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31st Year

Man walks province

Police

question student A

men’s soccer team member

was questioned on trip to the

to Ian

who gave me

Windsor area on

chance

at

James, athletic director for

can of our I

it was a member men’s soccer team (who was questioned),” he said. James,

give you,

who refused to give the player’s name until having consulted with him, said the player is strongly stating his innocence in this matter.

to

remember

that

everyone is iimocent until proven guilty,” he said. No further information was available at press time.

What’s

who was

By Jeanette

life,” said Marcello, diagnosed with terminal

To protest increasing tuition,

After spending 11 months on a list, he received a phone

waiting call

2 a.m. in August 1995.

at

Someone had donated a

Sept. 23,

suitable

2000 campaign urg-

ing the federal goverimient to

Marcello stopped at Conestoga College on Sept. 20 during his 2,000-kilometre journey. The stop highlighted the college’s involvement with the Step by Step Foundation to promote organ donation.

increase post-secondary funding

by $3.7 bilhon

Students at Conestoga will not be taking part in the scheduled strike because the Doon Student

Association (DSA) is not a ber of the federation.

campaign, called the Conestoga Connection, is the ini-=‘ tial step toward universal involvement and fund-raising by college and university students. Marcello,

who

Oonesto^a Ontario Student

get privacy laws changed to

make

and donor meet, started his walk

easier for recipients

families to

on June

26.

The three-month

trainer

is affiliated witfj

College Parliamentary

George Marcello, one

founders of the Step by Step Foundation, is walking across Ontario to promote and bring awareness to organ donation. (Photo by Jeanette Everall) of the

the colleges

it

lectively

concerned

DSA has new

co-ordinator

to freeze

Out with the old. The Doon Student Association .

FV^GES

has fired their promotions coordinator Karl Garner citing a

communications breakdown during the week-of-welcome events.

“Karl was a great guy but there

were some breakdowns when

came

it

to organizing events,” said

Jenn Hussey, DSA vice-president operations, on Sept. 2 1 And in with the new After the firing of their promo-

tions co-ordinator, the

have In

DSA didn’t

to look far for a replacement. fact,

Alycia Punnett

had

applied for the part-time salary

Peter Tosh

remembered

after 12 years.

position

FWGE5

She

CbMMENTARY Page 4 Students plan

r

it

was

first

created

strike

has cancelled.

it’s

it

then, but as of

her job.

Conestoga,

her jobs entails, but she

is

looking

forward to the challenge of promoting the DSA’s activities to the college community.

the better col-

To the

“I

Cambrian

at

College about the student association providing funding to a devil

worship club is prompting changes to Conestoga DSA clubs’ policy.

on

motion

Micheal, the DSA’s proassistant of clubs

idence,

the

DSA

my

would

like

to

accomplish with the administration, the association and legisla-

Menage. She would put applied degrees, the 30 per cent hold-back fund and what each individual college is

doing with that money at the list, not a tuition

top of the freeze.

Every year, 30 per cent of each

.

Ramy

wouldn’t put list of prior-

personally

tion for this year,” said

them

lions with

Concerns raised

issue

Ellen

said

said

and

res-

while certain

that

and

DSA

political,

can-

student’s tuition

allocated into

is

automatically

what

hold-back fund.

is.

In

called a

same

that

academic year the money is then used to contribute to Conestoga’s community in the form of community aid, bursaries and shortterm loans.

Substitute options discussed included “farmer Mike” who could bring some goats and a llama to the Sanctuary, and the Humane Society which could bring some “not so endangered”

suggested these types of

Tuition for post-secondary edu-

clubs would not receive any sup-

cation has been steadily rising for

strays to the school.

port from the

DSA.

about a decade. According to a

was decided in the

This 21 -year-old graduate of Conestoga’s recreation and leisure services program said that she isn’t quite sure exactly what

was one of

lege shows,” she said.

clubs, religious

In the course of the discussion

didn’t get

Sept. 24,

^ February

when

in April.

endangered species. Kim Kroeker, promotion assistant for awareness weeks, said at the meeting that the scheduled Endangered Species display at Doon campus has suffered a major setback. The African Lion Safari, which was supposed to provide a demonstration using large birds,

ty this

may be the

Menage, president of the Doon Student Association (DSA).

ities

tterms of organization and securi-

about

they

tuition,

more adamant about

tuition freeze

Meeting Notes: from Sept. 21, executive meeting Endangered Species Week is an

represents are col-

increasing federal funds in order

than

Compiled by Brad Dugard

the

Community

Although the association and

tour

and youth worker.

mem-

Association, which uses diplomatic measures to lobby for parliamentary change.

also trying to

is

to enable a tuition

cut or freeze.

The

scheduled to end in Toronto, where Marcello works as a fitness

Fund-raiser.

the

part of the federa-

is

tion’s Access

liver.

is

Downtown Jaza^ Fashion

Everall

Canadian Federation of Students is planning a nationwide student walkout in February. The day-long strike, announced

liver disease in 1994.

it

Inside

planned

of thanking the a second

person

Conestoga College. “As far as the information

“We have

my way

while on a

the Sept. 17 weekend, according

strike

ent of a donated liver, Marcello is walking across Ontario to bring awareness to organ donation. “It’s

Student

Everall

With two feet and a heart beat, George Marcello is saying thankyou for his gift of life.The recipi-

assault allega-

tions, but not charged,

road

By Jeanette

— No. 36

it

that perhaps llamas

school are a bad idea. I

Patty

Mother Earth

Stokes,

entertainment

manager, reported to the executive that although there are no final numbers on ticket sales; the I

Mother Earth concert was a success.

“Some

of the roadies said in

not receive

can

still

funding, they

organize and use

DSA

resources, like advertising space

on

bulletin boards.

He

“No one

is

saying these clubs

can’t organize (on their

(we are saying)

that

own) but

we won’t

support them,” he said. “It is probably best to exclude them (from support).”

The executive decided

that this

change to clubs’ policy would have to be considered at the association’s board of directors meeting, Sept. 29.

Statistics

in

Canada

report released

August, tuition rates

in

the

province jumped by 9.6 per cent this year. Since 990 the average 1

cost of tuition

climbed by

in

Ontario has

134.2 per cent to

$3,872.

The

administration

at

Conestoga has chosen not to deregulate tuition, said Menage. See Strike - page 2


.

— SPOKE, Oct.

Page 2

1999

4,

NEWS

Input necessary for strategic plan By Tannis Fenton

creation of the critical to Conestoga College’s new strategic plan, said Larry Rechsteiner,

answering the questionnaires. The questionnaires will help with the process of gathering include in information to the plan. They will be available in print and online at the college’s

director of college planning.

Web

The involvement of people

The

is

strategic plan captures the

changing needs of the community and ensures the college is striving to meet those needs, he said. “The strategic plan is an overall direction of the college for the future,” Rechsteiner said. “It’s a blueprint of the college’s direction.”

The new

strategic plan covers

and will replace the current plan, which has been in place since 1995 and the

next

years

five

expires in 2000.

“The board (of

directors)

and

senior administration, particularly

site in late

“We

anticipate that

about

be

bly

summer

or

be finalized,”

completion is not its important as the involvement of people in the process, he said. About 12 people are on the strategic planning committee which will develop the strategic plan. The committee includes students, faculty, support staff and

Economic

questionnaires distributed to peo-

outlined.

defines the college’s

and

vision

and

values. trends,

social

student success, quality services

and human resources are also

be looked

be

will

participate

by

they

are

may

in

tact.

has increased by $140 or 10 per cent, which is within the guidelines of what the college can do.

A

tuition

student strike •

is

somewhat

attention

and the

spark and the interest because it’s

not as exciting as skipping

member

school,!

to

the legislation

is far

more

said.

Menage

said

the job

it’s

administration and the

communicate the

of

DSA

to

strategic plan to

students.

(of

communica-

through the board of directors because there you have every program

tion)

is

represented

by

the

Phys^ resources employee,

Shaun Kempel, inspects a broken underground pipe directly across from the main idling buHding at Doon campus Sept. 24.

represented,” she said.

members

Board

strategic

can

communicate about

classes

Menage

with

the

plan.

said.

