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— No. 48

32nd Year

Directors seek action

What’s Inside

By Anna Two

directors

logies

Unbound

that sells

records and minutes from the meetings was in the

Sajfert

financial

from Technobusiness

Inc., a

computers operated by

former Conestoga College said they

dents,

stu-

going to

are

speak to the executive of the K-

W

section

Electrical

the

made

against

recent

allegations

them

by two Conestoga professors because they want to determine if they

private residence

ated,”

they not

are also former

members of

“The

brought

allegations

against us were never substanti-

Huang said. “Not only do make sense, but they same

the

In

Coons

article,

claims the people involved in

IEEE.

Conestoga College to lock them out of Room 2A116. “This statement is inflammato-

perhaps what hapbetween Technologies Unbound Inc. and IEEE may have been an internal violation of IEEE,” said Huang. “We want to find out from the executive if a violation was made and what to do about it.” feel that

Technologies

Unbound Inc. were

not Conestoga students

time and

it

was

IEEE

the student branch of

ry because

the

at

in the interest of

we had

at

in

the

office

of the

they wanted to find Technologies

Unbound’s financial minutes from the which meetings requested from the

records and

company’s they had employees

but never received.

Clements and Huang, on the other hand, deny either professor ever requested the documents

from the employees. “The first time we learned the professors wanted to sep, our .

'»**»»»<((

College announces campus partnership with Waterloo Compiled by

B.

campus

Grondin

be adjacent to the

will

major recreation building. discussions

Preliminary

between Waterloo and the college

sue a partnership that will see a

have suggested that many partnership opportunities may occur

said

Huang.

Coons and Hofer, despite

find-

ing nothing of concern in the cabinet, decided to lock the

pany’s

com-

employees out of the

room where they were operating the business.

had bought and not stolen certain computer parts from IEEE. He added some IEEE members Technologies not trust did Unbound employees and alleged they may have stolen computer

Conestoga College chapter of IEEE, in Room 2A116 on Doon campus, in June 1999, because

relations.

Conestoga College and the City

receipts to ensure the

located

Mohamet* Hdmodi (top left), director of Helena Webb, senior manager developing

of Waterloo have agreed to pur-

Hofer said he and Coons broke into Technology Unbound’s cabinet, which was In the article

sales manager. Receiving the

am president John Tibbits

ted access until August 1999,”

Spoke.

engi-

an article

right),

behalf of the eottejje

valid student

published in the Dec. 6 issue of

neering technology, in

Cross (bottom

cards at the time, which permit-

Hofer said in the article he and examine had to Technologies Unbound’s old

professor in electronics

V/Utlt

also defy logic.”

IEEE, said although they are not planning to take any legal action at present, it might be necessary in the future, depending on the outcome of their talks with

Clements and Huang were made scapegoats by Robert Coons, professor of mechanical engineering, and Rudy Hofer, a

7

knew

Unbound’s

financial records

Shin Huang, a former mechanical engineering student,

said they

me£

said the professors

Technologies

student at Conestoga College,

“We

weepingiy entertaining.

Huang

records.

pened

The Green Mile

records.

Never,” said Clements.

can take legal action. Brent Clements, a former electronics engineering technology

and

FWGE 5

Hofer

nor

such

were kept at a on Kingsway Drive in Kitchener, which is now the company’s official office. Hofer claims he did in fact tell Clements he wanted to see the

about

competition.

any

and Electronics (IEEE) in January

campus.

who

Coons

“Neither asked for

that

Alternativ e paper hits

Student logo wins transit

said.

of the Institute of

Engineers

FAGE3

Dec. 6 issue of Spoke,” Huang

Coons

company

new Conestoga campus

as a result of developing the

Waterloo. Negotiations between staff from

and the city are development of an agreement of purchase and sale for up to 35 acres of land in

the

college

underway

for the

individuals

who made

allega-

tions against our business such as illegal actions. •

0

P

9

and recreational

facili-

specialized programs such

ties,

as sports therapy and golf course

co-op placements for students

500 acres of land over

reputation as a centre of excel-

consists of

approximately four kilometres.

The

MPR will contain an

18-hole

for

and shared parking.

