Page 1

Gov’t invests By Walerian Czarnecki The

Canadian

a need for $20,000, then the millennium scholarship will cover

government

could have chosen to celebrate

the deficit. Since

it is

a grant,

it

the

could reduce the loan amount that a student gets, said Walsh.

ceremonies.

list,”

new millennium by building monuments or staging elaborate But the government has chosen new millennium by

to ring in the

“They

be on top of the

will

she said. “It could result in

equal money, but less loan.”

by

In June 1998 an act of Parliament established a private

instituting a scholarship that will

and autonomous organization

investing in Canada’s youth

enable students to keep their per-

with an endowment of $2.5

sonal debts low.

lion to assist all Canadian post-

The

Canada

Scholarship

Millennium Foundation will

begin to give out scholarships

2000 and

starting January

will

bil-

secondary students.

The

scholarship

will have

foundation

$113 million to spend

across the country, with Ontario

continue to do so for 10 years. Students who have applied for

per cent. 37 Approximately 35,000 students a

financial

year will receive the scholarship,

OSAP

through

assistance

and attend school

full

time are automatically considered for the scholarship, said Conestoga’s financial aid ofBcer Carol Walsh.

based on the OSAP assessment. It will go to stu“It

is

dents with the highest need,” she “It will affect

said.

about 100

students at Conestoga.”

Students

who

getting

which will range between $2,000 and $4,000. About 95 per cent will go to students who demonstrate a need and five per cent to

who

those

ondary

will enter post-sec-

education

and

show

merit.

most of the money, said Walsh. “Students

who

are

attending

university, with a higher tuition,

by

would have a higher need,” she

scholarship will be notified

each year and will receive the

said.

Need is determined by the same

scholar-

OSAP assessment that is current-

ship will cover the needs of stu-

applicant qualifies for the maxi-

income is verand costs are calculated by looking at tuition costs and liv-

mum

ing expenses.

The

in January.

dents that

OSAP

does not. If an

$17,000, but demonstrates

ASKTOJtllOfAt,

University students will receive

qualified for the

November and December of money

youth

in

ly used. Student’s ified

Carol Walsh, Conestoga’s financial aid millennium scholarship.

advertises the

officer,

new

(Photo by Walerian Czarnecki)

Partnership created with Conestoga ByTannis Fenton Conestoga College

is

in

the

Co^EVIENTARk Page 4

'

Blatant racist targets

Spoke

Welland; Sault College in Sault Ste.

contains aU the logistical infor-

Ontario

that will create

will allow the col-

according to specifications

program acquired through courses,

said

Deborah

The curriculum

It

$115

will cost approximately

per person for each training day.

Conestoga’s training and develop-

can apply for training dollars fund-

ment department can provide the courses on site or companies can

by

the

Ontario

Aerospace

Weickert, training and development

Council that was created to exam-

send people to the college for

manager of technical skills, supervisory training and management.

ine the industry’s training needs,

ing.

she said.

Two

The

Niagara

Weickert

train-

Ontario

asked

Conestoga College to join the pro-

gram as the sixth college. The Ontario Aerospace Council chose Conestoga College because

accreditation

process that recog-

college and the

company

will

fers credits, she said

Aerospace Council will sign the agreement in the next month or

cate consists of 14 courses totalling

are well-conversed in that particu-

said Weickert,

two.

240 hours of

lar subject matter,” said Weickert.

college’s flexibility

The

accreditation

agreement

training time, while

the aerospace manufacturing cer-

agrees to follow certain criteria in

tificate consists

terms of curriculum, cost of deliv-

280 hours of training. “The initial focus is going

ery of the courses and what the

of

1 1

courses with

choose instructors to teach the “(Instructors) will

Initially,

be

“We have the relevant backwe currently offer that

ground and be people

who

the Ontario Aerospace

Council approached five Ontario colleges to provide the

to

it

agreed to the certification and nizes previous learning and trans-

courses.

The program management certifi-

in

the

through the program.

be available

in

College

Council

said

According to Weickert, an officer of the college and the Ontario

certificates will

College

Oakville.

Aerospace

such as plane manufacturers,

ed

Nepean;

Marie; and Sheridan College in

for the aerospace

developed.

said.

try

credit

ment,” said Weickert.

Weickert

lege to offer the Aerospace Industry

a cer-

terms of develop-

manufacturing program has been

Training Program, which

is

later, in

certificate,

of the Ontario Aerospace Council,”

Aerospace companies, which produce parts for the aerospace indus-

tificate

12

coming

“It

tificate

The agreement

PAGE

Hamilton;

mation in order to deliver the cer-

the

a partnership between the two.

match for Condors.

with the program management

agreement

Aerospace Council

The Gdden Shield no

on the manufacturing

ing are.

process of signing an accreditation

with

Mohawk

parameters of assessment and grad-

program

including Algonquin College in

type of training to other industries,”

who added

that the

and immediate

response were also factors.

The program

will begin in 2000,

depending on company response.

interest

and


— SPOKE, Nov. 29, 1999

Page 2

News security on the

Doon By Adam Wilson

quickly to urgent calls by the

move

Walk

Safe program volunteers, to deter

Conestoga against

security

people from speeding around the

tool in the fight

campus road and to respond more quickly to emergency calls.

College’s

new

services has a

campus crime.

The college has approved

the

leasing of a 1999 Toyota Corolla.

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security

make

services, said the car will

security

more

visible, flexible

and

a real opportunity for us,”

“It’s

said Hunter, “and

it’s

reassuring to

everyone on campus to we’re here

if

know

that

they need help.”

Security guards previously used

own

cars

campus crime.

respond to

calls.

Four thefts of stereo equipment from students’ cars were reported in the last few weeks, said Hunter.

billed the college for gas

“We’re so close to Highway 401,’’ he said. “Most thefts come from outside campus, not from the

leased with the option to purchase

effective

in

against

fight

their

their

needed

as

to

The guards then and any

out-of-pocket expenses.

The new

when the

car

is

currently being

lease expires.

purse snatcher on campus as there

worth approximately $16,000 because it has some mileage on it. Himter said he was unaware of

students

on

it.”

Hunter believes there

is

also a

It

is

of complaints

any previous requests by security

about missing purses and wallets.

services for the college to provide

Most have been recovered but none of the missing money has

poses.

have been a

lot

The

been found.

He

cautions people not to leave

any belongings in a place where

The new vehicle

will

car

be used to

other campuses if they are

having problems, to respond more

is

a comfort to people

from the campus and the campus, he said. “This

they could be easily stolen.

visit

a car specifically for security pur-

is

visitors to

a very safe campus,”

said Hunter. “It [the car] is a

thing to see and

it is

good

very reassur-

Conestoga’s supervisor of security services, Al Hunter, proudly displays the department’s new 1999 (Photo by Phil Wright) Toyota Corolla.

mg.

