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31st Year

NOVEMBER 8,

What’s Inside

of

Elizabeth Witmer, minister of

and long-term care and

MPP for Kitchener- Waterloo,

said

provincial government

that the

has invested an additional $3.3

milhon

PfiGE9

and searching for a cure,”

life

she said. Expo ’99 was the

first

gathering

the

for

tri-branch

Guelph,

Kitchener-Waterloo and Cambridge diabetes associa-

in funding for diabetes

Over 100 people attended the which kicked off the residential campaign for diabetes

prevention, treatment and educa-

event,

when she spoke at the Canadian Diabetes Association Expo ’99 held at Conestoga

month.

College Nov.

body cannot properly use the

2.

“We’re not that far from a cure,” Witmer said. She said before she became an MPP, she served on the local board of the diabetes association. Witmer said she had a neighbour who struggled with diabetes and that got her interested in the disease.

made me want to make a dif-

“It

funding

in

tions.

tion

Radar Ball.

Expo

at

Diabetes gets $3.3 million more health

Waterioo inventor pitches

1999

Witmer speaks ByTalisha Matheson

— No. 41

Diabetes

a disease where the

is

sugar in food that

converts to

it

energy.

Across Canada,

1 .5

million peo-

ple have diabetes, while an esti-

mated additional 750,000 have

it,

but have not been diagnosed.

The

disease affects people of

all

ages. Seventy per cent of the people atflicted are 70 years old and

over 7,300 children in Ontario

ference in improving the quality

Elizabeth Witmer said the government is investing an additional $3.3 million for diabetes prevention, treatment and education. (Photo by Taiisha Matheson)

have diabetes.

Woodworking student harassed By Jeanette

Okum “Carpet muncher”

a phrase

is

of the closet

n^Eii

tion,

she says she endured months

of harassment.

“When

was

handed around, there was so much stuff written on my name I couldn’t sign my name,” said Okum. She said sometimes her name would be crossed out and replaced with words such as “dyke” and “carpet muncher” or the words would be written beside her name. The class in question was her finishing theory class, taught to first-year

woodworking

students.

John Buss, a faculty member and instructor of the class at the time,

Soccer season comes to an

said he doesn’t recall any inci-

end.

dents involving

Okum.

“There may have been some names on an attendance sheet,” said Buss, but because he taught the course a year ago he said he cannot remember to

comments were

Commentary Page 4 Internet

romance

“I don’t

affair

the

pay much attention to I

have kids making smart comments on (attendance sheets) once and a while.

And

if I

comment,

I

know who made

say something, but

happens very sporadically. I don’t recall anything directed

it

wasn’t even sure

ment

a significant issue and

is

something for which there recourse for those

who

is

it is

legal

ly feel they

classmates began to harass her in

formal

called out disparaging remarks

She was not successful in the program because of her absences,” said Findlay. “There was no indi-

during class.

cation of this incident hindering

“I’m not saying that isn’t the case in this case,” he said, “but

her success in the program.”

there

a

and students also

the hallways

“My

was

biggest thing

is

that the

teachers didn’t do anything,” she

Okum, who

said the general atti-

complaint,

individuals.”

complained to the dean of the program, Mike McClements, who is dean of technology.

question on

class

at

the

witnessed the events and said the harassment was allowed

time,

to continue.

Dropped out “Students were warned to not write on the attendance sheet, but

“When

I

talked to the dean,

it

was like he didn’t really know what to do,” she said. Okum said McClements told her he had warned one of the students who she claimed was harassing her, but she said she feels something more should have been done.

homosexual. The harassment escalated to the point where Okum dropped out of

would have been dealt with, but because it has to do with homosexual harassment, nobody wants

the

woodworking program during

the winter semester this year.

“Once I

didn’t

Okum.

I

started getting harassed,

want to go to school,” said “I wish I could have fin-

I

didn’t think

I

could.”

Peter Findlay, a faculty

member

and one of Okum’s instructors, said there was one isolated incident in his class where a comment was made by a student and retracted immediately, but it never happened again.

“If

McClements said there’s no some issues it is nec-

essary to keep notes or document things.

“But

don’t recall that

I

was

the

case in this particular situation,”

he

said.

“I really only

had one

conversation (with Raine).”

McClements

said he listens to

students’ complaints listened,

and having

makes a judgment on

what seems the appropriate thing

continued,” said Murphy who was intimidated because he is it

a

said

was nothing documented. It was a disagreement between two

tudes in the class were horrible,

Okum’s

file

McClements.

“The comments got louder

student in

legitimate-

have grounds to

because they (the students) knew they could get away with it.” Rob Murphy, a woodworking

ished, but because of the situation

directed.

those things,” said Buss.’T mean,

the

a popular

whom

said he

Okum heard the comment. “Raine was a capable student,

said.

the attendance sheet

became

but she missed a lot of classes.

program

woodworking

the

it

in a lesbian

that she

relationship,

in

after

group of male

known

learned about her sexual orienta-

R«VGE12

said

Raine Okum knows all too well. She is a lesbian. She is also a former student of Conestoga College and after her classmates

that

Three to Tai^ comes out

He

towards Raine.”

