Page 1

PC run-around

Getting student By Anna

finally

has monitor off

Sajfert

campus because of

When

grades.

Penny Poulin

be a

will

little

would only say

education student

$2,000

spent

College

Conestoga in

September 1998 when she purfirst computer, an Acer

chased her

Pentium n, firom Technologies Unboimd Inc., a student-run computer sales business, which operated

At the time the 24-year-old single mother was guaranteed top quality

15-inch monitor broke down.

a computer firom them.

When

she was unable to reach

Unbound

Technologies

via

Inc.

phone, Poulin decided to walk to

balling

my eyes know

out,” she said. “I just didn’t

whom to turn to anymore.”

and some Zehr’s

gift certificates to

money

help her save

for a second-

hand monitor, which she eventually was able to buy for $100. “I was really ticked off,” Poulin said. “No one was able to tell me what was going on.” Mike McClements, dean of tech-

been located in Doon campus, to report the defect

a person bu)dng a computer firom this organization would be in the

is that

position as a person purchas-

in person.

same

She then learned the business was no longer operating on cam-

ing a computer on King Street. “That’s the risk

you take,” he

In January 1994,

Poulin was told by

Pat Collins,

members

Conestoga student branch Institute

student branch of the Institute of

Electronics Engineers,

Electronics

and

Engineers (IEEE), whose office still

Room

in

Technologies

moved

2A116,

Unbound

Inc.

is

also told Paulin there

no contact number

had

for the branch

was

the the

and

commonly

“I-Triple-E,” to

to raise funds

by selling computer system upgrades to Conestoga

tion

and development of electro and

Unbound Inc. is an inside joke among the electronics engineering

who were

running the

business were ordered to

move

originally built

to the

student at Conestoga College and

and sold computers

current director of Technologies

Conestoga College commu-

nity out of the

adviser,

These students

Inc.

IEEE

office to

make

Unbound Inc. “Never did he

call to

inform us

money to complete Spectre II. They were subsequently locked out of the room where they had

about a customer complaint,” he

been operating the business by

having the students’ numbers.

The

students could not find an

alternative location

pus

and

on Doon cam-

moved

originally

to

Fairview Mall in Kitchener before

moving

to

Unbound

suddenly,

the

remembered

to

said

Inc.,

down so members never

notify

Hofer, on the other hand, denies

TTX

was

monitor

picked up by Brent Clemens, director of Technologies

Unbound

on Nov. 27 and taken to the manufacturer for repair. Clemens

Inc.,

said Poulin will get her monitor

Kingsway Drive.

Technologies

said.

Poulin’s

two of the college’s professors.

because the business shut

The same Conestoga members

students

Unbound

College and current director of

were involved in the Spectre I solar car project, which was supposed to

technology students because the

electronics engineering technology

gies

association that promotes educa-

Technologies

said

Collins

separate business entity. Technolo-

n, a solar car which was to be

engineering student at Conestoga

information technologies.

joke.”

entered in Sunrayce 99, formed a

had the students’ numbers and while he contacted them, he never mentioned an angry customer, said Brent Clemens, former

IEEE memwho were working on Spectre

In June 1997, eight bers,

international non-prof-

IEEE is an it

Penny Poulin, a second-year early childhood education student, said she was upset and distraught because she couldn’t locate (Photo by Anna Sajfert) the company that sold her a computer.

Shin Huang, a former mechanical

students and faculty.

for her to call.

“Those guys were a

the

Room 2A116

use

“Good luck finding them,” Collins told Spoke.

as

to

ofi

were permitted by the college

that

out a long time ago.

Collins

refierred

ofi

said. ofi

Electrical

chair of the Conestoga College

Electrical

cus-

their

back within the next four weeks at no charge.

to six

“They apologized for the hassle and everything, but that won’t make up for the extra dollars 1 had spend (on a monitor) to have a computer again,” said Poulin.

to

Technologies Unbound Inc.

tomers of the address change.

now

located at 2969

Kingsway

is

Dr.,

enter a solar car in Sunrayce 97, a

However, Rudy Hofer, professor

long-distance, nine-day race held

of electronics engineering technol-

Suite 1501, in Kitchener and can be

every two

ogy and the current IEEE

reached by calling 893-6010.

years in the U.S.

faculty

Profs have company’s cabinets forced

open

which they

and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

company’s employees out of the room where they were operating

believed contained financial records

sors asked college security in June

the business.

1999 to break into a cabinet Technologies to belonging

Hofer said they wanted to look at the company’s documentation,

were suspicious of Technologies Unbound Inc. and alleged they had stolen computer parts from them, he and Coons had to exam-

mechanical engineering, and Rudy

By Anna

Sajfert

Two Conestoga

Eve

“I ran into the counsellor’s office

nology, said the bottom line

pus.

Year's

see a counsellor at student services.

the company’s office,

which had Room 2A116 on

Ne\*v"

faculty

members, but no one returned her calls, she said. Poulin then went to

Poulin was temporarily given a

The company’s ty on labour was an eye-opener, said Poulin, and enticed her to buy

4 a.m

technology

Conestoga’s

used monitor by student services

a year

lifetime warran-

‘tif

at school.

Poulin immediately started calling

later Poulin’s

TTX

Boozin’

performance

products, as well as customer satisfaction, but

Commentary

business did interfere with then-

on Doon campus,

on Doon campus.

poor

their

Technologies Unbound Inc. that running the

at

at

firm

academic standing, two students

computer. early childhood

down

asked about their

warier the next time she buys a

The second-year

fixed after hunting

Unbound

Inc.,

College profes-

a student-run com-

puter sales business which operat-

ed on

Doon campus.

Despite finding nothing of con-

cern,

they decided to lock the

Robert

Coons,

professor

of

Hofer, professor in electronics engi-

neering technology, were assisted

by the

when

college’s

security

guards

they broke a $200 security

lock on a cabinet,

for Technologies

including

Unbound

financial

Inc.

records

and

minutes from the executive meetings of Technologies

Unbound

Hofer said because some

Inc.

mem-

bers of the Institute of Electrical

ine Technologies receipts

Unbound’s old

to ensure the

company

had bought and not stolen certain computer parts from IEEE. See Students - page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE, Dec.

6,

1999

News

Students kicked out of IEEE office continued from page

“We

1...

education and development of and information technolo-

didn’t find anything signifi-

cant ” he said.