The

city sees this partnership as

an opportunity to strengthen lence for higher education. also offer a

It

its

will

complementary edu-

golf course, a nature preserve and

cational facility for the high-tech

of the Walter Bean

business community. Waterloo it

will bring a poten-

for

a branch library,

also hopes

Grand River Trail. The site could also include a Mennonite generation sixth

tial

farmstead, the golf course club-

co-op students, shared parking

house, a playground and passive

opportunities,

recreation areas.

opportunities for Waterloo resi-

It

will contain sports fields

a main interested in any

college could have access

to athletic

management, opportunities

comes out about the allegations made against us,” Clements stat-

“We would be

The

cam-

MPR location.

The proposed site for the new campus would be adjacent to the Millennium proposed city’s Recreation Project (MPR), which

a portion

ed.

pus near the

the Eastbridge area of Waterloo.

from them. “Clements and I feel we’ve been set up for something. But what - that we’re not sure about,” said Huang. “We’re concerned that the truth parts

built in

sports

and

and recreation

building with arenas and

gymna-

siums.

The new University Avenue

site

employment opportunities

dents

more city

employment

and economic spin-offs

from housing up tional

for

full-time

part-time

of Waterloo.

to

2,000 addi-

and thousands students in the


Students need equal representation Guelph campus was

Recently, a Conestoga College student from the facilities at the

denied access to the

Centre

at

Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation

Doon campus because he did not have

do not pay the

IlkKKII

students, therefore they cannot use

ittkkfchg

who pay extra fees should have access

amIf

same student fees as Doon campus Doon campus facilities. While

fair that

it is

only students

««!««

a valid student card.

Full-time students at the Guelph and Waterloo campuses

wt'feyM.fac

is not fair that full-time students at other campussame opportunities as those at Doon. They have no form of student representation and the DSA currently has no relation-

IlllWIi

ship with students at other Conestoga campuses.

kMtkfcKS

to certain facilities,

it

es are not given the

Although

it

may seem like a complex undertaking to have all

« Mkittfcfc • fiitfttfcS

ikli

full-time

Conestoga College students represented by one student association,

it

tan

bat ft,

iik

mini

is

possible and this has been achieved by other colleges.

Humber College has

Toronto’s

merged the student organiza-

recently

from each of its campuses. This year a committee was teamed linking North campus and Lakeshore campus. There was a lack of communication between the executive councils of

tions

the campuses, so last year’s executive realized a change

Next year there

will be

was needed.

one council for both campuses. The intention

is

same events and opportunities to all Humber students. Fanshawe’s main campus executive has an agreement with area cam-

to offer the

puses.

executive collects the funds allocated by the coEege and about

The

80

per cent of the fees coEected go to the appropriate campus, while the is managed by the executive at the main London campus and goes towards services offered to all fuU-time Fanshawe stu-

remaining 20 per cent

dents.

campuses have student cards which permit access to events and This financial agreement has been in effect for approximately

All

facilities.

10 years.

Each campus has its own smaEer council. A recent alteration to the student organization permits Simcoe, Woodstock and St. Thomas campuses to have representatives on the

main

Winter gloom has cure Welcome back

council.

to a

People

who

develop

SAD experi-

She added she read a

new

ence the same types of feelings,

said

statistic that

believed that in the next 20

it is

become

semester in a

however, only in the autumn and

years depression will

among the councils. The coEege also wanted to consolidate the main student union. Other campuses will now vote for the student executive at the London

new

winter seasons.

second greatest cause of deaths.

sure

to

campus.

new new

courses,

This change

The DSA

an attempt to increase communication and interaction

is

interested in allowing students

is

campuses access est

from students

Stratford

from Guelph and Waterloo

to student representation because there has

who want access

to the

been

inter-

DSA drug plan or DSA trips.

and Cambridge campuses are not included because no

full-

January

SAD

is

fore,

Nicole

stresses

and a

lot

president John Tibbits announced Conestoga’s applica-

op

SuperBuEd Growth Fund and the new Waterloo campus, it reconfirmed to the DSA that students would need someone to represent

tion to the

inevitable.

is

mounds of snow,

We

will get

and

sleet

As a result, the DSA is currently conducting market research at Guelph how many students are interested in stu-

hail

who

live in northern

more

co-ordinator of student services at

Conestoga CoEege, said there high number of students lege

who

is

live in

take part in their favourite winter

is

erendum. The surveys should be returned by January and a referendum

sports.

There

wiE probably be held

For others, winter is a time to grumble about the horrible weather and count down the days until

dent representation. If there

This It is

is

definitely

all

sented, regardless of

enough

interest, the

DSA wiE hold a ref-

in February.

a step

important that

is

in the right direction.