Menage university’s

A

be

to

12-14 held Oct. will determine what action will be taken in support of the federation on campus, said Meaghan Gariety,

external commissioner

for the University

Rape drug back K-W

police

warn club patrons

By Walerian Czarnecki

The

Central

referendum

(Photo by Phil Wright)

read

and

plan

tuition hikes.

the

make

the

chance

need to be aware of. It’s great to have a strategic plan, but the people who are benefiting fi-om it should know what it is, she

federation in this area.

longer

plan

students

she said.

get

little

asking for a speak at board of governors’ meetings or going straight to the people who

Talking to the administration at

the

said

more

school to protest on the street,”

to

take a

“But eventually, if you believe strongly about the issue we can get the message out to the students without having them miss class or fall behind.” The University of Guelph is the only post-secondary

and takes the focus off learning, said Menage. uiu-ealistic

is

Student Association supports the federation’s motion to strike and said they will be participating in some capacity to protest

“It

The

But Menage something

then

productive, said Menage.

. .

shows the college

their

essentially

extremebecause it always striv-

ing to improve.

ensure

at first to

president,

is

ly important to students

vision and values

Strike unrealistic: continued from page one

DSA

Ellen Menage,

the

The mission,

will

about five years ago.

“A good avenue

administration.

The plan

Direction will be given to things such as applied degrees that may have been only briefly talked

is

But

mission,

to

(the

it

as

want a lot of particby the people in the college,” he said. a series of There will be

People

spring

next

said Rechsteiner.

ipation

community. encouraged

will proba-

when

strategic plan) will

the president,

ple within the college and the

it

it!

said Rechsteiner.

said the strategic plan

October.

Just do

The date-rape drug has arrived again in Kitchener-Waterloo. Waterloo regional police have all people who frequent clubs, bars and other establishments where the drugcould be used. Rohypnol, or flunitrazepam, is a sedative with approximately 10 times the potency of diazepam (Valium). It has been connected to sent out a warning to

date-rape cases in the

K-W area.

Rohypnol can not be legally bought, sold or prescribed in Canada, but limited amounts can be brought into the country if prescribed by a foreign physician. There are many adverse effects. They include: loss of memory, impaired judgment, dizziness and prolonged periods of blackout. The pills are round, white and slightly smaller than an aspirin. It is a colourless, odourless and tasteless substance when added to alcoholic or non-alcoholic drinks.

of Guelph

student association.

Campus

life

improves

Sheridan upgrades technology systems

NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUTION? you CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR

We

non-prescription medications

community referrals

prescriptions from a Doctor

birth control counselling

health resources and information

pregnancy testing

first aid

a place to rest when you are

Campuses throughout Ontario have a place where students can escape from their hectic day. Conestoga has the remodelled Sanctuary where students can

obtained a liquor licence for

newly constructed

its

patio.

The patio cost $100,000 and can accommodate 157 people. It

currently serves

two kinds of

lounge.

beer and for special events

The University of Waterloo’s Cove re-opened Sept. 13 after

provide liquor and possibly draft

closing for the spring term.

Sun, the college’s paper.

The Campus Cove was shut to Imprint, the

university paper, because of high

Their contract was renegotiated for opening to the satisfaction rent.

of the Cove management and their

can also help with: blood pressure monitoring

duced to the Cove. Sheridan College’s the Cage

down, according

AT THE DOON HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3) allergy injections and immunizations

By Walerian Czarnecki

landlords and

the

Cove’s lease

was lengthened. Some improvements for the Cove will include exterior and

beer,

The It

it

can

according to the Sheridan is not completed yet. needs eye-pleasing land-

patio

still

scape and a surrounding six-foot sidewalk to keep patrons out of the

mud.

Other possible features to be added to the Cage could be patio heaters to extend its use by a couple of weeks and an awning to keep patrons dry in the rain.

light-

The

ing,

games and the return of food anddrink. The return of WatCard,

funds

the University of Waterloo pay-

and the college paid for and $1,500 alarm system

ment system, could also be

the sidewalk.

interior renovations,

such as

il

intro-

patio was built from the student

with

unjA


SPOKE,

OFF CAMPUS

around 9:30 p.m., where there will be other performers at the clock tower.

While a large apple is being lowered in Times Square in New York City, spectators in Kitchener’s Victoria Park will be

The committee has also approached some churches in the downtown to see if they want to sing hymns or present organ

watching a spectacular fireworks display, according to Loma Ferguson, millennium projects co-ordinator for the city of

recitals.

Kitchener.

The fireworks

only part of the evening’s celebrations, however. “We’re having an enhanced version of the Festival of the Night that we’ve had for seven years,” said Ferguson. are

New

The non-alcoholic

Year’s

Eve

organize several celebrations across the

Ferguson said that she is excited and expects several thousand people to attend. She said that every year since 1995 there have been over 12,000 people come out for

New Year’s Eve celebrations. This year she is hoping for at least that

the

dles or creative lights to

“ft will be a symbol of unity, hope, renewal and community,” said Martin Robinson, who is organizing this project in Canada. Robinson said that communities participating in the Beacon Millennium Project

night,” she said.

are choosing various

ways

new year at midnight,

such as bonfires, can-

“We

“We wanted

“Kelly’s Klowns are taking over Victoria School Centre,” she said. “There will be a clown party and crafts for kids, as well as

City Hall.”

said Ferguson.

The fireworks will be set off at midnight from Roose Island in the centre of the l^e in Victoria .Park as part of the Beacon

ting light around the world at midnight.”

Millennium Project, which

around the clock tower.

“If

karaoke.”

move

to Victoria

it’s

in the

Park

He St.

cold enough there will be skating the ice rin k in front of

is

also be

far,

so basic and

She said there

there are

a program to

common,

will

be

at the

outdoor celebra-

same purpose.”

Mundy

said the casino is sponsoring a outdoor party on the river front, which will include a video wall for a retrospective look at the last millennium in Windsor. Ferguson is hoping to gather more volunteers to help with the New Year’s Eve

40

sites

from

John’s to Victoria.

“ft’s

handed out

tion for the

“The beacon is based on the concept of beacpns of biblical times to spread news,”

commons -

is

said that, so

Jim Mundy,

free

better,” she said.

do something bigger and

celebrations, said

“The tracker fights on the building will be turned off on Dec. 3 1 and will be turned on right at midnight,” he said. “Flashlights will

umbrella,” said Robinson. to

Eve

inte-

New

director of corporate communications for the casino.

necting a string of celebrations under one

cele-

a free concert in Kitchener’s City Hall for younger children. There are also plans for a small midway, Ferguson said.

activities will

Year’s

are currently in the process of con-

brations will begin early in the evening with

The

Casino Windsor is also planning to the beacon project into its

grate

to bring in the

dleht processions or bell ringing, which being done in Saskatchewan.

Bigger and Better

“We’re ^working on something like canhappen at mid-

world.

many.

— Page 3

New Year

Kitchener lighting up the By Beverley Grondin

Oct. 4, 1999

way of put-

a

parties.

Anyone

interested in helping for the night

asked to call 741-2902 and leave a message for the Festival 2000 comrnittee.

five or six bonfires

is

Millennium bash: The 1 999 New Year’s Eve

celebrations

will

be better than ever, say many organizers By Beverley Grondin (This

a twoCheck back next week

the first part in

is

manager

Revolution night-

encouraging couples to attend, he

club in Waterloo, the bar is planning ite biggest party ever.

said. The ticket price includes party favours and free champagne. In Waterloo, Loose Change

eral

at

part series. for more on the millennium celebrations.)

‘This year

The year 2000 is less than 100 days away and, according to T.J. Donnelly, director of sales and mar-

different.

Breakaway Tours, this Year’s Eve will be huge.

keting for

year

New

The

company

travel

a three-day

trip to

is

Tony Earner, general manager at Loose

Quebec City for New Year’s Eve. DonneUy said he thinks both trips, which are geared

Karla Steffensen

is

decked out in a nener's Market

in K.tc

m Thymes

g

II

Village. iSaiCiayfleklT

High fashtoil helps By Angela

Clayfleki

Imrie of

CKCO news, collected

spare change or bills in the shoes

Kitchener’s Four Points hotel

became a miniature version of a Paris runway when area clothiers held the 3rd annual

Downtown

Jazzy Fashion Fund-raiser S^t.

22

.