Hofer added

that

he and Coons

He

Unbound

said the guards

to break

I

solar car project,

time.

and finding nothing, Coons and Hofer decided to lock Technologies

Unbound

2A1 16 because they pany

of

Institute

nounced

Inc. out of

felt

com-

the

badly

reflected

Electronics

on

the

IEEE memwho were now working on

In June 1997, eight bers,

Spectre

II, a solar car which was be entered in Sunrayce 99, formed a separate business entity.

responsible for

the valuables in the room.

upset by the lockout, he said.

and

money Spectre

I-Triple-E).

lege to use

“In

to

my

opinion,

break

Coons and Hofer

didn’t

have the

right

Room 2A116

to raise

computer system upgrades to Conestoga students and faculty. an international non-

is

for

office to

into the cabinet.”

completion

the

of

to enter either race

due to

insuffi-

cient funds.

of the Institute of the Electrical at

Sales Representative

Volunteers Needed

are presently seeking

a highly motivated

Friendly volunteers are

needed

wants to make cash and be part of the largest

said. “Call

me

didn’t have the right to break into

neering, safety, testing, logistics

at the time,”

the cabinet,” said Prentice.

The room was

he

bureaucratic, but

it

who

and there was no corporate link between them and Inc.

members of IEEE. The relationship between TF.FF, and Technologies Unbound Inc. was unclear, he said. “I don’t know what happened there,” McClements said. Evan Prentice, a second-year

official office, but then one day Martin Hare, professor of mechan-

ical

engineering

College,

came

in

Conestoga

at

and told the

dents of Technologies

from

stu-

Unbound

were no longer the

room,

to

said

Prentice.

the

automated manufacturing student at Conestoga College and sales manager for Technologies Unbound

the solar car’s

Shin Huang, a former mechaniengineering student at

cal

Conestoga College and current director of Technologies Inc.,

Unbound

said the students contacted

the faculty and complained about

the lockout, but no one

was able to

help them.

The

and helping the team enter the he said. “I never supervised

race,”

the profits.”

All donations for Spectre

which

like Spectre I never

were placed into the Hare said. Wai-Cheung Tang, chair of the

to the race,

college’s account.

Kitchener-Waterloo section of IEEE, said the Conestoga College branch never mentioned a conflict between them and Technologies

Unbound Inc. “IEEE of Conestoga College was our member, not Technologies Unbound Inc.,” he said. “Therefore, they didn’t have to report to us about such activities

students were not successful

in finding an alternative

work loca-

because

it’s

not their responsibili-

ty.”

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Technologies were not Conestoga

in Inc.

I

things such as design and engi-

“In

operate

Hofer added the lockout was in

Technologies

my opinion, Coons and Hofer

people

Inc. that they

and Electronics Engineers Conestoga College.

your campus. outgoing person

involved

the

Unbound

1999.

with Inc.

“As an adviser,

when

“Especially

business ventures of Technologies

have an

the interest of the student branch

individual to represent

linked

IEEE and he wanted

to

adviser for the solar car team, said as a faculty adviser, he wasn’t

Unbound

Hofer said he asked to see the records because he was going to be the next faculty adviser for

association that promotes

Classified

Prentice,

manager for Technologies Unbound Inc.

seemed reasonable.” Mike McClements, dean of technology, said Conestoga College was legally not responsible for the

orderly transition in September

there to finally settle into

Martin Hare, the current faculty

Evan

Unbound

II.

left

in Kitchener.

the

make

soon

an apartment on Kingsway Drive

built

Neither car was finished in time

funds for the branch by selling

IEEE

IEEE

campus bookstore and physical resources.

After the lockout. Technologies

Conestoga College community out of the

approached the Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Doon

Inc. set up a booth at Fairview Mall in Kitchener but

sales

These students originally and sold computers to

on Doon campus, he said. Huang added the members

tion

Unbound

Technologies Unbound Inc.

(pro-

Electrical

Engineers

In January 1994, members of Conestoga’s student branch of IEEE were permitted by the col-

An

felt

was forced

business

2A116 because the IEEE members didn’t like the business. “Some IEEE members thought it was evil business,” he said. Prentice was discouraged and out of

to

Despite breaking into the cabinet

We

because they

Inc., said the

grow.”

United States.

in the

who

in possession of the cabinet

keys were out of the country at the

profit

Spectre

it

nine-day race held every two years

the lock because the students

were

Coons said that he and Hofer gave permission to the security guards to break into the cabinet

which was supposed to enter Sunrayce 97, a long-distance,

Inc.

had

gies.

the

them from the student employees of Technology

wanted to see IEEE succeed as

a club and see

The same members worked on

asked to see the documents around February 1999 but never received

“I

electro

Win a DSA Christmas Basket

the


SPOKE, Dec.

6,

1999

— Page 3

move

College makes big, bold <»

By

Phil

campus speciahzing

Wright

The proposed nursing program,

in different

Conestoga

disciplines.

made,” Conestoga College president John Tibbits has announced

announcement at a president’s forum where he spoke to college employees at Doon campus on Nov. 25.

the details of the college’s $39-

Tibbits also used the occasion

Proclaiming

it

the “biggest and

move the

boldest

college has ever

million capital plans contained in its

application to the SuperBuild

made

Tibbits

to

the

$800,000 from donation an

announce

software

Corel Systems.

Growth Fund. of

construction

is

a

35-acre

on University

site

Avenue in Waterloo. The extent of the programming offered at the proposed campus is contingent on the amount of funding approved, but preliminary plans have the

new

hosting a

said he

Ideally, Tibbits

form of cor-

specializing

college’s

the

in

its

such

as

IBM,

the evolution of Conestoga, said

He

plans are justified since Waterloo

capital funding for the expansion

as part of the application.

of information technology at

second fastest growing is region in Ontario and its economic

co mmuni cations

would

be

Doon

offered at the college’s

campus

the

details

is

current Waterloo

its

campus on King

growth

Similar to the proposed nursing

as McMaster

is

government’s

a

Tibbits said,

will

be a prerequisite

for

running a facility dedicated to multi-media communications and

registration in nursing in

the near future.

John

submit pro-

the expansion of the infrastruc-

ing programming, but also contin-

have not been

ture of Ontario’s colleges and

registration in the college system as a whole grew less than .1 per cent.

Conestoga’s

universities.

Tibbits envisions the college’s capital projects costing nearly $53

created for the college with each

million with a

number of partner-

increase

in

the

program would

uing education and international projects.

rose nearly 10 per cent in the past

Forming a partnership with such an “entrepreneurial and innova-

year, said Tibbits.

tive” institution as

number of first-year

students also

part

zations such as Corel and

offer not only undergraduate nurs-

Jeffrey said the

would depend in

Tibbits,

per cent in the past year whereas

Tibbits said he would like to see “centres of excellence’’

television,

upon

corporate partnerships with organi-

for

Ideally,

of

Tibbits said course dehvery and strategy

college.

quality

convergence

radio and the Internet.

