Page 1

— No. 34

3 1th Year

DSA denies

money misuse By Brad Dugard An anonymous by Spoke alleges

letter

received

Doon

that the

Student Association has misused students’ money by purchasing (Lett to right) Rene Beaulieu, London Protection International; Sgt. Rod Curran, training and education officer for Guelph police service; Don Douglas, co-ordinator of police foundations/LASA programs; and Brian Cunningham, deputy chief of Waterloo regional police service. For additional

photos see page

5.

parking passes for its executive

members

Lesley Turnbull)

and employ-

Police speak to police foundations program

ees.

Howev&r,

i^eminar urcw^s students to exceed standards By Lesley Turnbull

graduates

for

tions

of

both

Police officers from Waterloo Region and representatives of the private security sector spoke at the first

career orientation seminar for

second-year students of the police

“We want great performance from our graduates,” said Joe Martin, dean of the school of applied

Sgt. Bert

denies

arts.

Students of the police founda-

program were told that many

.

Brown, training officer

said students will only get

back

what they put into their job. learning Continuous stressed during the law

was and

the private security

with a police force.

group

sector were

guest speakers at

Conflict-resolution skills,

good

“It

Intercon

for

shows

you’re

it

and resumes and shows them what employers are looking for.

human

and growing. See LASA- Page 2

Don

Douglas, co-ordinator of the program, said the seminar helps students to refine their portfolios

Students were told that expecta-

resources

for

the

Waterloo regional police service.

Security.

looks good on your resume and

communication skills and ethical and professional behaviour are some of the important factors. “You will be a great candidate if you exceed in these areas,” said Sgt. Barry Zehr, who is with

the seminar.

willing

to

See

improve.”

Doug

Security,

said that after 20 years in the busi-

ness he’s

still

learning, evolving

your e-mail:

F¥VGE15

list

The

overselling of parking lot

told the Sept. 13 college council

be issued before Sept. 1 7. Students who wish to be reimbursed because there are not enough spaces should go to secu-

meeting.

rity

decals

was an administrative

error,

Conestoga president John Tibbits

CX)MMEIVIARY

Human

rights

battle rages

“No one

alerted

anyone

on

time,” he said. All 2,500 parking permits were

Page 4

on

However, he said a waiting

for parking space requests will

services

names

office

will also

waiting

and

their

be placed on the students

than

sold by Sept. 9, according to A1 security

parking spaces,” said Hunter,

who

Hunter, supervisor of

added

and

stu-

services.

dents have equal parking access.

Hunter said the campus security office could not provide an exact number of students lacking parking

tion is considering

that college staff

Hunter said college administratwo measures, alternative parking and additional

being consid-

ered as a temporary solution to the

shortage of parking

spaces.

A

however, solution, long-term would be to create 40 to 100 1 and 12. Hunter said a single parking space costs approximately $1,000 and the projected number of parking spaces required depends on the level of demand.

spaces in lots

list.

“We have more

The speed skating oval, located behind the Kenneth E. Hunter is

I^ee

Decals

-

Page 2

Wright

ism student who nearly received a four-month suspension after an

parking spaces.

recreation centre,

Phil

Conestoga’s principal hopes stu-

geiswdi^ access.

DSA - Page 2

dents heed the lesson of a journal-

administrative error says Tibbits Sajfert

park).

McGregor

Overselling of parking decals By Anna

(to

Don’t abuse

By

iiist

executives

Henrich, ISO 9000 co-

ordinator for Intercon

Parking spaces sold out

er and vraindei;

three

That came out of a discussion about executive wages. It was a bonus for all the hard work the executive did over the summer.” Hussey said the executive is

members of

involved

past

.

elected)

in choosing a candidate for a job

are

.

president ^ years we have paid for parking for our employees, it is just one of the perks that we give to them,” said Jenn Hussey, DSA vice-president of operations. “This year for the first year we have paid for our (student-

security administration seminar.

“Take courses,” said Joe Strgar, a member of the account services team and corporate resource

factors

at

DSA vice-

tions

different

“For

Jenn Hussey,

and security administration program Sept. 10. Seven police officers and 10 foundations/law

it

funds.

for the Stratford police service,

programs are high.

DSA

the

adventure in cyberspace. Grant McGregor wants students to learn to appreciate the intended value of e-mail, instead of using it for questionable or offensive purposes.

“What we providing,

are not doing here at

is

a large chunk of

public expense, a medium for students to transmit material

which may either be offensive, inappropriate or indeed pornographic or demeaning,” said

McGregor. See E-mail

-

Page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE,

Sept. 20, 1999

NEWS

Way says thanks

United By Anna

Sajfert

$4

raise

million.

Computing

Havel-Town

Waterloo’s IT

facilities

between the college and Hewlett

demonstrated the essence of the

Conestoga

College

council fall-semester meet-

held its first ing on Sept. 13 at the

Doon cam-

pus.

United Ingrid

Way

update

Havel-Town,

development officer for the United Way in Kitchener-Waterloo, thanked Conestoga College for raising over $33,000 in last year’s campaign. The next campaign runs from Oct. 18 to 25.

She added

this year’s target is to

service

social

safety

net.

She

asked all council members to sit back in their chairs and answer “yes” to questions, such as “Did you ever have to use CPR, unemployment, disability or coun-

Packard, as well as

The college

considering whether to purchase additional is

Video & Image Processing (DVPs) and Robotel software. Conestoga President John Tibbits said if the software Digital

durable, the college will place

Tibbits said he has great visions

Waterloo’s Information Technologies campus, which recently underwent a 60,000-sq. for

He

foot expansion.

remodeled to look

said

it

was

IBM are being

considered.

The Waterloo campus will focus on Information Technologies, communications and some business programs. strictly

a private

like

International students

selling.”

is

Ten out of 13 members were able to recall at least one of the

three additional orders within the

centre.

coming months. He also said the cost would determine the number

the

dents entering Conestoga College

expects to have an additional six or seven after February 2000.

is growing. Tibbits said the expected number is between 100 and 150 for the year 1999/00 as

four situations.

Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic research and educational

sector Information Technologies

Currently there are four labs at campus, but the college

services, said organizers organiz-

of purchases, adding the budget for capital equipment is limited. Robotel is a video linking sys-

They will

ers intend to increase awareness

tem

million, he said.

of the campaign

instructor interaction.

this year.

that

student-

facilitates

cost approximately $4.6

Tibbits added

The number of international

compared

new

partnerships

to

stu-

49 for the year

1998/99.

E-mail policies Parking perk to be reviewed DSA

explains employee passes

Continued from page one. Hussey said the executive

possible to the students,” Hussey

.

Continuedfrom page one. Petra Lampert, a secondsemester journalism student, sent an e-mail to some of her .

classmates.

It

contained

criti-

cisms of one of her instructors, Jason Gennings. Gennings, who teaches both desktop publishing and press photography, graduated from the journalism program in February and began teaching in May. Though the content of the e-mail

was was

troubling to Gennings, he also concerned because he

felt he had addressed problems with the class.

“I

was a

little

disappointed the

communication in the classroom broke down so badly,” said Gennings.

“I thought

we now

had a better dialogue.” The e-mail was brought to the attention of college officials who decided to suspend Lampert semester ended. Lampert appealed the decision and her four-month suspension

until the fall

was overturned. However, she was put on probation for the remainder of her studies at Conestoga. She must also write letters of apology to both Gennings and the journalism department and take a course in ethics in which she must write a paper about ethics in journalism. College policy regarding the transmission material

is

of objectionable

outlined in the col-

lege’s Internet lab policies, draft-

As a result of McGregor said

incident,

the

Fanshawe College’s vice-presi-

the

college

other Ontario colleges and the

dent of finance said paying perks

would re-evaluate its Internet and e-mail policies. He said he is hopeful some long-term benefit will come from the exercise. The college will review its

paid parking was used as a supple-

to executive members is not unusual for student associations.

practices

mine

if

and policies to deterthere are areas which

should be re-examined, ened up or changed and that will continue, he said. “It’s all part of the process of continuous improvement.” What students must be aware of, according to McGregor, is recipient can receive an e-mail

transmission.

conclusion

He after

reached this the

college

surf the Internet with reckless abandon, said McGregor. The Internet is being used for things that are frankly either frivolous

or inappropriate, he said.

seems indicative to me that two most popular sites generally are sports and sex.” “It

the

(that they get paid).”

four staff members and eight exec-

members

utive

to park at a cost

of

$1,896.

