Page 1

33rd Year

— No. 4

Conestoga College, Kitchener JANUARY

2000

31,

College

needs to improve Conestoga races

number

retain

camera, action!

Lights, " ;

II Jll

to

:

mk

Jlii

1

status for KPIs

By Laura Czekaj Conestoga College race of

The college needs standing in the

says

students face issues.

PAGE

the

improve

to

number 1 upcoming key

in order to retain

Barb Kraler

in

is

its life.

its

performance indicators survey in February.

Annually, independent surveys of Ontario’s 25 community colleges are conducted to establish

accountability and excellence benchmarks called key performance indicators. The surveys consist of 95 mutual and five

programs,

ranked

survey

year’s

Conestoga College as number 1 in overall quality of facilities and resources,

overall

quality

of

placement

graduate

services,

and graduate satisfaction. However, under employer satisonly Conestoga faction, achieved 15th place and under rate

Condors get rocked by Sault Ste. Marie.

RAGE 14

the section of

program prepara-

tion of the student’s

life

outside

work, Conestoga was trailing in 18th place.

Kevin Mullan, vice-president, finance and administrative operwrote in his assessment

ations,

By Ray Bowe

appeared, our efforts are

during the survey differed in job

areas of the college working on

in each situation. This proved to be an inconsistency in

improvement,” he said. “The difference between being number 1

may

number of first place standings by category and overall, students

title

programs and However, he also

are satisfied with facilities.

writes that there

is

a strong

com-

petition for the lead spot and there is a need for improvement. It

was acknowledged

meeting,

that

certain

at

the

factors

have contributed to Conestoga’s low ranking in the

might

area of employer

satisfaction

and

student preparation.

Employer

satisfaction

results

the survey.

had

different interpretations of

the question on the survey that asked if the program prepares the student for a life

students, along with

many

stu-

for the college to

would

divvied up,

federal

gift.

government has

first

round of schol-

arships as part of the Millennium Scholarship, the largest student assistance

jChild-care subsidy ;

wait

is

too long

program

in

Canada’s

“Since the

hit

first

The

is

broken down

into

general awards,

which account for

95 per cent

like

of the total

wouldn’t take

Confederation

much

to

jump

way,” he said.

College

was

ranked in 16th place by the KPI survey, however, in the areas

Conestoga

failed. first

place.

dent debt, will provide scholarships to about 35,000 students annually for the next decade.

There

Any

is

no application process. who did not have an Assistance Student

student

Ontario

Program entitlement

as of Oct.

be considered for the general awards and students with any errors that were 15, 1999, will not

not corrected before Oct. 15 will not be accepted.

Alberta. the

funds and are based on the merit and financial needs of full-time students

Ontario government hopes to

attending public or private insti-

to OSAP, there were applications with student 8,700

tutions.

uncorrected errors as of Sept. 23,

Ontario,

with $2.5 billion ear-

cold

for the scholarship over

Through

$3,000 allotments, are available Canada-wide and are based on each province’s population. Although the scholarships are not cash-in-hand in Ontario, Alberta issued cheques to its students. Each province had the

schol-

arship

debt reduc-

marked

mostly

“It

statistically either

scholarship jackpot

be

history

the next decade. scholarships, The

services, agreed with Tibbits.

being taught.

whether it be through tion

and number 15 is very small.” Greg Bums, program co-ordinator of recreation and leisure

Confederation ranked in set of KPIs

the

all

where

monies

unexpected Christmas

improve the

along the line of having

interpersonal skills students are

the

dents across Canada, received an

awarded the

Com,menial

how

outside of

work. Even so, college president John Tibbits said it is important

deciding About 250 Conestoga College

may have

Students surveyed

of

choice

more

not be reliable because the employers that were contacted

of the KPIs, presented at the college council meeting on Jan. 17, no college exceeded Conestoga’s

Conestoga students

The

{Photo by Ray Bowe)

faculty,

services and facilities.

Last

latt

questions

college-specific

regarding

Turcotte, Denise Lewis, i-Radio and Television students,

Pete Tokarsky (with camera), and (backgrc Curtis Dunat and Steve Lemay, ail second-, work on projects in Conestoga’s TV lab on Jan. 19.

or

cash debt

lessen the

giveness

in

reduction,

amount of loan inquiries

Essentially,

federal

it

for-

receives.

money

is

paying off provincial loans.

The remaining five per cent makes up the exceptional merit awards, which are based on the

“The provincial government

academic merit of students

has promised to reinvest the savings,” said financial-aid officer

their last year of high school.

Carol Walsh.

alleviate the ever-increasing stu-

The

scholarship,

in

designed to

According

1999.

September 2000, the Aiming Top tuition scholarship will begin to award funds to stuIn

for the

who earn top grades to help with the costs of attending college or university.

dents


Page 2

— SPOKE, Jan. 31, 2000

Child-care program approved By Walerian Czarnecki Conestoga

College

received

new program

approval on Jan. 25 for a

childhood

education

home

called

child care that will

September 2000. The need for this program stems from many parents’ preference to have their children cared start

for

Bill

school

home environment,

the

in

says

dean

Jeffrey,

of the

of health sciences/com-

munity services. Titia

said

nator,

ECE

an

Taylor,

member who

is

faculty

program co-ordi-

many

children

are

Taylor said research shows that good child-care providers make a major contribution to children’s

development

well-being and development

ductory level courses that will

major

three

areas,

we have

“Locally,

being cared for said.

said

cognitive,

lots

Courses will cover such topics as health and well-being in the

have tons of jobs

more than we have

care,

care

centres,”

said

in in

home day-

Taylor.

“Parents are calling because they

want

people

who have more

training.”

on

how

learn

to offer quality

home. The home

who want

to gain post-sec-

ondary training to work in a home-based setting with young children and their families or to those

who

way

and

beverage

do

better in the areas that

need

improvement.

who

Conlin,

said

the

KPI data

for their

programs

also

ran

listed

Deans

have

dents’ wishes.

in

similar programs.

Conestoga

also

conducted

to partici-

the

skills,

dren,” said Taylor,

program

is

who added

the

an exciting step for

program can give students and knowledge of child

If the

“We’ll

to

home

graduation,

child-

focus

concerns

Conestoga College could be its

at

a

applica-

SuperBuild Growth says Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic research and education services. tion

The

the

to

Fund

is

denied,

provincial

government

refer-

ence check must also be completed for students as new legislation

people to give

home

care, not put-

children

with a babysitter

someone does not know any-

will

know

these

people

“We who

graduate here and we’ll be able

speak to parents and give

ref-

erences.”

Applications are being accepted.

2003

for

construction

of

a

25,000-

on

site

Avenue

University

in

Waterloo, would give the college the space needed to

accommodate

the extra

according to

students,

Conlin.

Conlin said the college has been

menting secondary school populations

$660 million reserved given

the

ital

stu-

for

new

cap-

projects.

It is

in the

distributing the

money

to aid

expansion of Ontario college

and university infrastructure, which necessary to

if

said

accommodate

the

going to be very

what happens.”

said,

adding graduate placement

employment determine where and

funding

is

the result of the

If

Growth Fund natives to

that shortens

the length of

fund,

to

expansion

is

Conestoga College doesn’t get from the SuperBuild

lum implemented

September

help

rales

there are some alteraccommodate extra stu-

dents, said Conlin.

Holding evening and weekend

OAC classes.

classes,

which would finance

semester,

Conlin

waits

decision.

funding

for

(Photo by Tannis Fenton)

hours and changing the delivery of the curriculum using the Internet

and

CD-ROM

are

some

ideas for

providing extra classes, she said.

“None of

these are entirely satis-

factory suggestions, because they

Ontario secondary school curricuin

trends.

we do need

more space,” she said. The proposed campus would create room to expand college programs and create new ones, Conlin

new

cohort,

The

8:00pm The Sanctuary

found out that

needed.

by removing

4

and college admission

“We

The extra number of graduates, which is known as the double

1999

4^

criminal

to train

thing about,” said Taylor.

to

satisfactory

secondary institutions, which has

school from five years to four years

brought to you by the

ments.

in their indi-

measures,”

1

and have up-to-date immunization require-

approximately four years by docu-

ing from secondary school in 2003.