Conestoga has proven a

as

on

Ideally, Tibbits sees the college in

perspective,

Conestoga’s registration grew 4.9

commu-

relies

partnership with the Metis Nation,

college president

college

programming

under SuperBuild.

given the fact a degree

by the provincial government

entirely finalized, said Tibbits.

nications

the funding allocated the college

essential for Conestoga,

is strong.

From provincial

on the government

program, the extent of the

the

Street.

The

on the

capital funding provid-

Ontario, said Jeffrey.

and innovative”

itself

relatively little time to

some

neurial

an “entrepre-

SuperBuild Growth Fund represents a $660-million investment

in Kitchener, but details

of the location are preliminary. Because applicants were given posals,

college

are contingent not only

the

said the college’s ambitious

also requesting

The

program

accreditation the

amount of

Tibbits.

gency services programming. Expanded communications programming is also being proposed said Tibbits,

sci-

The

will provide, as well as the faculty,

tional requirements for nursing in

with such

institution

Technology Centre.

of computer equipment, are key in

program and police and emer-

Preferably,

Jeffrey,

ences/community services.

recently donated $300,000 worth

different disciplines.

Bill

Waterloo Information

milhon, and Hewlett-Packard who

in

said

Forming a partnership

whose donations may exceed $3

campus

principle

near future, said Tibbits.

$14

Corporations

the college with each

in

be a prerequisite

for registration in nursing in the

deciding definitively on the educa-

of excellence” created for

College, has not been

finalized but there is an agreement

fact a degree will

ed, but also

million difference.

recent growth, said Tibbits, partic-

see “centres

like to

McMaster University and

essential for Conestoga, given the

porate participation, providing the

ularly at

would

participa-

Conestoga’s dean of health ships, mostly in the

instrumental

new campus

four-year nursing

[j

Such partnerships have been

a

25,000-square-metre campus on

tion of

Mohawk

College

Foremost in Conestoga’s application

which would include the

McMaster

is

The proposed

police,

IBM. fire

and

emergency services programming would be the result of a partnership between Conestoga and the Region of Waterloo.

Although po^st-secondary instituhad only one month to put together proposals by the Nov. 15 deadline, project approvals won’t be announced until a few months

tions

after Christmas, said Tibbits.

Cutbacks not causing concern at Doon campus she said. “If tliey (cutbacks) result in higher tuition or student debt there will be

By Nicole Furlong

witti,”

cause lor concern”

provincial govemnicni recently annou-

The

nced cutbacks

John Tibbits. Conestoga's president, shares

to post-secondaty education.

Management Board

Menage’s viewpoint.

Clms Hodgson

chairmiui

Tibbits believes cuts to Conestoga will equal

annoonced, on behalf of the government, $30 million will be cut from post-secondary educa-

inaknu

iiu hidin'

iion

moie

loans

obtain

students

who

school,

for

refu-sing to loan

their

.

money

to

.

,

dlSappOintGd

hi.stories to

cuts)

/

(in

3 ^fOWth

ITlOd© fight

The

difficult for

it

John

come

at

aid

them

a time when enrolment has

revamp them, and

as

21 per cent decrease in college funding. The effect the cutbacks will have on Conestoga College students is unknown due to

lucks out.

the lack of specific information that has been

lot

Menage, president of the Doon

Student Association, said she

however

it

is

“We do

that is

such a great job

sector money,” she said.

where Conestoga

^Beat Goes On

in getting private

“We

haven’t seen a

of increase in tuition or student debt.”

Tibbits added he too hopes Conestoga will

disclosed by the government.

as of yet,

disappointed

“We’re

mode right now.” Menage added she believes these cuts are being made to streamline institutions as well

increased nine per cent while there has been a

Ellen

:

because we’re in a growth

in attaining a higher education.

cuts

said.

disappointment at the cuts.

college president

(OSAP) recipients to collect money in order to

not the be-all and

Tibbits,

more

Ontario Student

he

However, he expresi^d; his

Assistance Program

The

is,

end-all,”

universities ^ind colleges.

is

,y:w7'y''^

“Fortv thousand dollars to

^.$50,000

the default rate threshold for

make

the government

$30 million.

income and by lowering^

cuts will

$50,000.

made by

becaUSG weYe

.

underestimate^in

-

While that number may seem large, Tibbits points out the total amount of cuts being

ir

srudenls

lor

diffiuill

with bad credit

ajj^roximately $40, (KK)

is

not concerned

something to keep an

reye on. ‘Cuts to education are always difficult to deal

be prepared to deal with problems in the system and this situation will turn into a positive. “Hopefully this will mean more funds for schools like Conestoga, who are growing, in the future " he said.

(Ao-^frnmMjimdds)

(Canadian Tire Plazo)

IBelvffiCT

Hor^s 8. Burger


j

Page 4

— SPOKE, Dec.

6,

Comnientai^

1999

myn^

noGuS nian

'kr ICXI

I'.

Taber, Alta.,

many

.schools

have put

in place

emergency response

plan^

Schools have always had emergency proceduies to deal with boir' tK)V

ey have wdrked out

fih^Sxto '

At ^ifh

mci^dh^uton,' ^-^nts aitd teachers tnostixp\v'^^'

TP:c^|a^at ^tigia^t^ideia#^ tlfese

who do.^pt belong at flte schwl

The idea oTosing| profiling ^stewi to identify a student who could become violenUtas been propr^ed by tl^e Caniaian Safe School

John Hmne, superintendent of instruction at the WaWlc^llegion

TM^ct schooTboanh s^d. tte Ik^d has met widi Wa^^stgibaal and ^hulance sfiavic^ to come up

police, fire

procedures to

vrith

-hMtsway.

^

The safety ot .students is the priority, lu «.ccp siuucms siue, a iockdnwn keeps student.s away from an intruder until trained personnel decide their «u«a

is

sec^ from <|mgef ^nid'can evacuate them saf^. Wa„

mi'itiHo ^«<r>'nn-

jjjj

3 classToomthat

*ten to tbfe

,

bc

near^t safe ate^

aadmtoving people away from\v^ows and do^ks or breaking glass

aadfiyh^^gs.