“We

try to

members and our executive more than Conestoga’s

(does),” she said.

be as accountable as

Seminar

out in cyberspace, you’re

their jobs.

all

over

Policing college e-mail activity is extremely difficult, given the sheer volume of messages trans-

mitted,

McGregor.

said

Moreover, restrictive

schools

are

less

with their resources

than industry.

A number of com-

panies have far more stringent conditions and monitoring processes, he said.

“In that sense we’re very open

mitting,”

Continuedfrom page one. . Doug Henrich, ISO 9000 co-ordinator for Intercon Security, said still

in the business

and

growing.

executive earns $3,750 per school year compared to $2,200 at Conestoga.

Fanshawe also has a

full-time.

assistant at Sir

Sandford Fleming

College, said their executive doesn’t receive any perks, but they do

earn more than at Conestoga. The student association president makes $270 per month, while vlcc-picsiucixto moke $240. She said Conestoga’s pay rate

and bonus doesn’t seem out of line with other colleges in the province.

refines portfolios

said they love

We respect the

McGregor

college

said being a police offinot an easy life but he has enjoyed every minute of it.

cer

is

“Congratulations are in order because you have chosen a profession that is extremely rewarding,”

Brown

Zehr said the Waterloo regional police are going to be hiring a fair

number of

officers in the

fijture.

said.

Zehr agreed with Brown, stating that from his perspective it’s the best job in the world.

Students were told that jobs are available in both policing and in the private sector.

(on the committee),” said Miller. The committee is composed of 18 members including police officers,

At Intercon

Security, Strgar said

is a lot of room to advance and Henrich added that the people they train become ambassadors for the company. Gord Miller, chairman of the police foundations/LASA program advisory committee and retired deputy chief of the

there

Brown and Zehr Brown

the place.”

the

but the reality of the matter is students often abuse e-mail and

earns

learning, evolving

messages

one thing

utive

he’s

ing the Internet,

is

pass or parking pass for our exec-

comes out to

20 years

Despite the difficulties in polic-

Drafting policies

members) work it about a buck an horn*

“We pay $96 towards either a bus

(the executive

that after

used ... to “flame” or harass other users with inappropriate

any

“There were reasons for it. If you break down the (number) of hours

There were 16 different “hops” it reached its ultimate destination, said McGregor, and at any point there’s a possibility for that message to go astray. “It was bouncing all over North America,” he said. “Once you’re before

privacy of the individual trans-

in

to their base salary.

studied the path of an e-mail.

According to the policy, “College equipment must not be

engage

ment

the lowest paid

paid president compared to Conestoga’s part-time president who only makes $300 more per year than the vice-presidents. Renie Steel, an administrative

beyond the intended

that parties

and very relaxed.

... or to

among

said.

this

ed in 1997.

other practice which violates the intended use.”

among

is

Waterloo regional police service, said the committee has a commit-

ment

the

to

students’

at

tor,

members of

the private sec-

students and staff of the col-

lege.

Students from both programs regrouped to hear Zehr speak on ethical issues in law enforcement. “Ethical behaviour means a lot in the field you’re about to enter,”

Zehr said. Zehr warned

students

that

employers will look at the students’ whole life because in law enforcement, past behaviour

Conestoga. Members of the advisory committee are urged to sit in

affects future behaviour.

on classes

said Zehr. “Your test starts now,

as well as answer any

questions a student might have.

“There

is

a wealth of experience

“I

want

make

to leave

sure

when

you with the time

this,”

comes

you’re ready for us.”

said.

McGregor said must adhere to

Internet protocol, obligating the

school to identify the originator

of offensive material. But the whole process can only be instigated once a complaint is launched. With the pace of tech-

Correction

Waiting list for parking decals

In

an

.

Tibbits said the shortage result-

from parking

refrain

in illegal

spots such as fire routes.

A

on the college

issue, several errors

The Continued from page one.

article

health office in the orientation

$15

were made.

cost of doctors’ notes start

at $5, health sciences students

must pay a small service fee for vaccinations and they do not need to bring a health card when

ed because enrolment increased 2.6 per cent in September. Hunter said he would like to

those parked

“The whole area is a bit like the ‘Wild West’ happening out there,” he said. “Changes arc

ask the students to be patient and share rides.

ing out parking tickets,” said Hunter, adding the money col-

office need to bring a health card

lected in parking tickets goes to

only if they wish to see a doctor.

going to be massive over the

cerned,” he said,

nological advances policing will

become

increasingly challenging.

next 10 to 15 years.”

“Obviously we’re very con-

He added

students

parking ticket will be given to

“We

take

illegally.

no pleasure

in

hand-

the City of Kitchener, not the

should

college.

visiting a vaccination clinic.

Students visiting the health

Spoke apologizes for these and any inconvenience.

errors


NEWS

SPOKE,

Sept. 20, 1999

— Page 3

College wants to improve By

Phil Wright

Most of us

Despite No.1 ranking, review

strive for

improvement but

continuous

in reality

it is

an

intimidating undertaking.

such an occupational hazard is most welcome. Eleanor Conlin, Conestoga’s chair of acadenuc research and eduddtionaf ’services, said despite official

_

in quahty of services

The

“We may be number leges want to be

we

1

this year,”

aU the other

said Conlin, “but

number

1

col-

too, so

can’t stand stUl.”

Conestoga was tops in graduate

employment, graduate tion,

satisfac-

tied for first in overall stu-

dent satisfaction and was

and quality

number

survey showed us

have

independent survey of Ontario’s co unity colleges was conducted in February first-ever

mm

in partnership with the Ministry of Education and Training.

mittee

are

is

ect to establish accountability

excellence referred to as

improved,”

said

to hold focus groups that

mandated

to determine and deficiencies in speacademic programs.

strengths

UnUke groups

colleges undertook the proj-

areas that

One of the initiatives of the com-

Accountability The

be

to

some

Conlin.

cific

the college’s success in a recent

province-wide satisfaction survey, improveinents are possible.

improve in different areas.” Because of the decreased activi-

summer semester, journahsm and robotics, which offer a summer semester, participated in ty in the

1

of facilities/resources.

However, for one Conestoga

underway

is

the KPI survey, focus include the participation

of faculty.

and

“Focus groups provide an oppor-

Key

tunity for us to dialogue with<«stu-

“We’re looking at 11 programs,” said Conhn, “and we’re looking for best practises and areas to improve.”

Once they

focus group pilot projects.

“We

tried

it

out in the

summer

Conlin, there will be some professional development changes or teacher-training sessions, if

and now what we’re doing is refining that plan and talking to the parties that we need to talk to in order to make announcements

deemed

in the future,” said Conlin.

are identified,

said

necessary.

These programs were not selected because they scored particularly high or low in the survey,

More information on these focus groups will explain to students

how

work and who

they

according to Conlin. They represented a cross-section of the pro-

involved.

grams

familiarize themselves

will

be

Performance Indicators.

dents and faculty to find

Though college administration was elated by the survey results, they established a KPI response

can do better. We can’t stand still, we need to improve,” said Conlin

Conestoga’s campuses.

KPI

At this time a number of programs have been identified for focus group participation.

“You want some at every school, you want some that scored very high, you want some that could

Another survey will be conducted

committee.

“We’ve got

to

improve and the

how we

offered

at

of

all

A DSA poster, urging students to initiative,

with the has been posted in

the health services department. in February.

Humber College bounced from basketball tourney By Walerian Czarnecki Humber

College’s Hawks will not be participating in a Movemher hasketball tournament hosted by the University of Ottawa because it is a community college.