Everall

it

was sexual harassment

to deal with

it,”

it

she said.

McClements would not confirm

to do. “I

he

am

essentially here to listen,”

said.

McClements

he did not

said

address the matter with the faculty

of

the

woodworking program it was war-

a warning was given to the student Okum claimed harassed her. He

because he didn’t feel

had a separate discussion with Okum and the person accused of harassing her. “To my knowledge that intervention resolved the issue because I had no further indication that there was any ongoing disagreement between the two students,” said McClements. There’s no question that harass-

“Where it’s an issue between two individuals of some sensitivi-

said he

ranted.

ty, I

respect the privacy of the indi-

viduals in question,” he said.

Okum

said

McClements

advised her to speak to a counsellor in student services about the situation.

See Compliant - page 3


Page 2

— SPOKE, Nov.

8,

1999

Pro:

Con:

Applied degrees beneficial to college communities

Applied degrees are sticky subject

By

Phil

Wright

allow

increased

Twenty-three of Ontario’s 25

community colleges support

the

pursuit of applied-degree granting

powers

Ontario colleges, according to a survey of college executives Spoke conducted Oct. for

- 22 The remaining two

12

.

colleges,

Borea, in Sudbury, and Fanshawe,

London, were undecided. Although the colleges agree on

in

and

authority

boards of

flexibility for individual

each college, as well as expanded credential powers for colleges. Given the expected growth of first-year students in the near future, particularly in the year of the double cohort graduating from high school upon the elimination of Grade 13 in 2004, all surveyed agreed that universities would be hard pressed to meet the increased

demand.

Conestoga Sept.

said

24,

should be

applied degrees

initially tested in

as

research-oriented institutions

Many

offer applied

College in Sarnia, that allowing

would greatly enhance

as

colleges such powers

is

the next

natural step.

Deemed community colleges in 1965, the role of colleges has expanded well beyond their origi-

graduates to compete

Lawrence College

ognized around the world as a university credential and changing the rules by allowing colleges to grant degrees would change their definition. “Applied degrees would lead

in Brockville,

All surveyed agreed the

commu-

Catherine Rellinger,

Mohawk

College

largely because of the advent of

information technology. Colleges need a global emphasis and degrees offer that opportunity, said Catherine Rellinger, presi-

of Hamilton.

Mohawk

College

in

believe the ability to offer applied degrees in some programs greatly enhance the capaci-

ty of our graduates to

global

compete in a

economy and labour mar-

Such

fundamental changes necessitate an expanded role for colleges, according to a June 1999 position paper by the advocacy association of Ontario’s

commu-

nity colleges.

Association

the

of

Community tially

such cases, inefficiencies would develop and the value of such programs would be diluted,

students

colleges were ini-

designed for general-level and applied degrees

would create a gap

tions, thus creating a disadvantage

versities, colleges

fill

students,

that

col-

educational

need.

to

college graduates,

said

Rick

public affairs manager of Sault College in Sault Ste. Marie.

Universities their territory,

are protective

he

said,

of

Instead of competing with uni-

should co-oper-

by offering and sharing

ate with universities

joint

programs

resources, said Desbiens.

degrees,

to

grant

according

applied

colleges

create

of directors,

Donna

board

Desjardins,

offer

more

applied

Derks said allowing conflicts

all

col-

would

with colleges

Universities don’t

want

to

run

and less

effective post-

costly

secondary education system.” Ian Clark,

Council of Ontario Colleges

Brian Desbiens, president of Sir Sanford Flemming College in Peterborough. First,

universities should co-

more with colleges to ensure students with outstanding performance in college prooperate

grams are recognized, he said. “Universities have an inability said Desbiens.

sity

As a

have to take

result col-

many

redun-

dant courses.

programs.

Second, universities and colshould jointly develop applied degrees, Desbiens said. to co-operate, the Ministry (of

and universities offering similar

the risk of colleges diluting the

more

lege graduates attending univer-

degrees.

that

lead to a

to recognize college diplomas,”

der city such as in Windsor.

Clair College

“Applied degrees would

Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario. leges to grant degrees

St.

But applied degrees should be a final step in a process, said

Derks, director of research and policy with the Association of

likely than universities tolerating

said, is

Pam

to

Such a problem is even more pronounced for a college in a bor-

Such a scenario, he

study.”

students, said Ron Petker, a guidance counsellor at Grand River collegiate institute.

permitted

all

college

for those

original mandate.

accommodate

“A

should be well-known and developed in a particular area of

on the mis-

Diplomas, unlike degrees, are not recognized in some jurisdic-

not being able to

universities

degrees,” he said.

all col-

less effec-

sion of a different sector.”

avoided, said Rose.

Colleges need to be realistic about the pursuit of applied degrees, said Brian Desbiens, president of Sir Sanford Heming College in Peterborough.

and

rather than taking

be

she said.

costly

post-secondary education system,” said Clark. “Colleges should excel in their mission,

Creating consistent standards could be an issue if colleges are

and with

leges

said

appeal of degrees, he said.