VIP/CIP Day ’99 helps students out ByTallsha Matheson

Leisa Cronsberry the 1 1th aimual VIP/CIP Day was a success again

Over 2,500 high school students Perth and from Waterloo, Wellington

attended

counties

Visitor Information

Program and

College Information Program

(VIP/CIP Day)

at the

Day

Doon cam-

pus of Conestoga College Nov. 17.

According

to

liaison

officer

this year.

Twenty-three Ontario colleges

up information displays for the general public to view in the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre on the night before VIP/CIP Day. The next day students attended set

workshops about Conestoga programs in the morning and individual college workshops in the afternoon.

The event offers Grade 12 and 13 students the opportunity to visit

individual

college displays,

to

on various programs offered by the colleges, to attend workshops

ask questions about college pro-

grams and

to obtain information

greater

number of students than “The number just does-

packages about colleges and their

last year.

programs. Grade 12 and 13 students will be

n’t

applying to colleges and universi-

dents

month so VIP/CIP Day them the chance to research

ties this

gives

and get the information they are looking

for, said

go down,” Cronsberry and the feedback from the

was

This year the event welcomed a

stu-

great.”

Cronsberry said VIP/CIP

Day

offers students the opportunity to

see

Doon campus

“Hopefully

Cronsberry.

said,

first

hand.

choose

they’ll

Conestoga,” she added.

Volunteers Needed Friendly volunteers are

Pre

needed

New Years Pub at

to

provide compan-

ionship to people

who

have Alzheimer’s Disease.

Two

hours a week commit-

ment. Training program

Imk

(lui(t

Thurs.

Iwe I

provided (with certificate upon

P Doo On^

Conestoga Student Will win a $300 Gift Certificate with Breakaway

Call Alzheimer Society at

742-1422

SPRING BREAK & NEW YEAR’S TRIPS! Breakaway Tours, Canada’s #1 Student Tour Operator,

Valid for New Years or Spring Break Trip Tours

Must bring student ID to win Some conditions apply

completion).

is

looking for outgoing students and

organizations on

Classifieij

campus

to

help promote Acapulco, 'S^-5-

Daytona, Quebec City, Montreal and more!

Earn

FREE trips

and

cash!

TRAVEL-teach 5

day/40

1

800-465-4257

www.breakawaytours.com

English: 19-23,

(Jan.

2000 )

TESOL

teacher certification

course

(or

dence). available

Call

hr.

by

correspon-

1,000’s

NOW.

information package,

1-888-270-2941.

jobs

of

FRE toll

fre


SPOKE,

Nov. 29, 1999

— Page 3

College mandate undergoes changes By Anna

Sajfert executive and committee

year’s

Alumni

The

Conestoga changes to

Association

of

approved mandate and recog-

College its

nized the association volunteers at sixth annual meeting held

its

Nov.

Doon campus.

15 on

The

three constitutional changes

Fitzpatrick.

committee has now

financial

been dissolved and ities

its

responsibil-

have been transferred to the

executive committee.

The new mandate

The executives

Marie Thompson, vice-president Gavin Fitzpatrick, treasurer

Angela

Martin

and

secretary

Other

were Sheila McCleoud, Kim Graham, Jarret Kuepfer, Linda Hart, Donna Leader, Jim Henry,

Tom

also states that

In the treasurer’s report, Angela

Martin revealed a profiting part-

appointed by the slate of officers

nership with Johnso'n

from one of the student associa-

now

not the student government.

The final change was an addition

mandate

to the

Canada’s

Ontario’s infrastructure over the

Wonderland, African Lion Safari

next five years, half of which will

and SportsWorld also increased to 1,134 from 1,040. Conestoga president John

come from the government’s

Ticket

sales

to

“Maybe our students won’t have to

fly

out to

offers

fiic.,

John

Titbits,

Conestoga president

100 scholarships and

committee

posable cameras, as well as the

ing post-secondary institutions in

increase in sales of roses, frames

anticipation

and grad caps. The three sources

student population.

and

the

standing committee.

The

association recognized last

and

Faculty By

Phil

Wright

The efforts of two Conestoga College committees to improve the evaluation process for both instructors

and management are

ance throughout the delivery of

dent feedback Jeffrey.

The style changes in the revised form were inspired by

They

mandated Key

the provincially

Performance Indicator surveys completed by Conestoga stu-

chair of the

two groups.

dents in February, said Jeffrey.

The

an

of

the course material.

commitment

continuous improvement, according to the

expanded

is essential,

enhance performance,” he said. In

the

instructional

were fundamental in the school

dents need to realize the

being named the highest-rated

importance of their appraisal of teaching,

quality.

veys of Ontario’s community

“We

The

colleges establish accountabili-

input

two committees he chaired, namely the instructional

results of those surveys

college in Ontario.

The first-ever independent

ty

sur-

and excellence benchmarks.

evaluation and development

committee and acadenuc management evaluation and devel-

“We value

student input

community.

become

deans and students sat on the committees that met monthly for over six months.

to

assurance.” Bill Jeffrey,

Conestoga College

to

refine

the

both faculty and management at the college

went largely unful-

filled, said Jeffrey.

Highlights include a

new

student appraisal

of teaching form, a

community services for

new

chair

assurance,” he

revised

the

last time.

The second

step of the

faculty evaluation is an

appraisal

by the

method chosen

teacher.

Evaluation

“We tried to incorporate KPI in how questions were phrased

include

and structured,” said Jeffrey. Another significant revision

lio review.

the

evaluation

was

Jeffrey,

of the revisions

dents) to

22, printing problems have meant a delay which resulted in the old forms being used one

are about to implement the first round of performance reviews under the new system starting Nov. 22, said Jeffrey.

evaluation process for

student

want (stubecome part of

be in use effective Nov.

part of quality

dean of health sciences/

Earlier efforts

value

and

Though

The two groups hammered away at various revisions and

entire

said Jeffrey.

evaluation forms were to

representatives, support

staff,

form, allowing

to

said

the

instructor to include a question

of his/her

own

design.