Jack Eisemann, University of Ottawa coach, has informed Doug Fox, Humber’s athletic director,

that the

tournament

the

invitation to

has

been

rescinded.

Two

other teams were to take

part, the

University of McGill the University of

Redmen and Prince

Edward

Island Panthers.

Like Ottawa’s Gee-Gees, both are members of the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union. The University of Western Ontario Mustangs have filled

Humber’s place. McGill University basketball coach Ken Schildroth told the

Globe and Mail, “he would

years ago. Schildroth denies the

rather

allegation.

play universities, because of the different types of streams, different types of differexxt types of athletes between colleges and universities.”

Eisemann said coaches have

to

make many

decisions regarding SoH^dules, especially in oi

academic cutbacks

in

sports.

Exhibition games against community college teams are not counted in national top- 10 rank-

Humber coach Mike Katz said down at community colleges, which

ings.

have a different curriculum. McGill rarely competes against

number of games, you have

colleges.

try

Katz said the universities have an elitist attitude, and that it reflects a mindset within the university community. He said

teams as you can,” he said. Eisemann, who organizes the tournaments, said McGill did not pressure him, but he was told there would probably not have been a tournament if Humber were allowed to play.

university coaches look

the

universities

consider that

neither education nor athletics at the community-college level

should be regarded as serious endeavours.

Katz remembers that the McGill Redmen complained when they had to play the Hawks at a tournament four

“When to

you. have

get as

many

a

limited to

university

In the past 12 years Humbei has captured four Canadiar Colleges Athletic titles. They have also won 223 games, while losing just 43 over that time period.

Music to the ears

University of Waterioo

renovations compiete By Walerian Czarnecki •

Major renovations ries

to laborato-

in the faculties of science,

engineering and environmental studies at the University of Waterloo have been completed.

The improvements

will

modem

teaching and

facilities for

provide

research activities.

improve and reduce energy con-

Utility renovations will air quality

project

was

funded under the Canada/Ontario Works program, with the provincial government, the federal government and the University of Waterloo contributing one-third of the total cost.

Infrastructure

}

Matthews

Hall as well as upgrades to student residences. Elizabeth Witmer, Ontario Minister of Health and Long-

Term

sumption.

The $2.7 million

Under phase one of the Canada/Ontario Infrastructure Wqrks program, three programs totting over $5.5 million were implemented at the university. It included constmction of an addition to the School of Optometry and an addition to the B.C.

and

Care

Kitchener- Waterloo, Telegdi,

MPP

for

Andrew

MP

for KitchenerWaterloo, and David Johnston, president of the University of Waterloo were on hand for the

plaque

presentation

held on Sept.

7,

ceremony

Han Bennink, Dutch drummer and multi-instrumentalist, is known internationally for mixing unlikely and untraditional objects. He played at the Guelph Jazz Festival on Sept 11. fPhoto by Anna Sajfert) sounds from

.

^

.


Page 4

— SPOKE, Sept.

20, 1999

COMMENTARY

HEREija

Rights battle rages:

-jO]

/ ^Ho'M)ANQ.£R Tool;? Did Mot

^

Supreme Court says

But iHirsfeaUD

Should society be risk

worked

order to

in

accommodate under-

women

qualified

chin-ups and hose-dragging. After four attempts to complete the required 2.5-km

my' mind

run in

is

a

after

for

power couple

that will lead this country into

Clarkson will be the second woman, and the

first

refugee to Canada, to act as the Queen’s representative in this country.

Having come to Canada from Hong Kong

in 1942,

Clarkson is particularly suited to represent Canada through a turning point of history. With a growing population of Asian immigrants and the ongoing attempts by the federal government to provide equal opportunity to women, this move by Chretien should be applauded as a positive step to recognize Canada’s “vertical mosaic” of people. Chretien said,

after,

the much-criticized appoint-

ment of the former Governor General Romeo LeBlanc, that the position requires someone with political savvy.

Clarkson

department, but Saul

is

notably lacking in that

is not.

will the

outcome of

If I

am

want to be assured the firefighters coming up the ladder are capable of rescuing me, even if the hiring process is discriminatory. I would prefer to know I’m in good hands rather than know I’m in the hands of the token female who beat the system on a techniI

cality.

In this latest

human

There

is

not

much

Cup

tournament

much

like the posi-

today.

But Chretien broke with no political

that habit

ties,

by selecting a person

a person

who among

other

things, considers herself an impartial journalist.

Saul, on the other hand, does have a political agenda, but

one which

is

vastly different than the prime

No patronage there either. Clarkson and Saul will be able to lead this country into the next millennium by representing all the people of Canada and without the usual criticism of

minister.

patronage.

That

is

a

media

fail

to give the sport the

coverage

Spoke SPOKE

it

deserves.

not a traditional sport here.

screens in

Canada

are not

regaining her job as a firefighter on the

minimum

grounds of sexual discrimination she puts the lives of the most vulnerable individuals in society at risk. They are the people who find themselves in an emergency sit-

performmee.

uation relying on the police, the fire

design tests specific to fighting

department or the military to save them. It is not clear how many workplace test standards across the country will now

tests require applicants to

have to be scrapped. If she had instead attacked the real issue of the tests not being a true reflection of what is physically required of a firefighter, she could have been a key player in making B.C.'s forest flrcflghtlng team

allowing

Her choice has

Stronger.

he

And let’s not even mention the rise in^pularity of golf. Nothing could be worse to watch on TV. It is time for Canadians to open their minds in the sports department. All over the world people recognize rugby as a national sport. Leagues, like we have for hockey and football, easily attract crowds of 50,000 people. Rugby is not a

and

charged

like football.

commercial-filled

It is

game

exciting. Players are in

I

fire

metres without

hoses and carrying a hose

set distances.

thankful I live in Ontario where

to allow people like

work

Tawney Meiorin

to

in non-traditional occupations.

Doyle said rugby

much coverage

who

doesn’t get

itself

here because there

is a lack of interest and knowledge in the sport. And regarding the world cup, an

event which occurs only every four

the better

years,

he said as

gets closer fans will

it

notice previews.

Berkovich any calls from people asking why the Record didn’t report a particular rugby event. And if he started to do rugby coverage all of the time, he

“But it’s a world event. Papers have to keep it in mind. Just because it’s not hockey doesn’t mean it is not important,” Doyle said. He added that most fans will turn to television if they are interested.

CTV Sports Net has the rights to broadcast the world It

is

time for Canadians to

open

their

minds

stations tike

in

said his editor

covering

it

would wonder why he was

so much.

An audience of over two billion people watched Rugby World Cup ’95. But the numbers that matter to local media are in North America, according to Tim Doyle, former sports editor at the Hamilton

On

in

Canada this

year, so

are not permitted to

the other hand,

move

Spectator.

Production Manager: Anna

cup

TSN

show games. Sports Net will televise 41 games, including all of Canada’s action. This is a huge improvement for the time being. But as soon as the world cup is over I know it will be another four years before I see much rugby on TV in Canada. Maybe the media has to look at the interest in the game here and consider that when deciding how much time to spend on it.

the sports

department.

is

maybe

I

should just

to Scotland.

mainly funded from September

to

May

by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). Tlie views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolieiled submissions must be sent to the editor by

Sajfert;

Advertising Manager: Linda Wright; Circulation Manager: Nicole h'urlong; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spokc(a}conestogac.on.ca

am

pump 100

to touch the ground, dragging

my safety will not be jeopardized in order

far as covering rugby,

is

leanettc Evcrall;

The

no coverage

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Photo Editor:

it

pack over

her team.

SPOKH

Activities Editor: Lesley Turnbull;

28.5-ldlogram

the bore of football.

stop-and-start,

fires.

simulate forest

firefighting tasks, including carrying a

said.

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Bradley Dugard; News Editor: Brian Gall; Student Life Editor: Angela Clayficld;

Issues

left

safe effective requirements of

The Ministry of Natural Resources tested some 250 volunteers, including men, women and minority groups in order to

showing

blast us with

where by the outcome of Ontario has established a bona five in Ontario

affected

term recognized by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, which represents the

by

this:

if I

fide occupational requirement, the legal

When

prime condition. You do not see any 300pound beefcakes huffing and puffing on

welcome change.

this case.