“There is a clear problem with blanket permission,” she said.

Although Desbiens supports applied degrees for colleges, he believes more co-operative efforts

Derks said not all colleges should be given permission to grant degrees in every program.

Training,

graduates. extra hoops in trying to get recog-

between colleges and

They should be allowed

specialized areas,” he said.

nition for their studies,” she said.

should be explored

Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario requests the Ontario government allow a new charter for

Americans don’t readily recognize the diplomas of St. Clair’s

Ontario’s colleges.

The proposed charter would

must

more

tive

be resistant to colleges obtaining such powers beyond colleges’

want a degree

students

St. Clair’s assistant to the

The paper comprised by

programs

to a

and would

Most

rather than a diploma

McGee,

ketplace,” she said.

Niagara College in Welland. However, duplication of existing

Ian Clark said degrees are rec-

“Who’s going to serve the needs of general-level students if colleges offer degrees?” Petker said there needs to be a balance in the post-secondary education system.

leges can

“We

would

Vocationally oriented programs

In

labour marketplace.”

nity that colleges have serviced has developed into either a niche market or a global workplace

dent

programs with a significant

university

a global economy and

Gordon, president of Humber

gent requirements for offering

applied degrees, said Bonnie Rose, vice-president academic at

nal regional intent.

“Students have to go through

universities

to grant

“If universities are unwilling

Colleges

leges to give applied degrees in

initially.

Conestoga College students who ore experiencing financial

difficulties

register their child to receive

donated Register

in

and

Universities) should allow col-

Children’s Wish T ree can

only

versities.

and computer programming, are ideal candidates for

in

are

leges because there are strin-

tronics

the capacity of our

grant

degrees

zation representing Ontario uni-

such as nursing, robotics, elec-

degrees

does Terry Blundell, president of Lambton believe,

are permitted to

applied degrees, according to a councillor with the Council of

Applied

appropriate in areas where an industry has need, said Robert

College in Etobicoke. “This matter is not for

training component.

powers.

The meaning of a degree would become confused if col-

Ontario Universities, an organi-

ers, there is

believe the ability to

degrees only in areas where universities don’t offer them.

populated with students who have a passion for knowledge instead of a preoccupation with jobs, he said. Charlie Labarge, president of St.

for

“We

By Tannis Fenton

leges

Ideally, universities should exist

said applied degrees are natural

powsome disagreement on

method and extent of such

voca-

tionally oriented programs.

the merits of applied degree the

John on

president

Tibbits in a separate interview

a

gift.

confidence at the DSA office

O


SPOKE, Nov.

News No

formal complaint

continued from page one

.

up and dropped the

.

The counsellor was appalled didn’t do anything about it.”

Walk Safe By Adam Wilson

issue.

through and there was no way that was going to leave a message,” she said. Beyond the dean’s warning, Okum said she

I

First-aid kits are

1999

— Page 3

giving aid The

“I didn’t get

that the teachers

Okum said the counsellor told her how to file a

filed

8,

now

Walk Safe

being sup-

kits will cost about $20 each. “Most of the Walk Safe volunteers have first aid and CPR training,”

volunteers to

Smith

tend to any small injuries that could

help.”

number of

knows of no further action taken to correct the situation. Even though the situation improved

accom-

John Pribe, afternoon security rep-

college

somewhat, the remarks continued and she found

panying or someone they see in the parking lots. “I certainly don’t see any reason not to have the kits,” said Kim Radigan, health, safety and environmental co-

resentative for the college, said one

formal complaint and gave her the telephone

plaint.

the human rights consultant at the who would assist her in filing her com-

Okum caimot remember the names of the

counsellor or the

human rights

She made the phone call to the human rights was unable to contact the person.

consultant, but

After trying several' times,

Okum

by her peers. had made a complaint and automatically I was shunned,” said Okum. “No one wanted to work with me or talk to me because of what happened.” herself ostracized

“People knew

consultant.

said she gave

I

plied to the

happen

to

someone they

are

school.”

Record

staff

By Jeanette

back

executive on a

work

Oct.

Record in Kitchener after

29,

a deal was

reached bringing the company’s first strike in history to a close. The more than 100 editorial and advertising staff who walked off the job on Oct. 25 signed a five-year contract

new

ancillary fee for health sci-

ences students. The fee is designed to cover the administration costs associated with holding clinics to ensure all

Everall

Striking employees at the

returned to

work

at

recommended by their union’s

bargaining committee.

Included in the agreement are salary increases of two per cent in each of the first two years and a minim um increase of 1.5 per cent in the last

health science students have received required

work placements. and college administration must

shots to participate in their

The

DSA

“This

never knows

is just

a

little

extra

when one might need

the kits.

Preventive measures

ordinator. “If they see someone who needs a Band-aid in the parking lot, they can give one to (him/her) instead of the person having to come back into the

In brief

said.

Leanne Smith, co-ordinator of the

Walk Safe program,

said the kits will

be about die same

size as a fanny

pack.