The

Audrey Wilson, president of Gemini Modeling Agency which provided the models, featured magic from illusionist Brian Michaels event, hosted by

and magician Scott Dietrich, jazz music courtesy of Denise Baker with Shafapha On the Side, food and a lot of fashion.

Amber Panchen,

fashion

show

co-ordinator and marketing assistant for the

Kitchens Downtown

Business Association, said they were hoping to exceed last year’s total of $2,500. Over $4,000 was raised

from

ticket sales,

participation fees

and a

sponsor

pass-tfae-

shoe collection. Local celebrity models, including Mayor Carl Zehr and David

were

they

modelling

for

Petsche’s Shoes. All funds from the sold-out

show went

to the

local branch of the United

Way. Panchen said the first year attracted a small crowd at a

restaurant. This year the event

required a ballroom.

Some 300 year,

people attended this

up from 250

last year.

This year’s crowd, as noted by Sonia Burtenshaw, owner and operator of Frills Bridal, one of the participating stores,

was very

diverse as the fashions presented

were for men and women of every age. Several of the stores that participated were from Market Village in the east end of downtown Kitchener. Many of the selections were custom made. Panchen said people were

amazed

that nice clothes

being

sold

Kitchener.

in

are

downtown

selling

tickets

said.

crazy.”

Change Louie ’s

in

Waterloo

Although they have had several inquiries

regarding

they

plans,

this

year’s

won’t be releasing

information or selling tickets for the

evening until Oct.

One

8, said Stuart.

thing she will say

will stay

“We

open

is

the bar

until 3 a.m.

are trying to outdo, with

regards

to

special

effects,

countdown we have done

the

in the

past,” said Stuart.

make the parties extreme. Some 8,000 students travelled

general manager of The Whiskey Jack’s in Kitchener, Don

last year, he said. “Since then, we have been harassed by people to find out what we are planning.” In Kitchener- Waterloo, party

Haas, said this year’s celebrations

organizers are also planning big

New

Year’s

According

Eve to

celebrations.

Sue

Stuart, a gen-

He

said the party will be semi-

formal, which

means no jeans, and

tickets for a cruise

away during

might be given

the evening.

Many

since the beginning of September,

have sold close to 4,000 to 5,000 tickets, he said. The capacity is around 7,000. Although the tours will be the same as they have always been, Donnelly said that the pure excitement of the students going will

it’s

activities are also planned Niagara Falls, according to Kathy Murray, manager of the Winter Festival of Lights. Although the lineup of performers is not confirmed, there will be a performance by children’s entertainers at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 31 in Queen Victoria Park, said Murray. There wifi also be two fireworks displays over the Falls, one at 9:30 p.m. and another at midnight. “Our fireworks at midnight are going to be spectacular,” she said. Murray said there have been sev-

in

and so

far they

“Everybody’s so hyped;

crazy.”

as a trip to

Design Studio

it’s

organizing

towards college and university students, will seU out by early October.

Louie’s will be selling tickets for $20 each as of Oct. 1, said general manager Tony Earner. This year will be different,” he

be

Everybody’s

so hyped;

Montreal as well

They have been

will

will

be

great.

Tickets will go on sale Nov.

and will

sell for

eral inquiries

1

$25 each, or $40

^per couple, said Haas.

The nightclub will have a strict, semi-formal dress code and is

about the evening’s

and the organizers are expecting thousands of spectators. “We always fill Queen Victoria Park to capacity and we are expecting more because of the millennicelebrations,

um,” she

said.


Page 4

— SPOKE, Oct.

4,

1999

COMMENTARY

Editorial

Students to strike In a radical twist to student protests over increasing tuition at post secondary institutions, the Canadian Federation of Students intends to hold a nationwide strike in February. The organization announced its plans on Sept. 23 as part of its Access 2000 campaign, urging a $3. 7-billion increase in federal post-secondary funding and a tuition freeze. The organization is also seeking $1.2 bil-

up a system for national student grants.

lion to set

same

In the

vein, Conestoga’s

Doon

Student Association

(DSA)

is

from the Ontario Community College Student Parliamentary Association, of which the DSA is a member, to stand up and be counted in the fight against tuition hikes. The association is soliciting the support of its member institutions to lobby the provincial government to increase operating grants, thereby under pressure

enabling colleges to grant a tuition freeze.

However, there

is

one fundamental difference between the college

-

association and the students’ federation

While the federation

is

responsibility.

irresponsible in encouraging students to leave

the classroom in protest, the association will be taking the al

more

ration-

approach.

Understanding the importance of reasonable tuition, the college assoof its members, will lobby the government through parliamentary means such as working with members of parliament in order to voice student concerns as opposed to unpredictable, and possibly futile, outbursts of sign waving and picketing. In doing so, the college association is showing it is accountable to its student members. Their actions affirm their No. 1 priority is the best interests of the students. Conestoga students should applaud the DSA for choosing to associate with the community college association, which believes in working within the system. The federation’s compulsion to attack the system with irate protests and radical demonstrations has no predictable ending. Conestoga students are fortunate they do not belong to an organization that chooses to play Russian Roulette with their future. There is no way to determine what will result from the federation’s protest, but one thing is clear. There is no guarantee the one-day protest will benefit students. There is a possibility that a strike by students could result in failure even though students would be leaving classes which they are paying for. Post-secondary institutions which support the one-day walkout are only defeating themselves. The federation should realize the protest will only serve to hurt their cause. ciation, with the support

Sports not priority Being ranked No. 1 in the province aca-

letics

demically

college’s budget

is

A

a

al

What

should not be proud of, however,

is

our rank-

ing on the playing field.

.

to

sports should

are so limited in the sports

Its negligenc£over the 24-yearlong bloodshed in East Timor

Timorese, the Canadian government should have a clear-cut case for imposing immediate economic

and procrastination on the trade

and military sanctions on Indonesia. Although Axworthy has made claims

block

Aloz MacDonald, international human rights activist, and some 20 vitriolic student activists marched in downtown Guelph

MacDonald has been working who

“Why

hasn’t the government done

the while maintaining aca-

already?” federal

According to the 1999/2000 Trade and Economic Analysis (EET) report from the department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade,

they

academic standing, but athletgrowing consideration, and that is where we fail to pass muster. The only real solution to the problem is for the college to allot more money in the budget to athorder to

letics in

make

sports a

higher priority and allow the college

gain the recognition

to

it

deserves.

Achieving academic excellence should have the highest spot on the totem pole by colleges, however, athletics should be placed not too far behind.

Conestoga

ranked No.

is

we

demically, but for this is ath-

it

government, especially Lloyd Axworthy, minister of foreign affairs, to impose economic and military

Canada’s

ing sports one of their lop priori-

to raise aware-

MacDonald said. “What is it waiting for?” The Free East Timor group is urging the

cent, placing

mak-

and protests

with

are organizing

ness of the Indonesian government’s barbaric acts on the people of East Timor.

ics is a

Clearly, these schools are

closely

University of Guelph students

sanctions on Indonesia.

are, as

much more

Spoke

1

aca-

should have so

to offer!

isn’t

Sept. 24, protesting the killing of East Timorese.

students.

obvious students

it

true.

According to the East Timor Action Network

department we are losing potential It is

Canada

(ETAN) news ties have not been cut with Indonesia because some 300 Canadian companies, of which 10 make weapons, operate within Indonesian bor-

in

than Conestoga, runs 10 teams.

Anna

that

cut military ties with Indonesia “years ago,”

Sajfert

colleges

1

After 24 years of documented mass executions,

outright feckless.

is

their

Conestoga has a full-time enrolment of 4,900 students this year. Mohawk College in Hamilton has double that number, but runs 14 varsity programs, which is over triple the number Conestoga has. Niagara College in Welland, which has only 00 more students

Military sanctions are past due.

transmigrations and sadistic demarche on the East

an

teams.

demic excellence. The main reason

time the federal govern-

is

Ontario, harbouring only four var-

ties, all

other reasons.

said, there are sever-

should be, choosing colleges for

Conestoga

embarrassment sity

and a lack of

good reasons why

we

we

Athletically,

allotted in the

be made a higher priority. Because

deserves in.

at

It’s

ment imposes military and economic sanctions on Indonesia.

local vigils, petitions

spirit are the

That being

and should take pride

priority

money

lack of

school

Conestoga

well

a

Conestoga College.

significant achievement that

not

is

Canadian government neglects East Timorese

total trade it

with Indonesia

is

0.16 per list of

21st on Canada’s top 100

trading countries.