As

1987, both print and

we

ments or accepting the fact she does not have the required level of physical fitness, she screams sexual discrimination. is

unable to carry out

maimer. Would you feel safe

Thankfully,

she doesn’t realize

am

firefighter?

we will not be

said he doesn’t get

since

hockey and baseball, they

is

were a

of training harder to meet the require-

athletes are,”

in

tion of senator

efficient

unqualified for the job. However, instead

What

lack of physical fitness

I

the duties of a firefighter in a safe and

in the case of

Tawney Meiorin, she was unable to meet a standard and therefore was considered

“There’s no question

TV

profile patronage appointment,

and

my

mean

does not

Karlo Berkovich, sports editor at the KRecord, said he used to play high school football but now he says he thinks he should have played rugby.

Liberals and Tories chose Tories.

The position was danger of becoming nothing more than a high

job,

in this case,

the person

the real-grass pitch.

begins Oct. 1 and Canada has competed in every cup

It is

Ae

hired for

pump

over a distance of 100 metres without setting it down. But, according to the ruling

believe fitness tests are necessary to is

at the

which

decision,

court’s

could not carry a 28.5-kilogram

W

British noble.

television

I

ensure the person qualified

getting

rugby in

Even though the 1999 Rugby World

has to give final approval to the decision. In the early 1950s, when Louis St. Laurent was prime minister, the governor general was picked from the ranks of the ruling party - Liberals chose

ruling,

Rugby

In the early years of the Dominion, the Governor General was appointed by the Crown, usually to a

Crown stiU

rights

Tawney Meiorin is that token female. She is the 32-year-old B.C. forest fire-

this country.

at least in practice, as the

window of

ever leaning out the

political experience is

prime minister,

case

equity.

a burning building,

talk about

This held true for some time but eventually the duty of picking the head-of-state was left to the

this

have a national impact, but it also strikes at the heart of the argument over whether or not physical requirements should be different for women in order to promote

Having written three non-fiction books, primarily about the failings of capitalism, Saul is no green horn when it comes to dealing with political issues. The appointment of a Governor General without a precedent in Ottawa.

working

efficiently.

employment

the 21st century.

discriminated against

identify firefighters capable of

and

minutes, Meiorin was fired. Her

onds.

fitness requirements

women. The unanimous Supreme Court of Canada decision found the B.C. government showed insufficient evidence a tough fitness standard was needed to safely

1 1

running time was 11 minutes 49.4 sec-

court,

firefighters

Not only

Prime Minister Jean Chretien made the announcement on Sept. 8 that Adrienne Clarkson and her new husband (but longtime partner) John Ralston Saul are the

top

which found tough

step into the next milleimium.

which

the

nation’s

The formula for selecting the Governor General of Canada has changed - drastically. The change in tradition signals a new stage in Canada’s history, a change which is a strong first

test

the

found fitness tests unnecessary in determining whether or not firefighters can execute their job safely and efficiently. There is no doubt in my mind that I am not physically fit enough to fight a fire; I smoke, I never exercise and I certainly

years, failed to

question foremost in recent ruling by the

choice

more than two

meet the running portion of a

in

mercy of

as an elite advance-team fire-

fighter for

men and 55 women,

including 686

who

included a specified number of sit-ups,

pations? This

right

her job because she was

occu-

non-traditional

PM made the

lost

49.4 seconds too slow. Meiorin,

expected to put lives at

who

fighter

tests discriminate

9:.10 a.m.

Monday. Submissions arc subject, to acceptance or

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

file would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, -Sept.

COMMENTARY

20,

1999— Page 5

Majority applaud

new Sanctuary By Beverley Grondin With every new school year comes One of the big changes on cam-

change.

pus

this year is the

expansion of the

Sanctuary.

management

studies,

agreed with

Grewal. of com-

Among

a

said

list

Adams

plaints, it is

also

too dark in the

lounge.

Around 225

metres have been added, the carpet has been removed, there is a bigger games room and there is a kitcheiidjar

want

area which will be licensed during special

here,”

events.

probably not going to be in here many more

sq.

The results of an informal survey conducted on campus Sept. 9, shows that most students are pleased with the new and bigger version of the Sanctuary. Tricia Paries,

“It

almost makes

go

to

every time

I

he

me

sleep

to

come

in

Officers give input at seminar

“I’m

said.

,

Seeond-year

civil

Jared Puppe said the

In photo above, officers from Waterloo region and

engineering student

new

loimge a nice atmosphere.

engineering student, said compared to last year, the lounge is much improved. “It’s more comfortable and more roomy,”

“I haven’t really cruised

a place where you can

„ Puppe

times.”

a first-year construction

said Paries. “I find

,

lighting gives the

representatives of the private security sector

through

it,”

said

Puppe. “But from the outside looking in, it

spoke

reer

orientation

Top

row

Cameron

at

to

(left

a ca-

seminar. right)

London International; Gord Veitch,

Colleen Clark, a first-year social services student, agreed with

looks pretty nice.” 'John Eardley, a second-year student in the accounting program, is

deputy Chief of Waterloo regional police serv-

Paries.

also pleased with the

deputy

think^t’s a cool place for everybody to

changes made to the

regional police; Curran, training

come

sit

it

down more.”

“I

hang

and

out

tjH

just

like

because

it

better

games room is bigger, and there’s more room for

Nicole Rider, a second-year materials

tion

the

hasn’t been

to the early '

even though

hall,

it

Nicole Rider

is

students think that the lighting,

along with the darker coloured walls,

make

the lounge too dark.

dark that you even see inside,”

ca^i’t

Adams,

third-year

in

business

X

John Grewal

the

fell

Your article titled “From bathrooms to bar: survival guide to life at Conestoga College” in the orientation issue of Spolm

A

“It is good that they put the games in one room,” said Rider, “because it got kind of noisy last year with the foosball games.”

full money

for needs or special r^uests of business students, such as: providing funding for the

^ss the importance of class r^s or the importance of students participating on the board of (hrectors. Several associations were not even mentioned. Many programs have their own

Annual Marketing Competition (v^ch

organizations to be involved

in.

And what

about the Student Athletic Council? My biggest beef is the sad excuse for an uninformative section on the Conestoga Busina Students Association. No one from Spoke had asked anyone from the CBSA wtet we do or The article said “The CBSA is similar to the DSA except it is geared ^ecifically to die business student”

DSA wUi DSA uses a stu-

sure the

The

dent activity fee to provide services and entertainment for the students. The CBSA is not responsible for this:

CBSA

is

to raise

the association was founded), to subsidize the Annual Business Awards

The

Guelph police Burger,

(to

make

CBSA

affordable for all stuto support those nomi-

it

has an elected executive who meet with class every two weeks to maintain communication and participation throu^out the school of business. The executive is a volunteer position and the execu-

r^

works for the experience, receiving no pay or bursary for their time. A little more research could have been done in the article to clearly explain to students the details of several clths, associations, organizations, and committees. It was great of Spoke to point out the locations of washrooms. I’m sure students appreciate the directions. Did you need to fiU space, that tad?

CBSA promotions co-ordinator third-year maiketing

Gord

Miller, retired

service. Photos by Leslie Turnbull

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Roommates Sharing living space with a stranger, or even a friend, can be quite ferent

from

living with your family.

stay in the shower or

where

to

Things as simple as

to living together.

the transition from family life to living with a

One way

to avoid conflicts is to establish

instance, does

it

next morning?

drive

you nuts

Some

teeth

long you

So how can you ease

roommate? some ground

rules.

For

if the dirty dishes are still in the sink the

Or do you have a “high

roommate gnashing her

how

dif-

keep the potato chips can cause tensions

between people who aren’t used

dirt tolerance” that will

have your

by the end of September?

areas to discuss include;

common

-

space: private versus

-

food costs: shared? designated fridge space?

