Page 1

Arm broken By

Coming in fall soon...

Brian Gall

FM radio

A college employee has two broken bones in her left arm after slipping on the path in front of Door 4 at Doon cam-

By

pus, Sept. 30.

Phil

Wright

Erica Stoermer, a professional

development

assistant,

said the

accident was a combination of shp-

Conestoga’s long anticipated FM-radio station may be ready to

pery shoes and bad luck.

hit the

Wet

may have

leaves

to her

fall,

contributed

airwaves as soon as next

year.

but she said she has

However, those expecting a typcampus station will be pleas-

walked through the same condi-

ical

tions before, without stumbling.

antly surprised, said Pat St. John,

Stoermer’s arm is in a cast at least for a couple of weeks, cialist

will

decide

if

when a

Conestoga’s

spe-

surgery

vice-president

communication

studies,

of

in his

planning summary which he presented to the college’s board of governors at the Sept. 27 meet-

is

needed.

Stoermer complimented the assistance given by security and health

ing.

She also said she appreciated the help of one female student in particular, who saw her fall and stayed with her until the ambulance took her to St. Mary’s

Although the debut is fast approaching, there remains significant work to be done, he said.

services staff.

The

call letter

Hospital.

n’t been identified as

Erica Stoermer, a professional development assistant at Doon campus, is helped by her husband Chris (left) after slipping on a (Photo by Brian Gall) pathway and breaking her arm Sept. 30.

the pavement is wet, during the fall

it

A1 Hunter, supervisor of

security

though the area hasa hazard, caution should be exercised anytime services, said

in

particular,

when

leaves

are

falling.

“I’m not suggesting a leaf caused

speaking,

it’s

be aware of,” he said. Hunter added that pathways are

By Brian

to

two

The DSA has contributed $30,000 in terms of funding.

A tion

exhibits,

must also be

Ideally,

had with applications and

Each school

general manager for the sta-

also

to the

debut, said St.

station’s

John. This would allow the man-

ager to develop a marketing and

the general

college’s exhibit to provide guid-

dent at Conestoga was one of several hundred people looking

employers about

ance for anyone interested in applying to Conestoga College, and she said lineups had been steady

all

career oppoitunities.

“These

“I

things

(career fairs) are

don’t think

it’s

just

day.

Other exhibitors included General

Mic-

Electric,

college and

Toyota and McCain Foods. Cadence, an introsoft,

the best thing to

university (people),

go to. Just about everybody I

there’s

a mix here.”

egrated-circuit Joanne Higgins-Hall, design company, with a high-tech job has Cadence employee based in San Jose, Calif., was hopgone to one,” ing to find electrisaid Wilson, who cal engineers and computer sciis looking for a job in engineerence people to fill 20-30 posiing technology. The event, which had sold out tions. Cadence was also seeking stuits exhibitor space, featured over dents interested in internship and 220 companies, offering work

know

mostly in technology. Conestoga College, in conjuncWilfrid Laurier tion with University, the University of Waterloo and the University of Guelph organized the career fair.

co-op programs.

Cadence employee Joanne Higgins-Hall

said

many

inquiries

were made by job seekers eral,

in gen-

not specifically students.

See Career - page two

manager

months prior

six

sales plan.

third-year engineering stu-

hired.

general

a

would be needed

Leisa Cronsberry, a liaison officer at Conestoga, attended the

to speak with

the key.”

station is proceeding along with

they were nothing like Career

Bingeman

is

is

John told the

legal incorporation of the

program information.

The

(Photo by Brian Gall)

St.

said St. John.

The

career fairs before, but he said

Park.

Park. Sept, 29.

frequency (88.3)

station’s

tough.

as well as free transportation for

Gall

Fair ’99, Sept. 29 at

Bingeman

The

known, but as

the search for a studio location,

new blood

Robin Wilson had been

support employee at Northern of Waterloo, Digital Inc. demonstrates a precision sensor at the career fair held at

and slogan competition

to all students.

swept regularly by maintenance staff, but keeping them clear at aU times during this time of year is

students.

application

St.

board, “branding

but generally something we need to

(the accident),

Recruiting

Andy Johnston, an

open

must be John proposed a

station’s call letters

decided and

Another key responsibility of manager would be the imp’ementation of programming that would need to conform to Canadian Radio-television and

Telecommunications Commission The station

regulations. will

be on the

air

24

hours a day and will be similar to CBC, using specialty shows and a

music base. Three hours per week will be To fulfill ethnic programming. that requirement, St. John said German, Portuguese and Italian

programming

are being consid-

ered for the station.

Twenty-five per cent of prowill be in a talk format and four hours weekly will be set aside for educational program-

gramming

ming.

Commercials will total four minutes per hour and 504 minutes per week. Of that total, 126 minutes will be traditional advertising, such as 30- or 60-second spots, and the remainder will be in the form of sponsorships. See Station - page two


.

Page 2

— SPOKE, Oct.

1

1,

1999

Pumpkins weigh

Station

big

in

a

By Adam Wilson The

weekend

first

October

in

venture with CBC

is

special for the residents of Port

Elgin.

It

during this weekend

is

that tourists of all ages flock to the

small southern Ontario town for an annual event that was voted the People’s Choice “most popular

continued from page one

event in Ontario” in 1996 and ’98.

Even with

Pumpkinfest ’99 was yet another

play

tion of music.

on

people

35,000

Oct. 2-3

pumpkin on

international

ly

will include a

Weighing of the

little bit

amount of pop, some country.”

the first

attract students

and

college.”

A

grower’s

left the

it

World

in 1997.

pumpElgin, was

in Port

the largest in the world.

Scott Cully, of Ashland, Ore., shows off his pumpkin-carving

skills at

Port Elgin’s largest

year

was

pumpkin

awarded

this

Adrien

to

Gervais, of Barrie, at a weight of

981.5 pounds. The size of the pumpkins wasn’t the only amazing story to come out of this year’s event.

On Saturday, life

a six-year-old

girl’s

was saved when she began

to

choke on a piece of sausage. She was rushed to Southampton’s Saugeen Memorial Hospital where the piece of

Career

food was dislodged by paramedics

because

Adam

new

the festival.

also has competi-

and there’s lots to do,” said Sara Morrow, a Pumpkinfest visitor from Saugeen

tions for other vegetables such as

Shores. “It also brings in a lot of

tions

tent. In this area, local

a family-oriented event with over 40 activities for children

revenue to Port Elgin as well as the surrounding area.” The car show has always been a popular attraction at Pumpkinfest. In the past there have been as

and

many

The

festival

gourds,

zucchinis,

com

stalks,

sunflowers and watermelons.

Pumpkinfest

isn’t just for

grow-

ers. It is

adults.

Some of this year’s events included an arts and crafts show, a farm machinery show, pumpkin carving (underwater and on solid ground), a Kiddie Kamival, a motorcycle show and shine and the popular antique car show.

“Pumpkinfest,

is

such a success

as

event by adding

original

it’s

970 cars on display

downtown Port Elgin area. The cars date back as far

One

how

their

Lifestyles

businesses resources on

to maintain a better

way

of

in the

Vital Signs

and Fitness Comer.

The Port Elgin Chamber of

as the

Commerce declared this year’s event a great success.

“We were

awestmek,”

said

Connie Barker, an organizer of the event. “Considering the bad weather, it was incredible.”

to the

music content

it’s

My

Deals with clubs, Complied by Brad Dugard

and university (people),

mix

The Doon Student Association

just college there’s a

here,” she said.

Small

companies, like Waterloo’s Northern Digital Inc., were using the career fair as an opportunity to promote them-

had a shorter-than-norraal meeting on Sept. 28, in order to make time for the Ontario Community College Student Parliamentary Association (OCCSPA) roadshow.

The

association is the provin-

cial organization that lobbies for,

and provides information and

selves.

“We want

to create awareness.

We’re a small firm, so we want to get people

to

know

that

we’re

services

various

to

campus

Dick,

be Canadian. in securing the station, St.

told the board.

Their road show

is

an on-cam-

pus sales pitch designed to gamer

application support employee at

support

Northern Digital. The company manufactures and designs 3D precision sensors and was looking to fill a variety of Jobs, but mostly computer programming positions. Government agencies, such as Revenue Canada, the Public Service Commission and OPP were also seeking new people. Susanne Barwick, a human resources consultant, said knowledge about the federal public service is limited and she hoped to make the kind of jobs available

pus orgtuiizations.

her field

known

the) federal

publie service are aging, as every large corporation

is.

A lot of us will

a few years, so we’re

be leaving

in

recruiting

new

blood,” she said.

among

Currently,

individual

the

DSA

cam-

strong signal that the

CBC intend-

ed to fill the gap between Toronto and London. In terms of the strength of the signal, no other college has a signal this strong, said St. John.

Thus far approximately $97,000 has been spent on securing the station, said St. John, when questioned by board member Bob

'**

and n

ship in the association.

This the

is

a point of contention for

DSA as

dents

at

the

it

only represents stu-

Doon campus.

Further discussion about ongoing membership will continue at the next executive meeting.

wording of their policy would be necessaiy to keep cult clubs from receiving funding.

He

suggested that the policy

be provided to any clubs that have a

worshippers, Ubcrals and long-haired freaky people,

need not apply.

The continuing saga of the DSA’s clubs’ policy was raise at the executive meeting.

Micheal,

"classes,, during

die

My

Dick comedy show. Sept 9. The executive suggested that ftiture shows be scheduled on the half-hour so there is no changing

change

in the

-

.of classes

during the show.

political, racial, religious or cult

foundation.”