Conestoga CoEege students are properly repre-

which campus they

attend. Preference should not

be given to one group of students simply because their courses are offered at the

Many

main campus.

full-time

students at the Waterloo

and Guelph campuses

It

does not seem

The DSA’s results

fair that

these students

do not have access to DSA repat Doon.

program of choice was not offered

Guelph campuses

is

a positive

wiE show how many students

ested in student representation and

would Eke

to

away

the sun will melt

and

can

T-shirts

ers

the

be

wearing

among the

campuses are

inter-

affiliation the students

have with the Doon Student Association.

a society

is

increased

counselling and light therapy.

Light therapy includes the patient

under a

sitting

light

box

for

30 min-

per day. According to an

utes

Internet

site,

resulted

in

this

60

improvement

in

treatment has

80 per cent

to

SAD patients.

Researchers believe the light has a

on brain hormones

biological effect

you think you have symptoms

SAD, go

to

your family doctor

uncertainty.”

services at the college, where they

Carol Gregory, counsellor

will

assessment or to student

work

with you to

closely

resolve your problems.

SAD

do not

see most cases of

result in a crisis.

balance school, work and their

she said.

social

students get

life.

seems

to

bogged down

trying to

Winter weather

including a genetic pre-disposition,

appetite,

environmental circumstances and

vacation over the

reactive situations, such as a loss in

relax

the family.

lems! That’s what I’m doing.

concentration

overall feeling of being

and

an

down.

just

make things appear dreari-

sons people develop depression,

sleep,

Most

week we had 16 students who showed signs of depression,” “In one

which has

problems reduced

SAD

include anti-depressant medication,

low energy,

as

is

for an

Gregory said there are several rea-

symptoms such with

“There

directional

not diagnosed as

depression,

said.

From what I can

a kind of depression called

is

she

uncertainty.”

of

five lay-

seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

This disorder

live in a society that is very

up,”

increased isolation and directional

If

and

on top of them.

fall into

the

and function.

Because of the cold weather and

clinical

first step.

at these

how much

students at

at the col-

very sped up.

isolation

snow worn

gloomy atmosphere some people

decision to conduct market research

the Waterloo and

The

stu-

Doon campus.

resentation because their

Years, and get to

again.... without

undoubtedly want the same opportunities open to them as full-time dents at

New

a

are diagnosed or treated

“We

Christmas,

is

a joy-

ous occasion as they celebrate

“We sped

Treatments available for

that

and Waterloo campuses to see

likely to devel-

this disorder.

for clinical depression.

over the next few months.

For some people, winter

their interests.

people

Carol Gregory, counsellor and

Mother Nature has been gener-

it

believed to be a result of

countries are

Furlong

of

snow.

but

is

the shorter days in winter, there-

bring

ous in these past winter months,

time students attend there.

When coEege

year.

er than they really are.

My

solution: find a

sunny spot

March

to

break,

and forget about your prob-

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Nicole Furlong;

News

Editor: Tannis Fenton;

Student Life Editor: Talisha Matheson; Photo Editor: Talisha Matheson Adam Wilson; Advertising Manager: Walerian Czamecki;

Production Manager: Circulation Manager:

Adam Wilson;

Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz

Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-522Q, ,ext. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: -spoke@conestogac.on.'ca

SPOKE’s

address

is

299 Doon Valley

DSA

logo.

amount paid for the must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not tain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by^| out of errors in advertising beyond the space. Unsolicited submissions

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, Jan.

New

voice

emerges

The

Conestoga College has another

An

college newspaper.

ground the

issue of

first

who

be

Albrecht, Izadi and Doerr believe

cam-

in

democracy.

The next

Axis were

to

issue will be available

in January.

be banned, their

10.

Axis was founded by three dents

will

because

pus and they said they hope to

If

newspaper.

its

Doon campus Dec.

Axis, on

it

anyway

distributed

puses.

club distributed

political

mission statement states

three students plan to contin-

ue to distribute their paper on cam-

increase distribution to other

under-

3

Conestoga

at

ByTalisha Matheson

— Page

2000

10,

stu-

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

participated in a student

organized strike protesting college

Goal-

Setting for the Millennium

tuition increases Oct. 15.