The changes

in the form, have been previ-

options

self-appraisal,

peer appraisal or portfo-

The

final step

of evalu-

ation includes a formal

interview

and

assessments, completion

added

professional development plans

ously tested to ensure students

appraisal

stemming from the evaluations. The revised student appraisal of teaching form is more

fully understand each question.

the professional

detailed than the prior one.

only because they are the

The

Jeffrey,

student

instructors

are

appraisals

of

important not first

requests the student to eval-

step of the instructor evaluation

uate the instructor’s perform-

process, but also because stu-

review

with the chair/dean to discuss the two prior

appraisal as well as structured

It

stu-

said.

and want (students)

Union

evaluation process

quality

opment committee, included a cross-section from the college

said

“Students are very important. are commited to providing instructors with feedback to

dean of health sciences/community services, said there was a need to revise the process because of the college’s renewed dedication to Bill Jeffrey, Conestoga’s

student

demand

for the

and the programs to be new facility and

of

a

performance

summary and devel-

opment plan. The professional development plan has been designed to ensure both teachers and deans agree

money

from

the

January or February 2000. Tibbits

said that the issue

of

granting applied degrees in certain

programs

at

Conestoga College

is

offered in the

receiving great support from other

assess the project’s contribution to

college presidents, local

the community.

and provincial and federal govern-

He

said the college’s proposal

new

partner-

emergency services

grams.

While Tibbits wouldn’t elaborate on details of the new partnerships, he did say the proposal is by far the biggest project Conestoga has undertaken.

MPPs

ments. Tibbits added that local

MPPs

be helping over the next two months to move the issue at cauwill

cus level.

“Maybe our

students won’t have

to fly out to Australia to get

a

degree anymore,” Tibbits said. “We’ll be like a sophisticated

department

store,

selling

Ralph

Lauren, as well as Gucci.”

process revised

performance and review forms being used

further evidence of the college’s

to

used for building and moderniz-

staff evaluation

New

funds,

and information technology pro-

is

executive

SuperBuild Growth Fund in either

police/fire

additional sources such as the dis-

Conestoga will

receive

submission for the SuperBuild

tion to the board of directors, the

that

hear back on whether they will

wanted the college to identify the

how

monies have accumulated due to

forth.”

number of new student spaces that would be created by the fund, as well as the amount of partnership

ships in the broadcasting, nursing,

and direc-

will provide leadership

reports also revealed

government

Tibbits talked about the college’s

revenues from convocation cere-

states

8,

the

to

each director

which now

Section

said

includes the four

Growth Fund. The Ontario government’s $742million SuperBuild Growth Fund

to

“The $3.1 million for the FM is part of the futme school of communications at Conestoga,” he said. “This is the largest project any college has put

radio signal

He added

tors.

institution

anymore.”

who

academic grants of $1,000 each Conestoga students.

The

a degree

Australia to get

part-

ners in the public and private sec-

Tibbits

Langan, Susan Takacs, April

Dawn-Blackw6ll, Jim Van Hemmen, Kaylea Findlay, Brad Wardfort and Mike Harris.

The fund, which was introduced $20 billion into

in 1999, will inject

recognized

volunteers

a student representative will be

tions,

generate 85 per cent of the total revenue.

recognized were president Sara

Jennifer Sawyer.

were only minor wording changes, vice-president said Gavin

The

chair volunteers.

on specific planning objectives and their target dates for implementation, said Debra Croft, Conestoga’s manager of human resources.

The plan

also

incorporates

resources and costs needed to accomplish these goals. The same professional development plan is also used for academic chairs who report to deans.


Page 4

— SPOKE, Nov. 29, 1999

Commentary

lye education

COALITION FOR A HUMANISTIC

a chance Last week the Tory government cut funding to post-secondary education. The province hopes to save money by making it more difficult for students with bad credit histories to obtain

ritishcanada

loans for school, refusing to loan money to students who underestimate Ihetr income and by loweiing the default rate threshold for universities and colleges. These cuts to education will save the government approximately $30 million. The cuts f Kus on poor students. Poor students often have poor or bad credit histories. Poor students may also underestimate their incomes when applying for loans for school. Poor students often have trouble paying back their loans and therefore default on

payments

The same week, a York University study reported colmore monc> n>i less education. The study found that nearly 6*5 pci ».enl t>f college

lege students are pa>ing

teachers report a serious decline in the quality of their students’ academic work, almost half of the faculty reported giving fewer assignments because they don’t have the time to grade them and 71 per cent of college teachers report a decline in the quality of the curriculum covered because ot the reduced number ol weeks fier

On

The study also found

Sb per cent

ot the lesptmdenls

Oct.

14

The main

Coalition

clds^ si/e ha\e hurt the quality of reported that changes education. 88 per cent ol lacultv leported an iiitiease in weekly workload and 78 per i.ont reported highei stress Enrolment has gone up nine pei cent while there has full-time college faculty been a seven per cent decline and a 21 per cent decrease in college funding. According to the York University study, the number of students seeking a post-secondary education is expected to, rise 10 to 30 per cent in the next few years, enrolment '^ill incrca.se significantly w'hen Grade 13 is phased out in 2003 and double the students graduate tjom high school

for a

Humanist

that year.

afternoon edition.

m

m

Enough

such as Africa, the Caribbean and

Austen’s time.”

Asia with people from the United

edition of the

Kingdom. According

Record

of the

post-secondary education / It is not the time to cut funding for colleges and universities; it’s time to increase the funding. Post-secondary education has already taken a large cut in funding in the last six years. The time to stop these cuts

the goal of this

in

Kitchener. After

British people

letter,

laughed in disbelief that anyone

pulled

could actually believe that some-

in the

one’s nationality inherently

the ad before

it

was printed

him

According to an Oct. 15 Record

by Brian Caldwell,

was pulled because of

its

anyone could actually think

that

would take him or her

seri-

others ously.

There can’t possibly

racist content.

Among other things, the ad called for an

end to multiculturalism in said that Michael

can

Humanist

British

What

bothers

tremendous

made

gave

little

thoughuto the

until another e-mail, this

letter

one 38-

Chessman

and being which

affect everything

Two weeks

it

detailing the

e-mails from

it

to say that

about this

Someone with a narrow, gating his views

post-secondary institutions. Everyone deserves an education. Stop the cuts and everyone have a chance.

cable television station explaining

letter

addressed to the director

of programming

at

a

Muskoka

the purpose of the coalition, signed

by Michael Chessman.

The author of

this

letter

is

While

I

read

I

unenlight-

upon an unsusif

anyone

to the inane

views

man who is lost in a time warp,

was

alerted to an article that ran in

20 edition of the National

was about Chessman and the Coalition for a Humanist British Canada, the same man and group as those bombarding Spoke Post.

the sole

that

article

member of

man

It

with e-mails.

has gotten into the minds

of the nation.

Should this

we laugh and forget about

one-man reform? That’s a

tough question.

Bemie

was wondering

was subscribing of a

Post

is

one

I

ened view of the world was propa-

article

the

what

Spoke’s cyber mailbox.

had read the

in

Why does this upset me? Because

Suffice

of the document was disturbing.