Mon. Feb.

child and

certification,

CPR certification

infant

preparing for the double cohort for

individual in the college starts to

“It’s

first-aid

creat-

double number of students graduat-

interesting to see

ting that

$742-million investment in post-

be successful

Tibbits.

qualify for field placement

students must complete standard

the

serious disadvantage if

is

focus groups over the past year

“We want really solid

ed the SuperBuild Growth Fund, a

things

accommodate

micro

To

education program and the 250-

square-metre campus on a 35-acre

every

take

the

level,

or 19 years of age or older.

A

the college.

at

advance

that

their

been

to get a better idea

of what needs

have the academic

sarily

food

report from the focus groups and are currently making

survey will compare Conestoga’s

age

provide excel-

but they’re wonderful with chil-

progress

changes

to the provincial aver-

who could

lent child care but don’t neces-

participants

the

were working well

and the next student satisfaction

programs

“There are many people out

By Tannis Fenton

management,

the

equivalent

Funding needed

vidual programs.

Mullan’s assessment states each school or service area has received

Upon

care students have the option of

go about

to

pate in the focus groups.

groups,

or

basic, general or

Students and faculty from the

were vocal about

to

(Photo by W. Czarnecki)

the skills

but

upcoming KPIs and

co-ordinator of the

home

already provide

steps to ensure a repeat performthe

is

program.

there

provide an opportunity to

those

Taylor

educa-

in a

ance

in

child-care centre.

further studies.

geared to help someone

programs were asked

we can do better.” Conestoga College has taken

one being

the other at a

Diploma

will be

accounting, nursing and robotics

areas where

home and

field placement at a home and the 250-hour placement at a day care will be credited to their

during

learned we’re good, but there are

a

hour

research and educational services,

“We’ve

at

Admission requirements are an Ontario Secondary School

broadcasting, journalism,

meeting.

reference check in order to begin their field placements,

She said the program will be a two-semester program, which

Conestoga’s heels,” said Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic the

states

courses,” said Taylor.

not required by law, because

improving and how doing it. is

outline

of the benefits of the training.”

it’s

KPI surveys on the “Confederation

The program’s

students will have to produce a

continuing in the early childhood

formalized training, even though

child care.

continued from Page 1

requires for people working with

children and vulnerable adults.

home, guiding children’s behaviour and professionalism. “They are really quite practical

will

“We

child-care provider.

homes,” she

in

child-care program

home.

home

level

and

entry-

“Our advisory committee they would like to see some

own

their

in

offer the knowledge, skills

of kids

tional child care to families with-

house or

offer intro-

will

attitudes required for an

under the care of unregulated caregivers, whether it be at someone’s

The program

in

and emotional.

social

that they need, then

they can do that job, said Taylor.

conducting extending

a

summer day-class

aren’t to the benefit of students,”

said Conlin.

The college was expecting learn the status of

its

Growth Fund application March 1, but a large number of proposals means it may be April before the college knows, she said.

Friday February 4, 2000 1 1 :00am to 3:30pm

<#

In

to

SuperBuild

the Sanctuary


SPOKE,

New Web Career-College

site

By Adam Wilson

an excellent EDge

NACC On

Dec.

Interactive

EDge

1999,

6,

Publishing

and the

National Association of Career

(NACC) announced

Colleges

launch

Web

of a

will

site

was established

the

training

to pro-

institutions

site,

the

CD-ROM, which same information be available in

will

strong reputation of delivering

Web

the site

is

“It will

NACC,

said

a great tool for students.

help the students

in

1989’s

Montreal Massacre

at

l’Ecole

Polytechnique

made

being

is

the western region,

into

falls

which also includes Niagara, Lambton, St. Clair, Fanshawe and

Mohawk colleges.

related sites.

enrol in a technology or applied

demic records,

and

Web

NACC

loans.

will

Web

Web

is

EDge

presi-

CEO Chris Wilkins site and CD-ROM

SchoolFinder.com,

an association of 524

They

said will

women

available to

program

arts

enrolled as

community

at

col-

leges in Ontario.

more than

offer training to

known

International

the

as

Nickel Company, has instituted

100,000 students annually. ing to business courses and more.

Bums said NACC’s partnership EDge was largely based on

with

Women

the

in

The

applicants will be assessed

Technology bur-

of

prospects

promising careers based on spe-

recommendation

cific interests,

Inco of Toronto, originally

institutions.

Training can range from weld-

update frequently.

In a press release,

dent and

be the

site,

privately-funded post-secondary

said the only difference

site’s ability to

the

training,” she

died

according to financial need, aca-

want

go for career

award win-

bursary memorializing the

full-time students or planning to

informed choices on where they to

the

A

women who

as well as several other school-

between the two

make

CD-ROMs

be awarded for each

region of the province. Conestoga

information for

Bums

the chief adminis-

officer with

sites,

print material.

Canadian

Anne Bums,

to $500, will

ning

offer.

trative

By Ray Bowe

industry, they have built a

provides useful

facilities

the different kinds of training they

women

slain

five years experience in the

EDge produced

students on schools,

and

With media

and

site

3

publishers.

effective

The Web

vide students with information on private

all

early 2000.

Career-College.

The

stated a

and

— Page

Bursary remembers

tool for students

Interactive Publishing

have

as the

called

site

launched

site

Dec. 31, 2000

by a

financial-aid officer or a

letter

of support from faculty or

employer.

Those wishing to apply for the in Technology bursary

sary in partnership with the 23

Women

Ontario colleges of applied

should submit their application

arts

and technology.

to the financial-aid office before

help students by giving them as

the success of SchoolFinder, a site

much make

information as possible to

similar to Career-College

decisions about not only

information about publicly funded

ing 27 per cent of the world

will

post-secondary schools.

demand. Four bursaries, each amounting

the Council of Presidents will

a school or program, the programs

where they will go to school, but what industries they will be working in for the next five

being offered by each school, the

years.

schooling,” she said.

said.

The Web

site

provides useful

information for students, such as

what schools there of questions to ask

facilities,

are, the kinds

when choosing

EDge

entrance criteria, budg-

eting and student loans.

Interactive

is

one

of

Canada’s foremost new media

“We were [Web

The

looking for a similar

site] for

site

with

Inco

is

number

the world’s

producer of nickel metal,

1

fulfill-

Jan. 31.

Each region’s administrators nominate

make

the final selections.

the private sector of

can

be

viewed

www.Career-College.com.

at

40 students face probation By Ray Bowe

our

About

40

Conestoga

of

approximately 2,500 on academic

College’s

full-time students are

modifications to the provincial government’s Ontario Program Assistance Student (OSAP) criteria, about two per to

cent of students, face academic

must mainpassing grades and a full

probation, where they tain

program up

this

set

September of 1998 so first

this is

in

our

run through the cycle.”

In order to receive full-time stufunding, students dent

OSAP

probation this semester.

Due

time around,” said Walsh.

first

“We

must maintain a 60 per cent course load.

documents

If not, their

OSAP

flagged

are

and

delayed until the student’s marks

from the

fall

semester arrive at the

registrar’s office.

Even though

lines

of students

course load or risk losing their

extended into the cold, brisk

OSAP funding.

for three days at the registrar’s

According

to financial-aid offi-

cer Carol Walsh,

although this

OSAP

was processed

semester’s

relatively quickly

and without any

glitches related to the overly antic-

air

office as students waited to pick

up

their

OSAP

documents,

stu-

dents subjected to academic pro-

bation

may

have to wait longer

than they originally anticipated.

computer bug, prob-

Prior to September 1998, stu-

lems such as long lineups did arise and some students have been sub-

dents only had to maintain a 40

ipated

Y2K

jected to

per cent course load in order to be

considered full-time students for

academic probation.