Matthew Albrecht,

29, a second-

year computer program student,

analyst

reporter for the paper.

His part-

Conestoga

students

ners

are

I

co-founder and

the

is

statement

mission

Axis’

way

vide a

is

achieve

states to pro-

year, a

me

developed following an October

DSA

“Spoke

worked.

Menage role

not as free as

is

it

said

could

Many

Spoke does not have a

change every semester.

Albrecht said he wanted to

Matt Albrecht, co-founder of Axis, says the mission statement of the new paper is to provide a forum for average people. (Photo

know have the freedom to publish and views on campus,

for Talisha

by the microwaves and

ria

in the

distribute their

her.

dent press, free from censorship,

president of finance and adminis-

but subject to the general law and

tration operations,

the laws of defamation.

cial status

“I suggested they start another

would

be

lot

of students

interested

in

it,”

Menage

either personally or through the stu-

Albrecht said he has no written

said. “They are students from a program who have an

authority

opinion.”

distribute

Menage back

said Albrecht never got

to her as to

what Axis’ plans

came

were, but he

to the

DSA

weeks later with a box of papers and asked where they could be distributed. office several

Menage

said the

DSA

does not

support Axis and will not support

them in the future. She said Axis made negative comments towards the DSA, stat-

tion

it’s

tell

my

wrong kind of thinking. “Changeways” workshop helped me

why my New

didn’t need

Year’s resolutions never

more motivation;

at least

of us tend

from the college which

permits him and his colleagues to

Axis on campus, but they were given limits on where

and how

to distribute the papers

by college administration. “We were told not to put them in Spoke boxes and to be sensible about it by not getting into people’s faces,” he said. Albrecht added that they were allowed to put them in the cafete-

According

to

Kevin Mullan, vice-

Axis has no offion campus as a paper.

“Unless the distribution becomes then

problematic,

he

issue,”

there

is

no

said.

my

needed

I

long-term goals need-

to set goals that

distribution of Axis

On

Dec.

10,

on campus.

Spoke

reporters

found small stacks of Axis newspapers

in

many Spoke

Albrecht said he

about

boxes.

a result,

disappointing grade appears.

Instead, a long-term goal, such as “I

grades to improve this semester”

all

As

all A’s”).

even powerless when

is

want

more

my

attainable.

step-by-step approach might include: attending classes, with only sickness as

an exception;

staying ahead by doing textbook reading prior to class; and seeking help when necessary from faculty or a peer tutor.

The

latter are smaller,

achievable

goals that will almost assuredly lead to higher Set goals for yourself that are realistic, achievable and measurable. Failure saps confidence and

motivation. Success builds confidence and motivation.

it.

on anyone’s toes and

I

don’t

A Message from

Student Services (2B02).

know

they got there,” he said.

rarararararrirararHiirarararHirararrifrirararrif rirararrirarararatTJrailii

The DSA

chose a path of reconcilia-

and timid collaboration

down,

get

be out of

knew nothing

“We obviously don’t want to step how

first

I’ll

frustrated,

may

marks.

He added there is currently no formal

feel let

the

A

student services office.

ing in an Axis article, that the

DSA

I

we Matheson)

what could be done to change that and said Menage told him to start his own paper when he met with

paper because a

century,

possibly match a

a

reach (“This semester,

specific editorial direction because editors

new the new

not just a

ed to be organized into easily manageable steps.

limitations.”

He

it’s

In fact,

smaller goals, or

at

“There are

said Albrecht.

at

to recognize

Conestoga during the meeting. be,”

this is the

president

Spoke’s

discussed

new decade or a new What goal could

experience

Ellen Menage.

Albrecht said he and

heights and challenges that encourages

Past resolution failures from ordinary years

said the idea for the paper

with

that fresh

It’s

change of that magnitude?

age people don’t get a say.”

meeting

new

millenium!

Albrecht said, “Normally aver-

He

January 10th.

us to set goals. Well, this year

important.

is

Year’s resolutions that gen-

feeling of having a chance to solve problems,

for average people to

express what

New

erally didn’t last past

Ernest Izadi and Kevin Doerr.

the purpose of the paper

used to make

is

creating a

in

regards to the Oct. 15 strike.