Therefore it’s the case of cheap shoes made in Indonesia versus a young East Timorese’s head. What’s it going to be for the Canadian govern-

ment?

The Guelph student activists said the Canadian government should release a statement which would recognize the Aug. 30 popularity vote for East Timor’s independence and express condemnation of the genocide carried out by the proautonomy forces of Indonesia against the civilians of East Timor.

Although this piece of documentation will not stop the pro-Indonesia militia from wiping out the people of East Timor, it will help reduce the death toll in

the future.

ders.*'

The European Union was first to impose sancThe United States followed. What is Axworthy waiting for? Suharto’s government did not recognize the

tions.

United Nation’s Charter on the declaration on the granting of independence to colonial countries and peoples, which recognized the right of the people of East Timor to self-determination and independence. His army invaded East Timor in 1975. The annexation came 10 days after the East Timorese gained independence from Portugal. According to a Sept. 21 ETAN article the Indonesian military murdered one-third of the entire population between 1975 and 1991. After the Nov. 12, 1991, massacre, when 273 people were murdered by Indonesian troops, a brutally picturesque documentary. Cold Blood: The Massacre of East Timor, was released. Some of the systematic tortures that took place were electric shocks, mutilation, burning of genitals by cigarettes, rape, sexual assault, sleep and food deprivation.

Following the Aug. 30 referendum, when the East Timorese voted 78 per cent in favour of independIndonesia’s new leader, Yusuf Habibie, a demoniacal reflection of the former president ence,

Suharto, ordered his military to attack East Timor. Really,

time the Canadian government plays a

political tyrant

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

it’s

by imposing military and economic sanctions on Indonesia. little

is niiiinly

funded from September to

Student Association (DSA). in

this

file

newspaper do not necessarily

Cone.stoga College or the

DSA.

May

by the Doon

views and opinions expressed reflect

Adverti.sers in

the views

SPOKE

of

are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

eTidorsed by the

SPOKE Issues

and

is

DSA

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Bradley Dugard; News Editor: Brian Gall:

Activities Editor: Lesley Turnbull;

Photo Editor:

.leanelle Hverall;

Production Manager: Anna

out ol errors

Saifert;

Circulation Manager: Nicole Furlong; Faculty SupervLsor: Christina .lonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4BI5, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. ext.

()‘)

1

Fax:748-5971 E-mail: spoke(u'concstogac. on. ca

in

advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolicited .submissions must be sent to the editor by

Advertising Manager: Linda Wright;

Phone: 74S-522()

logo.

Pi.'H) l

a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or

ejeclion and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

Word (ile would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illuslralion (such as a photograph).


;

SPOKE,

ENTERTAINMENT

Peter Tosh gets By Brian

Anybody who knows about music has heard of Bob Marley. But hardly ^yone gives credit to the man who played and sang

first

real

“You

selling 30. That’s

Peter

Winston Hubert McIntosh, Oct. 9, 1944, he earned the nickname “Stepping Razor” because of

He wrote lyrics about the political

in

is

best It,

which became a theme song for the marijuana movement. “Legalize it don’t criticize it. Legalize it and I will advertise it. Birds eat it, and they love it. Fowls eat it. Goats love to play with it,” Tosh sang. Murdered in his Jamaican home in 1987, fans will celebrate Tosh’s

and music

massive birthday celebration Oct. 9 and 10, in San Diego, Calif. life

The La

at a

Jolla Indian Reservation

will host a lineup of reggae per-

Bunny Wailer, Junior Reid and the One Blood Family as well as Andrew Tosh, Peter’s son. formers like

A Tosh tribute of this size has never been staged in the California area, according to Dave Allard, of Lou’s Records, located about 40 kilometres outside of San Diego. He said there has been interest in the event and in Tosh lately. The store has sold all of their $50 weekend camping

Peter Tosh, as

shown on

his

CD

titled

Legalize

tickets for the

celebration.

Tosh album. The Best the store

“Something

of

like this is not a flash

mean you could have some new artist come out and sell this many (copies) within the first couple of months. Then they’re in the pan. I

most of the pioneers of reggae. And he’s one of them.” A couple of Tosh albums (his infamous Legalize It, released in 1976, and Equal Rights, released in

again.

Whereas

the Peter

Toshes will just keep selling and selling and selling probably until the end of time,” said Allard, who orders all of the reggae at Lou’s Records. Local reggae artist and three-time

Juno

award nominee Errol Blackwood saw Tosh play in Toronto in 1987 and exchanged hellos with the legend. said he likes

people

may

Tosh was

friend and fracturing his

After

The band’s name was

1962.

Island

Chris Blackwell decided he no longer wanted to issue Tosh’s solo album

Tosh left the Wailers. Records released Legalize

in 1974,

It,

his first solo project in 1976, title

track

Africa.

became involved the Rastafarian movement.

Soon after the release of No Nuclear War in 1987, Tosh was murdered in his Jamaican home. Only one of the three suspects

in

After the additions of bassist

Man”

Barrett and

drummer Carleton in Wailers became super-

A

his brother,

was caught.

1970, the

the reggae star

stars in the Caribbean.

Their debut

personal friend of

was sentenced hang for the murder.

Blackwood

not.

direct

He

admires

and told

it

how

like

it

Tcumament

Challenge Stelian George-Cosh as he pjays 20+ opponents at the same time

¥hurs. Cct. 7

Tosh for reasons other 1 1

:30

am

- 1

;00

“He wore emotion on his feet, you could say. If he felt mad about something, he expressed it and I

pm

The Blue Cafe.

'

with

that,”

Kitchener resident

who

said

the

fronts

The

$1

a game

proceeds to the Student Food Share Program

Blackwood Reggae Band. some ways I’m influenced by

Errol “In

Doon

Stuclent Associstion presents.

artist

spreading word By Brian

Gall

Reggae music has been an international success over the years, but few Canadian performers have explored its sound. Errol Blackwood, a Kitchener artist, is keeping reggae alive in this

Feat;uring Walter

OstenaK

and the Walter Ostenalc Band

country.

A native

of Jamaica, he has been in Canada for over 20 years. Blackwood said there are not many places to play in this area. The Errol Blackwood Reggae Band often has to play in the United States and places outside of Ontario, like Montreal and Quebec city, though they have recently performed in Cambridge and London. Blackwood said reggae is more of an international thing. Even in places like Germany and Sweden, the music is more popular than it is

1

500

st

stucfents to

put-chase ticicets <^nee

will t-ocelvo

a OktohenFest Mu,

here.

Fans of reggae can usually appreciate wide ranges of music. Bob Marley albums appear in most serious record collections, and Blackwood said it’s because reggae hits a nerve in people. “I think reggae is heartbeat music. Even before you hear the singing, as soon as you hear that bop-vibe, it gives you a ‘no problem’ feeling,” he said. Blackwood played the Bob Marley tribute festival in Texas from 1993-1997. He has recorded 20 new songs to be released on a CD this year. Originally from Maroon Hills, Jamaica, he formed a band called Messenjah in Canada in 1980. They toured across Canada and the United States, working with The Clash and Frank Zappa along the way. In 1990 Errol released a 10-song album called Warrior. Three videos ^^rc rom the album received Canadian Reggae Music Awards and arrior was named album of the year. Waking up the Dream, released in 1995, received a Juno Award nomination for best reggae recording. Blackwood also received Juno

nominations in 1987 and 1988.

Xhtu-irs.

October 14

TzOO p.mi.

-

1:00 B.m.

Queensmount Arena XioKet S'lO On sale at tHe OSA. Office fCoguirod

Ago

and

became an anthem for the marijuana movement. Other Tosh releases include Equal Rights, Bush Doctor, Mystic Man, Wanted Dread or Alive and Mama the

shortened to the Wailers shortly

Aston “Family

Chess

skull.

president

was.

west coast, and since the

Reggae

In 1973, Tosh, accidently drove

gone and you never hear from

them

biggest selection of reggae on the latest

of: Scrolls

was released July 1, has sold about 50 copies.

the Prophet,

identify

Allard said Lou’s Records has the

up in the slum of Bob Marley

after the three

it.