“For academic probation,

Is

candidates and

its

this is

OSAP purposes.

Student Food Program your class represented? Share donations, but Appreciates all

If

your class does not have a DSA Class Rep., Please send one to the next meeting in the Tues. Feb.

Thurs. Feb.

1

3

'fp

@ 3:30pm

@ 3:30pm

Cross Roads Meeting Room

URGENTLY REQUIRES the following canned pasta

toiletries

tomato sauce

tuna

spaghetti

canned

rice

juice

canned corn canned mushro om s

cereal

fruit

chicken noodle soup

j

Donation boxes are located at Student Services, DSA office

Main

cafe, or Security Office.

Thank you

for your Support


Heads Up! What A

starts February 7th?

student satisfaction survey that Ontario College

students complete to have their voice heard.

Outside the Main Cafe Q ii I

t

%1 ,'7<,V

:5.

How will

your voice be heard?

Take the time

to

up

DSA

office

out the survey. Supply the

school with your feed back.

@

Sign

fill

How did we do We

last year?

ranked very high, especially

in

participation.

Who can you

Mon. Jan. 31

talk to

if

you

have questions? The Doon Student Association, your teacher or program co-ordinator.

What do you need

Sumo

Complete the survey! Be

fair!

Be Honest!

With your help Conestoga College can remain a top Ontario College.

Wretflin^f 1

to do?

:30am

1

The Sanctuary $.

,

ki, „

«k

#C*

k

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4

Let

me

put your $1000 to

Work for

YOU

ELECTION NOTICE ONE PERSON

TO BE ELECTED AS A MEMBER OF THE CONESTOGA COLLEGE OF AND TECHNOLOGY BOARD OF GOVERNORS FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING TWO CATEGORIES: IS

APPLIED ARTS

ELIGIBILITY

Grad Rebate

IS

AS FOLLOWS:

Parts, Car, Light Truck Sales, Leasing, Service, & Paint Repairs Collision Complete Rentals, Daily

STUDENT

Greg Wilson

OPEN TO ALL FULL TIME AND PART TIME STUDENTS ENROLLED IN A PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION (A GROUP OF RELATED COURSES LEADING TO A DIPLOMA. CERTIFICATE OR OTHER DOCUMENT AWARDED BY THE BOARD OF

SALES & LEASING

GOVERNORS).

TERM OF OFFICE: SEPTEMBER

1,

2000

-

AUGUST

31, 2001.

Sates Ltd.

ADMINISTRATIVE MEMBER

'Night in

OPEN TO ALL PERSONS EMPLOYED BY THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS. CONESTOGA COLLEGE. ON A FULL TIME OR PART TIME BASIS WHO ARE NEITHER AN ACADEMIC NOR A SUPPORT STAFF MEMBER

TERM OF OFFICE: SEPTEMBER The terms appointed

2000

-

AUGUST 31.

of reference for these elected internal

members

of the Board of Governors.

Nomination forms 17. 2000 Board (Kevin Muilan).

Closing date for nominations:

Lists of

I,

will also

members

nominees to be posted on campus

10.

are the

Nomination forms

be available

MARCH

2003.

in the office

same will

as those for externally

be posted on Februarv

of the Secretary -Treasurer of the

2000

bulletin boards

ELECTION DATE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL

5,

2000

on March 20.

21100

me nean

:>f

Kitchener

Box 1178. 707 Ottawa St. Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4G1

P.O.

www.w8itandtord.ca Sates (519) 576-7000 Service (519) 576-7530 ,

W S.

Parts (519) 576-0000

Fax (519) 576-9130


.

.

OVER 150 RECRUITING EMPLOYERS at a

PERMANENT, CONTRACT, SUMMER, CO-OP, and

SINGLE LOCATION

PART-TIME JOBS

BINGEMANS CONFERENCE CENTRE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 10:00 a.m.

PREPARATION:

WHAT IS IT: /An opportunity. To To To To

3:30 p.m.

-

Focus

.

.

.

On specific employers that are of interest to you On researching employers On targeted questions to ask representatives On dressing and presenting yourself professionally

meet employers who are currently hiring investigate career options and current jobs give your resume to several employers present your skills and qualifications in person

RIDE THE FREE JOB FAIR BUS

DRIVE

WLU/UW

Leaves

FROM CONESTOGA COLLEGE

Leaves Bingemans 11:00

9:30 B1

B2

11:30

10:30 B1

12:00

B2

12:30

10:00

Leaves Doon

Leaves

Campus - Door #2

Bingemans

9:30 B1

11:00

1 1

10:30 B2

12:00

11:30B1

1:00

2:00

12:00 B2

1:30

3:30

12:30 B1

2:00

B2

2:30

1:30 B1

3:00

2:00 B2

3:30

2:30 B1

4:00

1 1

:30

B3

1:30 B1

:00

1:00

FROM GUELPH CAMPUS Leaves Guelph

Leaves

Campus

Bingemans

Bus # Bus

1

#3

11:00 12:30

Bus #3

Bus

#2

1:30

3:30

B1

UW Student Life Centre at

Departs listed time, then -

Athletic

WLU B2

Complex

-

Departs

at listed time, then

WLU

UW


Page 6

— SPOKE, Jan. 31, 2000

Waiting period too long A

first-year business student

and mother says when

she wanted to place her children in Conestoga’s daycare centre in September the fee was $1,600 a month

($80 a day) for her 15-month-old twins.

Fee subsidies for child care are a good investment, but the waiting period

is

too long.

and the public make use of the Conestoga College’s Doon cam-

Students, faculty, staff child-care facility at pus.

Those who cannot afford the $800 a month for infants, $695 a month for toddlers and $560 a month for preschoolers are told to apply to the Region of Waterloo for a child-care subsidy. But a subsidy from the region could take anywhere from six to eight months before it is

approved.

According

.

to

Teresa Trott, a supervisor

Region

at the

of Waterloo child-care service’s subsidy division, the wait is long because applicants do not have the necessary

documents on hand, not because the subsidy

is

,

unavailable.

Documents such

as their last pay stubs, social insur-

ance number, immigration

status,

a balance of their

bank account, assets and monthly payments are required.

To calculate the subsidy the applicants’ monthly net is compared to their monthly expenses. The subsidy fees are provided to low-income families and enable many parents to work. According to Mary-Ann Bedard, executive director for

Think before you complain

the Ontario coalition for better child care, the total

number of

child-care spaces in Ontario for 1998 was.

167,000 and the

total

number of subsidized spaces was

73,000.

Forty-four per cent of Ontario parents receive a child-

Ontario Ministry of

to the

Community and

Social Services, subsidies provide financial assistance

towards the cost of licensed child care for parents

who are

considered people in need, as determined by a needs

test.

Ironically while there are long waiting lists for subsi-

some areas of Ontario, many child-care have empty spaces because parents are unable to

dized spaces in centres

need.

post-secondary

Toronto Star Ottawa bureau

tory to

education

in a

pay the child-care

people

The government must address this problem. The average parent pays about $10,000 to $12,000 a

As

in

many

the

problem once and for

ernment announced post-secondeducation

funding cuts of

approximately

$30

million

in

York had

in col-

increase

in

enrolment between

cent

.

tuition hikes of 10 per

caused

two

Conestoga

College students to strike Oct.

many,

however,

issues are irrelevant to eat

when

15.

such

finding

and a place

to

Canada’s

growing

homeless

those without shel-

chill,

crucially in need of

help.

But homelessness, which

is

a

visible issue, is not the only epi-

demic

sleep are a day-to-day struggle.

in this

Poverty silently

is

a problem

affecting

that

is

more people

Figures released by

Campaign

2000, a social agency

alliance,

show that one in five children Canada were living in poverty 1997, which

is

News

in in

an increase of 50

is

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Kitchener, Ontario,

homelessness. I

all

the people

where

to

have

go

Phone: 748-5220, ext 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

insignificant

when

who

I

my

thought of

don’t have any-

to sleep at night.

grand scheme of things,

nothing

because

to

worry

I

about

have a roof over

I

head and food

my

to eat.