I

was even more disturbed when I

his coalition.

someone calling himself Michael Chessman began to arrive in

organization and

equality and

spread their views.

personality

types.

later

way of

who are willing to go this far to

was an essay author’s views on

they do and say.”

are this

disturbing that there are peo-

It is

ple

I

time

who

strides this country has

in the

read

and patterns of thought

about this isn’t

someone actually decided to put money and effort into organizing a group whose main focus is to undermine the

person, Michael Chessman. This

instincts

to

and equal-

ignorant, but that

mail box reportedly from the same

tribalistic

me

that there are people

pages long, landed in Spoke’s e-

brutalistic,

and an end

rights treatment.

Chessman, the founder of the with

Canada wants

multicultural policies

coalition, described blacks as “peo-

ple

according to

multiculturalism.

the Nov.

let

be peo-

still

are that ignorant,

there? I

article

who

ple

Canada.

The

made

or her a better person and that

of a

is

letter, I

Wayne MacDonald

lisher

doing well. The government should be thinking about putting money back into education for

The economy

are

Among other things,

the Post article, the Coalition for a

cultural assimilation,

After initially reading the

receiv-

pecting public.

now.

to the author

superior to other races.

was disturbed that our e-mail address had drawn his attention. I was even more disturbed by the content of the first email letter, which contained a copy

is

coalition is to

ing complaints from readers, pub-

from attend-

More and more students will be robbed of a future in a good paying, interesting job because they cannot afford

article,

ad in the early

the ad

ing post-secondary progtams.

ed in the National Post

replace immigrants from places

secondary students. The education system cannot sustain these cuts. The quality of education is sutfering, teachers’ morale is low, classrooms arc crowded and students requiring special education can’t get the help they need. Ontario already has a shortage of skilled workers and a shortage of workers in information technologies. While the Harri.s government sees lax cuts as the only way to stimulate growth, it is important to realize that in an mformalion age education and knowledge drive growth. It is irapeiative the government invest in education or Ontano will have a limited future. students

letter is that

Canada ran an

article written

some

of the

British

the future of the education system and the futures of post-

TTiese cuts will also prevent

gist

“Chessman wants a return to the manners and mores of Jane

enough. These cuts threaten Ontario's future,

is

According to information provid-

blatantly racist.

the

that

Spoke

Blatant racist targets

Farber, executive director

for the Canadian Jewish Congress, said in the Oct. 15 “It’s

great concern to

He

Record

article,

something that should be of all

of us.”

said his organization

tigating

is

inves-

Chessman’s group and

alert the

will

hate crimes unit of the

Toronto police. This

is

a crucial step to ensure

this hateful organization is stopped.

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE is published and produced

weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Beverley Grondin; News Editor: Nicole Furlong; Photo Editor: Talisha Matheson Production Manager: Tannis Fenton; Advertising Manager: Phil Wright; Assistant Advertising Manager: Walerian Czarnecki,

Circulation Manager:

SPOKE’s

Adam

address

Phone: 748-5220

ext.

Wilson; Faculty Supervisors; Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz is

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4B15, Kitchener, Ontario,

691. 692, 693, 664 Fax: 748-.597I

N2G 4M4.

E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

Submissions must not con-

helpful.

any libellous statements and

may be accompanied by an

illustration (sueh as a photograph).


SPOKE,

Nov. 29, 1999

— Page 5

In brief

Letters

College and high schools unite operation between the college and

Niagara College. protocol

signed

Sept.

agreement

30

College president

and

Bill

Niagara

McLean, district

was

by

Niagara

Dan

Patterson

director of the

school board.

The agreement continues a long history of collaboration and co-

The agreement commits

topical letters

and phone

the local high schools.

High school students considering technology careers have a pathway that links them with

A

spoke welcomes

'

By Talisha Matheson

toj

^e

Editor

that^pudc

the writci

\ name,

address

nulib^^ verification.

;

All letteTim|ii^& signed.

the

school

board and Niagara College to update the course pathways annually and to work

'

No e-mail let^rs'^'v^ be I

,

accepted.

...

together to offer advice to stu-

dents early in their high school

STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS

careers.

The pathway

project will help

students receive early information

FALL

about college programs leading to

1999

their career choice.

THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP. DATE

TOPIC TIPS

ON MAKING

MON. NOV.

THURS. NOV.4

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17

STRESS MANAGEMENT

WED. NOV.23

3:30-5:00

2D16

PREPARING FOR

MON. NOV. 29 THURS. DEC. 2

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17 2A411

1

WED. DEC. 8

NEED HELP WITH COURSE DIFFICULTIES?

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING FORMAT. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE COME TO STUDENT SERVICES. GAY, LESBIAN, AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING -Please see

PEER TUTORING CAN HELP! WE OFFER ONE TO ONE TUTORING AND GROUP TUTORIALS FOR HELP WITH SUBJECT

ROOM

PRESENTATIONS

FINAL EXAMS

FEELING LOST?

TIME

Barb Kraler

in Student Services

MULTICULTURAL STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP -Room 2B02 Lynn Robbins or Shawna Bernard in Student

-Sign up in Student Services -Please see

Services for

more information

SPECIFIC DIFFICULTIES

TO APPLY FOR A TUTOR, COME TO STUDENT SERVICES (ROOM 2B02) LAST DAY TO REQUEST A TUTOR FOR FALL SEMESTER IS DECEMBER 1/99

Making

wfeh’5

come true Purchase a

the child of your choice. Gifts will be donated to children of students of Conestoga College who are experiencing Gift for

financial difficulties.

Register at the All gifts

DSA

office.

are to purchased by Mon, Dec, 6


Page 6

— SPOKE, Nov. 29, 1999

Marketing students

Crafts are us!

come

in

By Beverley Grondin

second

Teresa Bricker,

Chad

Allison and

ing competition,” she said.

She added the team is especially Debra Reyner, of the

Rich Paquette.

Conestoga College’s business

Teresa Bricker, a third-year mar-

won second

keting student, said the Conestoga

business faculty, for her outstand-

Association

ing efforts in helping with this

marketing students

Student

place at this year’s annual Ontario

Business

Colleges Marketing Competition

(CBSA) provided funding

in Toronto.

entire trip.

The competition which took George Brown College included a Quiz Bowl, a marketing simulation and case studies where two-person place Nov. 17 and 18

at

“(CBSA) was

for the

grateful to

year’s competition.

“She was the

best,” said Bricker.

originally

Next year’s competition

founded

to provide funding for the market-

will

be

held at Conestoga College.

teams were given a half-hour to prepare the case study and a half-

hour to present

Jessica Kunkle; left, a tfflit-yearixjsl^^s accounting student, shops at the Nov. 18 craft sate held between 9:30 a.m. and noon at the Doon campus. Joyce Hays was one ' of the exhibitors at the show. :V \ by Anna Sajfert)

it.