V\

^

\

^

\

t^-Aset hf "guidelines th^

wnce me ponce

arrive,

mey would he

the quarterback ol decision

making.” he said

Expect more havoc for the millennium

The schools drills are

also do emergency response dnUs, added Hume. ITie preplanned so evcry'one knows what to do and to prevent

The emergency procedures

to deal with in«roders.vwere -put into

effect at St. Mar>'’-s high school in Kitchener in October,

school was locked called in after

down and a pdiice emergency

a student was seen whb a gun.

be a iraintball gun. Conestoga College

when

gun tamed Out hi '

,

is

also prepmng

deal with iatraders.

ji

an^mergency response plan to

-

?

,

is

to devise a |dan to ,

<

,

,

Ai^sent,

Conestoga’s emergency response plan does not deal 'Specifically with an intruder. According to Hunter the plan that exists 'ItoW'has tp'bekdflued;

^

^

/Ther^at^^C ^oMemsl Tl^Poon and they

all

c^aipus has uiauy buildings. require the same security coverage. The main building

has surveillance cameras but the others don't and the P.A. system can

..

u broadcasting

would reach

all

It s good to know that tfee Is k^e planning, but ad^morgency^ response plan to deal with an intruder should already be in place. It is important that everyone know what to do in the event of an

emergency involving an intruder. All faculty and administration as well as students would have to be trained in the emergency procedures.

By Adam Wilson

Local school boards already have emergency response plans that deal with intruders.

Conestoga should move quickly to devise a plan and train employIt shouldn’t have taken 10 years to see the necessi-

ty for such a plan.

In a Nov. 27 Canadian Press

news

article,

SPOKE is

it

was announced

is

would be allowed

to serve alco-

New

Year’s

Eve.

leaves a bar, gets in their car

a special occasion,

to

favourite bar until

Year’s

The

and organizations with temporary liquor licences will be allowed to serve alcohol from 11 a.m. on article said “individuals

Dec. 31 to 3 a.m. on Jan. Ontario is the most

1.”

also a

it’s

stay

if this

many

prob-

It is

this idea.

in a rush at

How

are you going to

they’ve had too

1

until

instead of their nor-

mal 3 a.m. closing time. the

article,

Consumer and

Commercial Relations Minister Bob Runciman said “the hours had been extended in the past for unique situations such as the Blue Jays winning the World 1993 and the Toronto

bar owners

4 a.m., it from leaving the same time. The at

different

times sporadically and not in a

a.m. Jan.

be allowed to stay open

if

until

people will leave

Bars and restaurants are supposed to keep an eye on their patrons and cut them off if

8 a.m. Jan.

New Year’s?

will prevent people

in his

will

happens on

thought that

keep the bars open

New Year’s, after changes were made in Newfoundland and Quebec. Bars in Newfoundland will be allowed to stay open for 42 hours straight, from 9 a.m. Dec. 31 to 3 In Quebec, the bars

or her car

his

New

stop anyone from getting

2.

someone? How stop anyone

to

most

recent province to extend these hours for

kills

you going from getting in are

fine to

at

4 a.m. on

may sound

lems with

your

drunk and

drunk? Will there be a special law saying bars won’t get shut down

people, but there are

much to drink. many people at

these establishments,

it

will

be

hard for bartenders, waitresses

and anyone else to keep an eye on one specific customer. Bar owners are also responsible for their patrons, so

if

there

is

accident where

large drunken

mob.

Runciman compared this occasion to the 1993 World Series celebration. If I remember correctly, there was a rather large riot after

or her car drunk?

There will be so

the Blue Jays

won and

after the

bars closed at 4 a.m.

This could happen again. Having a drunken mob roaming the

streets

celebrating the

new

millennium, with the possibility everything will be in chaos

because of Y2K, could spell trouble for

many people come New

Year’s.

an

someone dies, it can be blamed on the owner. What will happen if someone

is

Keeping bars open until 4 a.m. not a good idea. It is only going

to

cause more trouble than people

are asking for.

SPOKE is mainly lunded trom September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Beverley Grondin;

Festival.’

also stated that although this

Being able

New Year’s Eve

4 a.m. on

until

time to drink responsibly.

bars and restaurants in Ontario

Series in

Spoke

Film

He

In

ees and students.

Ontario to serve

hol until 4 a.m. on

;

A1 Hunter, supervisor of secupty services, says he ihe^ reguJariy witii a committee that discusses the various potemdid Ooteate llii could occur. The goal of this committee wfrh each contingeiicy.

in

the

response team wa.s

'the

Bars

News Jlditor: Nicole Furlong; Photo Editor: Talisha Matheson Production Manager: Tannis Fenton; Advertising Manager: Phil Wright Assistant Advertising Manager: Walcrian Czarnecki; Circulation Manager: Adam Wilson Faculty Supervisors: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Dooii Valley Dr., Room 4BI5, Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4M4 Phone: 748-.5220, ext. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3.534 E-inail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Student Associalion (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DvSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

out ot eiTors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by a.m. Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or rc)ection

or

and should be clearly written or typed: a WordPerfect lilc would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

MS Word

tain

any libellous statements and

may

illustralion (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by anl


SPOKE, Dec. 6,

New program media

The program of

part

is tak-

Romkey, adding

said

most

the world of technology.

portion of the program.

difficult

anything that requires the right

help people utilize their

brain to generate

is art.

Darren Romkey, a training and

such a grey area that we have to take it on a per person

development consultant.

basis,”

in

the

21st century, said

“It’s

Romkey

here

is

to

teaching the program, has a

do

media

is

BAA

in fine arts, a

in Internet publishing

certificate

Photoshop,

BA

is

master’s degree in digital media, a

teach people

cutting-edge software like

a

arts,

Valid for New Years or Spring Break Trip ^-'^^ Tours

said.

Matt Dyck, of Waterloo, who

“What we set out

Conestoga Student Will win a $300 Gift Certificate with Breakaway

said he’s a firm believer that

The program, which started Oct. 4 at the Waterloo campus, will artistic

One

that determining

artistic ability is the

He

art isn’t

curriculum,

the

digital

ing the artistically inclined into

skills

Ink (bre loiit i Thurs. Dec 9

geared towards

is

people because

artistic

Conestoga College’s new media certificate program

Must bring student ID to win Some conditions apply

and a teacher’s education diploma. Three weeks of the program are

Illustrator

designated for a work term that will

and

Flash.”

“There are a training

and employers.

benefit students

Darren Romkey,

lot

of industries in

the area that are deciding if they

and development

want

to

make

leap to the

this

[S]

Internet,” said

consultant

Romkey. “They see

everyone out there in the world doing

“The basics of the digital media program is to take an artist, someone with some kind of artistic background, and give them more tools to use that are real industry now,”

he

to

from

know how

really

where

come in.”

used in the said.

tive learning.

to build a

start to finish

that’s

program, which costs could lead to careers involving the Internet and interac-

Photoshop,

how

and

The

“it’s

more

is

a spin-

off of the graphics and animation program, which was offered by

Illustrator

the college’s training and develop-

ment department.