So, the next time you find yourself

complaining about education

article.

Conestoga College students are not

immune

to the desolation of

More

importantly,

have a

poverty, as college food and toy

night,

drives indicate there are those in

who

warm bed

costs, it

is

remember you to sleep

in

at

because there are so many

don’t.

funded from September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond, the space. Unsolicited submissions

N2G 4M4.

how

realized

to get a post-secondary education.

Editor: Tannis Fenton;

Room 4B14,

we

have a disproportionate number of people suffering from hunger and

Nov. 23 Toronto Star

Circulation Manager: Mike Radatus; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz address

considered one of the

is

remember what an opportunity

Student Life Editor: Talisha Matheson Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Adam Wilson; Advertising Manager: Walerian Czarnecki;

SPOKE’s

Canada

per cent since 1989, according to a

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Nicole Furlong;

we have

part,

best countries in the world, yet

In the

every day, especially children.

Keeping Conestoga College connected is

most

For the

debt worries are

country.

SPOKE is mainly

SPOKE

we

the fortunate.

become

something

all.

among

ter

Sparks flew when the Tory gov-

For so

Universal day care needs to be put into place, solving

are

wind

Annual

child-care fees.

but demographically speaking,

the

1992 and 1998.

students are also parents and cannot afford current

due

eat.

lege funding with a nine per cent

that

the temperature drops drasti-

largely

health care in the world.

been a 21 per cent decrease

on waiting lists for child-care subsidies. The government must take into consideration

a crime.

as

$7,000 for a preschooler. Ontario

is

is

and low funding,

to high tuition

it did on Jan. 17 when the morning forecast read -42 C with

who don’t have

1999

in

such abundance,

contradic-

opening paragraph, as

a roof over their heads or food to

country

this

said there

much.

may seem

this

my

access to the best education and

University study

this is just too

know

cally during these winter months,

year for an infant in day care and about $6,000 to

There are currently about 20,000 families

I

such student poverty

article.

out the basic necessities

November 1999. A November

For some

chief,

having people on the streets with-

tuition

are

Dec. 17

In a country of

cuts

increases, there

ary

fees.

about

funding

and

care subsidy.

According

problem has reached epidemic proportions, said William Walker,

As we complain

amount paid

must be sent

9:30 a m. Monday. Submissions are subject

MS Word

tain

to

by

acceptance or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect file would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

rejection

or

for the

to the editor

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE,

Jan. 31, 2000

— Page

7

In brief

DSA new

someone couldn’t

to test

checklist format

The Doon Student Association executive discussed changes to

are filled out every

which

month by

the

group, at a meeting Jan. 24.

The

checklists are a

tiquing the executive

decide effort

if

way of crimembers to

they have put in the

towards earning their hono-

course of the month.

DSA

vice-presi-

of operations,

suggested

Jenn Hussey, dent

instead of checkmarks,

that

tive.

Kroeker,

dent of student

DSA affairs,

suggested

having a place where comments

The honorarium is the paycheque each member receives

marked would know where he/she

monthly.

is

DSA

president Ellen

came up with nine each

member

Menage

categories that

of the committee

must be marked on monthly. The checklist would be graded out of 90 for each member, unless there was some reason

Friday.

sent.

made

Menage

the

DSA

elections

decide to attend for the experience in case they

win positions on the

DSA executive in the election Feb. 15-17.

The

cost of the trip

exceed $1,500

A the

if

is

not to

four people are

pictures for the

motion was carried by the executive to pay the cost of

trip,

for a

maximum

of four

DSA Web

page.

Only members of the DSA executive would use the camera. The would hold camera between 30-50 pictures and they would be saved on a disk in the back of the camera, which would

make

easier for putting the pic-

it

on the

tures

DSA

DSA to attend Toronto OCCSPA conference

in

The

Web page. committee

executive

agreed to shop around for the best possible deal

on a

digital

camera.

people.

vice-presi-

rarium.

could be

dates running against Harris and

a

number system be worked out so the marking would be more effec-

Kim

Hussey said the group should format for one month to see how it works and to assess what a satisfactory monthly grade would be. The group approved the format for the checklist and each member was to have them filled out by

test the

Each member of the group is to mark each other and themselves on their participation in DSA events and activities over the

By Adam Wilson

the honorarium checklists,

participate in

an event.

so the person being

doing well or needs improve-

At

Doon

least

two members of the

Student Association execu-

tive will

be attending the Ontario

Community

College

(OCC-

ment.

SPA) conference Feb.

Menage discussed what a satisfactory mark would be for each

Centennial College in Toronto.

person. She said, in her opinion,

of education, said he and

somewhere around 70 out of 90 would be a good grade for an executive member.

president

Harris,

a

digital

New DSA

purchase

4-6

at

After

DSA

business manager

Becky

4:30 p.m.

cameras they

The new camera would be used

expensive camera being $1,400.

DSA

for taking pictures during

could be two more going

events and trips, as well as taking

DSA at

This was the most convenient

time

going to the conference, but there

discussion, the

would be held on Mondays

ings

different digital

Menage were candi-

some

two

could purchase, with the most

if

for

executive agreed that their meet-

Boertien said she has looked at

DSA vice-president DSA

Ellen

date and time meetings

camera

Student

Parliamentary Association

Mike

DSA to

considering

the

group’s

schedules.

The

meet

association used to

Tuesdays.

6FF66TIV6 reXT^OOK P£ADlN6i

Q

im/

MONDAY, fee-PUAPY i4™ F-00M 24M W30 - 130 1

Indoor Ball Hockey Tournament

In th© Sanctuary 1 1 :30am start Tues. Feb. 1 sign up at the DSA office

Neep neL?

with.... Ticking out important information? Strategies for retaining information?

Understanding the role of spur textbook?

Workshop

Facilitator:

Please register

in

Shawna Bernard

STUDENT S€P.Vl£6S (POOM

are interested in a workshop but cannot

please contact “Shawna Bernard, Student Services.

INDIE BLAST 8:OOpm I isi

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Admission Doon Students $5 Guests $7

-

Acst.

If

you

attend at this time,

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Tickets on sale at the DSA office Three Live Indie Bands! Catch them > HERE BEFORE THEY MAKE IT BIG.


— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 8

31, 2000

32 years

Conestoga excellence

of

knew what was needed

Complied by Tracy Ford

in

the

workplace.

Conestoga College was

when

time

built at

a college education

a

was

considered a joke compared to a

Support for

education.

university

he

said,

became a

it

adjust to the

ondary education.

College” and “401 high.”

began

Since

beginning as 21 portables

its

grown

in 1968, the college has

to

include five campuses and excelled

where the

in excellence to the point

college placed

number

in the first-

1

The

post-sec-

which had a tough

college,

act to follow with

two well-estabtown,

across

universities

lished

lot easier to

new form of

was hindered by the nicknames given to it, sometimes by its own students. It was known as “Comedy College,” “Coconut the school

idea of what

Once people got an

college educated students could do,

add additional programs

to

to

keep up with the demands of the local

In

community. January

opened

A

its

Conestoga

1972,

furniture-making

year later

facility.

expanded by adding

it

ever independent surveys of Ontario

the early childhood education pro-

community

gram and building. Also in 1973,

Conestoga

colleges last year. is

now an

outstanding

the

in

likely

college,

best

the

In 1965, the Ontario Minister of

Education William G. Davis intro-

duced

Bill

153

Queen’s Park

at

enacting the formation of applied

and technology colleges

arts

in

Ontario.

Shortly

conducted

a

after,

Kitchener

site in

consisting of 58 hectares adjacent to

Highway 401 was chosen and construction was started. In June 1967, James W. Church was chosen to be Conestoga’s first Jan.

opened

its

The

was

doors for the

first

At

first

there

were 188 full-time students and 25 faculty

members.