“We won more medals than the year before.”

'

'

Teresa Bricker, third-year marketing student

Conestoga came in first place and 1998, and were hoping for a repeat performance this in 1997 ISJJ

year.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: I 1 I i I I

and Part 2:

Coping with

Management

I

1

Stress

we discussed that stress is the continual I change that we all face in our everyday lives, and I that we respond to these changes in different i In part

ways

1

physically, emotionally

learn us.

goal

how

is

to

and mentally.

not to eliminate stress but to

manage

it,

even use

it

to help

Raise your awareness of your stressors

and your reactions to them. Don’t ignore Ifyou failed the first test of a course,

I

decide what you can do to increase your

I 1

chance of success next time. What can you change? Can you avoid or

I I 1 I I I

i I I I I I I I I i

eliminate the stressors?

Are you working too many hours? Is this interfering with your educational goals? Can you reduce the intensity of your reaction to stress? Are you making a difficult situation a disaster?

The presentation

and worth

is

only 5 minutes in

5%

ofyour grade. Can you take better care of yourself, building your physical and emotional wellbeing? Exercise, sleep, nutritional eating and watching what you smoke and drink all add to your physical health. Cut one cup of coffee from your morning length

Lisa in the

advertising

entrepreneurship category; Rafael

I I 1 I

Mark Smith for Mark Smith and Scott

Bazzarella and

marketing;

Boyer for marketing research; Lisa Cashmore and Scott Boyer for the retailing

category;

and

Jenn Hussey for the job interview category.

Other student participants were

Lisa Cashmore, a third-year marketing student, won first place medals in the entrepreneurship and retailing categories.

Katie Sinclair, Jen MacKinnon,

(Photo submitted by Teresa Bricker)

1 I I I I I

i i I I I I i I I

Writing Problems?

Gz\ some free help (No problem)

..

ALA

routine.

Having mutually-supportive realistic rather

friendships, setting

than perfectionistic goals and

being good to yourself all contribute to managing

I i

stress.

For further assistance, talk to a counsellor

in

Student Services.

I I

category;

Cashmore and Jenn Hussey

the

your problems.

1

I

individual winners include

Jenn Hussey and Scott Boyer in

,

A

I

Stress

The

Stress

A Message from

I I I

Student Services (Room 2802)

1

Writing Centre

Room 2A118

(ext.

607)


SPOKE, Nov.

29, 1999

— Page 7

Student wins scholarship Dedication and hard work

pays

off with

ByTalisha Matheson

$1 ,000 prize The award

is

sponsored by the

Purchasing Management Asso-

A

Conestoga business adminis-

tration student has

won

a $1,000

scholarship.

Jeffery

the recipient

IN/lovi®

received

the

taken in the second year of the

management program.

His mark was 83 per cent.

Conestoga College

is

30 SDllDLER Bill IZ>cz>i_J

the only

Canadian college program to earn

PMAC recognition. Conestoga materials management graduates gain course equivalency credits from PMAC in a number of the association’s professional education areas.

“It

took a

Matteis said he works 20 to 30 lot

of hard

week at the Milton-based company Karmax Stamping and horns a

work, and you really

he also attends 21 hours of class a

have

to dedicate

“I really don’t

have a social

Jeffery Matteis,

scholarship recipient

life

who

right now,” said Matteis

is

looking forward to graduation.

“There are many things

I

can do

career wise,” he said. “I just have to graduate first.”

you

took a really

self,”

lot

of hard work, and

have to dedicate your-

Matteis said.

He added

the course

is

demand-

very useful.

you want

to achieve a

good

mark, you have to put the work into

it,”

Matteis said.

Matteis said the

scholarship

paid

money from some of

BIG BADDY

the

LIcensea event

his

school expenses.

ing, but the material learned is

“If

THC WATeKSOr

week.

yourself.”

“It

rxliQh^l"

Tuos. Nov.

the organization.

Matteis

award given to the student with the highest academic standing in the principles of buying course materials

Canada (PMAC) and must be a member of

ciation of

“I did have some fun with the money,” Matteis said. “It wasn’t used to strictly pay bills.”

He

said

it

takes a lot of hard

work and the money was a reward.

Stuclents $2

Ouests $4 7:00pm Doors Stcfckifljp :Stuffer|;|_03n

Fixed Rate of 6.7|% Available

until

December

17,

1999

Borrow up to $3,000

Use the Stocking

Staffer for

ANY

REASON! Guaranteed fixed

rate for

1

year

Convenient payments

Quick and Easy Application Simply complete the stocking

stuffer application form.

Send the form by

fax, mail

Stocking Stuffer Applications can be it in person by December 17. through; office or union credit from the obtained Ext. 354 Bob Wall Ext. 283 Bob Evans or submit

ritia

Taylor

Ext. 392

fCorjestga College

has won a $1,000 scholarship sponsored by the Purchasing Management Association of Canada.

Jeff Matteis

(Photo by Talisha Matheson)

Walter Boettger

employees and

Ext.

their families qualify for

294

membership}

Waterloo County Education Credit Union Education Centra, 51 Ardelt Avenue, {Corner of Ottawa and Homer Watson) Kitchener, ON N2C 2E1 Tel (5191 742-3500 « Fax fS19) 742-6072 » Web Site www.wcecu.com


Page 8

— SPOKE, Nov.

29, 1999

Inlertatafnenl

A-Trak makes waves By Ray Bowe

A

lot

of people don’t realize

but Canada

is

it,

some

harvesting

superb DJs these days. The most ^ notable

prodigy to

Canada

come

lately

Macklovitch, also

out of

Alain

is

known

as

A-

Trak.

For those thing

who

don’t

know

any-

about A-Trak, here’s an

which includes the notorious Mix

tures Goretex

Medinah from New

Master Mike and the legendary Q-

York-based

hip-hoppers

Bert.

Phixion. The album also contains two other songs, plus a bonus cut A-Trak produced.

When A-Trak

started skratching,

influence in the beginning,” says

Throw Records.

tial.