He had

for tunes like Legalize

grew

and Bunny Livingston in the early ’60s, forming the Wailing Wailers

“shitstem” (system) and benefits of

some love-type songs but

Tosh

was released

in 1972.

his car off a bridge, killing his girl-

CBS

Kingston, Jamaica, Trenchtown. He met

his bold attitude.

know

damn good,” he

said.

Bom

controversial at the time.

since July.

years and in two months we’re

its

marijuana, which was considered

It

gotta think. That’s some-

thing that’s been around for 20

of reggae music.

taste

by Columbia Records this he has sold about

30 copies of Legalize

him in The Wailers. Peter Tosh was a part of the trio, with Marley and Bunny Livingston the world

record. Catch a Fire,

by Island Records

year. Allard said

alongside

(Wailer), that gave'

1977) have been digitally re-mastered and re-released at a lower

price

— Page 5

credit

little

Gall

Oct. 4, 1999

of oioiority

"^Wundcrbar!

Free Bus from

REZ

to


5 Page 6

— SPOKE, Oct.

1999

4,

ENTERTAINMENT

Theatre reigns supreme Princess Cinema remains on top after 15 years By Adam Wilson After 15 yea^s of loyal patronage and excellent film viewing, the Princess

Cinema

supreme

in the art-house

is still

enjoyed,” he said. “Patrons are

new

warm

stereo surround system, as

well as

reigning

cinema

new

carpet and a

good

we

wouldn’t want to be too much bigger for a singlescreen cinema,” said John Tutt, owner. Tutt opened the doors of the Princess Cinema on Sept. 18, 1985, with a showmg of the film Casablanca. He said that the KitchenerWaterloo area was the largest urban population in Ontario without its own independent arthouse cinema. Tutt was interested in opening such a' cinema. It was just a matter of finding a

“Intimate

is

good

for

our corporation, so

much

bigger for a

single-screen cinema.”

is

John

He

of the layout and

also

number

1.”

that

opened),” said Tutt. “The prospect

With Silver City, King’s College and Fairway cinemas as competition, the Princess uses choice of films to draw patrons. They try to offer a good balance of movie choices that appeal to a cross-section of movie audiences. Their main attractions are» art-

of a small business was more than

ity

most nights. “The more we see how boring mega and giga-plexes can be, the more people realize that a good

house films, cult classics, Canadian and independent films that mainstream, big box theatres won’t show.

was 24 years old and needed work (when the cinema was

appealing.”

Tutt opened the theatre

with 1985 and has

only $1,800 in

the

for

city’s

suggested that the recently Maxi Co. building would

&

closed

ideal 50,000-square- foot

of Waterloo.

titles,

but

Over the

Tutt said he has thought about

ipoving from his current location

in.

year,

last

Tutt has been protest3, 000-

12-screen theatre

wilHeave Kitchener’s

Silver

City in the dust.

The new

make an

cinema complex for the north end

seat,

the customer is

bad planning on the

behalf.

Hollywood

plan to build a

bi-monthly Princess Cinema Film Guide. Tutt said that K-W’s response to the cinema is positive. People like the single-screen cinema, and with good movies playing, they are almost always filled to near capac-

“I

away from

ing against the city’s

provides design

is

it

blockbusters and big

Tutt,

Princess Cinema owner

projectionist. all

that they

occasionally they do

not only the

owner of the Princess Cinema but also the film programmer and

of cars so close to residential areas won’t be tolerated and that

I

try to steer

wouldn’t want to be too

He said the traffic, noise and parking problems from hundreds

He

He added

sneak

Tutt

titles,”

said Tutt.

said.

location.

or near-

cult, literary adaptations

plan

on installing 200 brand new seats which will be the best cinema seats anywhere in K-W,” he

for our corpo-

ration, so I

the

diligently stick to the art-

Hollywood

“Next year is

new paint

cinema where staff are knowledgeable about movies and to a

“We

house mandate of only playing quality productions, be they foreign, Canadian, independent,

job.

scene.

“Intimate

movie doesn’t need a 20-foothigh screen, tacos and chips to be

upgraded and reinvested over the Last November the Princess invested $20,000 in a years.

theatre will require a

garage and another 750 parking spots. Tutt said he is trying to illus-

five-storey parking

trate that his

objections to the

theatre relate

to

scale,

not to

competition.

scares

downtown Kitchener area him because the nightlife

seems

to

but the

be veering towards a

large bar scene.

He said he believes that Kitchener-Waterloo could use more independent cinemas, only because as the chains expand into their ever more mind-numbing, boring experiences, it becomes easier to be different. For general information visit the Princess Cinema Web site at http://princess.sentex.net.

“Waterloo needs a cinema somewhere in the north end,” he said, “but not crammed into our small core area.”

For film

Web

site

look on the

listings,

or pick up a Princess

Cinema Film Guide across the

distributed

K-W area.

I'

Sloan: Canada’s busiest musicians Hectic Canadian alternative band releases their third album By Adam Wilson

months, Sloan’s .

When bands get popular, they tend to stick to a formula that goes: release an album, tour, take

a break, then put another

CD

out within two years. Sloan has bro-

ken free from this workaholic standard and set a new one. Releasing their third album in 1 8

new

material.

album of Between the

fifth

piano-driven ballads to guitar-

N.S.,

yet another recording

heavy

11

stereo-blasters.

What the band has done is put all

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

E.1

facelift.

Mature Students

hi!;

Returning to school after years of being out in the workplace or raising a family can be intimidating. Mature stu-

family, school

difficult to

juggle the demands of

and work. They’re unsure

remember course

material or

if they’ll

be able

Here are a few observations about mature students that might ease some of their uncertainties about returning to school:

Mature students usually don’t have memory problems and can usually relate their learning to “real life situa-

-

more

in

with their

life plans.

Mature students can draw on previously learned work habits and time management skills. Mature students are

-

also

sometimes concerned about

fitting

in

socially.

Student Services can help, either individually, or through

\0

a Mature Students Drop-In. which provides a place to

meet and exchange for flyers

ideas.

For more information, watch

on Student Services

bulletin boards or contact

With each album, Sloan is somewhat showing their age as well as maturity.

They use more

them with your parents. What makes each Sloan album a

1 m 1

each album, each member

writes

and sings

is

somewhat showing

Student Services

least

two

age as

their

well as their

new

Scott’s songs

always standouts with his monotone singing voice and imaginative songwriting.

maturity.

are

Drummer Andrew are

influences.

With Bridges, Sloan is just showing where they are headed in the next few years: a slower sound, with a few rock riffs thrown in occasionally to spice up

influence.

always a solid Beatles But on Between the Bridges, other new ones are obvi-

the album.

ous.

album gave

is

The sounds of Black Sabbath,

Some praise,

early it

Pink Floyd and Sloan’s original grunge sound make an appear-

great

ance.

Sloan’s best so

listen.

reviews

of this

less than

but give

the

stellar

album a

Between the Bridges is a album and ranks as one of far.

Food Driv0 September 30 A challenge to

all

to

October

classes!

Who can donate the most items?

E*

Drop off your items to the DSA Office. The class that donates the most will win a Class Party! Details at the DSA Office.

rrif .A

i'i

A Message from

at

songs.

Student Feed Share Preeram

m 1 p 0 :

In addition to influences, each

band member is multi-talented when it comes to playing his instruments and songwriting.

On With each album, Sloan

There

listen to

Student Services.

Ijul

m

doing the exact oppo-

k

|l

[jilt

is

pianos and tone down their songs to a level where you can

easily.