-

quiet hours for morning, study time

-

guest policy

tive

Teresa Bricker

human resources for Waterloo regiondeputy chief of Waterloo regional police

regional police service; Sgt. Barry Zehr,

story

dents to attend and nated), the recent purchase of the industrial ratios database package in the LRG, and a recpiest by the caanagement department for a trophy to display their acmevemmts.

on the DSA was tnore deser^tive but did not

Waterloo regional police service; Const. Doug Pfiug,

al police service;

2.

how easy it is to form your own club through the Boon Student Association, The section

the

International; Sgt. Barry Zehr, resources for

Henrich, ISO 9000 co-ordinator for Intercon Security; Kelly Strickler, loss prevention investigator for Zehrs markets; Zara Thurgood, human resources specialist; Pat Leonard, branch manager for King-Reed & Associates; Bruce Bjorkquist, faculty. Absent: Patty Rose, supervisor of loss prevention. Above right photo (left to right) Brian Cunningham, deputy chief of Waterloo

Banquet

The purpose of

Rene

Strassburgur.

existing chibs nor give information about

And I’m

service;

London Protection

police foundations/LASA programs. Bottom row (left to right) Gerry Gibson, deputy registrar private investigator and security guards section for OPP; Doug

was why

Well, no.

officer

“We got in so much trouble last year for having food and everything in there,” said

was a great idea yet was lacking in research. Your clubs section did not even mention

appreciate this as well.

Rod

and educafor Guelph

clean.

studies, likes that the carpet

has been removed, making the floor easier to

Door Aaron

Waterloo Sgt.

service; Sean London Protection International; Joe Strgar, account services team and corporate resource group for Intercon Security; Lisa Vollmar, deputy chief of Guelph police service; Don Douglas, co-ordinator of

She also said with the extra space, the whole room is more relaxed. The most popular change seems to be the improved games room, which is bigger and located just inside the Sanctuary’s

so

it’s

afternoon performances, sponsored by the DSA, in the Sanctuary. Michelle Strassburgur, in her third year of

management

darker than before.

Some

of

human

student, in the new

Sanctuary yet, but said it looks nice from the

chief

police Beaulieu,

Eardley

management

Cunningham,

Brian

ice;

student lounge. “I

relax,” Clark said.

Protection

Miller, retired

Living with a roommate

be much easier

isn’t all

to set guidelines

areas

and

at

night

about rules and compromises, but

now, before you

other’s nerves.

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02).

start getting

it’ll

on each


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 6

20, 1999

ISSUES & ACTIVITIES

Book holds unexpected advice By Walerian Czarnecki

spent 64 days worth of income on its

It is 208 years old and it will have existed in four different centuries come the 21st cenhuy. It was established in 1792 by Robert B. Thomas and is the old-

est continually

cal

in

published periodi-

North America.

The 2000

edition

the first

is

Old

Farmer’s Almanac since 1888 without a nine in the title. The across Almanac’s circulation

North America will be 4.4 million copies, and the Canadian edition

came out

Sept. 14.

Instead of being encyclopedic

and

dry,

people can count on said

entertainment,

Deb

it

for

Keller,

senior associate editor. It

has useful and entertaining in addition to the

information,

astronomical data and weather

annual food

In 1999,

bill.

it

We are all looking forward to the millennium and

all

the celebra-

come with

took only 40 days, worth to pay

tions that

the tab.

2000. But that is just a man-made number. If we go by other sys-

A lot of people can eat whatever they like and never gain weight.

tems,

This can be done by fidgeting. Boimcing a leg while sitting, tap-

are

ping a pencil, or any other such fidgeting can potentially work off an extra 1,000 calories a day. But

you have

to

be a natural fidgeter

we missed

still

Can watching sports from the couch affect you? The Almanac reports, that testosterone levels go up 20 per cent in men when the team they cheer for wins, or it goes dovm 20 per cent if their team loses.

Almanac

2000 or

the year

waiting for

it.

years before Christ. But he forgot

add a zero between A.D. to

1

B.C. and

1

entertaining information.”

has such useful and

If we really care about the millen-

John

I

.

Pope

He

Keller, senior associate

editor

people are more often refusing to their ethnic

names

and

tions.

Broadcasters are less likely to their native southern or

lose

in order to

sound

more blandly professional. The Almanac also includes planting dates

start-

ed year 1 from the best known date of Jesus’ birth. So the year 1280 A.U.C. (which means from the founding of Rome), changed to the year 525 A.D.

is popular again. Sociologists have noticed that

regionalism

Brooklyn accent

Deb

asked Dionysius Exigus to

revise the Julian calendar.

for B.C. reports that

Polish spellings and pronuncia-

1421.

begins in 2001

Almanac

The

are reclaiming the old Gaelic or

“It

it

Common Era (B.C.E.)

change

If we’re

Jewish, it is the year 5761. The Japanese are at year 2660. In the Islamic dating system, it’s only

nium, then

for that to benefit you.

the year

In 731 A.D., a monk known as Venerable Bede used anno Domini or A.D. and began to use B.C. for

that are important

and the Zodiac for those who are interested in entertainment.

The Almanac

also points out that

now A.D. has been

Common

replaced by

Era (C.E.), and Before

predicts weather for

“It’s

been published for so long

that people Keller.

know about

“They

trust

it,”

said

it.”

2000

predictions, said Keller.

For example, older VCR models be programmed due to the Y2K problem. But don’t throw

By Walerian Czarnecki

on

them

out, the

Almanac

says. Just

VCR

One of the the

morning

first is

things

weather will be

dates as in 2000.

Conestoga College.

If you

want

to

make

a time cap-

sule to celebrate the millennium,

Almanac More than

the best advice that the

is not to bury it. 80 per cent are lost that way, because where they were buried is often forgotten. Corona, Calif., has lost track of 17 differ-

gives

good or

we do

in

find out what the

back to 1972. The days of the week have the same set the

bad, affects everyone at

this

find out the forecast, the sunrise,

ent capsules, that date back to the 1930s.

accurate.”

Norton

sunset, daylight

The almanac has two

com-

kinds of weather forecasts Conestoga students face in academic year?

ed rain to the east, especially in late September and early October. The 1^ hot weather of tihe season is expected in the second week of September, with a mild heat spell in early October, before winter takes over southern Ontario.

The

Flurries will hit southern

cold and change to mild and rainy.

Ontario around the middle of the

Starting Feb. 7 the month tvill become bitterly cold and snowy. March will warrant a spring break in Cuba. There will be snow

rainy.

month and continue

The Almanac stated that September and October AviU bring need-

first weeks of November be sunny and warm. The middle of the month will be cool and

will scientists

to

What will

The Old Farmer’s 2000 Almanac, Canadian edition, predicts the weather for the next year. You can

with the predic-

and an astronomer

pile the astronomical data.

The weather,

like.

and moon phases. “We claim 80 per cent accuracy,” said Deb Keller, senior associate editor. “When broken down to individual cities we are far more

In 1960, the average household

staff that help

tions

can’t

till

November. The begi nning of December will be sunny and cold with some flurries. Those flurries will change to snow showers by the middle of the month. The end of the month, which includes the winter break, will be mild with snow and rain. The first week of January, when students are starting the second semester, will be mild with showers. The rest of January will be snowy, then rainy, and then snowy at the end of the month. February will start off sunny and

from a oonventional can cost as much as $72. Utilities'^"''

the end of

and rain throughout the month. Either way iCwilL not be pleasant weather. The month will finish off mild, with sun and soml showers. April 1 to 3 will showcase flurries for the last time. The month will be warm, but rainy. Spring will finally arrive.

Speaking of the accuracy of the almanac, Keller said tbat wben the predictions for last year’s weather

were broken down, they were frightfully right.

retailer

We sell Not exactly rocket science is it?

Need more Mb? Visit OLv website or 90 to the

e-academy.com Simple, affordable software sHopping online


SPOKE,

DSA

Sept. 20, 1999

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 7

Prescription Drug Pian

Opt-Out

&

Family Opt-ln

Opting out deadline is Mon., Sept. 20, 1 999 Monday, Septemb&r 2.9, To s P 9 The Gemctwncry.

