, put Conestoga one up on

playoff berth as they are currently

Humber, making the score 2-1. The third period was a whirl-

with Cambrian

tied for third place

OCAA,

College in the

but

some of

been alleviated

the pressure has

Not only did Conestoga play three periods tirelessly,

expending

every effort they had, for the in

first

a while the team played

with a lot of heart.

off the

other to see

minutes

into

the

third,

Traynor, assisted by Stewart and

Greg Thede, scored the game-winning goal. captain

Humber would

not

let

up as they

scored once again in the third.

Both teams shot off the bench right

with both teams fighting

Two

with this win.

time

wind,

until the end.

top,

battling

who would

each

survive

and prevail.

The

last

minutes of the game

were played but

in

because

Conestoga’s end,

of

determined

a

defence and attentive goaltending,

This much-earned attributed to a

the

win can be number of factors, as

team pulled together to make

happen, but a large portion of credit

Classified

it

Travel-teach English:

should be directed towards goal-

tender

nally

5 days/

Anthony Gignac.

who

Gignac,

played phenome-

Conestoga’s

in

game on

Jan.

40

hr.

(April 3-7, 2000)

previous

26 against

Sir

TESOL teacher certifica-

Sanford Fleming College where they this

won 6-3, suited up to start game as well and came

tion course (or

by corre-

spondence). 1000’s of jobs

through for his team.

^^think

I’ve

Gignac

said.

to step

up

semester,”

this

“As a veteran

needed to step

it

I felt I

up.”

With only three games season, all of

my

been able

^ormance

which

will

available

NOW. FREE

information package, call toll free:

left in

the

be played

1-888-270-2841

the Condors managed to keep the puck out of their net. With four seconds left in the game and Humber’s goalie pulled from the net, Traynor solidified

win by shooting the puck into empty net from his blue line. When asked what the win means for the team, Snyder said he’s not taking this win for granted. the

the

“We’re taking it a shift at a time and a game at a time,” he said. Conestoga plays their next game against Seneca College on Feb. 4 in

Toronto.


Maurier

Supporting 234 cultural organizations across

Canada during the 1999-2000 sea

Digital Edition - February 07, 2000  
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