Mature students are often very motivated. They k;now why they’re here and how furthering their education fits -

Sloan site.

their

may associate school with

is their musical diversity. Their influences show up on each album, and on each album, there

treat

and giving George Michaels’ songs a hard rock

m

unpleasant experiences from high school days.

tions:

to the final track. Delivering Maybes, Sloan shows their fans that not everything is about screaming into the micro-

H

it

listen-

a must

each time. There are no breaks between the songs, making this album a rock and roll epic. From the opening song. The

is

that

phones

dents sometimes find

is

can be compared to The Beatles. But that’s not all. The album is solid, with 12 songs that range in sound from

Bridges,

mi

to

12 songs in a format where ing to the entire album

18 months

in

(Room 2B02)

Help us reach our goal of 1 000 food Items. •

i

1


SPOKE,

ISSUES & ACTIVITIES

— Page 7

Oct. 4, 1999

Applied degrees: Right time for college to pursue apple of prez’s eye By

Phil

Wright

ing effort

needed, said Tibbits,

is

as the decision to offer degree-

Conestoga

John

president

Tibbits believes the time is ripe for '

the

college

to

pursue

applied

“I believe the timing is appropri-

We’re

now.

start to

about

push.

it

really going to

We’ve been

talking

(applied degrees) a long

is

currently developing

ultimately a

advocates

Tibbits

because

applied

would

they

are passion-

about learning and creating

ate

They shouldn’t be with people who just want

filled

jobs,” he said.

of

Universities need to continue offering degrees in the pure sci-

without threatening universities.

ences, engineering and the liberal

What

the

prestige

British

extensive

grams, said Piercey.

Programs such as nursing,

ng powers.

“The question is not why should Conestoga and some colleges have this (apphed degrees). The. big question is why don’t we have

electronics

“We’ll be pulling in some sen-

people from the high-tech

people from manufacturing and senior people from health care,” senior

field,

advanced

said Tibbits.

A powerful and organized lobby-

agement

and materials mancandidates

are

for

applied degrees.

doesn’t want

said he

Tibbits

Conestoga to be perceived as a

them.” Besides, said Tibbits, universities can’t

threat to the universities.

He sees Conestoga’s ideal role as

keep up with the demand

and allowing degree-granting powers to Conestoga would be a benefit for

for their services

'

the universities.

A fan’s dream

a

polytechnic

where

institute

degrees can be offered for applied

programs.

Tallsha Matheson

A new the

life

begins at Conestoga

down

as

evening students flock to

When

staff

and

stu-

moving more

students,”

said

director of contin-

Not many people reahze how

many

students are at

Doon

in the

“When

the first anr^ hce at Stone Road Mall (Phoft) by Linda W^it) 'ers at

sausages

College students cooking free breakfast

it

seems

no one

like

is

may

universities

ment may be necessary,

would be a major achievement Conestoga.

tion,” said Piercey.

(applied-degrees)

_ Since there is no true polytechnic Canada, Tibbits sees an

educational

vacuum,

and

he

Tibbits

believes degree-granting powers

The inclusion of polytechnic in its name was just “part of its tradi-

face

“Let’s

we

If

it.

for

got this

would be one

it

of the biggest things that ever

happened he said.

at

Conestoga College,”

By

Tallsha Matheson

There are more than 30,000 students at Conestoga

CHYM-

Kitchener, Waterloo

Town

The chef

will arrive at 5:30 a.m.

The Learrdng Resource Centre (LRC) is open from 8 a.m. to 7:30

Monday through

Fridays.

times

more part-time students than

and tourism student, said she

likes

the fact that food services

open

when

accessible for the part-time stu-

from 7 a.m.

until

1 1

a.m.

females are males.

and

37

full-time

on gender are

available,

according

to

ing education students, but special

needs services and student services

cation

was

enrolment

about

9,700 for the spring, 940 for the sununer, 9,3(X) for the

fall

and

9,500 for the winter of 1999.

1999 was

lower compared to the past two years.

Enrolment for

fall

1997 was

for fall 1998.

been steady for the past five

cent

also

admissions.

Sixty-three

per

is

about 11,460 and about 11,510

tinuing education enrolment has

and the numbers can be

Divell said there

Stewart said there ic

reason

a total of

4,694 full-time students. Part-time and continuing edu-

why

is

no

specif-

this year’s enrol-

ment dropped compared to the two years.

past “It

is

so

and continu-

Lauren Divell of Conestoga

shocking to some.

breakfast serves customers

available for part-time

Fall enrolment for

part-time and continuing edu-

turnout,” says Esenbergs.

out on breaks at eight,

outnumber

statistics,

cation courses in Ontario are

get

there’s a big rush then.

are not accessible after 5 p.m.

The percentage of

years,

of the food and beverage manage-

as

per cent males.

most are women.

great

same

Conestoga ranks above the numbers for females with 64 per cent and falls below the provincial statistics with 36

per cent of those enrolled in

a

Dooners

a

students at college

and

by firing up 14 grills. “There is always

Hawco,

employee, said part-time students

The walksafe program

the free Oktoberfest breakfast.

According to 1998

Sandra

class.

mix and 25 cases of sausages. The students will arrive at 6 a.m.

said Beth Esenbergs, co-ordinator

is

she arrives for a 7 p.m.

closed at

is

9 p.m.

until

Stewart said part-time and con-

full-time students.

Although Pizza Pizza

1:45 p.m., Dooners remains open

Karry Litchey, a part-time travel

with about 20 pails of pancake

preparing the breakfast

on

p.m.

“one before eight and one

said,

after eight.”

Thursday,

4:30

to

students based

six

at

9 p.m. for the part-time students. “I have a few big rushes,” she

that the library closes early.”

not are

employee

“The only downfall

is

Stewart, director of continuing

said there

Steinberg, an

Roasters, said they are open until

education.

He

Square and the college.

Kim

accessible in the evening for

provincial

College, according to David

a co-

is

that

is

we’re here in the evening,” said Litchey

part-time and continuing educa-

Part-time students

cation

is

“The only difference

Jermaine Mavis, a continuing education smdent, said everything

full-time students.

the hall, people are learn-

The annual event operative effort among

The

Although

lobbying of the provincial govern-

The food and beverage management program at Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus hosts

ment program. The program has been serving

looking for people in

said Piercey. Only one or two of Ryerson ’s programs currently offer diplomas, he said.

down

breakfast for the past 15 years, she said.

widely recognized,

is

of skilled workers.

is

it

university,

dents because they are the

part-time and continuing edu-

is

Industry

are

said.

oppose his vision, and extensive

around and you can kick a pop can

full-time

The event

a poly-

is

She said everything should be

evenings for classes, he said.

start

he

in the direction of a

and 8 a.m.

uing education.

Oct. 9.

pro-

degrees

unless

trades

offered,

skilled trades as there is a shortage

Although Ryerson

p.m.

David Stewart,

air at

are

technic university in name,

corridors.

“Part-time students are invisible

FM

there

thirdly,

liberal-studies

and continuing education students invade the parking lots and the

to the full-time

and sausages will fill the Waterloo Town Square on

offers post-graduate

it

and

tion students.

full-time

dents leave for the day, part-time

Smells of bubbling pancake

degrees,

ing,” said Stewart.

Doon campus.

batter

a polytechnic institute’s

Night dwellers at college College as the sun goes

By Linda Wright

Firstly,

institute in

Ryerson Polytechnic University

By

Sizzling

legislation is passed.”

applied degrees, said Tibbits, are

sis.

ior

institute

not

still

those with a vocational empha-

robotics, information technology,

high-tech executives.

between a polytechnic and a college.

said Tibbits, “but we’re

allowed to grant degrees unless

In

powers, said Tibbits.

local

differences

not the best, then one

countries throughout

the world have colleges with such

made up of

fundamental

are, if

of the best colleges in Ontario,”

the

arts as

Conestoga deserves degree-grantiTibbits envisions this council

“We

technic university since 1993.

Bruce Piercey, "public affairs manager at Ryerson, said there are

fulfill that

need.

Secondly,

Columbia have colleges

with degree-granting powers.

-being largely

believes Conestoga can

faculty has a research mandate.

fact,

that

has been a poly-

they have the resources and expertise in place, he said. The programs suitable for

Alberta and

an advisory council whose main provincial

It

What this community needs is more people in the skilled trades and people won’t be attracted to

Tibbits is asking for is not

many

was once Canada’s only polytechruc institute.

three

Conestoga’s vocational programs

increase

function will be to convince the

government

who

knowledge.

unique in Canada.

time,” said Tibbits. Tibbits

is

political one.

degrees,

degrees.

ate

granting powers

should be

“Universities really areas for people

hasn’t drastically affected

the steady enrolment pace of part-time and continuing education,”

he added.


!

Page 8

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Oct. ^

The 5 Annual

1999

4,

Craft and

Hobby Show/Sale

X

DONT LEAVE IT TO THE LAST MINUTE! Start

working on those

Show/Sale

Campus,

to

in the

crafts for the

be held on Thursday,

main

Vendor

cafeteria

5* Annual Craft and

November

from 9:00 a.m.

applications will

18,

Hobby 1999, Doon

to 2:00 p.m.