Ctive the Ciift &f

Family Qpt

1999

In

deadline

Mon., Sept. 20, J-i'fe

M

1

is

999

must be submitted 1o the DSA Office by the deadline. No exceptions. More torrris

Information

Is

ovolable at the DSA Office.

DAD VALKOS campaifftt as to the hnpâ&#x201A;Ź>rtance

George is

AVorce/fo.

of organ Jonaiions.

a former Conestoga College student and a recipient of a

walking across Ontario and will he

in

Kitchener to

On Monday, September

visit

ZO.

1999 at 10:00

a.m..

to the College

Alt students

where he

who attend

this

will

walk

Or^an

"Refriaval

we

will

walk with

speak to the students of Conestoga.

will receive

There will be a large variety of events, and ail day A^onday in The Sonc+ucry.

(/^ifipfe

ZO.

a bus will be leaving from

the College to go to Pioneer Por/c baseball diamond, where

George

PSYCHIC RGADinSS

liver transplant,

Conestoga College on Sept.

a free t-shirt.

exciting

games going on

SEPTEMBER 2S. 1999

and Efchanga.) Card

an A\en^c?y. during the days events, or in the P5^ office. For more inkrmation. contact Steve Coleman in the PS^ office at lHS-5 1} will be availabte

or

call

Step by Step at

1

~

I

SOO-563SHiy

Conastitga Ct^Jegc

is

encourage

all

i1:30

ike first educational inslilulitm in Ontario

to lake part in this intporlanl causa,

Canadians

AM -i:00 PM

kfgatkar as a loam, u'c

to donate tkoir

organs to save

liras.

THE SANCTUARY

Saturday, September 25

8:30 a.m. Departure Tickets $25, includes coachline transportation

Doon Campus students are

permitted

1

Tickets on Sale August 30, 1999

guest


Beil First Rate* How calling home Is

no'big deal with the Sell f irst Rate tong DisUrKC Savings Plan, Call anywhere across Canada for as long as' you v/ant from 6 pm to 8 anj vvoekdays and all weekend long lor just i0<? a minute up to c*

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Page 10

— SPOKE, Sept. 20, 1999

STUDENT

No nurses

LIFE

to graduate in 2004

By Mike Radatus Even though enrolment

is up 53 Ontario nursing schools, Ontario hospitals face two major problems - too few nurses and the loss of nurses to the United States. The majority of nurses in Ontario are graduates of community colleges however, in the year 2004, there will be no nurses graduating from colleges because the nursing program at Ontario colleges is changing from a threeyear program to a four-year program. Nursing programs at Conestoga College, Mohawk College and

per

cent

at

McMaster University

will

com-

bine to create a program that will

enable college students to receive diploma.

This causes a problem for hospi2004 because most of Ae baby boomers, whose average age tals in

is

43 to 45, will have

retired.

demand when fewer

This will increase the for nurses in a year

nurses will be graduating. Bill Jeffrey,

community grads es

dean of health and

services, says college

make up 85 per cent of nurs-

and

in

2004

Eliza

Kempel

(left

to right),

Mary

Ellen Bridle

and

Jill

Cherryholme demonstrate

skills

they learned

the nursing program.

in

there will be a lack

(Photo by Mike Radatus)

of qualified nurses to choose from.

‘Times are going back to the it used to be when you could hand out six resumes and hear from all six,” said Jeffrey.

way

Community

Canada.

“Look

major problem.

up north. They’re always short on nurses because people don’t want to live up at

colleges graduate nearly 2,300 nursing graduates per

there,” Jeffrey said.

year and that number will be missed in 2004. This is not only a problem for

live in Florida or

Ontario,

but also the rest

of

“Why

live

if you can Texas with the

with the cold weather

same job?” Nurses seeking emplo)nnent in the United States

is

the other

They

and nursing jobs are

more jobs but

plentiful.

are frustrated with the lack

Julie Whetstone, a graduate of

of jobs in Ontario and employment across the border looks

the Conestoga College nursing program, said she believes Ontario nurses will have more job

she said.

opportunities

to find a job.

appealing.

“The U.S. is grabbing our grads by the handful,” Jeffrey said. Graduates from college nursing programs who work in the States can obtain a degree as they work

boomers

retire,

the but she

baby

after

is

yet,

States to work.

stiU

being cut,”

“You can get higher

pay,

more

and they pay for experiThat looks good on a

training

ence.

“There’s been a lot of talk about

haven’t seen any

Whetstone says that the United States is looking like a good place

still

thinking of going to the United

I

and beds are

resume,” she

said.

Beat Goes On (AcrosfromMcbonoldi)

((onadinn

Tire Plaia)

IBelwcai Harvey's & Bufga King)]


Be sure to attend

CAREER FAIR

'99

Wednesday, September 29, 1999 10:00am - 3:00 pm Bingeman Park Conference Centre Victoria Street, Kitchener •

Final

year students

students

in

-

employers actually start recruiting

September. Wouldn't

it

year

final

be great to have a job

all

ready

to go to once you've completed your program?

T< •

For first and second year students

-

attend the Fair to research

employers, careers, and to learn what in

skills

are required for success

your chosen career.

On September

29, over

200 employers

be under one roof eager

will

,

to talk to you and to review your resume. Don't miss this big, busy,

’i*i'

exciting event!!

For a

listing

of attending employers, pick up a copy of

Guidebook on September 22,

in

The Employer

The Student Employment Office

-

Room 2B04.

This

is

a business-like event

...

please dress appropriately

*

^4 4^4 4^4 4% 4% 4^4 4%

10 Steps for successful attendance

at:

Career Fair ‘99 1

.

Wear business-like

attire

2.

Research the employers

3.

Have your resume Employment lots of

critiqued (at the Student

Office) prior to the Fair,

4.

Go

5.

Attend the Fair early enough to see

through the Fair alone

employers you want 6.

Have questions Guidebook

7. 8.

and have

copies on the day

for

all

the

to contact

ready; see the Employer

some

ideas

Be courteous and patient ....smile! Watch your language and behaviour as you through the Fair

I

9.

Prepare a short “commercial" about yourself

10.

HAVE A GOOD TIME!!!

travel


— SPOKE, Sept.20, 1999

Page 12

STUDENT

LIFE

Lounge won’t become pub By Jeanette

Everall

spend

$1,200 on special occasion permits 1999-2000 academic school term. The permits allow the DSA to serve alcoholic beverages at events held at the college in the

The Sanctuary may become a

fully

licensed area in the near future, but the

new

mean

license doesn’t

students will be able

in areas not licensed for the sale

back a beer during their lunch hour. number of licensed events on campus is not the driving force behind the Doon Student Association’s (DSA) push to toss

If the

Increasing the

“We

not

change the Sanctuary into a pub,” says DSA’s entertainment manager Patty Stokes. “We are trying to save the money we spend on the trying

to

to the

In order for the

Nicole Furlong

to serve liquor at

DSA

must purchase a $75 special occasion per-

foundations program after they have met the requirements. To attain a position in police foundations, students must pass a

Twenty-one of Ontario’s 23 colleges, including Conestoga, are

new

sector to their

physical fitness

law and security administration programs called police foundaAll applied arts students entering the law and security administration/police foundations pro-

a general

test,

aptitude test battery

tions, this fall.

more of in post-secondary

“I think there is too much of a focus on needing alcohol to have a good time,” says Jodouin, whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver six years ago. Jodouin says

she

knows how much fun

but she

is

college can be, also aware of the problems with

says Stokes. “If we (have) a high calibre of

are told that alcohol

entertainers, students will

(GATB) and

Douglas said the study load is equivalent to a first-year imiversity Bachelor of Arts degree.

must achieve strong academic marks in their first year. Forty students were accepted

lum, he expects the program will be a challenge to both students

into the inaugural year of the pro-

and

Because

Don

Tibbits

come

out to the

excessive alcohol and drug abuse at colleges and universities.

“Requiring alcohol at events should be of the hard sell, where you

is needed good time,” says Jodouin.