During Conestoga’s

first

year, busi-

also

1975,

which gave the college a wide variety of programs. The addition totalled 3 1 programs ranging from welding and machine shop to

Construction on Conestoga’s main building continues while students attend classes

form the

skills at the

jobs they were

According to Clow,

who

second language.

lege’s reputation

was the

it

increased the col-

and now the

dents entering the college are

a cost

at

advanced

1982-83

By 1977 the building home away from home students,

the

years previous

six

a population,

demanded

facility.

Keeping up with the needs

recreation

cation students.

By

a decade and a half

this time,

after the school

opened

doors,

it

itself as

a

its

major competitor against other

most popular among

struct a recreation centre

Doon campus was He worked with the adult edu-

cation centre in Waterloo before the

college “I

was

think a lot of people didn’t

he

it

was going

to be,”

said.

May

31, 1969,

first

convocation, on

was held

at

Fairview

Park shopping centre where 67 graduates received their diplomas.

Clow

1987,

at

it

cheaper alternatives to university.

was renamed

the

Kenneth

In 1981, graduate placement

said graduates got jobs and

was

97.5 per cent with 30 pro-

grams ranking

their

placements

at

100 per cent

The college has developed most of its

reputation through

its

Conestoga was

graduates,

said Clow, adding they could per-

making a

portables.

an

under-

ground-style paper operated by

The journalism program took into a

community newspaper.

Rules and regulations have also

changes

effected

within

the

Up

In

Conestoga

1988,

until

smoking was allowed in classrooms and

he began

engineering technician.

When

he returned to Canada, his undergrad-

uate degree in mechanical engi-

neering in 1950.

master’s

his

He

earned

later

from the

degree

University of Toronto.

He was chosen from 80 cants to be Conestoga’s

appli-

pres-

first

ident in 1967.

John Goddard was Conestoga’s second president the

position

who

took over

temporarily

Church resigned conducted his

1988

after

Canada declared war Church on Germany in 1939. joined the armed forces as an

Church completed

various students.

it

Two years

neering.

his studies

after

He

1974.

in

from

duties

January until that following July

when Kenneth

E.

Hunter was

chosen from 117 applicants.

during lectures.

Hunter was 51 years old when he became president. He was

Grand River every spring begin-

from Midland and had completed

ning in 1968. Tragedy struck the

a B.Sc.

the computer-

annual event when, in 1972, a 19-

and a graduate degree

aided design and computer-aided

year-old high school student from

at the

definitely

statement in the community.

The school added

Conestoga’s third president.

sitting at

Conestoga’s

was opened

recreation centre

1980

colleges.

a cost of $4.7 million. In

fitness centre.

The

community

As years passed, the need for higher education became more evident and more students searched for

E. Hunter Recreation Centre after

established.

understand what

complete

with gymnasium, ice surface and

in

newspaper was

name was

Spoke. For years

banned smoking inside the school. Smoking had been allowed in classrooms and during lectures. A boat race was held on the

proposed an $80,000 plan to con-

even before the

the

to

students and 9,000 continuing edu-

technology courses were clearly

built.

changed

for 2,100

had already established

Business, was a part of Conestoga

but the

later

school.

of students, the college quickly

applicants.

established.

bringing the total to 4,306 full-time

ness administration and engineering

Andy Clow, dean of the School of

was

called the Conestoga

served as

which

a

was

over the paper in 1981 and turned registration,

population of the school had nearly

doubled from

full-time

better

not second class.

In the

$4.7 million.

who

students

stu-

more

first it

Doomed News

understand that a college education is

of

student newspaper

At

hired to do.

graduates

The recreation centre was opened in 1 980

in

(Photo courtesy of Twenty Five Years of Educating That Works)

basic upgrading and English as a

far

further their education.

was

transferred to colleges in

day of

from being completed. Conestoga College was intended for non-university bound students to

Manpower

Canadian

Industrial Training Plan

even though construction

classes

of nurs-

its first set

ing graduates in 1975.

1968, the college

8,

and

colleges

to

Conestoga saw

president.

On

were

at local hospitals,

transferred

province.

all

nursing programs, which were once

manufacturing

1984.

facility in

In

Bridgeport drowned while partici-

in

engineering physics in physics

University of Toronto.

Joseph Martin,

who was

presi-

1985, the $2.5-million Daniel B.

pating in the race.

dent from August 1981 until 1984,

Detweiler Electrical Skills centre

James W. Church had recomthat the race be open to Conestoga students and those invited by students. The college no longer conducted the race after 1992 due to cost, danger, liability factors and lack of student

was

was completed. The nursing and health sciences wing was completed two years later. The proposed $6-million Woodworking Skills Development Centre was completed in 1988.

And

in 1990, the Waterloo

campus opened its own hood education centre.

The general arts and gram was established

early child-

mended

involvement.

An

bom and raised on the Bay of He attended St. Thomas

Fundy.

University in Fredericton for two years before going to

St.

George

University in Montreal in 1965.

He

graduated with a B.A. in phi-

losophy and languages.

He

also

attended Niagara University and

annual

winter

carnival

graduated in 1979 with a master’s degree in science and education.

1988 and

became popular among students. The event, which continues this

an alumni association office was

year, includes a polar bear dip in

the schools of academic support,

created.

science proin

In 1992, there

were over

the pond.

The event

also includ-

10,000 alumni registered with the

ed softball, volleyball, tug-o-

association.

war,

The

student and clients services

was

building construction

started in

1991.

a

post-secondary

and graduates get voca-

tional skills that they

can use in the

workforce, said Clow.

Not only has Conestoga College gone through numerous architectural

sculpture competition.

changes, but the atmosphere of

the school has also changed.

During the school’s

first

years a

five

different presidents since the col-

lege opened.

All of

them

dis-

many different abilities and each brought their own unique played

approach

to the college.

The founding president, James W. Church, was bom in 1916 in Ottawa.

He

is

currently the dean of

applied arts and access. In 1984, Hunter returned to the

position and continued until John

W.

Tibbits took over in 1987.

Tibbits, the current president,

Conestoga College has had

Conestoga’s institution

played in

which

were all the snow, and a snow

relays,

Martin

enrolled at Queen’s

University in Kingston for engi-

grew up

in a predominantly French section of Montreal. He received his B.Sc. in Psychology at McGill University in 1965.

He earned

his master’s degree in

education administration from the University of Vermont.

In

1980, he received a doctorate in

education administration from

Boston University.


SPOKE, Jan.

2000

31,

— Page 9

Student displeased with fees ByTalisha Matheson

however,

Conestoga has

lower

child-care fees.

As

Rachelle-Lynn Quiroz, a first-year business student and mother of twins,

when she wanted

says

of September 1999 Conestoga

College charges $695 a month

to

($34.75 a day) for toddlers, $800 a

place her children in Conestoga’s

month ($40 a day) for infants and $560 a month ($28 a day) for

day-care centre in September the fee

was $1,600 a month ($80 a day)

Centennial College in Toronto, the college sets the day-care fees and

preschoolers.

the services are open to the public.

Centennial students and the public pay $815 a month ($40.75 a day) for toddlers, $920 a month ($46 a

day) for infants and $650 a month

($32.50 a day) for preschoolers.

for her 15-month-old twins.

“They wouldn’t give me some of a deal considering

I

am

a

need to come up with a different system for students with more than one child.” “I

sort full-

time student and mother.”

She said day-care centre

staff told

her she could apply for a subsidy

through the Region of Waterloo, but

would take anywhere from eight months to be approved.

that

to

“By

that

would be

six

Rachelle-Lynn Quiroz,

and $695 a month

($34.75 a day) for preschoolers.

They do not accept infants. According to Schenk, Conestoga’s day-care services are

open

to students, staff, faculty

and

Schenk,

education graduates care for the

manager of child-care centres at Conestoga College, the college

children and enrolled Conestoga

for both children.

looks at the market rate for child

the day-care centre.

need to come up with

care and

who

took her children to another day-

where she only pays

“I think they

for toddlers

the public.

time the school year

$700 a month

Sheridan College in Oakville, charges $800 a month ($40 a day)

student

over,” said Quiroz,

care centre

think they

a different system for students with

more than one child,” she said. Compared to some other colleges.