THE PHANTOM MENACE

be available to present

employees, students, retirees and immediate family

members of will be

present employees.

Vendor

table fee

$10 per vendor with a maximum of two

participants per table.

Please contact Erica Stoermer at extension 399 for

more

information.

Tuesday, October 19

iostensx Conestoga College Class Rings

10% Off

pm , The

8:00

Licensed event

Sale

6*^** October & From 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. In the Main

Admission Free for

Doon Canrpns

I

stnd.entS|

$3 for guests purchase tickets at the door

Cafeteria Keep your memories on hand for

Sanctuary

*

a lifetime.

ree Popcorn

Is

OVERCOMING PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY GROUP

YDUR CLASS REPRESENTED?

your class does not have a DSA Class Rep., Please sent one to the next Meeting If

DO YOU....

Tues. Oct. 5

*

feel

DR Thurs. Dct. 7 3:3D PM, The Sanctuary

*

avoid doing speeches at

*

accept a "0"

anxious about Public Speaking?

in

all

costs?

the public speaking

part of a course rather than

more information, see Jenn at the DSA Office.

make

the speech?

For

*

experience physical signs of distress before or during

presentations? *

THE LYRIC NIGHT CLUB Book your own Bus

Trip at

THE LYRIC

want

to

be a more

effective

presenter? This 4 session group

is

available beginning the

week

of Oct. 18th.

On any Saturday Night

THE LYRIC will give your Group FREE Admission, FREE Food, The CRAZIEST Prices, FREE Concert Tickets,

FREE

Prizes and

Call our

Also ask.us

FREE

Day and Time

to

Carol Gregory

-

be determined by timetables.

Facilitator.

Transportation.

INFO-LINE now at 749-2121 how we can help you raise Money

For your Organization or choice of Charity.

To

copy of your timetable and sign up in Student 2B02. Common hours will be selected from

register bring a

Services,

Room

submitted student timetables.


0

2

1

SPOKE,

ISSUES

Conestoga hopes Phil

Wright

may be a long uphill battle, but

It

Conestoga and

its

dean of engi-

neering technology are ready to

gender imbalance

confront

in

technical trades.

Mike McClements is hopeful some initiatives 'undertaken by

grams prior to coming to college.” Conestoga also participates in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP). Other participants in this effort are the Waterloo Region district school board, the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and

Conestoga will reduce the male dominance in programs such as robotics, electronics and engineer-

Universities.

ing technology.

Linda Barfoot, a consultant in

1999

Fall

statistics

from

students in Grades 11 and 12, said

experiential

with

learning

Waterloo Region board.

offered to 15 secondary schools in

do not surprise McClements.

“We cent

“We

pro-

struggle to get

1

program having women.”

“Anything

Mike McClements, dean of engineering technology

(an

the

technology where only six of first-year students are female.

One

being undertaken is an attempt to arrange a support group for women in technology at the college. Such an effort would reduce the stereotypical barriers for

initiative

women,

would

it

said

McClements, and

also help the

women

stu-

dents to feel more at home if they could share with other women who are experiencing the same thing.

.

Another more formalized initiative undertaken by the college is a in conjunction with project Human Resources Development

Canada (HipC).

dents

who

the best indicator

“When they asked the Grade 3 how they thought they did on

gender imbalances develop.

mathematics, generally their perception was lower than their actu-

needs to appeal to students early age about the modem

Industry,

McClements,

said

at

an

reali-

it’s

up

Role models, said McClements, such as women teachers with a relevant technical background, can make a significant difference as the stereotypical barriers can be broken down.

college

an

receive

eight- week said

credit,

enables

the student to enter the program at

an intermediate level in college, she said.

The curriculum being taught OYAP program identical to what is offered students in the

to is

at

Conestoga, said Barfoot. Conestoga has also been participating in Industry Awareness days for secondary school guidance

“The purpose of the project,” McClements, “is an attempt understand viewpoints of towards technology pro-

THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP.

DATE

TOPIC

TIME

ROOM

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A505 3B14

12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

5B14

1:30-2:30

1C15

OYAP

program, have been held thus far, with the last held at Toyota’s Cambridge plant. TTie guest speaker at this event was Conestoga president John Tibbits.

A

yet another effort undertaken to

said

--

According to Barfoot, three such

boards, parents and students.

This effort uses a variety of

STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS FALL SCHEDULE

counsellors and teachers. days, which are sponsored by the

combat

misconceptions

These

projects

MON. OCT.

4

THURS. OCT.

MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST TAKING

THURS. OCT

SUICIDE PREVENTION

WED. OCT.

about

trades, said Barfoot.

trades

TIME MANAGEMENT

MON. OCT.

7

18 21

20

2A411

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, COME INTO STUDENT SERVICES OR JUST DROP BY.

FORMAT. may

benefit

over the long run, but

GAY, LESBIAN AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND -monthly meetings commence September 29, 1999 please see Barb Kraler in Student Services

@

4:00

NETWORKING —

5:00 P.M. in Student Services.

If

missed,

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS NETWORK -to

be announced for mid-November

MATURE STUDENTS DROP IN -Thursday, October

7,

1999 @11:30 - 1:30 P.M.

in the

Blue

Room

(Cafeteria)

FOR THE FOLLOWING GROUPS YOU WILL NEED TO SIGN UP AT STUDENT SERVICES BEFORE THE BELOW DATES IN ROOM 2B02. PLEASE BRING A COPY OF YOUR TIMETABLE. YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED OF THE TIME AND DATE. TEST ANXIETY

Four weeks

GROUP

Commencing week One hour per week

FACILITATOR:

in length

of Oct.

1

Joan Magazine

Timetables due Oct.5

RELAXATION

Three weeks

GROUP

Commencing week One hour per week

in length

of Oct. 18

PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY

GROUP

Five weeks

Karen Rittinger

&

1

in length

Commencing week 1.5 hours per week

FACILITATOR: Allen Ledyit

Timetables due Oct.

of Oct. 18

Timetables due Oct. 12

to

youth,” he said.

then

focus groups with local school

women

is

but

like,

study that trade

collaboration proposed between Conestoga and Skills Canada, called Get a Trade Day, is

to

Since math

of success in the skilled trades, he said, it is easy to see how such

is

are

This

typical pro-

moment, said McClements, would be electron97

industry to sell themselves to the

ronment

I’m blue in the

until

Barfoot.

anomaly).”

ics

thought they did better.”

true; they

can talk

taught and stu-

in

more than that would be con-

at

face about what the working envi-

pro-

this

trades

McClements.

A

district

In

per cent of any technical

gram

“I

the region.

having gram women,” said

sidered

ties

gram, a number of different

10 per of any

technical

of skilled trades.

said

al

OYAP program is

struggle

get

to

percf^tion.

performance,”

McClements. “When they asked the same question of the boys at the same level, the reverse was

the

of students in the school of engineering technology. These statistics

according to McClements, the female perception of trades may start as early as elementary school. In a follow-up study to the province-wide Grade 3 testing, some interesting information came to light about female self-

school

Conestoga’s registrar’s office show males comprise 89 per cent

Currently, the

trades

in skilled

girls

This project teaches trades to

— Page 9

to decrease

gender imbalance By

Oct. 4, 1999

FACILITATOR: Carol Gregory


0

Page 10

— SPOKE, Oct.

4,

1999

ISSUES

Canuck youths By Brian

Gall

gym

sex education in

class

and

McGarvie admitted she skipped Canadian youth are among the world’s most sexually active people, according to the results of the

1999 Durex Global Sex Survey A Youth Perspective.

The

fourth annual survey

is

an

international study of the sexual

and behaviour of global youth aged 16-21. Fourteen counattitudes

tries participated this year.

Canada and the United States have the youngest sexually active population, with youth losing thenvirginity at an average age of 15, almost a year younger than the global average of 15.9, according

that class like

everyone

else.

Young people use friends as their main source of information about sex. Over a quarter of those surveyed said their first sexual advice was from friends, and 30 per cent said most of their information came from peers. Meanwhile, parents were voted as the preferred source, underlining a need and opportunity for parents to improve discussions about sex with their children.