A-Trak,

now

17.

learned a lot from

“As for DJs,

DJ

Jazzy

I

Jeff,

being thrust into an increasingly

to

there,

he went

Rimini,

finals

DMC talent

Italy, for the world and became the youngest World Champion ever. His led to him becoming an

honorary

member of

the illustri-

ous Invisbl Skratch Piklz, a alliance based in

DJ

San Francisco

Pete

widening DJ

circle. Most recently, A-Trak applies his skratching skills to Obscure Disorder, a

As

for solo projects,

But don’t expect any extensive touring right away. A-Trak has

no

is

came

is isolat-

it

growing

own

need

be Obscure Disorder or the Allies, A-Trak has a different purpose. He

I

come up with

emphasize

to

tries

their

He

spends ample time devoting himself to his art, and the results

on Dec.

shine through.

and plans

A-Trak has been busy this year, winning the ITF Western Hemisphere Skratching Battle and the ITF Canadian Advancement Finals. At the ITF Regionals in

university

Montreal-based hip-hop group.

skratching after school.

depends on what I’m working on at that point. I’ll usually start by warming up and tight-

“What

practise

Oomedy Nooner VfiNSTOH SfEM! Appearing the Sanctuary

I

style.”

different

aspects of his style.

Nov. 21 in Oahu, Hawaii. Then he’ll be at the Vestax world finals Until then, A-Trak will practise

on

just

Tumtablist Federation finals on

11.

Depending

who he’s skratching for, whether it

really fast, but

to

second place in the team

in

championships.

is

needs more attention. DJ-wise,

still

A-Trak juggled

A-Trak

said

dope,” he says. “If anything,

it’s

this year,

Trak mutated his style when he teamed up with the Allies and

“The Canadian music scene

people

Montreal

The Crunge from Led Zeppelin’s Houses of the Holy. At this year’s DMC Worlds, A-

on Ninja Tune

Canada, but he sees poten-

in

think

International

The band has a new 12-inch LP called 2004 set for release “really soon.” The lead track. 111 Bill, fea-

in

Some have

tour dates plaimed, but he’ll be

the

who

Koala,

Records.

battling

at

work on

I’ll

material,” he says, adding that

he also rubs shoulders with another notable Montreal DJ, Kid

ed

brother

home

From

new

A-Trak has a seven-inch EP titled Enter Ralph Wiggum to be released on Stones

“My

Rock and Premier at first.” A-Trak has come a long way from practising at his house, to

town.

ening stuff and then

came from home. (producer Dave One) helped me get started. Even though he’s not a DJ, he was a big his influences

At age 15, A-Trak won the 1997 Technics/DMC Canadian Championships in Montreal, his update.

Non

But A-Trak does not rely solely on his DJ prowess. He is equally diligent in his educational pursuits to attend a

Canadian

upon graduation.

Ray Bowe

a third-semester

is

journalism student at Conestoga College.

Dogma

exhibits big ieap of faith By Adam Wilson Two

renegade angels

fell

now

Earth years ago and

to

they’ve

found a loophole to get back into Heaven. It’s up to the last descen-

Wep. Dec. 8 th Starts at :30am 1

dant of Christ to stop them or else all life will

This

is

cease to

exist.

the premise for Kevin

Smith’s new, intelligent and fuimy

1

Dogma. The movie

film.

around

centres

descendant of Christ.

One

night

she

visited

is

by

Metatron (Alan Rickman), the “voice of God.” He explains about Loki and Baitelby, the renegade angels, and their plan to get back into Heaven.

Damon

13th

Bartelby;

Loki; George

as

Carlin as the head of New Jersey’s Catholic Church, Cardinal Glick;

and Jason Lee as Azrael. Dogma has prompted much controversy since

The

release.

its

Catholic League has been protesting the movie, saying

it’s

fun of Catholicism and

making pro-

it

Smith’s intention.

them

to Wisconsin. If the it

two would

God wrong. God is never wrong,

Since

two were dise,

to get

Metatron

the

back into para-

tells

everything that

is.

Bethany the

Up would

be

down, black would become white, existence would become nothingness. In essence, they’ll

The movie makes you think own religion and spiri-

about your

tuality. It talks a lot if

angels would “undo reality and

unmake

the world.”

and what your own how you use it. It

is

Catholics.

nothing It

pokes a

but

it is

guess

who

prophets are: Jay (Jason

the

Mewes)

of fun

at

nothing to get upset about.

in a strip club

probably

bash

to bit

Aside from the swearing (which is toned down a lot in Dogma

you know anything about Kevin Smith movies you

can

and

the Catholic religion in general,

compared

If

about faith faith is

very pro-God and does

absolutely

Metatron informs Bethany about two prophets that must accompany her on the journey to New Jersey.

^:0(ll,„

Matt

by

the

allowed into Heaven again and

prove

^ovie starts

Rock as Rufus, apostle; Ben Affleck as Chris

After Loki and Bartelby angered God, he told them they were never

get back into Heaven,

The StuiehMiry

There are some

performances

motes anti-God ideas. However, anyone following the story would see that this was not

sent

liceMed Cveot

is great.

outstanding

Bethany (Linda Fiorentino), a Catholic who works at an abortion cUnic. She thinks she has lost her faith in God and happens to be the last

the acting

with

Smith’s

other

movies), one brief shot of mild nudity and a scene that takes place

with a scantily-clad

Salma Hayek, offensive at

opposite

- it’s

movie

the

all.

It

is

isn’t

exactly the

enlightening.

Students $2.00

and Silent Bob (Kevin Smith). The duo lead Bethany to New

nal

Jersey on her “quest” and a great

explores religion as only Kevin

,^pi&fc^uests $4.00

adventure unfolds along the way. This movie is probably Smith’s

Smith can, but

most well-made movie

The

story

is

to

date.

witty and smart and

Smith’s

way

Dogma

piece

of

is

a truly origi-

filmmaking.

it

does

it

in

It

such a

someone who isn’t religious but knows the basics of the that

Bible, can enjoy the movie.


SPOKE, Nov.

29,

1999

— Page 9

Anywhere But Here

Looking

for outside forces for

happiness

By Beverley Grondin Any number

of cliches could

describe the relationship between

Ann and Adele August in Wayne Wang’s production of Anywhere But Here, an adaptation of the novel by Mona Simpson. Perhaps the best it

is

way

vi‘

to explain

they were both looking for

outside forces to create their hap-

two women need each other more than they would like to admit. Sarandon,

piness.

known

for her ability

Ann, played by Natalie Portman (Star Wars: Episode I The

to bring a quirky sense

Phantom Menace), is 14 years old when her mother Adele, played by Susan Sarandon (Stepmom), moves them from Bay City, Miss,

flighty

and

to Beverly HiUs.

is

Wang, who

also directed

The

Joy I.uck Club, said in a press release that for Adele, L.A. is like the

stars)

Emerald City in The Wizard

of humour

her characters, portrays the

to

Adele August as a woman energetic and exciting. Behind closed doors, though,

who

is

as her daughter

knows, Adele

barely keeping her head above

water.

She teaches

at

a tough inner-city

high school, but she hasn’t figured out

how

to

manage her

life.