According

to

Conestoga College’s

student procedures guide, students

Classified

TRAVEL

-

teach

English:

In the Sanctuary

& 18th

Jan, 17th

Sign up in the

Millennium-

DSA office

5 day/40 hr. (Jan 17-21,

Deadline to

2000 )

TESOL teacher certification course (or

team

your

by

register is

Jan. 14th

•>Capsule

correspondence). 1,000s of jobs available

NOW. FREE information package,

Great

Prizes

What do you think should be included? Have any ideas or suggestions?

Games will be played from 0:00am to 1

^oll free

1-888-270-2941.

3:00pm depending on

class schedules

see Kim

in ttie

DSA

office


Conestoga College’s Peer Host program offers a unique opportunity for senior students to meet and become friends with students from other cultures.

Through the Peer Host program, students

interested in

broadening their cultural horizons have the opportunity

DSA

Elections,

welcome and

to:

orient international Visa or landed

immigrant students to Conestoga College act as a college

and community resource

for

students from other cultures

form long-lasting friendships and learn more

ir

Positions Available:

about other cultures

President Vice President of Operations Vice President of Student Affairs Vice President of Education

To

find out

more about

to be a Peer Host, drop

this exciting

program and

by Student Services

in

to

apply

Room 2B02

or call 748-5220 ext. 360 or 236.

Nominations:

Open from Mon. Jan.

1

Wed. Jan.

26,

7,

2000 until 2000 at 2 noon 1

*Nomination packages available at the DSA office - packages outline candidate's requirements

and

and procedures. be accepted after

policies

*No candidates will Wed. Jan. 26, 2000 at 2 noon. 1

NHL BUS

TRIP

TO BUFFALO

Buffalo Sabres VS. TUTORS DESERVE THANK-YOU!

Ottawa Senators Level

OO seats

THU AS. FC B 3 1

^njuden||6j

;

exchange

rat©

Bus departs 3:30pm Doom* 4

i*4»iii Tickets on sal^ I*

in

the

January Office

Students this semester With areas of difficulty in their studies in

Health Sciences, Community Services, Technology, Business and Applied Arts

On

,

includes

Peer Tutors helped many

1

0

behalf of those you helped A sincere thank-you.

-

B^iSSlces Reminder: Peer Services is hiring tutors for Business and Technology programs: If interested in a position apply now at Student Services ( (room 2B02

APPLY EARLY FOR NEXT SEMESTER!


SPOKE, Jan.

AutoCAD exam delayed

10,

2000

— Page

A

Full-Time, One-Year Post-Graduate Program Starting January, 2000

Expired software causes two-hour postponement By Anna

Sajfert

The software is

Second-year

students

AutoCAD program

faced a two-

hour delay during a Dec. 20

exam

the

in

and

expiry date, he said.

which prevented

be

lapsed and monitors went blank.

work

a

Network Support 4.0 had expired

“A

our

in

of students didn’t seem to

lot

said. “If

like this,

we may

not buy

Mitchell

said

sion,”

Wawzonek, professor of

continues to

it

mechanical

it.”

technology.

engineering

He added

part of the

the

exam con-

problem

ware department could

ware, which contributed to the

sisted of theory questions,

servers going down.

not computer applications.

decide

evaluation

if the

finish the

of

it

to

Wayne

product should be pur-

just in the expired soft-

first

“We

Hewitt, also a technical

all

know computers

we

chased, said Kevin MacIntyre, a

support specialist, said computer

are

support specialist with

services wants to evaluate a differ-

have to learn to deal with

technical

ent version of

Conestoga’s computer services.

Network Support.

Conestoga student designs By

Phil

available

exam on

Dec. 18 before Conestoga’s soft-

three-week

is

they were able to get an exten-

decision,”

MacIntyre said he’s assuming the is

ext.

tffctacial assist

time.

failure will definitely

factor

MacIntyre

informatj

get upset about the delay because

“The server

to

exam between 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. when the servers col-

finishing the

more

writing

the computers,

formance.

write the

who were

couldn’t log on to

them from

to evaluate

doesn’t have an

exam

been finalized yet because the

more time

it

students

their final

the software’s ease of use and per-

one of four was occupied by

24 students who were scheduled

The

their opera-

MacIntyre said the purchase hascollege needs

labs,

labs, permits users

and display

network servers.

2A302,

519-7 48-5220,

and open-access

n’t

Lab

Call for

Support 4.2 would be safer to assess because

software application corrupted the

AutoCAD

Unlike the version 4.0, Network

labs,

tions to other users’ computers.

course after an expired

drafting

which

AutoCAD

2A201, 2A202, 2A203 and 2A302 to transmit

final

in the engineering design

application,

used in the

it,”

not perfect and

Wawzonek.

said

transit logo

Wright

design

graphics

program.