The

current policy only says

that such clubs will not receive

DSA

them to boards and

funds, but allows

DSA

bulletin

resources.

promotion

not realize the

agreement, the CBC will send Conestoga its job postings at the same time the network posts

them

internally, said St. John. This will give Conestoga students

approximately two weeks to apply before the postings go external.

The postings

read, “Sanctioning will not

Other pom topics The DSA’s office computers

sively

include

will not

be exclu-

broadcast jobs, but will other

areas

such

as

have developed a nasty habit

administration and marketing as

Apparently, the default browsers on Microsoft Internet Explorer are changing to an

well, said St. John.

Internet celebrity

pom

site

from

Mary Wright, Conestoga’s manager of student employment and co-operative education, said in an

die standard www.doonsa.ca.

interview after the board meet-

be brought to the next board of

At press time it was still not known what was causing the

similar arrangement at the college

directors meeting, Oct. 27.

glitch.

for

The amended

policy

will

But adrenaline addicts welcome Tlirec campus clubs received .

.

What a BOD

.

the official

okey-dokey from the

executive during the

The graphic design

meeting.

club,

swing

dancing club and adrenaline club

now sanctioned by the DSA. As a side note, the cost for lia-

are

bility

Demon

Ramy

going to

may

their

pays

approximately $1 lor every student at Conestoga as member-

to the public.

“The (employees of

John

This partnership

employment opportunities stemming from the college’s partnership with the CBC. As part of

and porn ...

assistant of clubs

use

organizations.

here,” said Chris Monterroso, an

in

will

Evans. However, the value of the signal is far in excess of that amount, he said.

told the executive that a

“I don’t think

between the was developed

Forty per cent of the

Students

continued from page one

CBC

enabled the college to purchase a

Some of the exhibitors included the Grey-Bmce Health Centre,

This year’s show had approximately 850 cars on Saturday and 650 on Sunday. Each year, organizers try to

even more people

was the Adult

attrac-

life.

1920s.

attract

features to

new

of this year’s

showcased

Wilson)

fair

used for promotion

magnet to be a wonpromote the

Pumpkinfest. (Photo by

just before her arrival.

This year’s largest pumpkin was weighed in Pennsylvania at over 1,100 pounds.

partnership

college and

Last year a 1,092-pound

weighed

and

will

derful opportunity to

Pumpkin Confederation

large

tion will also “act as a

The Port Elgin competition became an independent weighing competition, after

“A

jazz, blues

the second day.

site for the international

of every-

Overall, said St. John, the sta-

largest local-

grown pumpkin took place on

kin,

broad sec-

thing,” said St. John.

with the weighing of the largest day.

list

“We’ll play a

Saturday alone.

The event took place

.

tent

great year for the event, attracting

more than

.

Forty per cent of the music conwill be Canadian, and the

and cold winds,

rain

joint

insurance always goes up

for the

DSA once

it

approves the

adrenaline club, but not

when

it

approves the graphic design club.

The DSA’s board of directors met for the first time this school year.

The boiud oversees

the activi-

of the executive, but has nothing to do with the day-to-day ties

of

operation

the

association. Little first

was accomplished

at tliis

meeting, however, diey did

elect a chairperson to chair their

future meetings.

Jessica Sperling, a second-year

More about My Dick Appiuenlly some people were distracted by people coming and

business student, tion.

No

management was elected

studies

to the posi-

one ran against

her.

ing.that she

was not aware of any

any other program.


SPOKE,

Oct. 11, 1999

— Page 3

Applied degrees pursued College president wants gov’t to approve By

Phil

Wright In that test Conestoga’s pass rate

exceeded the rate for Ontario *^8 university graduates in the very same exam. If applied degrees were available

Conestoga’s board of governors

and

its

four

new members heard

umes of books and

the

number of

in this

community.”

in nursing, said Tibbits,

board there

curriculum and a fourth year

With the provincial election over and the lack of skilled workers becoming more of a concern, now is the time to pursue applied

be

degrees in select vocational pro-

board universities

grams

College

President

needed accommodate

is

affairs

support” for the college’s pursuit

obtaining

the

oppose degree-granting powers for colleges, but he is

upcoming meeting with a provincial government official, Tibbits said he would request the government allow Conestoga to offer applied degrees on a pilot

would make the college more

don’t need another

Conestoga

university in this

College

nity.”

commu-

John

increased

Tibbits also updated the board status

of

the

expected demand of the double cohort, he

include Hewlett-Packard,

said.

the

Board

appropriate for applied degrees.

the

Afterwards, a marketing strategy

graduating class.

ties as indicated in the college’s

are.

superior pass rate in last June’s reg-

evaluated differently than

istered nursing examination, said

nity colleges.

presidents.

Although universities

is

may

con-

board the simply not as

vocationally oriented as colleges

Moreover, universities are

commu-

“They’re assessed on their vol-

January of next year.

the

of applied degrees.

chairperson

would need

Sawicki also said the college needs to pursue this aggressively, otherwise the universities will be

main beneficiary of this

Tibbits told the board.

In

addition,

Tibbits

said

that

In addition to Evans, the other

other college of the same size in

grams.

Kristin

the

IBM and government’s Access to Opportunities Program, provincial

Conestoga’s admissions increase over last year was superior to any

three

The board then discussed

Sizable contributors to the centre

sizable

be developed to effectively promote those proto

on

Information

develop from an upconoing meeting with university

university system

Tibbits.

$321,000 sur-

plus on a $56-million budget.

funding to meet

However, Conestoga has proven its ability to compete with universi-

have

MuUan reported the college had a better than expected

Technology Centre at the Waterloo campus. He told the board the campus is expected to be fully operational by

are

lobbying

government

threat, Tibbits told the

colleges

that

statements.

________

of agreement will

31,

financial

Universities

for

a travesty.”

all

board

March

year-end

fiscal

the

the

sider colleges offering degrees as a

requesting

the

1999

to

college president

degree-granting powers “would be

told

Kevin MuUan sub-

mitted the college’s

these graduates.

Tibbits,

Sandra Hanmer suggested the board look at the college’s programming to determine which programs are

Tibbits

attractive

also

hopeful some sort

.

taiy/treasurer

before that time

“We

would

In an

grant

to

applied degrees

________

Tibbits told the

Tibbits told the board.

power

Linamar Corporation.

In other business, board secre-

John Sawicki, Conestoga’s public manager, told the board that

“overwhelming

to

the

resources,

of the elimination of Grade 13.

added material.

John

project basis.

may

Vision International; and Mike Annable, director of human

ber of students that will graduate from high school in 2003 because

don’t need' another university

ry

year on Sept. 27.

chief executive officer of Virtek

num-

“We

at its first

more theowould be introduced into the

“double

cohort,” the unusually high

for applied-degree granting

powers meeting of the academic

the

tenured professors,” said Tibbits.

Bob Evans, a new board member who represents faculty, told the

the college president’s argument

of

implications

pilot project

new board members

tative;

include

Murphy, student represenJim Crocker, president and

Ontario.

The next board of governors meeting is Oct. 25.

OVERCOMING PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY GROUP DO YOU.... anxious about Public Speaking?

*

feel

*

avoid doing speeches at

*

accept a "0"

all

costs?

the public speaking

in

make

part of a course rather than

the speech? *

Conestoga College

experience physical signs of distress before or during

presentations? October

11 -

October 22, 1999 *

THE UNITED WAY

be a more

This 4 session group

Keep an

60

to

effective

presenter?

CAMPAIGN HAS ARRIVED! out for what's happening!

want

Day and Time

to

Carol Gregory

-

is

available beginning the

week

of Oct. 18th.

be determined by timetables.

Facilitator.

V. ^0

nited

Way

bnng a copy of your timetable and sign up in Student Services, Room 2B02. Common hours will be selected from

To

register

submitted student timetables.


— SPOKE, Oct.

Page 4

11,

1999

Coamentai^

woes \

^

drink; !S tK^oming

mo*®

t^og

are

No^'any dr# more timely^an^ith^chilling accu'^' eaougb aoticd^ s

4^hon

Nations,^

people^ in 3J

and 3.4 pt?{>ple

aaaJHost^^

die eveiy year trom lack ot water or water-related (.con-

#e

yod-fos^

^'wit^'y€m'iE^yr^^tedjb^aad4'§^^

'^^dowaAe^dr^.X effort to

And

'

'•

\

wateis

washeif'^

^

save tho w#ld where

the region ol the world

SnHAWftcwar.— this

should be sires.sed most, is feequeatiy dan-

becoming

IS

i*

Canada has 25 per cent of the According to the United world's tresh water and the Nations, 1 .2 faillion maionty of it. 22,000 trillion litres,

m

is

the Great Lakes

Think about it. Would you want

w

swim

in

31 COUntheS

m have no access

water

drinking water

up.

year from lack of water

about water

is

™„um

no

that there is

of w.,er «a.

was created about four §!years%^^> ’he world's population

2025 and

people die every

il

statistics frightening Many

... water-related .

tlon)

someone you know

peo-

ple

are

breathing

Date rape

a

happen than being assaulted by a stranger.

arrest

cxpecied to grow by 2.6 billion by li\ ing in regions with loo little or

contaminated water. Third World countries need fresh v\aler as badly, if not more, ^Ifaan deveiope4 ones do, because their industries ^e growing. But given the world’s lack of ftesh water sources, tihere simply not eaou^ to go around. This pending environmental di.sa.ster, like all disa.stcrs, has

mm

willingly chosen to be

with or go Acquaintance rape

is

ual intercourse by

someone you

out

with.

forced sex-

the

have

For weeks a man has been entering women’s bedrooms at night and assaulting them even while their partners lay next to

them in bed. The fear of strange men and dark alleys

may be

slightly less-

closer than

most people

Unfortunately,

may be

realize.

women

are nat-

Many women

Women

do many things

e

extended summers caused by global warming are dry ing

w^'^otnees.

li)

is,

men

are

usually

the

naturally by layers of rock and comes up drink Problem solved right? Sure, but we

heighten those fears. Women do many things to protect themselves from the danger

stronger.

which accounts for 68.4 per cent of

all

•ater is filtered

ready

fact

Caution and fear become deeply engraved in the minds of women. Highly publicized crimes

the ground water,

,

the

Canada, on average, is Ocean Fall. B.C., with 4386.8 mxlHtnetres of rmn annnnlly. Tliey'il bave enough water 10,000 years from now but others won’t if we don’t act now. Global water supplies are abundant, but poorly distributed among and within countries, according to World Resource, a publication of the United Nations environment program. But a poll for the Torstar Newspaper Group shows that 76 per cent of 403 asked said they would be in favour of laws preventing the exporting of water to other countries. However, if the poor condition of Canada’s fresh water continues to deteriorate, specifically in the Great Lakes, you have to wonder why anyone would want it. .

in

of assault. We don’t go out alone at night and we keep our doors

and windows locked.

es.