The

first-aid kits are a

good idea for

“They could

Two 11

someone,”

kits will

be purchased for the Walk Safe

volunteers with the

program. Two teams of two work a shift each night for Walk Safe and each team will be provided with a kit. The Walk Safe program runs from 6:45 p.m. to 10:45 p.m. from

Monday

the safety factor, added Smith.

really help

said Pribe.

to Thursday.

approve the fee before it can be introduced. The fee proposal would be broken down by year and by program so students would not pay

do not require. For instance, nursing students would pay $15 in

for services they

their first year for all their required shots,

how-

a personal support worker (February intake) would only pay $10 for aTB skin test. ever,

three years.

Depending on the cost of

living index, the

increase in the last three years could be

up

Board updated on plan

to as

much as three per cent. The agreement with Local 87-M of The

was a guest

Communications, Energy and Paperworkers

Oct. 27.

union

He met with the board to update them on the development of a new strategic plan, which will provide ah overall direction for the college for a five-year period until 2005. He also asked for their

is

retroactive to Jan.

1,

1999.

Speeding up convocation DSA

president Ellen

Menage

reported to the

board that the convocation committee has been discussing how best to announce various awards and distinctions at the ceremonies held each year

Larry Rechsteiner, director of college planning, at the board of directors meeting

input.

The board suggested

and the college community to

in the spring.

The problem in past years, the ceremony

is

said

Menage,

too long and there

is

is

that

add any additional awards to the program. suggested that awards and accomplishments could be displayed with the

One board member

help of a power-point presentation. The idea would allow each graduate’s list of awards and/or accomplishments to be displayed

he or she walked across the stage

to

receive a diploma.

Jenn Hussey, DSA vice-president of operathought it was a great idea. “Personally I think it is an awesome idea, but it

tions, said she

will

be time consuming

program

to

all

the infor-

mation,” said Hussey. She added that she doesn’t think the problems

outweigh the benefits.

New

ancillary fee

Parking

from students

their classmates.

woes should improve

a reluctance

to

briefly while

class reps could distribute

strategic surveys asking for input

proposed

By Brad Dugard Three guests made a brief presentation to the

Ellen Menage,

DSA

president, reported to the

board that the parking problems could be resolved by January.

at

Doon campus

At that time, she said, a number of students will work terms and co-op placements. This should reduce pressure on the blue lot, near the business wing of the main teaching building. She also reported that the college is now working on plans to build a new parking lot near the woodworking centre.

leave on

Beat Goes On

UW student arrested in stabbing

USED CD OUTLET

A

suspect wanted in connection with the stabbing of a University of Waterloo student Oct. 12

has been taken into custody on charges of attempted murder. Lawrence Michael Pogany, 20, a science student at the university, stabbed another student after a heated exchange. Pogany has made two court appearances and has been denied bail.

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'

— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 4

8,

1999

gov

t

feimefT^iKe Hkris jiy ptdmce^l <Jhaiiges to 67 different provincial

same

Spireme Court mliiig M| —^^^-pjK^te-sex couples 'differ-

ras unconstitutional. Specifically with resect to

-was: mitiat^

lie Supreme Court awarded a

do six months to ct)mthat thLs issue is not

of the Conservative government's

priorities,

one

or even one

Finding iove oniine

*of its i§snea-

“The courts have

we must

told us

deal with this.... and

‘X:orapi;^ag’’ widi tli^Jnw i#^e only action the gbvi emmerrt ii^ltadng on this issue, and th^Te barely meeti ing that requirement Iflarris has found a way to comply with the Stmreme /Court ruling without changing the traditional definition pi spouse, which is what homosexuals are really looking lor.-

,

,

^

same-sex; coucategory same-sex partner ;

new

,e

;nal

ig

legislation that refers td comthe same rights as heteroj-

— —

them

^ described as

*1.

;^

1

1

a professor of criminology at the onto, told the National Post some gay a I.„; .1-.: [e;ti;ew ^ J,

i

ha

.t

S

Falling in love

with someone

‘Well, the

Supreme

11

cept Is this

goverament so obtuse

that

it

can’t accept people

asthey^are? It is time for Harris and his Stone- Aged government to accept all people, regardless of their sexual orientation. Governments should show leadership, but on the issue of gay rights, the government is not leading the way. It is following the public.

love with some-

comes to describing who they are. The man who says he’s a 6-foot-

one

online

2,

changes

all

in

The

rules.

needling question is it is

25-year-old, single,

5-foot-8,

According to CBS’s 60 Minutes, the Internet has

become one of

most used resources over the past five years and is one of the the

when

sources people use

sexy

man

woman

or

the

man

or

woman who

is

on the

other computer.

single,

According to the International

home of

to think he/she

Internet romance, an

Web

ntemet

online dating, meeting someone

on the net

they are looking for simple infor-

many

meeting someone in person.

mation.

having a good laugh.

paved the way meet individuals

Internet has to

from different cities, countries and from all comers of the world, by simply entering a chat room.