A

graphics

third-year

design

has

student

designed the winning logo for Grand River Transit, the

the Jan.

1

new

regional service resulting

from

merging of Kitchener and Cambridge

GRT grand

transit services.

Conestoga’s manager of public John affairs Sawicki said con-

HI'Vi.

tests

Foremost

Conestoga students in the new year, but starting in September 2000 it will also be evident to students

who

take the bus from

Cambridge

to

Doon cam-

such as these

benefit everyone.

John Martz’s logo will not only be evident to

the

benefit dents by allowing

them

to

showcase

they stu-

their talents,

said Sawicki.

pus.

Calling his logo “bold and simple,” Martz’s

Secondly, such arrangements underscore the

design incorporates a wave symbolizing water as

quality in the program, and thirdly, they increase

well as forward-leaning letters depicting motion.

the profile of the college in a positive manner.

The logo

is

buses on Jan.

expected to appear on

all

regional

1.

The winning

design, for

which Martz and the was among 30

college split a $1,000 honorarium,

submissions by Martz’s graphics design class.

“We were

graded on

it

as part of our professional

practice mark,” said the soft-spoken 21-year-old.

In professional practice, said Martz, students are responsible for developing and nurturing a

designer.

“I’m “It’s

He

sort of in

between the two,” he

replied.

hard to pick between them.” has designed his

own Web

site

(www.sen-

tex.net/~jmartz/hogwash/) that’s rife with humor-

ous one-panel cartoons entitled Hogwash.

The cartoon innocently pokes fun at pop culture Pooh to Marilyn Manson

icons from Winnie the

client base.

Proceeds from

As far as his career ambitions go, Martz is tom between becoming either a cartoonist or a

clients,

according to Martz, pro-

vide much-needed funds that go towards pur-

chasing supplies and paying for expenses for the

without being crude or vulgar.

Among

his influences,

Martz

ator Charles Schultz as being

622-7774 cites

Peanuts cre-

somewhat of an

893-2464

BURLINGTON

idol.

GUELPH

Indoor Golf Lessons and Clinics Let Conestoga College help

Under the instruction

you

attain

your golfing

of P.G.A. golf pro,

needs!!!!

Tony Martin, you or

your group (maximum 5) will be taught the necessary instructions and techniques to better your golf game. Classes will consist of a series of 5 lessons, each 45 minutes in duration. Tony Martin has been a professional golf pro for over 16 years. He is currently an instructor at the Westmount Golf and Country Club which is ranked in Canada's top 15 courses. Prices are as follows: Individual or private instruction Sessions of 5 $140.00 Group of 5 persons $105/person Sessions of 5 Children under 12 - Saturday Mornings Sessions of 5 $60.00

Students Mon.

-

Pri.

Morning Instruction

Sessions of 5 Three hour golf classes

How

$90.00 $45.00

Understand the Full Swing - Components of the Swing -Practice Procedures -

to

884-7376 •

LONDON

5


T

l

m

Correction

t

In the Dec. 20 issue of Spoke in the DSA briefs on page 4 we printed the incorrect price for colour photocopies. It should have read $1.10 per copy.

Spoke apologizes

Fri,

Jan. 28

Letters to the Editor Spoke welcomes

Transportation & lift ticket

for the error.

topical letters to the Editor. If

please bring your signed

submit a

letter,

office in

room 4B14.

Letters received

Letters

by e-mail

may be

will not

letter in

you would

like to

person to the Spoke

edited for style and clarity.

be printed.

Doon Students $25

Guest $30

no exceptions Kitch ener Transit

Bus

Pass Sale at

Conestoga College

Jan 10

&

11

10:00am to 2:00pm at Door 3

Kick off the

new year by reading 4

4

*

«

-

*

»

*

«


SPOKE, Jan

New movie

supreme

not

The Green Mile .

Scenery and costumes make up

for

ByTannis Fenton

staggering plot

King is a film about the strength and persever-

human

school teacher

who

travels

is

Phenomenal, extraordinary, moving and long, are four words that describe the new box office tear-jerker The Green Mile.

nothing to

makes her hard-headed come to life effectively.