Many

of Oz.

times the power in their small

“She sees it as the answer to her hopes and dreams,” he said. Adele, a perpetual optimist,

forgets to

desires to give her daughter a bet-

Sarandon

ter life

than she would have had in

their small town.

Ann

is

angry

about being taken away from her friends

From

and family. the first minutes of the

movie, the volatile relationship

between mother and daughter

is

apparent.

However, as the film progresses, it

becomes apparent

that

these

apartment goes off because she

The

pay the

bill.

Natalie Portman and Susan Sarandon check out the elegant cannot afford - in the movie Anywhere But Here.

home

in

Beverly

Hills

-

which they

(Photo submitted)

of Portman and one of the strongest elements of the movie. Their on-screen chemistry is

wants to accomplish.”

pushing her mother away, resent-

for college, is that her life

solid,

and the audience can feel the pain, sorrow and joy the char-

Both Ann and Adele are looking for something to make their lives

ing her for the instability her

not have been as exciting or as

better.

mother has created for her. Her focus from the moment she

colourful without her mother.

acters share.

moves to California is to get away from her mother as soon as she can.

he

pairing is

In the press release Sarandon

saw her character as misguided and self-serving, despite her love for her daughter. said she

“In a way, Adele

is

in denial,”

said Sarandon.

“She has

to

be in

order to accomplish what she

For Adele, it is the dream that her daughter will become an actress and live an exciting life.

some normalcy

Ann

Ann

life.

believes her crazy, unstable

Aim believes getting in touch with

mother

her long-absent father will restore

unhappiness.

With

to her

spends most of the film

is

the root of all her

What

comes

she

though, as she

is

Wang summed “By

said,

Ann

to

realize

about to leave

it

would

up best when

the end of the story,

realizes

that

without her

mother the world would be less interesting and everything would be flatter.”

DJ Dancing!

vame

3WNED,OPERATED

V

AND TAXED!

B

Westmount PlaceShopping Centre, 50 Westmount St., Waterloo

3

(519) 884-8558

OAKVILLE BUKLINCTON BARBIE HAMILTON WATERLOO .

.

.


A

Full-Time, One-Year Post-Graduate Program Starting January. 2000

Call for more informatj >^-748-5220, ext. 6^

^a^cial

assistfln^feis

Peer Services is looking to hire Business and Technology students. Want to earn extra money while you complete your studies and feel a sense of pride and accomplishment for having helped a fellow student? Increase your own academic mastery. If you have achieved 80% or befter in certain courses and have a 75% average in your program, then you qualify to be a tutor. If you would like more information, please visit Student Services (room 2B02) and make an appointment to talk to the Peer Services Administrator. Peer tutors are paid hourly.

Peer Services Supported by Doon Student Association

t

TOAL EXAMS WOj

Rudolph the red -nosed

Greyhound?

Have a safe and happy holiday season.

Go Greyhound and leave the driving to

'Heed us.

student return fares from Kitchener

*te<fcewcft^. to:

euELPH

$10

BELLEVILLE

$52

TORONTO

$22

Ottawa

$101

cCeaeie^lii^

AeCfr

a

^tudcf

(fon.

(n Ce<vutc(t^ ^tfuzte^ie^ (a ute^iectAe excun ^lien^ofuMutee?

(^XMte ta one

PETERBOROU6H

$46 SUDBURY $101 PLUS many more discounted destinations! GST

not included.

GREYHOUND CANADA

Date

Location

Mon., Nov. 29

Time 11:30- 12:30 P.M

Thur., Dec. 2

12:30^ 1:30 P.M.

Room 1D17

Wed., Dec. 8

12:30- 1:30 P.M.

Room 2A405

Room 3A620

15 Charles Street West

741-2600

Workshop

No

WWW

.

greyhound ca .

Facilitator:

Shawna Bernard

required for these workshops. If you have any questions, please drop by Student Services in Room 2B02. registration

is


.

SPOKE, Nov.

29, 1999

— Page 11

•WWF rocks SkyDome

the

EO\4/UNC; NtQHT!

By Adam Wilson On

Doon

Nov. 20, the

@ Fredrick Bowling Lanes

Student

(DSA) organized a

Association

SkyDome

trip to the

to see the

World Wrestling Federation’s last Toronto “house show” of 1999. For a house show, which is a general event that gives wrestling fans a chance to see their favourite superstars in the ring,

it

was very

large and flashy.

WWF’s

Most of the were

SkyDome

at

big stars

with the excep-

Cold Steve Austin, who is rumoured to be suffering from neck and knee injuries, and tion of Stone

New Age

the

The

Outlaws.

show

began

from hell. Next up, arch-enemies X-Pac and Kane went one-on-one with Kane getting the win after a choke slam. X-Pac then proceeded to go after the referee who threw X-Pac to the mat and told him to “Suck line

The

Crowd-favourites, Mankind and A1 Snow, fought the next match against the feuding cousins. The Hollys, who fought with each

event had finally begun.

other as

taking

There were some weak matches featuring

some mid-card wrestlers Albert and Sean

Prince

like

Stasiak.

When

the

popular superstars

began wrestling, however, the crowd became excited.

D-Lo Brown,

Test

Venis got the crowd

and Val

pumped up

in their respective matches, but

wasn’t until Orangeville’s

it

own

Edge and his “brother” Christian came out that the crowd began to go wild.

match (two against three) against Too Cool and the WWF’s newest Canadian sensation, Chris Jericho. The crowd went

when

absolutely crazy

Jericho

his entrance.

between the two teams,

until the

intercontinental champi-

on, Chyna,

made an

much

chant of “Socko” and hit his isher,

appearance,

the main and even before the match started, the crowd was in unbelievable anticipation of the

way

his

to the ring to a chorus of

fi-om the crowd.

com-

one of them.

batants, especially

boos

Then came

the

Great One.

The Rock came out to a SkyDome full of people chanting his name and proceeded to destroy Bossman

in the ring.

ed the Rock infamous

to deliver

lines,

The Rock

some of his

which he

did.

talked in the ring for

minutes, giving the crowd

with the exception of his song.

After the match. Triple

H

taunt-

ed the crowd, telling them “If

was ever a crap-hole where

wouldn’t want to win

my

I

title

would be Toronto.” The crowd booed Triple H out of the ring and escorted him out of the SkyDome with the same chants he gets on TV. it

the

intermission,

there

were some unbelievable matches.

A

New Age

triple-threat,

single-elimina-

team match between The The Hardy Boys and The Dudley Boyz resulted in the

Outlaws were sorely

missed, as was Stone Cold, but the

show was

The

Showstopper.

(Ian Rep

After the match, the crowd want-

The Smackdown Hotel. Overall, the show was great. The

match with the champ winning with his signature move, the

h

The next match was

WWF

was another good

€"

event,

heavyweight champ. The Big Show, took on the former champ.