Many men and women, young and

old,

both

Their aim

mate,

the

searching

is

their Mr. or

to find their soul

love

for.

in

they’ve

They want

been to find

Ms. Right. Internet

surfers

home those,

220 of them. Of more than 50 are specifi-

who

cally directed to those

When one

falling in love with the physical

are

If

relationship

logs online and chats

may

is

Wilson; Faculty Supervisor: Clirislina .lonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

by

tionship

a possibility a

doesn’t

begin.

all

means

it

may

mean

is

is

is

your

the rela-

enjoy

take you, but that

letting

run out the door think

let

hold and

take

wherever

True feelings may be made known and the “L” word could come up in a chat session. Someone who says he/she has

Keeping Conestoga College connected

meeting people online

forte,

person for a long peri-

od of time, there

different than

aspect of the other person.

looking for romance. to another

no

is

They say it is a safe haven where two people can open up to each other and not worry about

to about

SPOKE

091, 69;., 693, 694 Fax: 748-5971 E-iiiall: spokc(a)cone,stogae.on,ca

is

There are thousands of chat rooms online and Yahoo Chat is

from every ethnic

background, surf the Internet hopes of finding true love.

times the other person

your sense

when what you

love walks

in.

you were a sensible person before you logged on, weren’t you? After

all,

mainly funded from September to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in tliis newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga C'ollege or tlie l^SA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA

logo,

(lie

DSA

spoke:

unless their advertisements contain the

be

out o( errors in advertising beyond the

damages amount paid

space. Unsolicited submissions must be

.sent to

d:,t()

shall not

liable for atiy

arising for the

the editor by

a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or

rcjeelion ami should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

I

favour of

in

site

has found the perfect mate, but

Adam

ext.

with the perfect

is.

fallen in love

he/she would like to be with, not

model

One may begin

the other person

The person has

could be a grandmother in a retirement home.

Production Manager: Tamiis Fenton; Advertising Manager: Phil Wriglil; Assistant Advertising Manager: Walcrian Czarnccki

Phone: 748-5220

who

70-year-old

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor; Beverley Grondin; News Editor: Nicole Futioug; Photo Editor: Talisha Mathcsoii;

SPOKE’s

The person may be in love with mind of what and

the image in the

she’s a

23-year-old,

mate

not necessarily in love with that

person.

dark

tall,

The woman who says

whether fliyUHiSiUil

true love.

is

Circulation Manager:

is

When it

endorsed by

SPOKE

fallen in love with an online

and handsome man could be four 12-year-old boys sitting at home behind their dad’s computer.

the

What many

Spoke

the people on the

often are not being honest

falling

for people

ment should hav/made^it a priority. When it comes to treating everyone equaUy,the govern-^ ment seems to be having a hard time grasping tms con-

is

other end of the Internet wires

a great feeling,

The

govern

don’t realize

is

but

first ,

must use common sense

Internet users

Word tile would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE,

Ancient wisdom

Nov.

Volunteers needed Friendly

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2 SPOKE,

Nov.

8,

1999

— Page 7

Conestoga educates Indonesia By Walerian Czarnecki

Jenderal Soedirman University,

Canada

said that

Indonesia

is

change, and

undergoing a

it

will affect the edu-

tem, as Indonesia moves toward a

democratic system.

group of 28 Indonesian dele-

“Indonesia

gates visited Conestoga College

said Seta,

on Oct. 26 to learn about the Canadian system with the hope of

tem.”

improving the Indonesian system.

five

The delegates were here about the

way

to learn

the college educa-

tion system is closely tied to local

businesses and technological standards, affects

and how the community what is taught at the col-

lege, said

Edy Yuwono,

leader of

the group.

“We

decentralizing,”

is

“as

is

the political sys-

The delegation wants

to achieve

objectives to improve their

The five objectives, under acronym RAISE, are relevance, academic atmosphere, internal management, sustainabilisystem.

the

ty

and efficiency and effectiveThese areas relate to cur-

ness.

riculum control and design, professor qualifications and

are here to train,” he said.

In Indonesia, the education sys-

tem is moving toward an autonomous state, similar to that of Canada, where there is little government interference in the curriculum.

central

ic factors, said

“We have here,”

One

he

seen a lot of these

said.

of the topics discussed was

Many

fund-raisers

potential donors

get

system in Indonesia, and the local government has only 40 per cent. “Now we are changing to a wider mandate,” said Yuwono.

Ananto Kusuma

Seta,

from the

money

come

and ask

to

that they

Conestoga College president John Tibbits. He cited examples of schools like Harvard, which have such a good standing hold,

in the

said

on

said

The

local authorities will

gain 80 per cent control and the central

20 per

government the remaining cent,

which

will enable the

universities to reflect really

needs in

its

what society

education sys-

“What we have done Tibbits.

“We

is

“It’s

hard to go and

much

easier if you’re

known

and what you’re doing is known. to meet other people’s needs, which meet yours too.” There are several advantages of the Indonesian system in meeting

very

the needs of students. They include how inexpensive educa-

involved in the community.” Tibbits

said.

advised the group to

tion is for the students, the

cheap

develop partnerships with compa-

living expenses in Indonesia,

community, based on what can be accomplished that

the 1:10 professor/students ratio,

nies in the

and

said Seta.

could benefit both institutions.