She

widowed

a

ByTalisha Matheson

genuine and sincere, but her

fake English accent

Anna Leonowens, played by is

her producing

makes her charac-

be admired.

19th century Siamese culture.

Jodie Foster (Nell),

.

a real tear-jerker |

ter

set in

spirit

who began

career in 1992,

the

ance of the

d

a

production justice. Foster,

Anna and

— Page 7

2000

10,

character

Yun-Fat,

to

who

usually

stars

in

It

not only a story about a

is

The world of Coffey, who has been convicted of raping and killing two girls, possesses a j

magical

mysterious

gift that is

and miraculous.

He is a man who, by his

appear-

ance, could crush anyone, but he

|

Bangkok in 1862 to teach the son of Siamese King Mongkut,

Chow

played by

who

English and becomes somewhat

action films, does an exceptional

of a mother figure to the royal

job portraying a royal leader and a

murder and a white prison guard

family.

compassionate

who

black giant

convicted of

is

spoken and afraid of the

is soft

j

Yun-Fat (The

father.

dark.

His gentle, naive nature and

befriends him.

|

Many

Killer).

Leonowens, who brings her son played by

Louis, faces

many

Tom

challenges

Felton,

when she

Siam because she is more independent and strong willed than most Siamese men can arrives

to love each other.

outspoken

has stood before a king as

she does.

meeting

when

the

woman

intelligent the is.

other people

come

ly until the king’s favourite

miracles,

life,

a story about

love and friend-

unusual powers starkly contrast with his appearance and raises

j

and Leonowens,

who

subtly

grow

mind

questions in Edgecomb’s

ship. |

Director

The

!

Andy Tennant (Ever

of

version

big-screen

Steven King’s 1996 novel

1935

daugh-

Anna and

at

the

Cold

set in

Mountain

Penitentiary in Louisiana

hours long, but worth

the

ter dies

from a

After) uses the beauty and eccen-

For the most part to

and a rift erupts between King Mongkut and Leonowens.

with the king, Leonowens earns the respect and admiration

how

same conclusion, Leonowens goes from being called sir to ma’am. Everything moves along smooth-

her “sir” as no

after a brave first

freely.

Mongkut

is

aboht Coffey's

Edgecomb

guilt.

bewildered

later

is

j

As

Everyone

But

woman

speak her mind so

The Green Mile

helps to create believable

chemistry between King

king realizes

handle.

woman

He

between Leonowens and the king, who is not used to having a Their relationship builds

in

calls

conflicts arise, however,

is

three

by a remarkable power ally forces

it.

that

Coffey demonstrates and eventu-

him

to

make

a choice

I

the King

It is

I

tends to stagger along like a drunk and unravel like a lazy ball of yarn

told in a flashback narrated

by Paul Edgecomb, played by

i

Tom Hanks, to his friend. He is living in an old-age home

I

six

I

decades after working as the

head guard on death row

at the

that affects Coffey’s destiny and his

own.

God has given Coffey the

abili-

ty to feel the soul of another per-

son, the ability to destroy every-

him

thing around

make them

or

j

man many

The

fear.

Leonowens

King which

meets

is

rift

when the king new concubine,

betrayed by his

Mongkut’s royal family, consists of 26 wives, 24 concubines and 62 children. Leonowens is then asked to

Tuptim, played by Bai Ling (Red

of the royal children in

Leonowens and King Mongkut

teach

all

addition to the son she

was

prison.

heightens

tricity

of 19th century Siam to the

|

movie’s advantage.

better.

Edgecomb, the head guard of E Block - death row, develops an

^

His decisions change the lives of

everyone on The Green Mile,

|

The stunning scenery comple-

Comer).

When trusted

one of the palace’s most

men

are brought

origi-

nally asked to teach.

their

With the help of the king’s head wife, Leonowens teaches the children how to speak, read and write

betrays

the

back together

king,

to face

demons.

The movie, which was filmed Malaysia,

concludes

with

in

an

explosive ending that does the

ments the

|

seven-foot,

plot.

For the most

unusual relationship with the

330-pound

new

black

the As Edgecomb

part,

Anna and

inmate, John Coffey, played by

the

King tends to stagger along like a drunk and unravel like a lazy ball of yam. But the scenery and the conclusion make up for the film’s short-

Michael Clarke Duncan.

The Green Mile ;

is

prison,

W:

the green

linoleum on the corridor of the

which leads convicts from

.

a

:

.