When

from the danger of

According

Statistics

to

Canada’s

1993 national survey, 85 per cent of sexual assault victims were attacked by someone they knew. The survey also indicated

women

are

more

be attacked in their than anywhere else.

likely to

own homes

Being sexually assaulted by

woman

a

assaulted by

is

someone she knows and assault.

while

.

we

.

may be tively know

Ironically,

she

are protecting

the danger

trusts,

unlikely to instincit’s

wrong

as

she

might if a stranger assaulted her. There is also a fear of the judicial system, Kraler said. Although “no means no”, a victim’s actions are often judged in

ourselves so carefully,

may be

inside those locked

court.

Many

doors.

rape cases are never

reported.

Statistics,

which

already frighteningly large,

occurred in Kitchener- Waterloo when, over the past two summers,

women were

assaulted in their

homes. In at least

Ironically,

while we are protecting ourselves so carefully, the danger may be inside those locked doors.

lack understand-

ing of #te rape, said Barb Kraler,

a counsellor with student servic-

themselves

to protect

urally at a disadvantage because

,

Unfortunately, date and acquaintance rape is something too few women are informed about. Educating women about the prominence of date and acquaintance rape is not emphasized enough in this society.

rapist.”

ened, but the real predator

Reasons why small lakes die anti larger lakes become polluted in range from to global warming to industrial waste misman-

is

have previously met. Events similar to Scarborough incidents

the

“bedroom is

But being raped by a date or an acquaintance is far more likely to

you have

the

Scarborough

ivvo-ihirds will be

out alone at night.

sigh of relief

being

billion

called date

with

of a man suspected of

diseases,

is

or acquaintance rape.

defined as forced sexual intercourse by someone

recent

(oontamlnation/pollu-

planet has been fixed since

aa5

ye/m

Acquaintance rape

and 3.4

million

to realize

TtM*

to safe

has either been poUuted or in the case of inland lakes, has dried

What pec^de need

^

people

W nn

were

two incidents women

entered their

dows

when a man homes through win-

assaulted

or patio doors left open to

cool the house in hot weather

had left for work. Those cases have yet to be after their partners

solved.

are

may

be higher than the numbers show. Statistics Canada’s 1993 survey shows that almost 50 per cent of women have experienced one incident of sexual assault after the age of 16. About 60 per cent of those women have experienced more than one inifcideht of sexual assault.

Sexual assault is a real problem Canada. But only half of that problem is being addressed. Women and men need to be more aware of the realities of date and acquaintance rape because knowledge's power. in

make

Incidents such as these strangers and the night

two of our

greatest enemies. Don’t get

me

wrong, women must take precautions around strangers and when

SPOKn

is

m.iinly funded

from September

to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). fhe views and opinions expressed in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

('onestoga College or the

DSA.

reflect the

Advertisers in

views of

SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE Issues

and

is

DSA

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Bradley Dugard; News Editor: Brian Gall;

Activities Editor: Lesley Turnbull;

Photo Editor: Jeanette

Evcrall;

Production Manager: Anna

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9:.10 a.m.

Sajfcrt;

amount paid

for the

Monday. Submissions are subject

to acceptance or

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or

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tlie

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Phone: 748-5220

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SPOKE,

Commentary Knocking on wood, throwing

sait

over

ieft

Oct. 11, 1999

— Page 5

shouider

Superstition meaningiess? By Angela So,

added that he has never knocked on wood and had never needed to. “Knocking on wood doesn’t really change anything,” said Laura Fife, a first-year computer

Clayfield

you burnt your

Campus

and

toast

Pu^ walked away from you when you tried to give her a goodbye pat on the head. When you got to school you dropped all your books and realized that you were late for

Question:

your black cat

Are you superstitious?

However, Oliver

know on the way

Matt Martindale, a second-year law and security administration student, does, you could have avoid-

a if

superstitious. If this

“Honestly

been mornyou

Matt Martindale ing,

know

would have tempted the

devil with your charred toast, your cat would have brought you bad luck when

it

believe

I

it.

sounds kind

stupid, but

I

I

of

do.” Kitty

Bounsanga,

mechanical engineering student

would have meant you would

make

mistakes in your

ed having a cursed Debbie Winsor,

lessons.

LASA

you had

your and crossed your lifted

Kitty

Bounsanga

you

train

tracks

West Toronto

man

On

25, a 75-year-old

Sept.

man

died from a rare, mosquito-bome, encephalitic

don’t believe

“I

said,

“You don’t

“My

dad

throws the

oddly

whole

13th,

salt

shaker over his shoulder,”

he

“The worst one I do is

probably

were

the

silly

superstitious.

salt-

it

really If

is frue.

it

turned out to be true and you’d be like ‘Oh

my

God!

All

these

I’m

years.

Darren O’Connor,

LASA

student

(knocking on wood) was told it’s one of those things you do,” said Marie “I do because

Lewis,

it

I

a

first-year

broad-

casting radio and television stu-

She

dent.

Oliver said she isn’t paranoid

said.

kind of

luck.

police foundations/

is

may sound

in

not

in for it!’”

Gawel, a second-year automated programming mechanical engineering student, said he has thrown salt over his shoulder

first-year

about superstitions and

it depends on how much you believe in it and your outlook on life. For example, if you focus only on the negative things that happen to you, a few students said, you will create your .own luck, good and bad.

“I

don’t believe in luck.

You

said Darren O’Connor, a first-year police foundations/LASA student. He

make your own,”

joked

eking on

about

kno-

wood

during her

view

inter-

to get

into

the

broadcasting

pro-

gram, she said, so

it

must

work.

Darren O’Connor

has

symptoms

dies after visiting

By Adam Wilson

Toronto

a

Nile fever

flu-like

crazy.”

Tom

but five out of 10 students polled at they campus said Boon It

over

You make your own.”

cases.”

fingers '

The most common superstitions were knocking on wood three times and throwing salt over the

very superstitious. “I believe in all that,” she says. “I’m probably one of those loony says she

feet

went

Mariel Oliver, first-year marketing. “My boyfriend thinks I’m

for fun.

who was

student,

said

thing,”

mechanical engineering student, did not want to go into the specific details of her superstitions but bases her need to follow them on her dreams. “Honestly I believe it. I know it sounds kind of stupid, but I do.”

day.

enough bom on a Friday the

However,

when

over-the-shoulder

left shoulder.

she walked away from you and when you dropped your books, it

if

Kitty Bounsanga, a third-year

to school, as

you’re had

“It’s

whether or

class. Having bad day? Only

prgrammer/analyst student. just wood.”

a short visit to New York in September. The outbreak in New York

was

first

brought to city

offi-

New York encephalitis with a radical

new

drug and briefly awoke them from their comas.

An

educational health

Web

warns that the best protection from the disease is to stay authorities sprayed the entire virus. Normally, this wouldn’t away from areas where there is city with insecticide in early sound too out of the ordinary, a high risk of mosquito bites. September. except that the virus normally The disease seems to be A disease like this is not only occurs only mbirds. throughout spreading Encephalitis is a very New York State. As of for dangerous disease Sept. 31, 31 cases of the many reasons. Most people who have There is no cure for encephalitis disease had been confirmed. Six of those the disease never show any cases have been hospioutward symptoms, but or the West Nile virus. talized and the Centre they face a serious threat to cials’ attention in

August and

site

for Disease

their life.

The disease was originally thought to be SLE, St. Louis encephalitis, city

where

it

named was

after the

first

recog-

nized in 1933, but after some tests, scientists now believe that

it is

West Nile

fever.

This

new fever has never been previ-

deadly, but also scary.

The symptoms the flu.

are

much

Headaches and

like

slight

fever are normal, but severe

infections

Symptoms

quickly.

act

include headaches,

ously diagnosed in the Western

high fevers, disorientation, comas, tremors, convulsions,

hemisphere.

paralysis or death.

A

said that

New

York article the West Nile virus

Reuters

has been attributed to five

New

York including the Toronto man who had made deaths in

This disease was to

many

first

brought

people’s attention

by

movie Awakenings. The 1990 film was the true story of

the

a doctor

who

treated victims

of

Control in

blood samples for any antibodies to the virus. There is no cure for encephalitis or the West Nile Atlanta

is

testing

Goes On

virus.