“However, our faculty members

These partnerships have benefitted Conestoga College in many

mostly have no sufficient qualifi-

ways, as the community has more

cations,” said Seta.

“It is

30 per

Yuwono, who has a PhD

in

influence with the college, said

cent PhD and 70 per cent Masters. By 2015 we would like to have 80

marine science and teaches

at

Tibbits.

per cent PhDs.”

tem, said Seta.

With

all

the improvements the

delegation wants to achieve under

RAISE, they

want

still

to

keep

Seta.

students

can

go

it is

to

inexpensive, said

“We

it

cost-efficient for the students, said

Many

Indonesia to study culture because

Yuwono

are interested in CanadiafT

students coming here for credits and visa-versa,” he said. “We call it

a sandwich, two school systems.”

You have

a lot of

get

he

ask someone for a million dollars; it’s

their reputation.

is.

systems will be controlled differ-

ers,”

community that the commu-

tions based

to develop partner-

ships and relationships with oth-

nity will donate to those institu-

networking in the community,”

ently.

“You have

for the reputation they

National Development Agency, explained what the wider mandate

The cuiriculum and education

Ananto Kusuma Seta (left) and Edy Yuwono were two of the 28 Indonesian delegates who visited Conestoga College to learn about Canadas education system. (Photo by Waierian Czarnecki)

fund-raising.

Yuwono. government has 60

per cent control of the education

econom-

Yuwono.

This impressed the

delegation, said

The

a good model

for the changing Indonesian sys-

cation system.

A

is

of

lot

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1999

:30am

Brought to you by the

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is

here to tote

Bring in your old blankets

and coats to the DSA

office

the Other

In

Oct.

Collections Donated to

R.ObO.F. Reaching Our Outdoor Friends

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25 to Nov.

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ways to deal with stress


SPOKE,

Nov.

8,

1999

— Page 9

Inventor having a ball ByTaiisha Matheson was working

classes because he

on

A

Waterloo

man

has earned the Young Entrepreneur’s award for Ontario this year with his creation of the Radar Ball, a unique baseball that times the

speed of a pitch.

David Zakutin, 27, is the president of Zakutin Technologies Incorporated, a Waterloo-based company that produces and sells the Radar Ball.

The

ball is a sensitive device that

tracks the speed of a pitch

the time

hand

it

until

from

leaves the pitcher’s it

hits

the

catcher’s

glove.

a regular baseball with a hole cut through it where the radar is

It

and a battery are placed. Zakutin received a bachelor of applied science degree from the University of Waterloo in 1996 and began his company while finishing his degree.

The dream of inventing

“When

the

you’re starting a fresh business out of school, you don’t

Radar Ball began while Zakutin was still in high school when he did not want to go back to the same summer job he had the year

have any,” he

He

before.

was

in

years in those five years,” he said.

He

admitted to being a bad student, sometimes not attending his

ty to carry the

Ra

dar Ball next

year.

the year.

his sleeve.

jobs waiting for them after they graduate,” Zakutin said. Students

Zakutin said the award was important for the product and afterwards he received plenty of

have

recognition.

His next invention, due out in January or February 2000, has something to do with the cleaning of disposable contact lenses. In one word, Zakutin describes his accomplishments as “formi-

to realize there aren’t

to start thinking

nities

of opportu-

for themselves,

They should

he

said.

also pick a specialty

before getting out into the world.

as a small child

“They need

to learn

In

1998, the Radar Ball was Sporting Good product of

Zakutin said one Radar Ball costs about $35.

It is available in the United States in such stores as

Now

that the ball has been creZakutin has another idea up

dable.”

more than

they are taught,” Zakutin said.

Being the man behind the Radar is a great feeling, he said, especially since there are major

tools.

Ball

Zakutin said he has always been

how

interested in seeing

things

league baseball clubs using his

worked.

device.

a thrill out of building something the world hasn’t had

into this particular area is because

“One of

before.”

He

said only about 1,000 balls

society.

“They have

and made wooden sailboats and worked with Lego blocks before he mastered power

“Hopefully there will be some in this job in the future,”

glamour he said.

He

have crossed the border into Canada. Canadian Wal-Mart stores might have the opportuni-

ated,

sell

“I thought maybe I could create an electronic device and sell 100 of them to my friends and make some money,” he said. He said he liked inventing things

inventor in society.

Wal-Mart.

named

high school,

but never got far enough to them.

new technology stuand those who are sJmost

Zakutin said he figured he could life interesting because there was room to be a recognized

make

finished college or university to take a look at what’s happening in

He said he created the first Radar Ball while he

said.

advises

dents

“I get

probably aged more than 10

“I

One major obstacle he had to overcome was the lack of money.

his business.

likes

why

I

got

even though inventing is kind of boring, I realized earlier on that I

consider himself more of an artist than an engineer. to

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER:

the reasons

could not be a rock and

roll star.”

Quitting

want to be here!” Many students, exhausted by workload and weather and discouraged by borderline marks, consider leaving college. Counsellors see many students who want out and hope to return later. But is “out there” any better? “I don’t

Quitting does not solve a financial shortfall or

make the course work any

easier the

next time.