She said trained early childhood

According

to

Shelly

tries to stay

competitive.

Conestoga day-care fees are

set

by

students

According to Marie Robinson of

their field

placements

“There are more adults on

at

site

including paid employees as well as

ECE

the college.

do

more hands

“The

she said.

students,”

Rachelle-Lynn Quiroz says Conestoga College charges students too

much

for child care, especially

one

child.

She

is

shown

with Vante

who have more than and Dante.

those (left)

the better.”

(Photo by Talisha Matheson)

Young students face

Sure shot

tougher issues today By Walerian Czarnecki

The

fall

semester was exception-

ally busy,

Younger students face more com-

but

according to counsellors with stu-

ed a trend

dent services.

more

“The complexity of the problems increasing,” said Carol Gregory, a

counsellor and co-ordinator of stu-

dent services.

“The multi-faceted

warms up

tournament

in

for

the

(Photo by Laura Czekaj)

from a major change

in their fives.

Gregory said there has also been an

is

also

an

ing, then

Barb

Kraler, a counsellor in

student services.

a

lot

@

stress,

whether

it

working a

“It’s

another thing to have to deal

because they are carrying a large

with,” said Kraler. “There are

debt load, she said.

demands as

Gregory said the pace of

many

life

more

students.”

Many new

has

people don’t

lot

family issues or sleep deprivation.

going off to part-time jobs

increased and

under

be from

of hours and coming to school,

come

students

well as students

who

in as

are about to

more academdemands on people, so many stu-

graduate. There are ic

the Rec. Centre

to student services are

of

financial difficulties,

increase in anxiety.

ing a lot of assignments and study-

said

Kraler said a lot of students that

come

ment,” said Kraler.

Gregory said there

Kraler,

a number of

people with a suicide risk assess-

symptoms.

many

Barb

counsellor

people are aware of depression’s

are identifying their depression,”

assessment.”

in to get help, said Kraler.

Students are going to school fac-

people

way.”

with suicide risk

stu-

more

increase in depression and

“In a positive way,

Free Skating

and a number of

life that

“We found there was a number of people

Depression, violence, anger, family situations

“Life’s a

time,” she said.

and many people are going

through

titude of problems,” she said.

“We found there was

be homesickness and adjustment

blur,

“People are coming in with a mul-

been

typical problems used

“There does not seem to be any

down

Kraler.

dents are dealing with an awful lot

to

student,

that more students have complex problems, said

dents with suicidal thoughts have

The more

m

transition into college,

nature of the problems shows stu-

in their lives.”

find time for themselves.

students were

many colleges have demonstrat-

plex issues than in recent years,

have been changing gradually and

Chris Pagnan, a first-year his final game during a Sanctuary.

making the

new

as

dents

who advance

come

in

when

a semester

the workload

is

heavier, said Kraler.

Both counsellors said there are a lot

of academic issues that students

are seeking help for. find out

why

Many come to

they have difficulty

with certain subjects, time manage-

ment or concentration problems, and in discussions with counsellors, is discovered those academic

it

Wed. Feb. 2

problems stem from more severe personal problems.

“There itself,”

is

a cycle that perpetuates

said Gregory.

There are few supports for people,

6:30pm

to

7:30pm

as traditional family supports are

separated and there are cutbacks in the health-care system that people relied on, said Gregory.

“That’s going to continue as the

brought to you by the

Grade 12 graduates come lege,” she said.

to col-


Page 10

— SPOKE, Jan. 31, 2000

Improve your writing

skills

By Pamela Hopwood

17

This semester, the cenhas 10 tutors,

tre

winter

the

for

whom

term.

Andrew Coppolino,

a

to

ing a busy term as people

ly

is

the centre

and

its

because their role

Students must

servic-

forms

consent

es.

“First

and

By Donna Ryves

try

be relaxed and friendIf

is

a beautiful thing, then perhaps students won’t mind

extra for

it.

menu

item will increase by about 10 to 25 cents

nationwide.

before

Harvey’s will also be introducing some new items, for example, the triple burger, the bacon-barbecue cheese melt and hash browns. The triple burger, which is three original hamburgers on a bun,

receiving help.

foremost,

is

little

In February, each

out

fill

Harvey’s

paying a

not evaluative, he said.

know more about

get to

previous

Coppolino said they

expect-

he

have

of

all

experience in the centre.

writing consultant at the centre, said

at Harvey's

done.

The Conestoga College centre opened

writing Jan.

Price hikes

what students need help with and what they’ve

put you

we’re not a proofreading

“Don’t

service,” said Coppolino.

off,” said

“The idea

only takes about 30 sec-

will cost $4.89

onds.”

a salad, onion rings, soup, fries or a drink.

to help stu-

is

dents discover issues in

own

their

writing.

build

The

What is

says

a sort of writing

who

we’re aiming to do here

He

Coppolino

said

who come

Rob Good, a

tutors

then

over a student’s progress

(Photo by

them

resources,

the

centre has written

handouts and book-

marked Web

sites to help students

with specific problems.

“We

try to

accommodate every-

body,” said Coppolino. to

make

of the

P.

Hopwood)

service

special

is

writing

on the menu, says Seyler. Harvey’s has been at Conestoga for six years and accounts for 18 per cent of the total sales for all food outlets at the Doon campus. “The average sale per transaction, per customer is $3.35,” says

not only stu-

dents. “It’s for any stu-

“We want

students aware that they

Gresham.

don’t write in isolation.”

One thing the tutors strive some kind of continuity,

for

is

said

Coppolino.

Rob Good,

a tutor at the centre,

Students can drop in or book an

appointment with a

Doon campus. Tutors are availMondays to Thursdays from

said each student has a progress

at

able

By

tracking students’ progress,

tutors

can keep a good handle on

tutor.

The writing centre is located in room 2A1 18 in the main building

file.

being offered as a promotion-

whether or not it’s a viable item to put on the menu,” says Jeanne Seyler, Harvey’s supervisor. The bacon-mushroom melt, a promotional item offered in the past went well, even though it wasn’t put

special

needs

is

item and will cost $3.49 and $5.14 for the combo. “The promotion will run until the end of March to get input as to

al

a learning skills

with

and $6.59 for the combo, which includes choice of

The bacon-barbecue cheese melt

free,

dents in the college,” says to

resources that can help them.

The writing

for

file.

problems

lead

The

tutor at the writing centre, looks

to the centre to

their

is

Gresham,

centre.

are trained to help people

and

is

charge

ones that have

control of their writing.

identify

service

“It

needs services and in

stressed that students

the

are

Coppolino.

Lynn

adviser

culture.”

let that

9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

John Kast, food services director. “Students like the service we provide and the food we provide.” Kast says Harvey’s hasn’t had a price hike for at least four years and other franchises are raising prices as well. “They’re going to complain for awhile, but they’ll have it

to accept

everywhere,” says Kast.

The price changes are set by the Harvey’s franchise, not by Beaver Foods, which has an exclusive contract to provide food services to all Conestoga campuses.

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31,

2000

— Page

11

the survey says...

Focus: Violent behaviour

all

By

Matheson

Talisha

mostly students initiated the A few employees and

incidents.

Only 138 responded

By Talisha Matheson

conduct/crisis

Conestoga’s student employ-

ment centre

is busy all year and offers a variety of services

to

who

students

all

veys,

is

“It

far

sur-

Radigan said the incident most mentioned was verbal or aggressive behaviour.

The survey indicated result

Kim

go,”

one

a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

“We

co-ordinator,

keep

tried to

it

said.

as short

and

simple as possible.”

that

no

being

harmed

results indicated

about 66

reported

physically.