CD-ROM Web

said,

The 670-hour program

Romkey

said

enough time

and lay out an

aesthetically pleasing

Romkey

But,

geared toward people that already have a job or have a goal in mind.”

and Flash,” he said. The 27-week program will teach students

but they don’t

is

$6,500,

teach people cutting-edge softlike

it

start

these (students)

The primary focus of the postgraduate program is the new media that is evolving, said Romkey. “What we set out to do here is to ware

there

wasn’t

to adequately teach

the animation aspect of the graph-

site,

cation, Internet design is the pri-

and animation program, so the media and the 3-D graphics and computer modelling programs

mary

were created

Romkey

ics

said.

Although

it is

focus,

he

not the only appli-

said.

New Years Pub at

digital

artists

By Tannis Fenton

— Page 5

m-

Pre

creates

1999

digital

m its place.

rinrrin3n3rr3isMMiaaMSiMaiarsisisjar0iSMsrsiaf3M3i5M3i3MSMSM5iSM5iaJ3MaM

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Public Speaking Anxiety 1 1 Do you do any of the following? H & 1) Feel extreme anxiety when thinking about doing a presentation. 5 2) Find your palms sweat, your legs shake or your heart beats wildly before, dur^ ing or after a speech. 1 3) Find your thoughts race and your mind blanks before or during a presentation. be “safe” from having to make a ^ 4) Select your program/course/assignments to 6 speech. a course by not doing a speech. ^ 5) Risk low marks or failure in illnesses (that feel real at the time) to avoid doing or excuses creative Develop ^ 6) presentations. & S 7) Let others in your group “carry” the presentation. 5 8) Fear “making a fool of yourself’ in front of teachers or peers. 6 9) Believe everyone is fairly calm but see yourself as a “wreck.” 1 5 These are some signs you may be experiencing one of the most common 6 anxieties: public speaking anxiety. It can be overcome using a planful approach thoughts; 2) relaxation and ^ involving; 1) recognizing and altering negative & positive mental rehearsal techniques; and 3) practicing in low-risk situations and & then in situations with graduated levels of risk. your potential to perform as an employee ^ If your course work, your well-being orabout Remember, avoidance actually something do to time & are affected, it is 5 increases anxiety! The following resources are available to you at the college; Anxiety group, offered through Student Services ^ 1) Join a Public Speaking 6 (2B02) in the Winter semester. i 2) Enrol in the Public Speaking option of the Anxiety and Personal Performance January, 1999). ^ course (offered in D block starting 1 Read the Anxietv and Phobia Workbook. Bourne (available at the LRC on the 5 shelf and on reserve). This approach must be supplemented with practice in front s of friends, family or classmates. 6 4) Make an appointment with a counsellor in Student Services.

i°j

a

I

1

it.

Tuet. Dec. 7lh

NINTENDO DIY In ike

Soicciiuiftii

1 A Message from ^

1o

4:00pm

games or use ours

1 1

i 1 1

i 1 I 1 1

1 I

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

Student Services (Room 2B02)

I I I

%

10:30am

I

\

IhJ

Bring your

you have a story Idea call ext. 691 or e-mail us at spoke @conIf

748-5220,

estogac.on.ca


2

.

— SPOKE, Dec.

Page 6

6,

1999

College and university unite University of Waterloo students to get hands-on welding experience By Anna

Sajfert

uate university students hands-on

exposure

The University of Waterloo’s mechanical engineering program

various

to

welding

processes such as ultrasonic

Madsen.

said

ing,

test-

Conestoga

has seconded Conestoga College’s

College students will also benefit

welding

from

technology

on

labs

the

partnership

because

University of Waterloo approached Conestoga 2 1/2 years ago and asked the college to train and

flux-corded welding, gas tungsten

share

arc welding and

its

expertise with the univer-

sity students.

Conestoga College, with co-operafrom University of Waterloo

university students an opportunity

Madsen

mechanical engineering professors,

to obtain a university degree in

Norman Zhou and Hugh

mechanical engineering welding specialization.

He added the University of Waterloo doesn’t have the facili-

tion

Kerr,

developed the labs programs.

The

which was September 1998,

partnership,

launched

in

gives the graduate and undergrad-

new

capital

Madsen

equipment into the he said.

said Conestoga is giving

with

work with he

the top-notch students,”

said.

increase in the years

In another lab course, they are

the university to use Conestoga’s

learning to do a series of experi-

facilities,

he

said.

ahead to give college and universi-

ments

ty graduates the skills

ples of ultra sonic testing, liquid

interact with Conestoga’s welding

penetrating testing, magnetic par-

program, but whether or not the interaction expands beyond the

edge the

ties

“I’m tremendously enjoying the

will

than the University of Waterloo’s mechanical engineering department, and it is more effective for

submerged arc

welding.

college’s labs,

fer

and

Conestoga’s welding department has more equipment in their labs

welding, gas metal arc welding,

“This type of co-operation must

Guelph campus. Karsten Madsen, co-ordinator of the welding technology program at

University of Waterloo will trans-

shielded metal arc manual

ing,

real

and knowl-

world requires,”

said.

ticle testing

or the expertise in welding

technologies.

The

students

now

are

getting

training in resistance spot weld-

“We

“We

to demonstrate the princi-

and radiography.

don’t train welders, but are

current status

hope

to

will

be able to

depend on

some engineers

future government programs for

and have hands-on

expanding space, as well as the success of Waterloo’s welding

trying to educate to understand

certainly

experience with various welding processes and non-destructive

specialization

examination

Kerr.

tests,”

Kerr

said.

program,”

said

Nursing students can take the pressure By Talisha Matheson

She said students must have inon the correct way to

class theory

Eleven first-year practical nursing students held a blood pressure clinic at

take a blood pressure before they

can take someone’s pressure.

Conestoga’s Cambridge

campus on Nov. 25. Sue Garlick, co-ordinator of preparatory

studies

Cambridge campus,

at

the

invited

Yippy

Novotny, professor of practical nursing at Doon campus, and her students to conduct the clinic in Cambridge.

SO they can gain

“It’s

competency

for clinical

experience. Yippy Novotny,

professor ofpractical nursing

was a co-operative effort between the campuses and a Garlick said

way for the

it

students to practise

on

a varied population.