Leaving student’s

natural

This all

is

causes life.

other

A

problems.

Jobs are elusive. Contact

sudden

void

created

is

with school friends

is lost

in

the

who form

a

community of support. Returning to school seems a monumental task. not a “carry on at all costs’’ message. Rather, know the costs and consider

alternatives carefully. Consider options other than withdrawal

Drop a course which

is

not salvageable and pick

it

up

from a program:

later.

Consult your instructor before conceding defeat.

Pick up a failed course through Continuing Education evening or

summer

classes.

Negotiate with the program chair for partial load. Better to save a

few than lose

Apply

all.

for Peer Tutoring.

The

cost to the student

is

minimal and

it

works.

Considering transferring to another program within your school.

Communicate with a peer

or faculty with

whom

you are having

difficulty.

Request a leave of absence (Health Sciences).

Ask

for help

David Zakutin practises his pitch with his Radar Ball invention.

from faculty or classmates.

Seek temporary shelter

if

home

has

untenable.Community resources are See your doctor.

A sudden decline

(Photo by Talisha Matheson)

become listed in

in

energy

Student Services.

may

JOB FAIR

indicate treat

able illness.

Take off a day or two

to deal

with grief or personal

entitled to a “personaf’absence

now and

loss.

Everyone

is

then.

The Lyric Night Club Metropolis are

now

&

hir-

ing Servers, Security,

&

These and many other solutions have been explored by students with a counsellor.

Support

We

Promoters. Apply

in

person w/Resume

@

are here to listen

get through with a

and help when you have run out of ideas. Most find they can little

support or leave with a plan for completing their

THE LYRIC

education.

A Message from Student

Staff,

Services

(Room 2B02)

DJ’s

located at

122 King St. West on Tuesday November 9th from 3-6 pm. To book Special Events or Trips, Call 749-2121


6

!

MULTICULTUEAL STUDENT OUP

Remembrance Day Service

Would you

In the Sanctuary

like to:

> Meet new people? > Leam more about Canadian culture? > Share information about your own culture? > Discuss issues related to being in a new

Tkrs. Nov. 11

country?

Needed

Volunteeis

Sign up at Student Services times.

Future group meeting times will be decided after the first session.

9:3o - 1 o:30 a.m. 3:30 - 4:30 P.M.

Wednesday, noV. 3 THURSDAY, MOV. 1 1

See Steve in The DSA office

(Room 2B02) for one of the following group

Facilitators:

Lynn Robbins and Shawna Bernard, Student Services

I

Get the

facts,

then get the vox

i""n

The Sanctuary

In

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Nov. 1 7 Tues. Nov. 1 8

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Tango deals with ’90s romance ByTannis Fenton Three to Tango deals with love triangles,

more

and,

professional struggles importantly, illustrates

the experience

of someone com-

ing out of the closet he was never in.

Oscar Novak, played by Matthew Perry, shows what it would be like to be labelled with the wrong sexual orientation. Architect Novak and his business partner, Peter Steinberg, played by Oliver Platt, are trying to land a multi-million dollar con-

with business tycoon Charles Newman, played by tract

Dylan McDermott. In an odd sequence of misunderstandings,

Newman comes

conclusion that

Novak

to the

gay and assigns him the task of spying on his mistress Amy Post, played by Neve Campbell. is

Novak faces the age-old challenge of deciding between love and money as he struggles with watching his heart’s thief shower her affections on another man even though his career is taking off.

Perry’s acting

makes

hi's

is

genuine and he

character sincere.

His comedic talent is well defined, but his dramatic scenes lack depth as he tends to come across as cheesy.

There are striking

Three

to

Tango

entertaining film that

doesn’t require a

lot

similarities

between Novak and Chandler Bing, Perry’s character on the TV

an

is

sitcom Friends.

Campbell

of

is

surprisingly believ-

able as an artistic mistress.

She makes the chemistry between Novak and Post work

analyzing.

well.

Her

dramatic

abilities,

which were fine-tuned on her

Novak

falls for Post,

who

is

an

eccentric glass first

From

artist, during the night of his assignment. a broken-down taxicab to a

bad case of food poisoning, the star-crossed pair manages romantically connect.

That

is,

Novak must pretend

to

be

gay so he doesn’t jeopardize his and his partner’s chances for thenbig break in architecture. Before he knows it, Novak

TV

series Party of Five, help to over-

ride Perry’s lack.

McDermott (The

Practice) and

(Bui worth)

add tremendously to the effectiveness of the

Platt

film. Platt’s

Novak realizes he’s gay. From that

until

Post believes point,

to

character

hilarious

makes some and

diversions

McDermott’s character’s demeanor helps to maintain

bal-

ance.

Damon

Santostefano,

who

directed Severed Ties, could have

used

friends.

But, as Novak soon realizes, being gay does have its advan-

copter.

an article

through in the Chicago Tribune life

and he must face the associated questions from his family and

tages,

especially

for a

straight

man.