Radigan, health, safety and envi-

ronmental

centre staff pro-

surveys

as

visitors to the college also

initiated the violent incidents.

dealt with violence

was actually a good

open Monday to Friday 8:30

Employment

management

some

527

and violent behaviours on cam-

as

The employment centre

the

pus, distributed Dec. 3.

use the

centre.

which

members

staff

to

The

per cent of respondents reported violent incidents while about 33

per cent didn’t.

vides a variety of services for

Radigan

students

from interviewing tips to employer research. According to Karen

focused on

Parrinder, a staff

the best time for students to

on campus on a scale of one one being the least safe and 10 being safest. She said about 75 per cent of the answers were in the high end

look for employment

of the scale.

in July

Other questions on the survey asked if staff had ever dealt with

cerns over a perceived increase

violence while working

aggressive behaviour on

student

member

employment

at

services,

from

is

January until about May.

She

said there isn’t a slow

period in the employment centre

because part-time, full-time

and contract jobs are always

safe

Radigan said about half the respondents have received train-

felt

to 10, with

college, if

the effect

Of

available.

survey

employees

the

said

how

the

at

was reported and had on them.

it

it

the returned surveys about

“Students mostly look for

half the respondents said they

jobs related with their pro-

had dealt with violent behaviour on campus.

gram,” Parrinder said, they

said

She

Radigan said the survey asked respondents whether students, employees or visitors to the col-

look fo

hours and locations the

employment on

ing

in dealing with violent behaviour and the other half

would

According to Parrinder, the September and October for first-year students

She said most responded

that

more

1999 as a result of con-

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in

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She added students could ask and have

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The conduct/crisis management task group began meeting

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like

Kim Radigan, health, safety and environmental co-ordinator, is happy the surveys are over, but says there is still work to be done at Conestoga College.

i

Suggest a creative name that

staff for assistance

their

resume and cover

represents a positive image of our

letter

by office staff. According to the graduate employment report, statistics for 1998 show 803 of the 1,515 Conestoga graduates are employed in a related field, while only 179 are employed

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in

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!

Page 12

— SPOKE, Jan. 31, 2000

it

Hurricane a swirl of emotions By

Sherri

mostly with the words and expres-

Osment

sions of the actors, yet the tension

they create

Denzel Washington’s performance as Rubin “Hurricane” Carter in

The Hurricane

is

After meeting Carter, Martin

quite possibly

is

home

goes

the best of his career.

The Hurricane

the true story of

young

sentenced to three consecutive

when he

Martin,

Lesra

by

inspired

life

who

Hurricane’s

is

story

reads Carter’s book.

The

with them in Toronto to give

live

him a

better

Sixteenth Round. It was the book that Martin ever read. Martin

move

the emotions and brilliance of a

begins corresponding with Carter

fight to free

man whose life was taken from him by a corrupt police force and a failed justice system. Washington

in jail

and eventually meets him. Shannon’s performance is just as convincing as Washington’s and

and

when

the two are together on

chance for education.

Martin and his Canadian friends

to life

portrays Carter with a passion that

his

taken Martin from Brooklyn to

first

sentences.

and convinces

Canadian friends that Carter is innocent. The Canadians had

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, a boxer who was wrongly accused and convicted of triple murder and

Washington (Fallen) brings

something that can

is

almost be seen.

to

New

Jersey to take

Hurricane.

up the Martin

many

his friends encounter

obstacles in their search for the truth,

including witnesses

who

don’t want to talk and even threats

of the

against their lives.

ger they face, they

portrays; his hatred, rage, bitter-

seem to vanish and there is only the two of them. A movie that takes place in the

ness and despair are not just seen,

small confines of prison cells and

not have committed the crimes.

they are

rooms doesn’t have many background distractions or a lot of pointless action. The story is told

for a crime he didn’t

is

not only convincing but inspiring.

Washington seems

to

become the

embodiment of the emotions he

screen,

the

stark walls

Despite the obstacles and the dan-

prison

Vicellous Reon Shannon (Can’t

Hardly Wait) plays the role of the

to find

After spending 22 years in prison

visiting

felt.

manage

evidence that proves Carter could

commit, Rubin

“Hurricane” Carter was released.

(internet photo)

Hurricane meets with his friends to help him win his fight for freedom.

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)

SPOKE,

— Page 13

Jan. 31, 2000

Taking a Strong approach Comedian addresses issues By Mike Radatus

*

“When

I

work

kind of show so

currently

an agreement.

He

Show

Tonight

Def Jam, CBS

Carson,

and black entertainment better

Johnny Morning

with

known

When

television,

Strong performs for col-

week or two, packing in many performances as possible.

do

to

said he relies

his

make

to

on

to get into the

show

Strong touches on some touchy

‘OK, don’t bother

me,’ ” he said.

make jokes about homosexuals

and

stuff like that to bring aware-

ness to these things,” he said.

His favourite place to play

is

in

laid

back and you can put on a more

24.

Students

Sanctuary

the

in

laughed when Strong made such tred out

were not

insulted, includ-

ing a student that was called gay

male

for sitting next to a

elaborate show, something he can’t

friend.

Garrett Brennan, a marketing stu-

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

in the Sanctuary Jan. 19. The comedian is on a deal with HBO for a spot on cable. He problems in society in order to bring awareness to

Carl Strong performs

makes

light of

the problems,

laughed

attacked

(Photo by Mike Radatus)

when

him with

I

Do you

lack energy and feel like sleeping

more?

Are you always eating and gaining weight?

you

feel

it

Do

depressed? During the winter months,

the snow, cold and dark days.

get

We call

the “winter blahs”.

For one

in fifty

Canadians

this is a

more

serious

problem called seasonal affective disorder

SAD is a form of clinical depression that

(SAD).

occurs yearly during the

Four times as many

1 1

1 I I I 1 I

li Ǥ 151

He

Brennan said he thought Strong was one of the funniest comedians

was singing

he has seen

sang well.

at

Conestoga College.

“He got on me a bit, but it was funny. You can’t get mad when you’re laughing.”

sing.

“Even

said that although Strong to

make

a joke, he

still

new Power located

CBSA

is

Learning

the

in

Resource

CBSA’s

Point machine

not

Centre,

the

Also, an incor-

office.

rect deadline for applications

had a good voice. If comedy doesn’t work out he could always be a singer.” as a joke he

for a position

The

given.

on the

DSA was

correct date

was

Jan. 26.

Blahs or Seasonal Affective Disorder?

away from

1 1

jokes.

Another thing that impressed Brennan was that Strong could

In an article in the Jan. 24 edition of Spoke, the

Winter

many of us have these symptoms and want to

I

Strong

his

1

1

Corrections

currently working

dent,

comments and even people he cen-

pubs because people are more

1

that

to offend people.

“I

half an hour to eat, so they’re pretty

Pub Night at Loose Change Louie’s, Feb

they

subjects like sexuality, race, drugs

shows.

like

Sue

15.

*

if

and alcohol. However, he says

much

with

act.

he never means

lunch, people usually only have a

Sex

Talking

Johanson, Feb.

hard to get people in the

shows a day and says they are hard play in colleges at

*

the jokes funnier and to

Often he will perform two or three

“When you

Pub and

He

can’t see me,” he said.

tours for a

Valentine’s

Fantasia Party at the Sanctuary, Feb. 14.

was difficult show in the

facial expressions

get people into the

back

*

said.

also

it

DSA

for

positions, Feb. 10.

good joke them

Sanctuary due to poor lighting.

“It’s

lege crowds he usually goes on

as

him

breezey

that will help

Strong said

BET.

as

head

through the day,” he

for

The

has also worked on

light

Speeches

people have to

if

leave they can have one in their

Candidates’

in college situa-

do a

tions I try to

working towards getting himself back on cable. He is talking with HBO and says there is a good chance by mid-summer they will have come to

The following are DSA events coming soon:

time.

Sanctuary Jan. 19. is

humour

do when people don’t have time to watch for an extended amount of

The DSA held a nooner featuring comedian Carl Strong in the Strong

society with

in

and

usually

fall

women

1

I I I I

as

men

are affected,

occurs in early adulthood.

overproduced by some people in

I

melatonin, the winter

is

when

the days are shorter and darker.