According to Novotny the purpose of the clinic was for the

stu-

dents to gain experience in taking a variety of blood pressures. “It’s

so they can gain competency

for clinical experience

work

in

and future nursing,” Novotny said.

“Students find the experience very valuable,” Novotny said. “It

gives

them confidence

in

their skills in taking

blood pressures and dealing with the pub-

lic.”

She said the clinics are held once each semester at both campuses.

Lesley Bolt, a first-year nursing student, takes Leslie Johnston’I’s blood pressure at the blood pressure clinic held on Nov. 25 at Conestoga’s Cambridge campus, (Photo by Talisha Matheson)

The

Strategic Plan, 2000-2005

Conestoga College Moves Forward

.

.

.

For

With Your Help

As Conestoga College continues work on the Strategic Plan (2000-2005), you can help make that Plan a reality - one that works well for the College, and for students, faculty and staff. Any time from November 29 through December

17,

please take a few moments to complete

the survey giving your thoughts on an Environmental that

will

Here’s

Scan

--

the social and economic trends

affect the College’s future.

how to

OR Pick up printed survey forms

- you’ll see them at various locations throughout the you've completed the forms, send them to College Planning (Employee Services Building, Doon). College.

e page

,1

Make the Official La

Monitor

participate:

Go to a special Web site ~ www.conestogac.on.ca/stplan - where you can complete the survey on-line and submit it electronically, or print a copy of the survey forms to be completed and sent to College Planning (Employee Services Building Doon),

SPOR

When

in

Looking for an opportunity to work another province? Need to brush up on your F"f‘*^nch skills? Spend a year in C^uebec or New Brunswick!

Check out the Official Language Monitor Program. We promise an exciting and engaging experience. As a monitor of English

you

will

work with a

• French Department; •

teacher in a classroom, parttime or full-time, to promote

your language and

for further information see your:

• Career Placement Centre; • Financial Aid Office; Registrars' Office;

• Graduate

Studies Department.

or conloct tho

culture. Provincial Co-ordinator

It’s

that easy.

reflect

The more responses the College

receives, the better our Strategic Plan

will

your ideas for the College’s future.

Take the time to help make Conestoga a better college - participate Planning process.

in the Strategic

Official-Languages Monitor Program Curriculum and Assessment Policy Branch

you are a Canadian Citizen or permanent resident, have at least one year of postsecondary studies and you want to work

Toronto,

with students, then the Monitor

Web

If

Program

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for you!

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SPOKE,

Get ready, By Anna

set, KPI!

into the college

highest in the

KPI

that ranks

the

survey.

Hunter said is

Sajfert

Thief The annual surveys of Ontario’s 25 community colleges to establish Key Performance Indicators consists of 95 mutual

and

five col-

lege-specific questions regarding

on the loose

obvious the thief entire

lennium project

from

all over.

over 8,000 people have visited the

suggests students be wary of

Web site.

their

belongings,

especially

women, who have been Students are being warned to

the

targets so far.

keep an eye on their belongings after numerous reports of stolen

facilities.

wallets.

any of their belongings are missing

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security services, said there have been

or

Indicators are

and

accountability

excellence

benchmarks. This year the Association had design

its

own

Doon

Student

chance

a

to

which

question,

be included with the college’s

will

other four college-specific questions.

Jenn Hussey,

DSA

vice-presi-

dent of operations, said the question asks the students to list in

DSA

order of preference, which service or activity is

most impor-

tant to them. “If

we

it’s

will

areas

faxing or bus

know

more

president Ellen

Menage.

will be conducted between Feb. 7 and Feb. 11,

Last year’s

KPI

results

Conestoga College the No.

ranked 1

col-

lege in Ontario.

Conestoga Tibbits,

major millennium

He

who spoke

John

Sajfert

board of directors for the 2000/01 Student Association elec-

CRO is not eligible to run in the DSA election.

activities.

um project for Canadians between the ages of 18 and

or model

in the

tables

while they search for a

book. table,

they their

come back wallets

Hunter said the

are

to the

gone.

theft is not discov-

their wallets later.

“I

forum for college employees Nov. said 24, Human Resources Development Canada pours cash

from washrooms when purses or backpacks are left on washroom

me

please do so,”

.com).

Melnyk

DSA

Jenn Hussey,

They will fill out an application to become one of the 400 partici-

who

will gather in

CRO,

into a

then

told the

board. vice-presi-

dent of operations, said the biggest job

is

CRO’s

to get the electors to

Ottawa

come

out and vote.

to July 3 to partici-

pate in numerous legacy projects

The week

in January after the candi-

and environmental

dates have campaigned for

from June 28

The

participants

activities.

will begin

a

elections will run for

one

two

weeks.

five-month virtual trek in January

Wallets have also been stolen

shelves.

a special millenni-

24 who are invited to log onto the Future Trek Web site (www.futuretrek2000

pants

its

board of directors have

agreed to purchase 38 Maple Leafs

DSA

$10 raffle tickets. The winners of the tickets will be announced before the last day of classes on Dec. 22.

Royalty exhibited

“You need 50

signatures to run

DSA election),” said Mike Hams, DSA vice-president of

event.

education.

(in the

The

A

special exhibition will

association

company’s Crown Royal whisky in Waterloo.

The exhibition will be held at the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery at 25 Caroline St. N. This

is

Waterloo’s

exhibition

since

first

Seagram Collection in 1997. The exhibition will trace the tory of the development of

O CO

It will also highlight Crown Royal’s relationship with Waterloo.

For more information on the looking at

is

exhibition call (519) 746-1882.

ISO Team

Pauline Winston

Ross Cole

-i

Susan Davidson

Gord Turner

s;

Paul Matresky

Margaret Struck

Dana Williams Tony Chappell

A1 Hunter

Beth Esenbergs

John Tribe

Ian

Irene

Sally

Susan Hartley

Mike Abraham

Dick Deadman

Jeanette

Tim

Cliff

Ingham

Pete Schlei

Dave

Putt

Shahzad Habib

Barry Milner

)ga

Schill

his-

Crown

product.

fe

the

Royal highlighting the production,

to the

Rhude

major

gaining

CONGRATULATIONS Facilities

show-

case the journey of the Seagram

packaging and marketing of the

and communicate by Internet to develop plans for the summer

The National Capital Commission

o>

indi^

will be selling

The

and backpacks.

is

The Doon Student Association and

Compiled byT. Matheson

tion.

have no experience whatsoever but if in any way you can train

Future Trek

in

Doon

searching for

explained that the wallets are being taken out of people’s purses

an open

at

is

Hockey fans tune

vidually, the

Jenn Melnyk, a third-year mar-

Compiled by T. Matheson Future Trek

possible for students to

vote online.

keting student, has been elected chief returning officer by the DSA

gone.

ered until the students look for president

is recruiting

— Page 7

Instead of selling the tickets

elects officer

By Anna

Trek

it

1999

hockey game tickets worth $4,200 for Conestoga College students.

around campus,” said Hunter.

young Canadians who want to get involved in the development of

When

.