He

Chicago are shown from a

Doon Campus - Main

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cast,

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Cafeteria

11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

heli-

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LeatKer Jacket

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require a lot of analysing on the part of the audience.

The

Jacket Fitting and Orders Taken on Tuesday, November 9/99

Melton

Overall, Three to

entertaining

exposed to the mysterious world of women, which few men have seen, when Novak and Post become roommates. is

JACICET DAY

stiff

fewer sappy musical sequences and some of the scenes come across as over dramatic. The film’s scenery is breathtaking at times when spectacular images of the bustling streets of

comes out larger than

Neve Campbell and Dylan McDermott gaze into each other’s eyes in the Warner Bros.’ new offbeat romantic comedy. Three to Tango. The movie is currently playing at Silver City, Cineplex Odeon and Cambridge Centre Cinemas (p^o,o submitted)

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— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 12

8,

1999

Correction The information ten

Letters to the Editor

in the article

by Jody Andruszkiewicz on Oct. 25 “DSA,

writ-

spoke welcomes topical letters that include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification. All letters must be signed.

athletic

council must promote sports”

was not gathered from a formal meeting, but from individual

No e-mail

letters will

be accepted.

Spoke apologizes

interviews. for the error.

Conestoga’s men’s soccer team finished their season in fourth place in the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association after losing to Durham College in the bronze medal game of the finals.

Sports roundup: Soccer season ends By Nicole Furlong Conestoga College’s varsity fill ihi. ^^eck of Oct. 25 - 'fi ill tollows

results

On Nov. 3 the team was defeated 5-3 by tliL Humber Hawks. Ilorne-te.iin scorers were Kyle Boulton and Dairell Woodley

Sat. Nov. 20

with two.

Soccer

The

noi'key

f’ondois’ men’s

soccer

Conestog.i s men’s hnckes team took u tough 6-4 loss to

team finished off

Sault College in Sault Ste, Marie

Duih.im College in the bronze medal game of the Ontario C'olleg.-s Aihlctit Association championships on

m

Oct. 2Q

iienaltj mmutes and omening un the referees' p.irt oncNtogd was defeated in thei; '.eLond league game

With 77

Indsed

I

(

season with los.s

their

untortunate 6-3

.in

to

*

Oct. 30.

team finished

Overall, the

oi the season

f{»^

posafion in the

Home le.irn goal scorers wcie Oreg Thcde, Jon Sudkeit and Darrell Wnodlm with two Assists weie made hy Brad

which

is

Woodley

Marshall,

MacDonald w ilh

aaad

Ian

two.

Conestoga's next“ cirKov. irf at 7:

1999

in

OCAA,

Permitted

excellent accoiding to

Ian James, Coiicsioga's athletic

dUector-

’There soccer.”

is

he

final four is

Includes transportation

such competition

in said. “ To gel to the

cstrcmely good s

were

Purchase your

P.iul

Shaun Samuels.

for intramurals

registered in volleyball, ball hock-

ey and full-contact ice hockey on Oct.20. Full-contact ice hockey the

most popular sports

is

to

one of be run

by the college’s intramural program. Because ice time is very limited, only six teams could be

accommodated in the league, Vuich plays on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. The league filled

up immediately

after regis-

tration began.

Ball hockey will run on Monday and Tuesday nights in the gym. With the entire surface being used,

FALL

1999

participants are getting a workout.

Unlike ice hockey, ball hockey is non-contact. While the competition is intense, players strictly

also realize that they are there just

THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP.

have fun and maybe score the winning goal.

to

As this session moves towards Christmas and exams, participants are urged to come out and relieve their stress

on the courts rather

than in front of a textbook.

Campus recreation activities are way to take one’s mind

TOPIC TIPS

ON MAKING

PRESENTATIONS

DATE

TIME

ROOM

MON. NOV. I THURS. NOV.4

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17

WED. NOV.23

3:30-5:00

2DI6

MON. NOV. 29 THURS. DEC. 2

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17 2A411

a great

which

Volleyball,

Wednesday

STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS

of the program.

College students geared themselves up for Session 2 of intramural athletics. Students

ticket

DSA office

at the

Students register Conestoga

guest

.

home game is

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

1

nights

will

was

run on

split into

off the

real

world for a

little

STRESS

MANAGEMENT

while.

competitive and non-competitive.

While bump,

set and spike is an important part of the game, for league participants, getting out

Jody Andruszkiewicz is a member of the Student Athletic Council and a first-semester journalism

and having a good time

student.

is

the goal

PREPARING FOR FINAL EXAMS

MON. DEC.

6

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING FORMAT. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE COME TO STUDENT SERVICES.

Attention

Condor

Read Spoke

fans! GAY, LESBIAN, AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING

for indepth

hockey coverage

-Please see

Barb Kraler

in

Student Services

MULTICULTURAL STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP

@

-Wednc.sday, November 3, 1999 9:30 -10:30 a.m. -Sign up in Student Services -Room 2B02 -Please sec Lynn Robbins or Shawna Bernard in Student Services for more information


Digital Edition - November 08, 1999