There

is

nothing that can stop

of yet. Scientists and doctors are working on With flu season a cure. approaching, and one Canadian the dead from already

this disease as

disease,

ming know late.

the

most disconce-

fact is that if

one

one doesn’t

has-it until

it’s

too

(AatsfromMdmds)

622-7774

BURLINGTON

BeKveen

(Canodian Tire Pnza)

893-2464 •

GUELPH

Hows & Burger

884-7376 •

LONDON


1

Page 6

— SPOKE, Oct. U, 1999

COME OUT AND SIGN UF FOR INTRAMURALS 2ND SESSION 1N1HAMURALS

LRC OPEN SESSIONS Thursday

Friday

ARE:

CO-ED VOLLEYBALL CO-ED BASKETBALL CONTACT HOCKEY BALL HOCKEY

15*'’

October

October

9:00 -10:00

-

Wednesday 20*'’ October

pm

3:30 -4:30

-

11

:30

- 12:30

am

pm

Group Sessions arranged by request - call Ext.361

URGENT NOTICE

CAFTAINS MEETING WED. OCT. 20 AT 4:30F.M AT THE CONDOR ROOST

UP A REGISTRATICHV FORM AT THE REC. CENTRE, DSA OFFICE, OR OFF ANY PICK

ATHLETICS BULLETIN BOARD.

To All Students Planning to Travel Di^^^^hristmas Owing to the Millennium New Year,

reservations for air

travel are heavier than normal. All students are therefore

urged to book their Student Class™ disappointment

Canadian Travel

CUTS,

later.

airfares

Student Class™

now to

airfares,

cities, are available exclusively

avoid

between

from

Canada’s national student travel bureau.

::iRAVELCU1S STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS - FALL SCHEDUT.R THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP.

70 University Ave. W. University Shops Plaza 886-0400 1

Owned and operated by the Canadian Federation ofStttdents.

TOPIC

DATE

TIME MANAGEMENT

MON. OCT. 4 THURS. OCT.

7

TIME

ROOM

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A505 3B14

MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST TAKING

THURS. OCT 21

12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

2A411 3B14

SUICIDE PREVENTION

WED. OCT.

1:30-2:30

1C15

MON. OCT.

18

20

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, COME INTO STUDENT SERVICES OR JUST DROP BY.

FORMAT.

GAY, LESBIAN AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING -monthly meetings commence September 29, 1999 please see Barb Kraler in Student Services

@

4:00

- 5:00 P.M.

in

Student Services.

If

missed,

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS NETWORK -to

be announced for mid-November

MATURE STUDENTS DROP IN -Thursday, October

7,

1999 @11 :30 —

1

:30 P.M. in the Blue

Room

(Cafeteria)

FOR THE FOLLOWING GROUPS YOU WILL NEED TO SIGN UP AT STUDENT SERVICES BEFORE THE BELOW DATES IN ROOM 2B02. PLEASE BRING A COPY OF YOUR TIMETABLE. YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED OF THE TIME AND DATE. TEST ANXIETY

Four weeks

GROUP

Commencing week One hour per week

FACILITATOR:

in length

of Oct.

1

Joan Magazine

Timetables due Oct.5

RELAXATION

Three weeks

GROUP

Commencing week One hour per week

in length

of Oct. 18

FACILITATOR: Karen Rittinger

&

Allen Ledyit

Timetables due Oct. 12

PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY

GROUP

Five weeks

in

length

Commencing week 1.5 hours per

of Oct. 18

week

Timetables due Oct. 12

FACILITATOR: Carol Gregory


SPOKE,

MP3

Is By Anna

Web

browser, but not nec-

essarily a credit card.

Can

there be

interesting

cybersex? Try

users than

MPEG-1

called

MP3s

for-

layerS,

or

MP3. Songs recorded on MP3s

have become the hottest

heads.

However, the record companies are worried the

piracy because

space.

download artists

such as Alanis Morissette and

Bowie

David

have

released

MP3

albums available only as

To

get a taste of these

will

need a computer,

MP3s you a modem

Employment

service could

has become associated with

the

to

distribute free

Web

users can

for free. It’s a threat

it

industry,”

said

Bill

MP3s.

downloaded music should be paid

“These people devalue the music industry, as well as the artists

for.

“The government has already

because they refuse to pay

Banham said.

already looks bad and

decided to keep Internet.

“It

can only

it

million

the problem with reg-

are just as

no jurisdiction or geography. On the other hand, Pete Watson,

with

problems

ing

Metis

stutfents

know

that

encounteridentifying

in

and

them

letting

organization

their

exists.

development officer

for llte train-

takes over 11/2 hours to

government should which

said the

implement

regulations,

will help to shut

down Web

users

of the Internet because

Web users

are “moral”

know

enough

to

that

aims to help Metis

employment and

ann of

against Children, in co-ordina-

Metis Nation of Ontario, which has been working for

the

iiilBillMliiiiMli According of

ini-

been (^'rating since to

is

all

St.

iMliM

Germaine,

St Germaine she ,want$ Metis students to know there are

"We encouuige any student that thinks they may have aborigtmd

Metis students arc.

them

allows

tt

to inform students of the

^

organization's

their

workshop

Conestoga College. The workshop, called the safety

free of charge, to all

day care cenand nursery

pre-schools

Chapman

said

chil-

to pro-

that

they

are

lic

education, a resource library

and a counselling assistance program.

According to 4Cs

literature,

She

known

the

to

she encourages

ents at the college.

children

children aged 18

18.

Children are vulnerable and

are targeted

by

abusers. Teaching

say

to

“No”

number

tive at their mil free

888-54b-3847> tor more infor-

Citizens Concerned with

^

"

^

witness program, an interview room, a court waiting room, pub-

children since 1981.

mental in advocating on behalf of

(1-

In

^

Diploma and degree 1

to

1

:30pm

Oct.

1

3,

1

999

more marketable

are By

the ^anciuar^

:30am

Talisha Matheson

and part-time students holding university degrees.

Many

university graduates earn

The

and then find them-

tistics

their degrees,

selves in the hallways of

commu-

college does not keep stafor university

graduates

apply for full-time courses.

David Stewart, director of con-

nity colleges.

According to 1998 continuing education

who

statistics,

27 per cent of

those enrolled in continuing edu-

tinuing education, said he thinks university graduates

come

to col-

lege for specific training for specific jobs.

Students “It’s

a good combination,

and a college student want-

ma are more

the

a university degree

same

is in

said,

both a uni-

and a college diplo-

marketable.

a good combination,” he

“It’s

ing

who have

versity degree

“and a college student want-

ing a university degree

boat.”

same David Stewart, director of continuing education

for

the

combination

degrees and diplomas.

employers want a person

t

cation and part-time courses in

the theoretical thinking

Ontario have university degrees.

versity

Conestoga

ranks

below

provincial statistics with

cent of

its

the

24 per

continuing education

the

and

practical

of

He said who has

from unithinking

from college. “They come so they can get a job,” he said.

6tart CeLsbrating ^rly:

many employers

Stewart said

look

is in

boat.”

Crime

against Children has been instru-

mation. 1

not

offers initiatives including a child

all

ctMoe

is

enough.

initia-

attention

child.

Approximately one in four boys and one in three girls will be sex-

to contact our office."

said

80

to 85 per cent of offenders are

sakL

Metis youth to contact the

it

download with a 56K modem and between three and four hours with a 28K modem, Watson said.

and under in Waterloo Region and

vide prevention strategies for par-

any

except for the fact

ually assaulted before the age of

The 4Cs helps

Room

project

experienced

yet

workshop in all child care centres. The workshop is open to all the students and paradvertising the

at

on Oct. 14 from

7:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. in

be available,

schools in the Waterloo region.

program,

2A301 at the college. The program is designed

and sup-

will

tres,

the

not

yeai round.

all

.incestry

^

early

at

of pre-school age children to provide education

The workshop

has

children’s safety

port to early childhood educators.

Silverheights Child Care Centre, will be holding a

will take place

employment.

Chapman,

educator

ages in acquiring

ent institutions” St. Germaine,

Metis

childhood

dren’s personal

employublv; skills iind finding

able

tion with Joyce

to assist Metis peo-

internship opportunities avail-

we need to identify them.’’ She siud if they know where the

organization called the 4Cs,

Citizens Concerned with Crimes

is

“There is no way for us to track them down thn)Ughout the differsaid. “In order to serve

An

an

quality

youth,

and

It

who and where Metis students and letting them know that for

ents

training

Metis rights since 1994. The

maintained, Watson

Workshop promotes

youths

training

is

Virgin

not impose regulations on the use

youth find employment.

ple

'~y'

Bowie

that the

and Universal have implemented security measures, which have proved helpful. For the release of David

ing ditBciilties in identifying

'

He added

believes the government should

their goal

assistance ^''

said.

ensuring their intellectual

Canada.

ing initiative, said they are find-

arc

site will

be immediately linked to Liquid and Microsoft for screening,” he

glitches

tiative has

Jen St Genname, community

and

said.