Bright light blocks the release of melatonin, and

people with

SAD

ments to be very

have found bright

You can

try taking

light will help in the winter.

more walks

outside, partici-

pating in winter sports, turning on inside

light treat-

effective.

For any of us, more

more

lights

and yes, of course, going south during

March Break! If

you suspect you may have SAD, you can

to staff in

Special

talk

Health Services, Counselling or the

Needs Department

Date

Time

Time Management

Mon., Feb. 7

11:30-12:30

2D14

Mon., Feb. 14

11:30-12:30

2D14

Mon., Feb. 21

12:30-1:30

2D14

Multiple Choice Test-taking

Mon., Mar. 6 Mon., Mar. 13

12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

2D14 2D14

Preparing for

Mon., Apr. 10 Wed., Apr. 12

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

Effective

1

first

Room

Workshop

and winter months.

Researchers believe the sleep-related hormone,

it

Winter semester 2000

for

1 1 I I I I

1

more informa-

Textbook

Reading Listening and

Note-taking

Final

Exams

2D14 3A405

Workshop Facilitator: Shawna Bernard, Student Services

tion.

A Message from

Please register in Student Services

Student Services

(Room 2B02

i a

workshops. If you are interested at

these times, please see

(Room 2B02)

in a

for the

above

workshop but cannot attend

Shawna Bernard, Student

Services.


Condors squashed by Cougars By Sherri Osment

Conestoga defeated

in third

straight last

The Conestoga Condors men’s hockey team suffered

varsity

loss

third

f

as

in

against

the

Cougars

Jan.

22

their

The Condors’

minutes remaining

He was

recreation centre.

was

in

game.

the

by Dave Stewart.

6-4 Cougars.

The Cougars received 48 penalty

mem-

that the rookie

assisted

minutes throughout the game; the Condors received 20 penalty minutes.

In addition to losing the

goal

The Cougars scored twice in every period. The final score was

The first two goals scored by the Condors came from rookies. Ken Condors head coach Galerno said

final

6.

scored by Sean Murray, with three

Marie Conestoga

Ste.

at the

minutes of the game,

five

bringing their score to

many games

Sault

game

two of the Condors were

Mike Rudney the

first

game,

injured.

injured his knee in

period and team captain

Greg Thede suffered a

slight con-

cussion in the third period.

This was the final game Condors will play against

Cougars

the the

this season.

bers of the team played quite well. “It

was

the veteran players that

decided they had something better to

iostensi

do today than play hockey,”

Galerno

“They’re not pre-

said.

pared mentally

prepared their

Class Rings

and they’re not They have

physically.

own

personal agendas both

on and off the ice and it’s ing on the whole team.”

reflect-

Rookie Dave Galbraith

scored

the

Condors’

in

the

first

first

assisted

The Cougars were leading

by

with

a goal

2-1 at

their lead to in

the

first

widened the lead with another goal with eight min-

minute. They

Condor Tyler Heimpel

is

Heimpel scored with two minutes to go in the second period. He was assisted by Dave Stewart.

rt

st

,

Foyer inside Door #4

grabbed from behind by a Cougar

player. (Photo by Sherri Osment)

goal for the Condors, with less

Sean Murray, bringing the score to 4-3 for the Cougars at the end of

than a minute remaining in the

the second.

Craig McBrearty scored the third

utes to go.

nd

Feb. l & 2 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Jan. 31

the beginning of the second period

and quickly brought

Sale

game

goal of the

period,

10% Off

another rookie Tyler Heimpel.

three

Conestoga College

second period.

He was

assisted

by

The Cougars scored twice

Keep your memories on hand for a

in the

Conestoga College

jj

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to

meet and exceed the needs of our

Conestoga College fl

students, employees

and communities.

lifetime.


\)

SPOKE, Jan.

By Adam Wilson

“We

have not been approached

fact that

about the money,” he said, “but

Claim your

A substantial amount of money was found in a parking lot at Conestoga College last week. The money was found and returned to security services by a

money

who was

regional police officer

teaching a course at the college, said A1

Hunter,

supervisor of

we would

like to see

back

hands of

in the

was a

money

found.

He in

also

lose

which parking

lot

who added

was most likely the why no one has

reason

services

doesn’t realize the

missing.

Hunter encouraged the person security

for

it

this

but he stressed the

is

has

Hunter,

it

money

who

taken

security

loss. It is also possible

the person

assume someone themselves,” said

would not say in,

most

people

dis-

approached about the

“When

it

its

amount of

the

amount of

money, they just

Hunter would not close

large

money.

rightful owner.”

was found

security services.

it

— Page 15

2000

31,

lost the

money

services

to

come

to

and, assuming

he/she can disclose the amount of

money and ber

it

was

the parking lot lost

in,

it

num-

will

be

returned.

Letters to the editor

Spoke welcomes topical letters that include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification. All letters must be signed. They can be brought to room 4B14.

No

e-mail letters will be accepted.

Tues. Feb. 8

MOVIE WIGHT The Sanctuary 8:00pm Students $2 Guests $4

' Katie McCartney, organizer of the kinderskate program, helps three-year-old first session of the program Jan. 18 at the recreation centre.

Hayden

Polski learn to

skate at the

(Photo By Nicole Furlong)

Conestoga hosts kinderskate Rec and

leisure student organizes children’s

By Nicole Furlong Twenty-four and

slid

After graduation, McCartney said

slipped

children

over

all

the

ice

at

Conestoga’s recreation centre on 18 while participating in the

Jan.

Conestoga College offers kinderskate

programs three times a year

as part of

its

community.

undecided

is

want

to

kids

learn

McCartney has taken

the

challenge of organizing the learnto-skate program,

and

children feeling at ease on the ice

program and actually learn to skate,” McCartney said. “We’re just teaching them the basics

is

circulated to stu-

community,

the

who

McCartney,

in

is

also

here.”

the

involved in various aspects

of the rec centre. She has a contract

ice.

to get the

is

continuing education

men’s varsity hockey team’s manis

to get

so they can enter another skating

is

return for credit in her course.

ager,

job

is

on the

to feel comfortable

my

which allows her

to

perform

The program runs

for

order to complete this phase of her field

placement, }vhich

include

time keeping for hockey games.

of the program, as well as scout-

that teaches children to skate at

early

age,

course

^a^ause

^3

partly

to

requirements, she

is

fulfil

but

an

her also

knowledgeable

in

years and currently recreation league.

ing' instructors to help teach the

children and designing the pro-

gram.

McCartney instructors

recruited

who have

and knowledge

in

plays' for a

Includes exclnanoe

Bus departs 3:30pm

four

experience

kinderskate

instruction, as well as four volun-

tin §-

She has played hockey for 10

boon Students j>60

several duties in

handling the administration aspect

McCartney offered to organize which is a program

THURS. FCB 3 I

one hour

such duties as scorekeeping and

kinderskate,

Ottawa Senators Love TOO seats

every Tuesday for six weeks.

McCartney has

I*

rom

Tickets

teers.

The program way for

great

costs

TO BUFFALO

to five years

main objective

“Basically

TRIP

Buffalo Sabres

in

adver-

calendar that

dents

which

NHL BUS

they can take with

program are three

old, the

them

I

helping

she said.

skate,”

to

skill

am

I

for the rest of their lives.”

the

tised in the

work, but

Because the children enrolled

gram

Katie

at this point.

am excited to run this program because not only am I gaining

dent has decided to run the pro-

ment.

in

“I

them

as part of her field place-

hockey or figure

skating lessons.

This

a

without enrolling

actual

youth programming, although she

“That’s a

semester,

skate,

them

contribution to the

recreation and leisure services stu-

to

she would like to begin a career in

experience in the field in which

kinderskate program.

how

Licensed event

program

$80 and

is

a

children to learn

in

on

llooi*

4

sale, January

the JEPr office

1

O


du Maurier

Arts

Supporting 234 cultural organizations across

Canada during the 1999-2000 season

Digital Edition - January 31, 2000  
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