DSA

they see someone suspicious

had gone missing.” Hunter said some of the stolen wallets have been recovered, but any money in the wallet was

Learning Resource Centre. Students have been leaving their purses or backpacks on

DSA

if

capcan.ca

services immediately if

lets

Several of the incidents occurred

The KPI survey

2000

“Initially it was just lost property being reported,” said Hunter, “but then people realized that their wal-

then

carefully,” said

ask the students to notify

complaints over the last couple of weeks.

to look into these

trips,

“We

security

making

6,

and to date

this fall

For more information about Future Trek call 1-800-465-1867 or visit the NCC Web site at www.'

main

programs, faculty, services and

Key Performance

(NCC), the organizers of Future Trek, launched their national mil-

cam-

pus as the reports have come in

He

By Adam Wilson

is

it

moving around the

Dec.

James

Sookram Walker

Thank you for your work on ISO 9001


Mnm. Peer Services is looking to hire Business and Technology students. Want to earn extra money while you complete your studies and feel a sense of pride and accomplishment for having helped a fellow student? Increase your own academic mastery. If you have achieved 80% or better in certain courses and have a 75% average in your program, then you qualify to be a tutor. If you would like more information, please visit Student Services (room 2B02) and make an appointment to talk to the Peer Services Administrator. Peer tutors are paid hourly.

Toufs

Break or

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SPOKE,

New By

A

new

charter

of an entrepreneurial environment,

entrepreneurial environment,” said

the college increased five per cent

said Tibbits.

Tibbits.

relative to the previous year, said

regulating

community colleges

is

want expanded powers, Conestoga College presiessential if they

dent John Tibbits told the Nov. 22

If

would

regarding

the

of college boards were

removed or lessened, said Tibbits, then colleges would be “masters of their

own

Though

Powers such as offering applied degrees and facilitating interna-

programming

restrictions

activity

board of governors meeting.

tional

destiny.’’

there

is

no timeline

for completion of a

new

set

charter,

the Association of Colleges

of

increase the marketability of col-

lege students and significantly

province’s advocacy group for

enrolment

the

of

Conestoga, said Tibbits.

fully

it is

futile for colleges to

explore the feasibility of

delivering tionally

programming through

the

— Page 9

by the program, its locaand the makeup of faculty are

tion

not finalized, said Tibbits.

Tibbits.

Conestoga also had the fourth highest growth rate in applications

among

Ontario’s

community

hoped, he added,

leges.

Conestoga would host the programming and provide the

The also

instruction.

Ontario, he added.

it is

that

In other business, registrations at

col-

enrolment at Conestoga is up 100 per cent as international students have increased from 50 last tion,

year to the current number of 100, said Tibbits.

The

objective, said Tibbits, is for

Conestoga to expand to 500 college’s growth rate

the

highest

in

was

southern

years.

The next board meeting

In terms of international educa-

inter-

national students in the next five

is

sched-

uled for Jan. 24.

currently drafting a

In other board matters,

it was Conestoga has selected Mohawk College and

announced

that

interna-

McMaster University in a

sally accepted as degrees.

foster

more

as partners

EOU/UNQ Mtqmt @ Fredrick Bowling Lanes

proposed four-year nursing program.

Though other

Allowing individual college boards a degree of autonomy and

would also

is

Internet

because diplomas aren’t as univer-

flexibility

1999

charter, said Tibbits.

Without applied-degree powers,

he said

colleges,

Details such as the accreditation

offered

However,

Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario (ACAATO), the

increase

6,

college charters essential

Phil Wright

Ontario’s

Dec.

universities court-

ed Conestoga for a nursing partnership,

McMaster was

because of

its

selected

“innovation and

TUTORS DESERVE THANK-YOU! Peer Tutors helped many Students this semester With areas of difficulty

On

behalf of those you helped

DSA office

Tickets at

in their studies in

Health Sciences, Community Services, Technology, Business and Applied Arts

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Students

for

Non-StudentsI

-

A sincere thank-you.

m

Peer Services Supppnwl byPoon

Reminder: Peer Services is hiring tutors for Business and Technology programs: If interested in a position apply now at Student Services (room 2B02)

APPLY EARLY FOR NEXT SEMESTER!

Stocl^rip Stufferf l_oan

Fixed Rate of 6.75%

WOMEN’S OPPORTUNITY AWARDS funded by

Available

until

December

17,

1999

SOROPTIMIST FOUNDATION OF CANADA

Borrow up to $3,000 •

DO YOU

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ARE YOU A FEMALE HEAD OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD WITH PRIMARY FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR SUPPORTING

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TRAINING PROGRAM?

A VOCATIONAL OR TECHNICAL

CAN YOU DEMONSTRATE A FINANCIAL NEED?

YOU MAY AP^Y FOR THE WOMEN’S OPPORTUNITY AWARD

Applications available in the Registrar’s Office or Student Services

Previous

Women’s Opportunity Award ineligible to

recipients are

apply

Deadline has been extended to December 20

Use the Stocking

Staffer for

ANY

REASON! Guaranteed fixed rate

for

year

1

Convenient payments

Quick and Easy Application Simply complete the stocking staffer application form. Send the form by fax, mail or submit it in person by December 17. Stocking Staffer Applications can be obtained from the credit union office or through;

Bob Evans

Ext.

Titia Taylor

Ext.

283 392

Bob Wall Walter Boettger

(ConestgB Coffege emp/oyees sncf

Ext.

Ext.

(heir families qualify for

354 294

membership)

Waterloo County Education Credit Union Education Centre, 51 Ardelt Avenue, (Corner of Ottawa and Homer Watson) Kitchener, ON N2C 2E1 Tel (519) 742-3500 • Fax (519) 742-6072 • Web Site www.wcecu.com


JNews

4vE, Dec.

,

6,

— Paac 10

1999

Business gets new dean By Beverley Grondin

He

existing employees.

says they

would then write training plans

The new dean of

the school of

ered.

in

“You learned a at

doing something like says.

in

1965.