“Anyone accessing our

said.

initiative

is

Banham

property

By Linda Wright

Training Initiative

songs and distribute them widely over the Internet,

manager at Universal Music Group Canada, said he

The Hamilton-based

TTie Metis Nation of Ontario

that are in sync

companies

pirates

foil

who copy

Internet

for Metis

By Talisha Matheson

many

record

artists,

Microsoft Audio to

Web users who don’t real-

ize the nature of the issue, there

has

is that it

hands off the

Although there are well over a

implemented.” ulating the Internet

its

are a moral rather

than legal issue,” Watson said.

get worse, unless regulations are

He added

MP3s

Bowie’s album Hours..., Virgin implemented encrypted coding through Liquid Audio and

Banham, vice-president and general manager of Virgin Music

He

files.

new

have nightmarish repercussions. “It

who

for the product,”

sound as good as songs in CD format and use less than 1/10 of the

Over the past months,

among diehard

trading product

Web

MP3.

an audio compression

It is

mat

anything more

Web

to

— Page

the CD’s Death Star?

and a

Sajfert

Oct. 11, 1999

Great Prizes Oktoberfest Sausage Rootbeer Chugging Contest


Page 8

— SPOKE, Oct.

11,

1999

1

A gfimpse

into the future

Psychic predicts love and happiness for college students By Linda Wright “Will

From

I

be stuck

in

Loblaws?”

reading palms, looking into crystal balls to inter-

preting tarot cards,

it

seems everyone wants

to travel into

the future.

Jacquie Curry,

Some Conestoga

College students took the trip Sept. 28, in the Sanctuary when psychic reader Dan Valkos gave the students a glimpse into the unknown. Valkos invited the

come to the stage and ask three questions. Most of the questions on the students’ minds were about love, money and happiness. Nik Rac, a second-year computer programmer analyst student, said he was going to

general business student

students to

ask about love. “I am going to ask, what’s going to happen in

my

love life,” he

said.

Jacquie

Curry,

a

first-year general busi-

ness student, to

know

future

wanted

how

her

was going

to

be stuck in ”’ she said

I

how the world will look for her be as messed up as it is now and whether her boyfriend is the one for her? As she left Valkos, Curry said she was happy with the answers to her questions. To the first question Valkos’ joked, “Thanks honey that’s a nice offer, but I’ve been children and would

fixed.”

Valkos told her she was going to reach her goals and have happiness and money. He said the world would be a great place for her children. The answer to her third question was that her boyfriend wouldn’t hurt her. Julie Valletta, a first-year general business student, asked what her future looked like regarding her career. She also asked whether she would find a soulmate and whether she

Look

into his eyes

you your

more. Psychic telling

future. Will

Dan Valkos

has been

people their future for 30

years.

was bored with her relationship, but there was ample opportunity for growth and she should just take one day at a time. The students had similar questions and said they were happy with what their futures had in store for them. Valletta

Valkos said Valletta will be extremely successful and

“I’m a controlled, precognitive

and he will you fall in love? Will you be wealthy? How happy will you be? He will answer all of these questions and tell

Jacquie Curry, a first-year general business student, waits for Dan Valkos to predict her future in the Sanctuary on Sept. 28. (Photo by Linda Wright)

will get married but not for a long time. Valkos said

Psychic claims By Lesley Turnbull

it

would ever get married?

turn out.

“Will

with a laugh. Curry also wondered

it’s

walls, barriers

not a hustle

and shades, he

said.

clairvoyant,” he said. “Basically,

Some people get emotional when

what I do is pick up on the impressions of individuals. I can do this by simply looking at them.” Valkos said he can read some

he does private readings. “When I’m doing private readings, we can get into a lot of personal, deep stuff.” Valkos was skeptical when he

people better than others because some people are more open than others.

learned about the psychic phenomenon in 1969.

Some people are hard to read because they can put up their own

bunch of garbage and everybody

first

“I

thought everything was a

was running a hustle.” He met some people who proved him wrong by explaining their psychic abilities to him and he began to develop

his

own

psychic

abilities.

“I

ary

went (through) the evolutionprocess of (believing)

absolutely nothing in the psychic

world exists, to perhaps the psychic world could exist, to some people are psychic, to most people

taking

V^os has worked with different psychic organizations, primarily as an investigator. He was the

my awards.’

Valkos has helped people find missing friends or relatives but doesn’t like doing it. “ril: do everything I can to get out of doing something like that, but I have done it before.”

Valkos said he listens to his missing person.

instincts to find a

He

are psychic.”

Doon Student Association presents.

of the year award) but I’m not bithe said. “Sue’s a sweetheart. I told her, ‘You old biddy, you keep ter,”

said if

someone came

chief investi-

Oktobe;^efC Featuring Walter Ostenak and the Walter Ostenak Band 1st

500 stMdontB

to **“'’®'*«*o C'cfcets

will necelve Fnoo OktoboipFeBta Mu|

that person’s

Association of Psychic

“I

Investigative

bunch

body was running a

of

Dan

haunted

director of the Paranormal Enlightenment Centre where he conducted a psychic research

group.

Valkos has also been involved with the Canadian Organization of Activities for 10 years, giving psychic readings to students at colleges and teaching

on psychic development and reincarnation. classes

teaches psychic development

22 colleges and lec50 others. He’s a

guest speaker at about 115 radio stations and has published a cou-

sale at OSA. Offioe

On

ple of books and a line of self-help

ttie A»e of malority nodoirort i^Wimdcrbar!

Free Bus From

REZ

the per-

son

died,

maybe

Valkos,

the

not

actual

pain but the

psychic

houses and helped people develop their psychic ability. For seven years, he was the

at

how

hustle.”

investigated

He

life so he experiences

garbage and every-

tures at about

TioKet $*tO

was a

thought everything

Researchers where he

workshops

him

moments of

gator for the

Campus

XlmtEirs. October 14 7:00 p.BT^. - 1:00 B.nu. Queensmount Arena

to

and asked him to find a friend that had been murdered, his primary focus would be on the last few

emotional trauma. “Shit like that’s not fun,” he said. Valkos said a lot of missing people don’t

makes

want to be found, which

it

impossible for him to

find them.

“You decide your life sucks and you might just take off out west and start a new life,” he said. “You put up your own shields and your defensive parameters to where no one will come around you.” Valkos teaches a one-day workshop on psychic development and a one-day workshop on reincarnation and past lives at Conestoga through the continuing education program.

“Everybody

is

bom

We

chic abilities).

with

it

(psy-

have to and devel-

just

tapes.

learn to trust

His most recent book is called The Psychic World of Your

op our

Dreams.

believe that they have had a past

Last yeai‘ Valkos

was nominated

He life to

and

said people don’t have to

take the reincarnation work(

variety entertainer of the year and

shop.

two yeitfs ago he was nominated speaker of the year.

things in such a

“Sue Johanson took

it

(speaker

“It

in the

listen

abilities further.”

doesn’t

matter.

way

to

I

present

where

realm of possibilities.”

it is


SPOKE,

liitertiUiinmt

American Beauty: a redemption home.

about the beauty that around us. It is also the classic story of redemption. It is

exists all

were an

If suffering

Lester

Burnham

form,

art

would

be

Life couldn’t get

Michelangelo.

Burnham, played by the outis

a

tured by a marriage that

man is

tor-

without

Mendes

love.

the

His wife, Carolyn (Annette Bening) makes up for the lack of a home life by pursuing a profes-

strous

Mogwai. Mogwai, a Chinese word

for

ly shot for the film festival circuit,

not as a typical Hollywood release. It

is

therefore

more mature than

much of what comes ver

out of the silbut the extra thought this

city,

film requires gy,

is

well worth the ener-

^d the eight bucks admittance.

and a drab grey, simiused in Payback,

Mel Gibson. This purposeful use of colour draws the viewer through the story in a seamless fashion, bridging the starring

5

:

Lester Burnham (Kevin Spacey) frustrates wife CaroFyrT (Annette Bening) with changes he’s made in his life in American Beauty.

Come On Die Young on

New York.

was in the middle of nowhere so we had a little more isolation,” “It

asked us if they could do and we said ‘Yeah!’ They suggested some names. “We suggested some names and talked it out. We had very little to do with it,” he said. (JetSet)

“It

was a strange

“But mics are mics,” he joked. The term “punk” has been applied to Mogwai, and the opening sound bite on Come On Die Young is a spoken word clip of Iggy Pop from the ’70s on how rotten rock music is and his interpretation of punk. “I can think of worse terms, but

to

obvious pLasmatroN.

He

criteria,”

prefers the term

New

fit

the

added

do

if

gested

the fact that

imaginative

song

The

decided someone else hadn’t sugif

they were all the project,

on pLasmatroN was quick friends

to point

out that the only people they knew was a group called Arab Strap.

Aidan Moffat, of Arab Strap, Cody on Come On Die Young and there is also a song titled Waltz for Aidan. sings

titles.

project

was a variety of

the various artists on the project. It almost seems like a tribute, but Mogwai is still around. Mogwai is planning to release an EP on Matador this October. The EP should feature six songs; four new ones, and two from the

thing. It’s not

we would’ve

asked

in

Mogwai is not very when it comes to

Mogwai songs remixed by

it.”

When

America

But pLasmatroN took pride

it

something

we

a movie about different lives

to invade North

said pLasmatroN.

certainly I don’t think

It is

styles

York’s Matador Records. The band applied a new approach by recording in Cassadaga in upstate

Review

various characters together.