Before the intermission,

f

Hardcore Holly.

everything they wanted to hear,

After

Non-StudentsI

fin-

five

back,

for

The Mandible Claw, on

attacking Jericho and costing his

there

$8

as with their oppo-

team the match.

Triple H. This

Students

This contest was as fiiimy as it was a good-all-around match. Mankind and Snow won after Mankind answered the crowd’s

the

This match was a great contest

WWF’s

for

office

nents.

The Big Bossman made

The two fought a handicapped

made

$6

DSA

it.”

with

on Steve Blackman. The crowd was excited by this match simply because the Godfather

Tickets at

stiU entertaining.

show

each and their entrance music sounded great as light

wrestler

was

for

fantastic

Meeting

S Cross Roads Room Q t/

well.

One problem with the how expensive the

event was

memorabilia

shows. T-

shirts

wrestling

is at live

ranged from $25 for a shirt to $30-35 for a

smaU-sized

3:30pm

large shirt.

WWF

The

SkyDome

won’t be back

until

fan of wrestling

March

who hasn’t seen it

tion tag

live

Acolytes,

WWF

Acolytes winning with a clothes-

shows justice, even house shows.

should attend.

on

TV

at

3 and any

Tues.

November 30

Thurs.

December 4

&

Seeing the

does not do if

live

they are

you have a story idea, 748-5220, ext. 691 or e-mail us at spoke @conestogac.on.ca1 If

res every

week

in

call


— SPOKE, Nov. 29, 1999

Page 12

Condors win game, lose players By Anna

Sajfert

it

in front

tied

TSvo Condor players were

assisted

seri-

when

the Conestoga hockey team defeated Cambrian Golden Shield

ously injured

Condors

game

held

at the

Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre at Doon campus. Steve Wesseling suffered a dislocated shoulder and Matt Turcotte

broke his wrists after they were

slammed Both

backboards.

the

into

were

treated

for

their

injuries.

The Condors played a game, with a

lot

persistent

of passing and

fewer shots on net than Cambrian. In the early minutes of the

first

Shedden

of

Darryl

period,

of the net untouched and score

at

two.

scare with a powerful slapshot to the top right-hand

comer of

swept through the crease, banging

puck off the post, past the Cambrian goalie and into the net. With 9 1/2 minutes to go, the Condors’ Tyler Heimpel scored the winning goal for Conestoga the

while shorthanded.

puck

the loose

He

at his

picked up

own

goalie and the defender.

team’s

completed

goal at the halfway

mark of the

first

line

and

raced

a

blue

Cambrian

defender down the right wing. He faked a shot, losing both the this beautiful

He then move by

wrapping the puck around and

period.

Conestoga’s defence wasn’t as active in the second period as

This oversight proved costly five

Cambrian Golden Shield’s

net,

brought

in

net as possible.

(Photo by Anna Sajfert)

handed for 6

The team never

1/2 minutes straight in

the second period of

passed up an opportunity to shoot. The Condors followed the same

was

minutes

which

1

1/2

two-man

a

disadvantage.

“We

philosophy.

Conestoga’s defence held strong to protect their goalie

a Nov. 20 game.

strat-

egy was to shoot as many shots on

minutes into the second period

when Cambrian’s Darryl Skworchinski picked up a loose

Conestoga Condors squeaked by Cambrian Golden Shield 4-3

into the net.

it

was in the last period of the game. The defence was more concerned about playing the puck than tying up their opponents.

puck from behind the

the

Cambrian a 3-2 lead. Conestoga responded quickly. Only 38 seconds afterwards, on a powerplay. Condor Dave Galbraith took the puck on the right wing and goal, giving

Cambrian scored the first goal. Condor Jon Suckert, who was assisted by Tyler Heimpel and Dave Galbraith, scored the home first

He was

by Shawn Denomme.

With 13 minutes left in the game, Skworchinski gave the Condors a

varsity

4-3 in a Nov. 20

the

to

tonight,”

on our one

said

Doug

Bonhomme, Cambrian Golden

Jamie Taylor.

The Condors' were able to protect their net when they were short-

He

Shield’s head coach.

“Our defence made some bad

and

said the

patient

didn’t capitalize

three

decisions

the

forwards

weren’t driving the net.”

Condors played a

game.

“No Condor player put his teammate in trouble,” said Bonhomme. Cambrian has a strong skating team which didn’t skate Saturday night,

he

said.

Condors’ Galerao,

head

said

played one of

the its

Ken home team

coach,

better

games

Saturday night.

“Giving up only three goals was a real boost to our guys,” he said. “Every time Cambrian Golden Shield

good

comes down, they give us a

run.”

Golf tees off at rec centre By Nicole Furlong-

Martin

J

not

only

brings

his

there are several different pack-

which includes a membership with the Canadian Professional Golf Association for almost 20 years, but a computerized teaching system to help students perfect their swing and gauge how quickly their ball trav-

ages to choose from. Rates for golf lessons at the

expertise in golf,

Conestoga

College

is

now

offering golf lessons six days a

week.

Tony ^.teacher

Canada)

Martin, (the at

a

level-three

highest

level

in

Westmount Golf Club

in Kitchener, is teaching lessons to

els after they tee off.

students and anyone

Martin program.

community who squash court 2

is

from the interested, on

at the recreation

is

recreation centre are;

$140 per

session for individuals; $105 per session for groups of five; $60 for

children under 12 on Saturday mornings; $45 for a three-hour golf class; and the special rate of $90 per session for Conestoga stu-

optimistic about the

dents.

He said he thought it was odd the

When

the

room

is

not booked

centre.

college didn’t already offer golf as

for appointments,

Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation, said his initial plan was to build a bubble where people could train under Martin, however, this proved to be too costly.

a sport.

welcome to use it range to practise their swing fi'ee of charge. The long-term plan is to develop a golf team at Conestoga, James

The under-used squash court was the next best thing.

James said the two courts are under utilized, so it shouldn’t cause a problem to dub court 2 “the golf room.”

“I think

it

will take a year or

two

make the program more solid,” he said, adding in the early months of the new year he suspects business will be booming. Martin will be available from Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. The program began Nov. 22. A full session is an hour and to

students are as a driving

said.

“Tony would

like to

develop a

golf team in the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association for

Conestoga and within his own network.”

Dec. 6th to 9th

is

^CluisteTlieieWeel: In the Sanctuary Volunteers Needed See Alycia in the

*-x

DSA office Tony Martin is teaching golf lessons at the recreation centre^^ squash court. He is available Monday to Saturday. (Photo by Nicole Furlong)

Digital Edition - November 29, 1999  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you