Students seeking work related to government jobs, investigation

ordinator,

strongly

duce

services, etc. branch off to

law

endorses two-year

and security administration in second year.

to have a

public policing enter the police

John

program, and

here, everyone

is

now

that

excited about

it.

pro-

have

still

“This is a good thing for the college as well as the community,” Tibbits said.

provincial fall.

Kirsty Bradley, a second-year student at Conestoga, said very excited about what this type of training could mean for her future. “This program is not just lec-

she

which means the program

is

there’s a lot of practical as well,” she said. Bradley said students are expected to go to Guelph police services to assist them in their tures,

work

up-to-date.

“Conestoga has established an excellent relationship with the Stratford,

all

law and security/police founda-

or have recently retired from a is

be utilized by

colleges beginning next

tions

Most of the teachers in the program are either on a police force

faculty

will

Guelph and Waterloo

police forces,” Douglas said. In addition to this being the ini-

training.

year for the program, four Conestoga police foundations

She added her

class

must comcam-

tial

plete a Ifi-mile run around

for any-

“This will allow us to have a real police focus for those who are

one looking to

interested in police studies,” he

instructors are currently writing

pus grounds twice a week as part of the intense physical aspect of

adding that those interested

textbooks for the program, which

the course.

gram

are interested in

the

president

said there was a large students to intro-

this

in other aspects of law

the option of the law and seciuity administration program.

force,

demand from it’s

curricu-

staff.

Conestoga’s Douglas, co-

new

this is a

program

who

like to see

institutions.

soft sold instead

workload.

gram.

gram must complete a common

Students

would

facility, she says the DSA will continue to hold no more than two licensed events per month. “Alcohol isn’t the main focus of events,”

police officer, however, he warns students not to expect an easy

first year.

their

“The DSA has set some guidelines for the (number) of licensed events,” she says. If the Sanctuary becomes a fully licensed

DSA to hold

organized events, Stokes says the

Jodouin, Waterloo Region’s president of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD),

is not a necessity.” This lack of focus on alcohol at DSAorganized events is exactly what Brenda

group enters new police program

First introducing a

DSA

$75 and must re-apply and purchase anothpermit. If the Sanctuary was fully licensed, events could be rescheduled without the cost of purchasing additional special occasion permits and the hassle of applying for the permits 30 days in advance, says Stokes.

events.”

DSA’s liquor license pro-

posal presented to college administration in August, the DSA is currently budgeting to

By

attempt to

its

administratively easier for the

special occasion permits.”

According

successful in

events would be $1,055 initial start up fee and $450 every three years. Stokes says, in the long run, the DSA will save money. “The issue isn’t to hold more alcoholic events,” says Kevin Mullan, Conestoga’s vice-president of finance and administrative operations. “It’s a means of making it

money. are

is

events. Alcohol

er

license the Sanctuary, the cost to license

to license the lounge; rather, they are trying to save

DSA

of alcohol.

mit 30 days in advance of the event. Consequently, if the event is cancelled and/or rescheduled the DSA loses the initial

become

a

Douglas

said,

7 Have a

great paying job, ^ workplace Hiat appreciates and respects me because bf the uniqueness of my education, and a future that

Student

Servic^HM

brings a smile to my face..." Scott O’Neil, TMiP Graduate ’99

Facilitator:

NOW IT'S TIME TO

Shawna Bernard

No Registration Required

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If

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Rm 2B02. Meet with our

Mon., Nov. 29 Thur., Dec. 2

Bingemans Conference Centre Wednesday, September 29 - 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

repre.sentativcs at the Career Fair at

to

Student Services,


STUDENT

Want

SPOKE,

LIFE

Sept. 20, 1999

— Page 13

improve your memory?

to

Learning disability specialist says students must recite information over and over again By Linda Wright

Strategies for Student Success that is

how

Visual or audio,

memory work

does your

best? If you’re a

teaches

the

students

how

achieve success with a learning disability.

your learning and there

is

no quick

fix.

Barry Cull, learning disability with special needs services, can assist students with learning disabilities to develop their memory so they can meet the challenges of college. Cull has three roles. His first role is a psychological associate. Cull performs a psycho-educational assessment on students to indicate specialist

a learning disabiUty

when

a dis-

ability is suspected.

Cull

seUor

also an mstructor/coun-

is

who

teaches a course called

the material

needs.

“The students will ask me, ‘What is the easiest way I can improve my memory?’ ”

Writing information on three by five-inch cards, with the question on one side and the answer on the other, is a way to improve

informs

they can expect to recall 95 per

lazy.

is

and should allow for

what they

For example,

self-test, the

student

that at if,

exam

after the

knows all of exam time

Learning Resource Centre

Doon Campus Come to the book GIVE-AWAY Starting at

9 a.m.

Monday September

across from (the

20

Door 4

room between Roasters and the

stairs).

Over 1500 books

Come

Sarah Sieeman, played by Earia Vickers, was shocked when she wa$ what she thinks about her former home, now the Manor Motor Motel bar and stnp club. The spirit walk, a tribute to dead heroes, was held on Sept 12 at Woodfawn Cemetery in Guelph, (Photo by nda Wnght)

in

to

choose from!

and help yourself

they’re

-

FREE!!

i

Phone

lines

By Tan n is Fenton

needed

Suites

signed

up

for

for Internet

Golden

Tridngle’s services and found they

Students who were hoping to have Golden Triangle On-Line

provide their Internet service in residence had better think again.

Rodeway its

Suites does not allow

residents to use

its

phone hnes

weren’t allowed Internet access on

phone hnes at the residence. Tonja Percival, a 22-year-old residential sales representative for

the

Kitchener Internet

service

provider, said this created chaos

She had to process refunds ah the students who had paid up to $130 for Internet service. They will have to wait about a for her. for

week

for their refunds.

Students can access the Internet free of charge however, at several

Conestoga College computer

labs.

for Internet access.

Save Your Seat Today Planning on flying

“Students have to get their own phone hne,” said Dylan Morgan,

The 5* Annual Craft and

Hobby Show/Sale

home for the

already scarce for Christmas and

now

holidays? Seats are

New Year's

general

contact us

Suites,

advantage of our unbelievable Student Class

all

manager of Rodeway because the Internet ties up phone hnes

the

at

DONT LEAVE IT TO THE LAST MINUTE!

and extras

dence.

Students

who

access can get

own phone

if

they get their

activate

new phone

it

Jeff Lotz, a first-year engineer-

ing student, says dents

who need

working on those crafts Show/Sale to be held on Thursday, November

it’s

in the

main

cafeteria

from 9:00 a.m.

18,

Take

Airfares’'^''^

Hobby 1999, Doon

to 2:00 p.m.

like a free

"Change Coupon"

for departure

changes should conflicts with your exam timetable

arise.’’'

Make sure you're home for the holidays. Call Travel

CUTS now.

to

hne, $55 to and approximately $30 monthly basic service. a

install

for the 5* Annual Craft and

Start

Campus,

line.

Canada charges $65

Bell

for

it

require Internet

2000, so

to avoid disappointment later!

I

the resi-

unfair to stu-

the Internet for

Vendor

applications will be available to present

employees, students, retirees and immediate family

members of will

present employees.

be $10 per vendor with a

Vendor

table fee

maximum

of two

‘We don’t have a lot of money to throw around,” said Lotz. Six students from Rodeway

University Shops Plaza

170 University Ave. W., Waterloo

886-0400

participants per table.

school.

Please contact Erica Stoermer at extension 399 for

more information.

the,

the material, then at

Cull, the student

remembered with over learning time.

study skills. The strategy can be used when a student is waiting in line, or sitting on a bus or whenev-

Cull

will discuss strategies to

Cull said that the students will

specialist.

ing,” said Cull.

to recognize learning

teacher on what measures can be taken to assist the student. Then

correct questions were

lose five per cent of

Barry Cull, learning disability

is

and the teacher meet the student’s needs. For example, material on tapes might prove useful to the student who is a slow note^ker. Workshops are held for teachers to inform them about learning disabilities, said Cull. The workshops inform teachers on how to distinguish between a learning-disabled student and a student who is just

over and over. Memory improved by rehearsal.

are thinking about think-

on how

disabilities.

an important way to check thinking.