(Photo submitted)

New

of the moninstrumental quintet

loveless home.

lar to the colour

released

home

than just a story about a

movie

eye for colour in this film, using vivid reds and blues in lim-

By Ray Bowe

the

more

is

going in different directions. If planning to attend this movie, be warned this movie was original-

at

ited scenes,

American Beauty

seri-

terful

>

band set

is

keep

jokes written for an adult, not some pre-pubescent, bodily-fimction type of humour. Mendes has also shown a mas-

Scottish is not the only place Scotland to lay claim to a strange and unusual monster.

refreshing to go to a

It is

Mogwai blends many musical

Loch Ness

inspires the cast to

movie from becoming too

and laugh

Combining these two seasoned actors oii the same screen is sheer genius by director Sam Mendes. The tale of a loveless marriage is nothing new to most movie-goers. And when added to the mix of Spacey and Bening interacting in a tale that could- be told about any number of homes, you have a seri-

in

Affairs,

ous.

sional career as a real estate agent.

ous Oscar contender. But, American Beauty is more than just a story about a loveless

much worse for

family.

homosexuality, poor musical taste and even child abuse are dealt with in this film. And somehow,

standing Kevin Spacey in the film

Glasgow

Burnham

the

American Beauty,

taie

Rv Brad Rrarl Dugard niinarH By

— Page 9

Oct. 11, 1999

No

Education EP, which is not available in North America. One of the constants over Mogwai’s short career has been their inclusion of strong photos in

album sleeve. The cover photo

the

for

Come On

Die Young bassist

is

a macabre picture of

Demonic with

bright red eyes shaded red and his pale white face adorning a jetblack background. lipstick, his

Inside are

catch

the

some pictures

that also

eye quickly.

pounds up against the

Water

pillar

“We didn’t really have any idea what we wanted the sleeve to look like.

We

just

had

all

these ideas. I

don’t like being rushed and

kind of pLasmatroN.

rushed,”

Mogwai, based ditional rock

Strong

cover

photos have been a constant in Mogwai’s short career. Above, bassist Demonic is featured on the

Come On

Die

Young

CD

cover.

I THE PHANTOM MENACE

tortion.

At an

instant,

they retreat into

the soothing bass line with the greatest of ease. It

doesn’t even seem peculiar or

out of place. That’s the beauty of it

monster, recently finished their

on North American and their first on the West

fourth tour soil

all.

Mogwai styles

blends many of the they were influenced by

Coast.

earlier

They played two sold-out nights at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto before hopping on the bus

pLasmatroN lists his favourites as The Cure, The Jesus & Mary Chain, David Bowie, My

Vancouver and down the coast Mogwai was on tour with

Bloody Valentine and Dinosaur Jr. But, he added. Bob Dylan can take the edge off any situation. A strange project was recently undertaken and released on JetSet Records, Mogwai’s European

to

Scottish comrades Ganger, another instrumental outfit.

Mogwai consists of Stuart Braithwaite (pLasmatroN) on guiDominic Aitchison (Demonic on bass guitar, John Cummings (Cpt. Meat) on guitar, Martin Bulloch (Bionic) on drum kit and Barry Bums (Diesel) on

in

life,

in

one form or

another.

tar,

label.

Christ)

The project. Kicking a Dead Pig, was a double-album that featured the likes of Alec Empire, Hood, Third Eye Foundation and Eye Q remixing songs from Mogwai’s first two albums. Ten Rapid and Mogwai Young Team, both

flute

and piano.

The band

P

’-c,

also included The but pLasmatroN admits “he

got sacke- ” departure Earlier

The terms of

his

-re not discussed. this

year,

Mogwai

Tuesday, October 19

8:00

pm , The

Sanctuary

Licensed event

A^dmission

Free for

Ooon Campus

|

students^

$3 for guests purchase tickets at the door

*

released in 1997.

pLasmatroN said he thought the project was well done. “Our label

'I

ree Popcorn

I felt

noted

Mogwai is sure to become a far more recognizable Scottish name than the Loch Ness Monster ever was or will be.

Wave.

largely on the trainstmments of bass, guitar, and dmms, seamlessly inject piano, flute and a myriad of samples and electronics. Mogwai will be plugging along on a minimalist bass line before breaking out into a maze of cacophonic white noise and dis-

of an

oil rig.

hO'


Page 10

— SPOKE, Oct.

11,

1999

Speed

Giving a

heart

iittle

skating oval

be

will

closed By Anna

Sajfert

The speed-skating

rink will be

closed for the third consecutive season.

The

oval,

which

located

is

behind the Kenneth E. Hunter recreation centre at Doon campus, is being used as an additional 50to 100-car parking

lot.

“Due to parking shortages at the Doon campus and the overflow on

Manel ing the

Oliver, gift

of

a

first-year

life,

marketing student, says donating blood makes her feel good about herself. Although "woozy" after givwill do it again. (Photo oy Anna Saifert)

Oliver says she

Parking Lot 12, the college has decided to keep the oval closed,” said

A1 Hunter, security supervi-

sor.

Ian James, director of athletic and recreation services, said college officials have no concerns about students parking on the 400metre track. “It’s a hard, packed surface,” he said, “however, it will have to be resurfaced.”

“The track, itself, will not be damaged,” Hunter said. “But it definitely won’t be as smooth.” He added that the oval, which is a

among the Conestoga Sirtoma Speed Skating Club and the City of Kitchener, has not been developed or maintained in the last two wdnters due to bad weather conditions. partnership

College,

James said the college plans

Proper identification

needed By Linda Wright

public library, which is a branch of the Kitchener public library.

Students looking to loan material from the Pioneer Park coimnu-

The

nity library

need proper identification or they will not be allowed

library

to take out books.

occurs when the student

Some Conestoga College students don’t know what identifica-

has no identif i c a t i o n

frustration

tion is

needed to get a library and this has resulted in frustration for the students and the

showing

card,

current local

new official parking at Doon campus.

librarians, according to

Maureen

Without the

Pioneer

identifica-

lots are built

Plomske, manager

at the

between the

stu-

the student’s name. A piece of mail that has been postmarked within the last two weeks or a

library,

but doesn’t go into detail

about

what

a

address.

will

'jji-

“Some Conestoga College students identification is

has resulted

needed

to get

a

don’t

know what

library card,

and

this

Pioneer Park library manager

be a

Frofii

and the other with

been signed during

least that has

the current school year will suf-

Plomske. proper identification, he/she can obtain a library fice, said

If the student has

Resume

Builder

card immediately.

but

ed to provide companionship

address, then the library will send the student a card within a week

who have

Alzheimer Disease.

Two

“We

are trying to help the stu-

dents as

Training program provided

Plomske. There is no charge for obtaining

(with certificate upon

, '

J

if

an opportunity to learn about turning your College Diploma into a t Unlyeraity ^Degree

,

is

i

In Australian!

local

to 10 days.

com-

much

a library card,

This

show a

doesn’t

it

hours a week commitment.

pletion). :

as

if

we

can,” said

the student

is

a

resident of Kitchener.

Call Alzheimer Society at

742 - 1422

Plomske.

The

library has

.

More about on the

registration appears

library’s

Web

site at

www.

The site gives information on becoming a member of the kpl.org.

and Careers on CD ROM. Careers examines opinions of people who are currently working in a field and what the salaries are. Plomske said the librarians see a of early childhood education who are developing a program with the day-care children and need materiad. lot

Friendly volunteers are need-

to people

pm

said

rial,

Canadian Quick Reference Guide

If the student has identification,

Robin 2A3013:30 pm - 5:30

valu-

Periodical

local address

|n

may be

able to students

the

Kdl\fl

be 6n-campus Wednesday, Optober 13,

select information

analysis of mate-

Maureen Plomske,

Two pieces of identification are needed to obtain a card, one with a current

will

and

public.

card.

Consul tantf and University of Westerii Sydney,

the

Internet

and the general They also do a critical

the students and the

in frustration for

search

that

librarians.”

refused

is

Librarians

tion, students h'"

identification

required.

dents and the

continue using the oval for student and staff parking purposes until

to

books

for

students

LASA students and students taking technical courses also come in to use the library’s services.

Plomske suggests the main branch of the library would be a better choice if a student is doing complex research. The library can courier material from another library branch usually within the same day. Students can also renew or reserve material online.

Classified TRAVEL-teach English: 5 day/40 hr (Oct.

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.

SPOKE,

GLOW celebrates

One student shows up

Coming Out Week By Jeanette

when

Everall

they are not ready.”

GLOW, mn by

the University of

continuously operating gay group

(GLOW)

in

as they kick off

Out Week. The phrase

Waterloo’s Federation of Students for the past 28 years, is the longest

Coming

Canada.

University

Tlie

of

student life centre at the University

Guelph’s community organization, Guelph Queer Equity, is a close second with 26 years. Both groups have a support and resource phone line for anyone

of Waterloo during the week of Oct.

dealing with gay, lesbian, bisexual

buttons

from

be featured on will be distributing information booth in the will

GLOW

their

The group’s

11.

Ae

wear

campaign to bring awareness about homosexuahty to

“People should out to

when they

come

come

are ready

at large

GLOW co-ordinator '

out,” says Singer,

who

has

Singer

feel comfortable

with yourself and depends a lot on the person’s circumstances.” it

coming out

in Waterloo

Region, Singer said this area

is tra-

which makes coming out difficult and

for a gay, lesbian

and

itated a

bisexual students to network and meet other homosexual students

who

on campus.

meeting for any students were interested in forming a

Any students still interested, should contact Kraler in student

support group.

services.

at

conservative

As a peer

coming

out,

support group,

tunity for gay, lesbian,

encourage people to

GLOW

bisexu^ and

transgender individuals to

more comfortable with

We can also

become

their sexu-

ality.

GLOW

also

organizes

special events.

“We don’t come out

relation-

provides a non-threatening oppor-

GLOW.

Singer.

you CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE DOON HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3)

meetings, which delve into pre-set

nights, dances, bus trips

“Our goal is to make people feel more comfortable with their sexu-

NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUTION?