“You wonder

if

they have

to a press release issued Sept. 21.

The

necessity for improved sex

education

is

for

condom was

years.”

cent admitted they didn’t use a for their first time. And

and

cent of the respondents using no form of contraception.

can be related to

Availability

On

cost.

doms

is

average, a box of six consold for $10.

is too expensive for many youth and McGarvie said shfe is definitely in favour of making

This

condoms

free.

“Every time there is a young woman who has a baby and raises that baby on mother’s allowance, it costs the country $500,000,” said the former sexuality co-ordi-

But

youths.

main method of contraception and 92 per cent recognized that condoms protect against HTV infection. Yet 43 per

Sue McGarvie,

their

condom

sex, while Taiwan, Singapore

Mexico ranked lowest with 49 per

Ottawa. Free condom programs can eliminate the hassle of buying them for

1

Sixty-two per cent of yduths said

a

Germany and Spain rank the highest for condom usage for first time

nator at Carleton University in

been on Mars

prominent in survey

findings.

getting lucky

sex therapist

starting

not a problem with panies,

McGarvie

programs

is

condom com-

said.

Durex, they’ve been really responsible. They have given me a whole whack of condoms to “I like

Planning for safer sex

is

an area

give out.”

18 per cent of respondents were not aware that a condom protects

that

against pregnancy.

“You wonder if they have been on Mars for 10 years,” said Sue

Forty-seven per cent of those who did not use a contraceptive for their sexual experience said it

McGarvie, a practising sex thera-

was because protection was not

some kind of agenda. At Conestoga College, the Doon Student Association (DSA) provides free condoms for students in

available.

their office

pist in

Ottawa,

who

is

not sur-

Canadian improve upon.

youth

need to

prised at the lack of sexual knowl-

Globally, 28 per cent of the sex-

edge among youth. She said high school kids in Ontario only receive two weeks of

ually active respondents did not

use a

condom

or other contracep-

tive for their first time. France,

She added that it is up to the fedgovernment to step in with

eral

and

at health services.

The DSA often schedules sex expert Sue Johanson to give presentations about safe sex at the

DSA vice-president of student affairs, displays available in the DSA office. (Photo by Brian Gaii)

Steve Coleman, free

condoms

Lifestyles condoms, with whom Johanson works, provides Conestoga with the free condoms. “They (students) can grab a

handful.

.

.

We

don’t set a limit,”

DSA

said Steve Coleman,

vice-

president of student affairs.

He

college.

condoms

said

are located

right inside the door in health

services so people can just reach

and get what they need without having to ask. Some students are shy about it, he added. “They should be proud that they’re protecting themselves,” said Coleman. in

U^sbnoifflt Place Shoppiiy Centum

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have 2

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4

satellites,

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giant screen TVs, Billiard Tables, 2 Bowling Lanes,

NTN, and Amusement Machines. plu$ari out-of-this-world menu featuring pasta, chicken, steaks,

ribs,

wings,

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We also

have a dance

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SPOKE Oct. 4,

SPORTS

Condors By Nicole Furlong

minutes into the

game putting the Mountai-

Hami lton’s

Conestoga’s coach Geoff Johnstone said team played well overall, despite the

record 2-1-1. This puts the Condors at 2-2-1.

Mohawk had

his

ing end of a hard-fought battle against the

The remainder of the half continued this way which ended up being Conestoga’s

the first league

Mohawk

downfall.

season, as they lost to the Condors in the

the los-

Mountaineers in men’s varsity soccer action at Conestoga on Sept. 23. It didn’t appear as if Conestoga was giv-

ing

it

their all in the first half against the

Hamilton team as the offence tended to hang back. Attitude also reared its ugly head when Paul Mouradian was given a yellow card for mouthing the ref. Maciej Kujawa of

Mohawk

scored 15

— Page 11

can’t recover from slow Start neers into the lead.

The Condors found themselves on

1999

Kitchener came out with a vengeance in the second half with strong defence, an attacking offence and a

number of scoring

was

no avail, thanks to excellent goalkeeping on Mohawk’s part. The home team couldn’t match the score. Conestoga was defeated 1-0, making

Ace

in

it

western division playoffs

Mohawk

to

loss.

this,

“We were by second

pleased with his team’s

effort.

asked about Gibson’s expectations for his team this year, he said, “We’re taking it one game at a time. Today was a good

in the

said.

now

strong, but right

injured and have yet to play a

said.

team

far the better

he

we lack a goal scorer.” Two members of the team

When

are currently

game this

sea-

son.

The next home game for the men will be on Oct. 14 at 4;30 p.m. when they take on Fanshawe College.

start.”

the hole

half,”

“The defence was

last year.

coach John Gibson said he was

“They worked very hard today,” he

opportunities.

But

something to prove in

game against Conestoga this

College intramurals are up and running By Jody Andruszklewlcz Spoke

ensured

they

participants

all

number of games. They play on Mondays and Wednesdays on all three diamonds on the far side of the socwould get a

Special to

fair

,

As

many Mcked into

the fall term began,

aspects of student life

Programs

gear.

at the recreation

centre, a vital aspect of college

got under way, along with

life,

registration for first-year students

finding their

Campus

way around

classes.

recreation officials ran

two outdoor

activities for this ses-

touch football and baseball.

sion:

While the number of teams and are

participants

low

cer field.

have made the sloWhile the “boys of summer” compete for the World Series, the “boys and girls of autumn” are pushing to have as much fun as possible while the weather lasts. Conestoga College’s first intramurals session Participants

pitch league quite popular.

in the touch

enthusiasm

is

on the

participants

is

Only

high.

also well under way. All

is

Emphasis

league,

football

“Sunday Afternoon”

six

teams signed up

enjoying them-

atmosphere

play this session. They play on

to

Tuesdays

of laid

back

and

campus

football. field

from the college conununity. With 10 teams interest

participating,

league

officials

tournament

Yanting Zhao, third-semester Tuesday, Sept. 21, at Doon campus.

(Photo by Beverley Grondin)

-

24)

TESOL

teacher certification

course

(or

by

correspon-

dence). 1,000’s of jobs available

NOW. FREE

informa-

tion package, toll free 1-888-

270-2941

I

first

I

and

should not worry. Session two will be starting and there will be another chance to get involved with the college’s intramural leagues. The next session will offer indoor sports including vdlleybaJJand ball hockey. Officials will be needed. Participants are always a must. is a member of the Student Athletic Council and a first-semester journalism

Jody Andruszkiewicz

student.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF An

opportunity to gain valuable work experience to enhance your resume/portfolio. IMPRINT, the Student newspaper is looking for a full-

UW

6 month contract, salaemployee for the period

time,

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7

ried

ROOM CAFETERIA

{near windows)

Meet other students with similar interests

LOST PHOTOS

FOUND Former journalism

instructor like

thank

faculty

journalism

member Dean Robinson finding

my old

to

for

family photos

also to everyone

who

kept an eye open for them

who

paced environment, please submit

letter of application,

resume and samples of

and documents.

and

you would be

responsible for organizing volunteer staff overseeing all production/layout for all sections of the paper and be familiar with IBM compatible computers/desktop publishirig. If you enjoy a challenging, fast,

Jim Hagarty would

Thanks

and concerns

6/^ to Mar. 31A2000. As

Editor-In-Chief

Drop by between 11:30-1:30

BLUE

the

session’s

excitement

Nov.

I

Those

CAREER OPPORTUNtTY

Classified TRAVEL-teach English: 5 day/40 hr (Oct. 20

MATURE STUDENT DROP-IN

-

activities

practice

behind the tennis courts. Participants in the league are excited about having a lot of games to-play and a large field to play on. Emphasis in this league is on the “Sunday afternoon” atmosphere of laid back football. As the season progresses, all minds are turning towards the playoffs. Where touch football had just a handful of teams sign up, slo-pitch

drew more

selves.

who missed

Thursdays on the

Doon

in

the leagues are

expressed concern.

writ-

ing to: Katrina DiGravio. Staff Relations Co-ordinator, Human Resources, University of Waterloo, Waterloo. Ontario.

N2L3G1 byOctober15, 1999.

»

I

*


du Maurier

Arts

Supporting 234 cultural organizations across

Canada during the 1999-2000 season

#

<


Digital Edition - October 04, 1999