“You

is

Cull’s final role is to advise fac-

The student shouldn’t stop until he/she has perfected it a few times in a row, which will help the student retain the information. The self-test, which involves seeing answered,

is

Hard work and time

ulty

how many

for

the students there

fix.

learn,” suggests Cull.

the student to recite information

is

no

tells

required.

100 per cent, don’t stop, over

Cull offers one-on-one

strategy Cull suggests

Cull

quick

“When you know

advice on different strategies according to the individuals’

One

cent of the information.

students

study, said Cull.

to

student with a learning disability,

The

spare time.

is

simply pull out the cards and

The course

learning disability.

memory may be an

obstacle to

er there

specifically for students with a

IZ IRAVELCIfIS * Subject to av2tilability and seasonal rate adjustment.

Owned and

operated by the Canadian Federation of Students.


(

done

Not every decision

will

dorm. Upon approval,

be as easy

you'll

the purchase or lease of a

to

make as

get a free Frosh

new

GM

get a tattoo for instance, you’ll get

getting

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apply on-line

©Registered Trade Mark of General Motors Corporation. TD Bonk licensed user. *TD Bank and GM aro licensed users of Marks, '*'Trade Mark of TD Bank. **AII applicants applying in person for The GM Card at on-campus booths will receive a copy of the Frosh Two CD at no charge. Applicants applying via the Internet will receive a copy of the Frosh Two CD upon approval, at no charge. Limit one copy per applicant. fApplies to full-time students only. ttSubject to The GM Card Program Rules.


SPOKE,

ENTERTAINMENT

My

Sept. 20, 1999

Dick:

Comedian teaches tolerance By Beverley Grondin

humour

with

when they found out that it dealt with homophobia. “We saw that as tying into the violence in our society,” says Magazine, “because sometimes people who are homophobic use violence or hate to hurt that group.” The funding from the Women’s Resource Group came from a grant for cam-

My Dick (and other manly tales) appeared in the Sanctuary Thursday, 9 before an unsuspecting crowd. The show was performed by Norman Nawrocki, who walked through the crowd dressed as a woman in a sparkling gold wig, a colourful housecoat and big, artificial breasts. Carrying a fl^hlight in one hand and a red handbag in the other, “Mrs. Robinson” was looking for something. Her clitoris. In the next sketch Nawrocki became “Chris”, who explained his first sexual experience with a woman. For the first few sketches, the subject matter was light-hearted and humorous, but that was just to warm the audience up. Nawrocki was really there to deal with homophobia. He said he doesn’t advertise that the show deals Sept.

pus safety for

women from

the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and

Universities.

Magazine, also a counsellor with student services at the college, says that she is not sure of the magnitude of any problems with homophobia at Conestoga, although she said that if it

“After the

show people came up

me,

all

me

n’t think

body

but that stuff about

as

sexuality,

hear

that.

we

don’t

Take

want

me, all ‘Wow, great

:

“But I’m sure that is gay bashing, I’m sure there are

there

jokes that get told,” says Magazine. “I

your show.’”

to

Norman Nawrocki,

on the audiences’ reaction to previous

open

and

their eyes

shows

think if you

“I spent diree years interviewing

gay, strai^t, bi(sexual), old,

hundreds of young - to get

he said “All of the

show are true stories.” There were accounts from students

stories

downright sinful and disgusting, says Magazine. That is one belief that Nawrocld is trying to dispel through his

told in the

schools

at different

show.

who claim

they couldn’t have gay and lesbian clubs on their campuses because offices would be vandalized and some students received death threats, said the actor and former journal-

Norman Nawrocki excitedly

a gay sports broadcaster describing the play-by-play of a fictional footplays

ball game in My Dick (and other manly tales) in the Sanctuary Thursday, Sept. 9. During the sketch the

ist.

character lets

Joan Magazine, of the Conestoga College

slip his

appreciation of the homo-erotic

elements of the game.

Women’s Resource Group, says they decided to co-sponsor Nawrocki’s show with the DSA

He ful

sexual orientation.

“And don’t assume everybody around you

is

straight,”

Clayfield

Just when you thought “Weird Al” Yankovic couldn’t get any

gonzo artist releasRunning With Scissors and is

weirder, the es

now

officially stranger.

This collection of parodies and original work has something to offer tastes,

everyone’s musical with styles ranging from to

Yankovic ’s own obnoxious brand of polka to industrial akin to Nine Inch Nails.

From track,

the cover art to the last

there are non-stop gig-

phrases like, “I’m so ferklempt that I could plotz.” If you’re one of the few people

world who hasn’t seen the movie Episode One: The in the

Phantom Menace, then the first track. The Saga Begins, will explain the plot to you in plain English to the tune of American Pie, by Don McLean.

Some of

the best parodies on

album

include Jerry Springer, to the tune of One Week, by Barenaked Ladies and It’s All About the Pentiums, this

It’s All About by Puff Daddy

originally called

and yes, even guffaws. But, bear in mind that you need a fairly open-minded sense of humour to enjoy a “Weird Al”

the Benjamins,

creation.

like the real thing.

gles, smirks

Some people might

think his

parody of Pretty Fly for a White Guy, by the Offspring, would be a tad offensive, but that’s not his style. There is nothing slanderous or anti-Semitic about Pretty Fly for a Rabbi. If anything, he plays up the stereotype with

and the family. In both cases, only the words are different since Yankovic sounds almost

Among

his original

album Horoscope this

is

work on

a song called Your

for Today, which can only be described as musical slapstick.

taste

for

You’ll

need a good and the

the bizarre

unexpected to find humour in this track. Also featured is a 10-

minute song, for the most part, about Albuquerque. This one is

beyond

description.

Just keep reminding yourself it’s a “Weird Al” creation and you’ll be fine. His sample of industrial music. Germs, would pass unnoticed in a nightclub as a legitimate song

that

if

it

weren’t for the lyrics mak-

ing fun of people

who

are exces-

sively clean.

And you

haven’t lived until

you’ve heard the polka versions of Intergalactic, by the Beastie Boys, Ray of Light, by Madonna and The Dope Show, by Marilyn Manson. They’re all part of Polka Power, a medley of recent pop and rock songs. If you’re bored or depressed

and you need a good laugh. Running With Scissors is the cure. At the very least you will find yourself with one eyebrow raised shaking your head and giggling because no one else can do what “Weird Al” does and get away with it.

said

Nawrocki.

He feel

(Photo by Beveriey Grondin)

said he wants people to understand that they should be respectof everyone arotmd them, regardless of their colour, gender, or

said that

it is

important to create safe places where people will

welcome.

“We’ll learn that diversity

is

a good thing in our lives,” he said.

“Weird Al” just gets weirder and weirder By Angela

knew

any gay or lesbian people on campus and asked them would they be com-

ing) their sexual preference with their classmates, or talking about it in class, I think you would see some fear or concern about coming out.” It makes a lot of people uncomfortable, and some people think it’s

minds.

material for the show,”

might happen in

Victoria Park.

to

that out of

that any-

would

fortable (with shar-

realized people needed to

-

it

cam-

get beaten in the halls,

homo-

show,”’ said Nawrocki.

people

this

She says she does-

show, but that stuff about homosexuality, we don’t want to hear that. Take that out of your

He

on

pus.

me, ‘Wow, great show,

al.

across the country, and told

exists

across the country, and

told

which dealt with sexism. During the performance, one of the ch^acters comes out as bisexu-

show people came up

exists in the general

to

population, then

with homosexuality because he wants to attract people who are most uncomfortable about it. He said there are many people who don’t want to even discuss homosexuality because it makes them uncomfortable. This became apparent to him while he was doing his last show, I Don’t Understand Women,

“After the

— Page 15


Maurier

Supporting 234 cultural organizations across

Canada during the 1999-2000 sea

Digital Edition - September 20, 1999  
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