40 people to their

increases the need for groups like

said

“What I’m hoping to do is just facilitate the group by putting up

Wednesday

ships and sexual exploration.

ality,”

29 meeting.

The idea

She said the discussion group is a chance for gay, lesbian and

Conestoga. Following

GLOW

topics like

ditionally

-at

draws between 30 and

been a member of the group for the

for

inquired about any existing organizations

the inquiry, student services facil-

said

past two years. “I think you have to

As

but there was-

Barb Kraler, a

counsellor with student services.

open to students and the community

out.”

they are ready to

come

cast,

the brochures,” said

cussion meetings

Steve Singer,

when

was

bite.

group was few students

That’s the way it looks for Conestoga’s gay and lesbian discussion group after only one student showed up at the iititial Sept.

the universities.

“People should out

bait

any

a

hold weekly dis-

the public.

come

The

support after

to discussion

They

issues.

buttons

in support of their

bisexual

— Page 11

and transgender

co-ordinator, Steve Singer, hopes people will

Everall

initiated n’t

narrow” is one of the ideologies being presented by Gays and Lesbians of Waterloo “Straight, but not

By Jeanette

Oct. 12, 1999

movie

community referrals birth control counselling

health resources and information

Information about

GLOW

can be found on their at www.csclub.uwaterloo.ca/clubs/glow or by phoning

Web

blood pressure monitoring

non-prescription medications prescriptions from a Doctor

and other

help with:

allergy injections and immunizations

> pregnancy testing a place to rest when you are

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©Registered Trade Mark of General Motors Corporation. TD Bank licensed user. *TD Bank and GM ore licensed users of Marks. • Trade Mark of TD Bank. **AII applicants applying in person for The GM Card at on-campus booths will receive a copy of the Frosh Two CD at no charge, Applicants applying via the Internet will receive a copy of the Frosh Two CD upon approval, at no charge. Limit one copy per applicant, fApplies to full-time students only. “*No purchase necessary. Contest closes December 31. 1999, Open to Canadian residents (excluding Quebec) who have reached the age of majority. Visit nobrainer.gmcanada.com for full contest Rules & Regulations or to apply on-line. tfSubject to The GM Card Program Rules.


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— SPOKE, Oct.

Page 14

11,

1999

Year 2000 By Beverley Grondin

partiers gathered

(This

is

the final instalment of a

two-part series on millennium celebrations.)

New Year’s Eve is and

ebration,

many

year

it

that this

places are planning on

ringing in the year tle

a night of cel-

seems

2000 with a

more pizzazz than

lit-

in previous

years.

According to information provided by Heather Kaufman, the marketing co-ordinator of special events for Toronto city hall.

be part of a festival with its theme around light. Light has great significance around the world, representing beauty and spirituality, truth and hope.

music.

downtown Toronto on New

Year’s

Eve

will

A

pyrotechnic countdown to midnight will begin from the CN Tower, with blasts of light and colour ascending the sides of the tower, counting down from 10 to

The

one.

final blast

from the top

of the tower will light up the sky

Big party By Beverley Grondin

on the waterfront

around the region. Fireworks will begin at 12:01 a.m., 600 metres (2,000 feet) over Lake Ontario. The spectacle will last 17 minutes and will feature the newest laser, hght and fireworks technology choreographed to

in

“We know

it

will

be

terrific,”

said Crowley.

A new upon

giant ball will descend

New York’s Times

Square to

About 1.5 million people are expected to show up to celebrate

bring in the year 2000.

in

According to Dennis Crowley of the Times Square Business Improvement District, the ball is covered with 504 Waterford

Square.

Crystal triangles in a Star of

It will be illuminated from the beginning of the celebrations, which will be longer and more involved than any previous New

,

2000

celebrate midnight

in

each time zone. Dennis Crowley, Times Square Business

.

encourages

www.torontomillenni-

site

um.com. Laurie Peters, in media relations with the National Capital

Improvement District

That

Year’s

Ottawa’s

at

Parliament Hill will be unique.

The theme

A

The clock

Story of Time, and Peters anticipates over 30,000 people will

parades,

attend.

charge.

according

to

be the staging

will

area for entertainment, including

And

not just a party,” said Peters.

which

at

be free of

will

midnight there will be

“It’s

a family gathering at the foot of our country’s capital, at the foot

spectacular fireworks.

of the Peace Tower.”

kids stay up later,” said Peters.

She said that a giant clock will be set up on the surface of the Hill and it will start ticking an hour

about the evening or any other mil-

lennium

before midnight.

Web

Work

“This

is

Anyone

it,

the one night to let your interested in

more

details

can visit www.capcan.ca.

activities

site at

their

baby!

Crowley said the momentous event will include 160 oversized puppets floating around the square, bands and live musicians. Five giant screens will broadcast live

from

New

Year’s all

Eve

over the

world.

And

of course, at midnight,

eastern standard time, the glow-

ing ball will drop, bringing in the new year in this time zone.

The party is expected to be so immense the police have warned theatres that the crowds will make

Crowley recommended anyone more details to check

interested in

out

,

their

Web

site

at

www.timessquarebid.com.

Clairol technical consultant, Antoinette Julien

the

new

show

Bingeman Park Oct

3. iRioio by Linda Wrigh

.it

I;''

includes coachline trans

^(Bars of age students permitted 1 g kialteiitilie PSA \

New Year’s

companies are getting ready a busy night as the tri-cities celebrate

for

By Beverley Grondin

“New Year’s Eve

looks like

it

will

be business as

companies in Kitchener-Waterloo on New Year’s Eve this year. Although it may be the biggest night of the century to date, Tony Rodrigues, assistant manager of for

taxi

Jacqueline King, the assistant

company any

The Sanctuary

surprises.

be any busier than other

years,” he said.

The

have an outstanding number of bookings yet either.

“We are expecting a amount, though,” she said.

large

DSA party in 2000

of the cars out

at

for the best, said Rodrigues.

Dressing up Although the night of

New ing,

Students hoping to ring in the year with the DSA, may be

new

disappointed

do is have all once and hope

best they can

Year’s Eve,

is fast

all

nights.

approach-

most party-goers have yet

to

rent their tuxedos.

According

am

in

Kitchener, said her store doesn’t

think this year will bring the taxi “It can’t

Tuesday, October 12

more sponta-

manager of Tuxedo Royal

Waterloo Taxi, said that he doesn’t

Gerr^o Watson P6QI Show

is

neous,” she said. It

"Canada's Premier Billiard Entertainer"

Eve:

Taxi

usual

DSA Presents

demonstrate

Marcelle curling iron on Trudy Roberts at

i:;Oktobeffest hair

11:30

the format festivi-

begin,

Peters.

be In Motion:

will

when

is

will

ties

it difficult for theatre-goers and have urged them not to hold performances that night, said Crowley. “Most producers have voluntarily agreed not to perform that night, but some stiU will,” he said.

celebrations in cities

parties.

This year. Times Square, the usual location of Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, will celebrate midnight in each time zone. It will begin at 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 31 and will last until 7:30 a.m. Jan. 1

Times

This year Times Square will

Eve

around

streets

Hope

design.

Year’s

the

anyone seeking more information on the evening to check out the city’s

Web

celebration

“It’s

Kaufman

New

Commission, said the

Eve

Big Apple

in

a bang

to begin with

that

for a party before students

Sanctuary.

However, she said the planning a party for the

Wear

second week

to

in Kitchener, some people have already booked tuxedos,

number of

come

back from the holidays. Jenn Hussey, DSA vice-president of operations, said she doesn’t think there would be a lot of interest in a New Year’s Eve celebration held in the

Brenda Ribeiro, manager of Freeman’s Formal

but the

Doon

the

Student Association has no plans

rentals

has

after the

is

first

or

Christmas

vacation.

The theme

will

be something lilA

survived the

Y2K, and willlj, week asking

been nothing out of the ordinary. She said she is expecting most of her customers to wait until

We

December

gency, said Hussey.

to start booking.

DSA

part of an awareness

people to keep safe in case of emer-


SPOKE,

K-W

month, and students pay $30. There is a $50 registration fee. Popeye’s classes include aerobics, boxercise, step and toning and saunas are available in the change rooms.

Students wanting to get in shape

need to look no further than Conestoga College. For those seeking exercise, the recreation centre has a weight room, ice rink and squash and

The A. R. Kaufman YMCA is Carwood Ave. arid membership costs $24 per month located at 233

basketball courts. Starting

Oct.

3,

classes

step

with a $25 registration fee.

be held every Monday and

Wednesday at 3 p.m. The recreation centre

It

is

Life Fitness Club, located

St., has a variety of membership plans designed to

Campbell said service

Samantha Campbell, a Good

“You want

customers choose a plan depending on their fitness tative, said

varies

Aaron Watchom, a customerf<sr

said a variety of

is important when a considering a gym. cost of the membership,

student

The

is

the condition of the weight

whirlpools at the Good Life club. Popeye’s Gym, which is open

room

and how busy the gym is should be considered when searching

777 Weber

for a club, said

Alex Costa, a first-year management studies student, makes good use of Conestoga’s weight room in the Kenneth E. Hunter recreation centre. (Photo by Tannis Fonton)

E.

$40

Gym,

equipment

boxing and aerobics. Members can enjoy saunas and

costs

representative

Popeye’s

boxercise and punch, which is like Tae Bo, a combination of

Membership

important too, she

is

service

Fitness classes include aerobics,

is at

staff that’s friendly,”

Clean equipment that works properly added.

according to the plan but students receive a discount.

St.

a top

she said.

goals.

24 hours a day,

is

priority.