/.:

V.r..:.:

.

:

their cells to the electric chair.

e&eci

i

T

V

:ca

and.

comings.

[J

Quality Policy &

oa

se-

ts

Conestoga College ym

I

some-

Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

:

a

in

the

.

/a.;,:

i

e

-

|

O GO

that

miracles happen

times

Conestoga

o>

unfolds,

story

learns

|

and communities

,

ffsx

::

:

die


Page 8

— SPOKE, Jan.

10,

2000

Indoor soccer popular By Adam Wilson

assistant with the recreation cen-

said the indoor soccer league

tre,

Although the outdoor soccer season has been over for several is

shaping

E.

Hunter

months, indoor soccer

up

at

Kenneth

the

This year’s indoor soccer season first

week of November

including

and,

“We

and

regionals

provincials, runs through

March

women’s teams

four

recreation league,

where any team however the

in the

Condor team is considered a varsity team which will play in three varsity

tournaments

during the season.

Playing the

invitational

other teams

league

team

recreation

their

in

an opportunity for the

is

to play

each week

at

home.

Conestoga hosts four different divisions

men’s

of indoor soccer. The

first

division,

teams, plays

women’s

which has 10

Monday

division,

nights.

The

consisting of

«ine teams, plays Tuesdays.

The

men’s premier division, which also

has

Thursdays.

nine

And

teams,

plays

the second men’s

on the court

Each of

the teams

where the

teams compete. Marlene Ford, athletic program

elite

register

offi-

games,

Each team pays $850

to enter the

soccer league, but the college teams

pay a reduced

price.

There

is

no

is

just an opportunity for

teams

varsity

to

The teams must

register early to

get a spot in the league because the slots

fill

“We had

up quickly, said Ford. all

10 teams for the

by “But once

division

first

September,” she said. the season begins,

play each

week,” said Ford.

Not only

is

Conestoga hosting an

hosting this year’s provincial tour-

nament.

you can’t

regis-

your team.”

teams play

From

the regionals, the top

two

teams from each region go

to the

provincials. There are six

men’s

cial finals.

The Condors’ place

at

regionals will take

March

3-4

and

the

March

17-18.

Starting the indoor soccer league

has been a great opportunity, said Ford. “I

thought

it

would be a great

opportunity for our teams to get a play at

to

week,” she

home once

a

said.

It is

also a chance to get the col-

lege’s

name out to people who want

to play indoor soccer, said Ford.

“This

how

is

like to

nominate a distinguished teacher?

For information or nomination forms, contact one of the following committee members:

Centennial College in

provincials at Conestoga will take

place

Would you

in the provin-

an outdoor squad

Throughout the season, the teams play anywhere from 14-18 games, depending on how many

AUBREY HAGAR AWARD

one for each

play indoor together each

that plays indoors for the winter.

for the

in three invita-

of the three indoor soccer regions.

chance

Ford said the indoor soccer teams

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Before provincials, each of the varsity

Toronto

individual cost to join a team.

ter

the

and women’s teams

said Ford.

year, or they’re

the highest level of play

for each

cials will officiate at the

either

is

at

Southwest Regional Soccer

ing Fridays. division

must

playoffs and

indoor soccer league, they’re also

Association so that registered

men’s

own

its

tional tournaments,

division has eight teams compet-

The men’s premier

36

competition, with five players and

game.

to play,

there’s

seven registered players for

run similar to a

can sign up

now

Ford said the teams must have least

is

Indoor soccer

years

five

teams playing each week.”

a goalkeeper

18.

men’s and

started with four

Each

in their division.

championships. “This

last five years.

ago,” she said, “but

Recreation Centre.

began the

has grown tremendously in the

teams are

division has

a great chance to

show

well the college can run an

indoor league,” she said.

Sue Garlick (Cambridge 623-4890) Lana Lee Hardacre (Doon, ECE ext. 369) Susan Hartley (Doon ext. 338) Maureen Nummelin (Doon ext. 300) Mark Salmikivi (Doon ext. 353) Peter Sheldon (Doon ext. 212) Ted Spicer (Doon ext. 282) Edie Torbay (Doon ext. 381) Bev Walker (Guelph, 824-9390 ext. 142)

Nominations Nominations

OPEN on January 14, 2000 CLOSE on March 10, 2000


Digital Edition - January 10, 2000