The

college

open until 1967. “In 1969 the adult education centre joined Conestoga College,” says Clow. “I like to

people

tell

that the college joined the adult

education centre, but

seem

I

to

be

the only person with that view.”

Clow

says he initially taught

^

DSA office

chair for computer

part-time

studies

working alongside Edith Torbay

who

was chair of the day

full-

time programs.

He

says the biggest adjustment

so far has been the size of the job.

Whereas he once had nine

full-

part-time

such as running a

full-time

front”

operation

from

time

staff, he now has 52 and just over 280 part-

staff.

Torbay says she and Clow have

“It was just an office on the main street and we rented facilities and whatever was available,” he says. They offered courses in

been colleagues for over 18 years, as they have worked together in

these facilities to try to bring col-

with him as co-chair of the school

lege education to rural

communi-

various capacities.

She says she enjoyed working of business.

“We

ties.

was a very small operation,” he

says.

Volunteers Needed See Alycia in the

and

studies

into various positions with

“It

In the Sanctuary

For about the past five years.

Clow has been

moved

1972-74 in Haniston.

^CliristmasTlieineWeekS

he

time teachers and about 280-300

“store

is

that,”

mathematics and physics, then the college

Dec. 6th to 9th

about a whole

in

centre

didn’t

(Photo by Beverley Grondin)

lot

of different jobs when you’re

education

adult

Waterloo

of the school of business.

lot

September, started working

the

new dean

all

College since before there was a

Andy Clow, who became dean

the

ensure

to

necessary areas were being cov-

college.

Andy Clow,

industry,

the

for

business has been with Conestoga

“(We) w'ere able to make

was happening in where the college was becoming more visible.”

think alike in

many ways,

was always easy for him to understand what my motivation so

it

inroads into what

was,” she says, adding that he

the northern parts

supportive colleague.

One of the

Torbay says Clow

is

is

honest,

Clow

straightforward and reliable, and

remembers fondly was his time in industrial training and consulting in the late 1970s, where people from the college would consult with the industry and make determinations as to what they wanted to do to train all new and

he cares about the students in his programs. “I have a lot of respect for him,

other positions

and I think a lot of other people do He’s very old and with age

too.

comes

experience,”

she

says

laughingly.

Corrections In the Nov. 29 edition of

Spoke on Page

Golf were for a

12, in the story

off at Conestoga, prices were correct as printed, but

tees ses-

which consists of five lessons. Therefore, per session individuals would pay $140, groups of five would pay $105 and Conestoga students would pay $90. sion,

In the Nov. 22 edition of Spoke on Page 2, in the story Massacre commemoration in place, the rose bushes were donated by the Cambridge YWCA. Spoke apologizes for the errors.

A Full-Time, One-Year Post-Graduate Program Starting January,

Cail for

2000

more informatjop

519-748-5220,

ext. 66%.'

^^%cialassisM^

*

a

available


DECEMBER 6â&#x201E;˘ COMMEMORA TION

TIME:

11:30 A.M.

PLA CE:

THE SANCTUARY

To commemorate the 10th anniversary of the murder of 14 women students at Montreal's Ecole Polytechnique and in recognition of all women who have suffered from violence, the Women 's Resource Group (in conjunction with the D.S.A.) is sponsoring: ,

GAIL WEBSTER (O.P.P. Staff Sergeant and Provincial Co-ordinator for Crisis Negotiation)

Speaking About Her Personal Experience of Sexual Assault There will also be a ceremony at 2:00 p.m. outside the Blue Cafeteria to mark the planting of 14 rose bushes - one in memory of each student killed in Montreal. Cambridge Women â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crisis Services has selected Conestoga College as the site for this permanent memorial and co-ordinated the donation of commemorative plants from local organizations.


Page 12

— SPOKE, Dec.

6,

1999

Sports

Condors tied for second place

STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS FALL

By Nicole Furlong

beginning as the scoreboard was

The Conestoga Condors men’s hockey team won their second game in a row on Nov. 25 against

od.

scoreless at the

-Fleming College in Lindsay, Ont. This gives them a 3-2-1, win-losstie

first peri-

About three minutes into the second period Woodley scored the first

This places them in a three-way

second place in the Ontario

Colleges Athletic Association with

Fleming and Humber Colleges.

by Jamie Hickey.

With eight minutes Joe

Sullivan

left in

the sec-

scored

for

Heming who came out flying in the third with Wes NeUd and Aaron

hockey against the team they

Setterington scoring a goal each

within the

provincial championships last year.

period putting them one up on the

of guys stepped up today,”

lot

first five

Condors.

assistant coach,

Conestoga came back, however,

referring to the return of three-year

with Woodley and Stewart scoring

Murray who was not

a goal each only seconds apart.

said

Bob Hunke,

veteran Sean

able to play this season until this

game

because

his

course

Conestoga did not begin

at

until

recently.

Hunke lent play

of Darrell Woodley,

who

scored two goals for the team, as well as the excellent goaltending of

Anthony Gignac. “Anthony played a phenomenal game,” said Hunke. “That’s what

we

M ike

Shane Neil, Adam Duce, Rudney and Heimple assisted. Fleming pulled last

also referred to the excel-

need,

we

really

need those big

saves.”

The game was

close

from the

TIME

ROOM

their goalie in the

minute of the game and

was

all

the

end during that time, but Conestoga fought to the end for a well-deserved win. “We had a great comeback in the third,” Hunke said. “This was a real character-builder, and we showed a action

lot

TIPS

ON MAKING

PRESENTATIONS

MON. NOV. 1 THURS. NOV.4

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17

STRESS

MANAGEMENT

WED. NOV.23

3:30-5:00

2D16

MON. NOV. 29 THURS. DEC. 2

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17 2A411

minutes of the

beat out of fourth place in the

“A

DATE

Conestoga. Dave Stewart assisted.

three exciting periods of high-quality

TOPIC

followed suit making the score 2-0

ond,

The determined Condors played

THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP.

goal in the bottom left-hand side of the net, assisted

Five minutes later Tyler Heimple

record.

tie for

end of the

1999

PREPARING FOR FINAL EXAMS

WED. DEC. 8

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING FORMAT. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE COME TO STUDENT SERVICES.

in Conestoga’s

of character.”

The Condors play their next home game on Dec. 8 at home against the

Humber Hawks at 7:30 p.m.

GAY, LESBIAN, AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING -Please see

Barb Kraler in Student Sekwices

MULTICULTURAL STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP -Sign

up

-Room 2B02 Lynn Robbins or Shawna Bernard in Student Services for more information

in Student Services

-Please see

Digital Edition - December 06, 1999  
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