Life customer-service represen-

membership

and body

club.

suit individual needs.

cost of

boxercise,

squash courts and a running track. The club also has a swimming pool, whirlpool and sauna. Several things should be considered when looking for a fitness

25 Frederick

The

step

ketball,

several fitness clubs.

Good

aerobics,

sculpting classes, along with bas-

included with tuition. But for those who want to workout off campus. Kitchener has

at

offers

power pacing, fee

— Page 15

many fitness clubs

offers

By Tannis Fenton

will

Oct. 11, 1999

per

service

YMCA

customerrepresentative Matt

Elgie.

l£l

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: DEPRESSION

1 1

i 1 1

i 1 1 1 1 1 I

i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i°j

Most of us have experienced waking up

bad mood or “feeling the blues”. are usually of short duration and have minimal impact on our lives.

These feelings

Some people experience

in a

sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt for

weeks, months and even years. These experiences characterize depression, an ness believed to affect one in ten.

Here are some signs which might indicate

that

ill-

you or someone you care about

is

experiencing depression:

FEELINGS

-

Loss of joy

in formerly pleasurable activities; crying a lot or feel-

ing emotionally “empty”;hopelessness; worthlessness; loss of warmth towards

people in

key

of sexual desire; deep sense of shame or self-doubt. PHYSICAL - overwhelming exhaustion and lack of energy; insomnia or the opposite; loss of appetite or the opposite; physical aches and pains; digestive problife;

loss

lems; headaches.

BEHAVIOUR

- irritability,

withdrawal; neglect of responsibilities or appear-

ance; reduced ability to concentrate, If these

or cope with daily activities.

symptoms

persist, or if their intensity is causing you to consider suicide important to seek assistance with a knowledgeable professional. campus, counsellors are available in Student Services (2B02); a nurse and

as an option,

On

remember

it is

doctor are available in Health

& Safely Services (inside door #3).

Pick up a free brochure at our display table (just inside door #4) during the week of October 18.

A

free presentation, “Preventing Suicide,” will help

you learn ways to identify signs of suicide and what you can do to help yourself or a friend.

Wednesday, October

20,

1:30 -2:30 p.m.

Room 1C15 A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

1999

1 I i 1 1 1 1 1

I i 1 1 1 1

i I 1

Boxercise: a new' m

M

fitness em, which has become popular.

who

People

aie bored with

closes or for something different fitness

imy want

to try die latest trend

to hit fitness clubs.

Boxercise

a workout that

is

integrates boxing, martial arts

and aerobics. Upper cut, hook and jab punches are combined with roundhouse, front and side kicks for a complete workout.

The boxercise craze due

is

largely

of Tae Bo, a combination of boxing and aerobics, which was created by Billy Blanks.

Blanks

i 1

a U.S. martial arts champion who began teaching is

I 1 1

1 15)

it

“It’s really motivating and it’s a challenging workout,” said

Natalie Buiberry,

who

is

mem-

bership co-ordinator at Good Life Fitness in Kitchener and

does boxercise. Boxercise utilizes more upper body muscles than aerobics, said Toth,

who

cise at Stretch

teaches boxer-

Your

Life.

because it involves natural movements, Burberry said. Jensen said,

“It’s

a good car-

diovascular workout.”

But people doing boxercise need to be careful. Boxercise is tricky because marital arts are involved, said

it

Toth,

(boxercise) a kick start,” said Karen Toth, owner of Stretch

“If you don’t train properly, you’re bound to have repetitive

Your

strain injuries,” she said.

Life,

a Pilates exercise

centre in Kitchener. Pilates are exercises based on proper stretching,

1 1 1

helped

There’s no impact in boxercise

to the popularity

Tae Bo in 1989. “Tae Bo has really given

1

j

breathing and pos-

ture.

working out

is crucial for safe

exercise.

Amanda Popeye’s said

Toth said stretching for five to 10 minutes before and after

Jensen, a clerk

Gym

Wercise

is

in

at

Kitchener,

fun and differ-

Jensen said people

who

boxer-

cise shouldn’t overexert themselves.

1


— Page 16

— SPOKE, Oct.

.

11,

1999

Condor sports briefs By Nicole Furlong For the week of Sept. 27 - Oct. 3,

Conestoga Condors varsity

action results are as follows:

SOFTBALL women’s

In

Rebecca

Miller (front)

sweeps the

ball

from an unidentified Fanshawe player

women’s

in

varsity soccer, Sept. 27. (Photo by Angela

softball action, the

Condors won their fifth-straight game by trampling Loyalist College, defeating the team 16-6 at Conestoga on Oct.l. Home-team scorers were Cassy Chilton with three runs, Tanya Holland, Lindsay Harrison, Andrea Douglas, Leigh Marostega and Michelle Kirwin with two and Christine Fountain, Lori Walden and Carrie Cruickshanks with one each.

Clayfield)

Falcons slam Condors

The women’s final home game was played on Oct. 5 against Seneca College. Scores will appear in next week's paper.

By Angela

HOCKEY Clayfield

The team had played seven games in three weeks. said.

Despite a valiant effort, the Condors’ women’s soccer team

box Fanshawe

failed to put the ball in the

and

1-0 to the

lost

Falcons Sept. 27. Inabibty to score goals was a

problem

is

also an issue. Players

who

practised all

more

fit

than those

teams,

said

Falcon

ness

base

to

game

is

that

Peak.

“The unfortu-

we

can’t score goals.”

nate part about it

(the

game)

we

that

score

he

said.

about

can’t

“The you

(Conestoga)

five or six

who

SOCCER

see

Sept. 27.

The

end of They’re

whole game. Peak said the girls were well matched but with the opportunities both teams had, the score should have been about 10-9. Injuries and fatigue are still contributing factors,

Johnstone

Home-team scorers were Angela Tanya Listar and

Papazatos,

Diana

end once in the first half when Fanshawe, who dominated the field through most of the game, scored the first and only goal.

In men’s soccer action, Conestoga was defeated 3-2 by George Brown College on Oct. 1 Home-team goal scorers were Paul Mouradian and Derhan

Overall, both coaches said the

women played well given the circumstances.

Conestoga’s next home game be Oct. 12 when the women play the Lambton Lions at 4:30 p.m. will

Jailall.

The women play their next home game on Oct. 12 at 4:30 p.m. against the Lambton Lions.

Conestoga Condor Erin Marshall (left) and an Fanshawe player chase after the ball.

unidentified

Sherifali.

(Photo by Angela Clayfield)

game on

The guys play against the

Varsity

Conestoga’s men’s varsity hockey team has only four returning players this season, which has coach Ken Galerno excited. Although this year’s team has so many fresh faces, Galerno said they are faster and have more last year’s

group.

The team has already won three of four exhibition games. The season begins Oct. 23. For the past three weeks, the team has been practising three to four times weeldy, giving Galerno a chance to pick the team as well as put lines together.

home

their next

14 at 4:30 p.m.

Oct.

Fanshawe Falcons.

men’s hockey team gets new look

By Nicole Furlong

depth than

for

score of 3-0.

only took the ball out of their

Condor coach Geoff Johnstone agreed but said there wasn’t a decent shot to be made in the

scorer

On Oct. 1, Conestoga shut out George Brown College with a

good

Conestoga

can’t either.”

lone-goal

Fanshawe was Kelly Sweet.

Falcon coach shape.”

action, the

Condors were defeated 1-0 by Fanshawe College at home on

to the

in

women’s soccer

In

the summer or through the high school season

really

Friday.

The team will begin league play on Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. at home against Cambrian College.

played through

June.

David Peak,

thing it is

said.

game on

Adam Duce.

with,”

Johnstone “You can

Humber

Scorers for the Condors were John Suckert, David Money and

didn’t.

start

up

is

goals,”

good

who

in an exhibition

are

don’t have time to get them fit if they don’t have a fit-

‘The unfortunate part

David about the

summer

“We

for

both

coach

Fitness

In men’s hockey action,

College defeated Conestoga 5-3

The coach said the men have been going at it hard and have shown a good level of commitment to practices and the team. Galerno said man-for-man, the team might not be as talented as

However they have tremendous commitment and competition.

the

“This

is

great calibre

hockey and

I’d like

fans out to root these

he

said.

Galerno,

who is a rookie

himself,

only being his second year as the team’s coach, said his expectathis

tion for the

team

this

year

is

to

be

ished in third place in the provincial

championships and second

in

the nationals.

guys on.”

“This

Ken Galerno,

depth and he said he’d take that combination any day.

“We have players from the OHL, the Minor Hockey League and the Junior B and C leagues,”

to get

teams to challenge Conestoga. The team, which ended last year with just over a 500 average, fin-

coach provincial champions. “1

wouldn’t be here unless I make it,” he said. He also acknowledged it wouldn’t be thought we’d easy.

Galerno said he expects Flemming, Cambrian and Seneca colleges

to

put

together good

is

great calibre

He

said he believes they were

invited because of Conestoga's

good relationship with the two Waterloo universities and their status. “It will

hockey and

I’d like to get fans out to root these

said.

guys on,” he said. He added the guys “work their butts off’ and deserve recognition from the students and community. To prove the Condors have put together a good team, Galerno noted they have been invited to an Oktoberfest tournament, which normally only university teams

at

play

against

in.

be a tough challenge for do okay,” Galerno

us, but we’ll

This

year’s

captain

is

MacDonald, who started with team in January 1998.

Ian the

Galerno boasted his captain has and will bring a lot to the team both on and off a lot of character

the ice.

The Condors’

.

first

game

will be

3:30 p.m. on Oct. 23, at Cambrian College.

home

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