Page 1

.

.

Car costs prompt overhaul

on grants By Brad Dugard The Grants to Groups program of Doon Student Association, will

be overhauled

wing the solar car Ellen Menage,

follo-

controversy.

DSA

presi-

dent, said the solar car incident

(Photo by Brad Dugard)

llie ins

and outs of body

piercing.

FW3E8AND9

12- to 14-hour days. If we didn’t feed them they wouldn’t feed themselves,” he said. “I don’t see why I would apologize over a proper expense^’ Huang said a cellular phone was needed because there was no phone in the quonset hut, where the team worked, even though they had requested one from their faculty adviser Martin Hare. “It became an essential part of

The Doon Student Assocaition has sharply criticized the solar car team for the way it spent $3,000 in student grant money on food, gas and

cell

phone

calls.

In a financial statement given to the DSA, the team reported

spending close to $650 on food,

$570 on gas and $170 on cellularphone airtime. Ellen Menage, DSA president,

getting

“Basically, at is a total

FW3E 14

what we are looking

of ($1,275.77) of doc-

umented misappropriation of funds. The metals, the spray foam

“I didn’t have a clue they spent any money on food,” Hare said. “That is unacceptable. You may work on the car but that doesn’t mean the club has to feed you. If you weren’t working on the car you would still have to eat.”

needed the money for, there was no budgeted money for food, gas be

to

was suptools

for

or

(materials).”

But Shin Huang, student project manager, defended the spending. “That is not a lot of money (to spend on food) for people working

If

the

Punkfest

d^ends on

By Angela

for

their spending to the school.

for food.

Clayfield

Commentary Page 4 Talking-head

and

will

be available

graduate, the Toronto

Star reported.

The

Help Wanted; Projections of Canada’s Labour Force Over the Next Four Decades, released by the Urban Futures study.

Institute

in

Vancouver, predicted a labour

The number each year will jump from

shortage within the next decade.

journalists top the

hate

list

the jobs will

of Canadians retiring 225,000 to 370,000 by 2010. The job demand will be high in what the report calls “human services” such as teaching.

law enforcement and firefighting where jobholders are being drawn into retirement by solid pensions. The recent figures from the student employment office shows an increase in jobs available. From September 1998 to Aug. 4, 1999 there were 1,574 more jobs up for grabs. Last year, 2,857 jobs were available via the office’s services. This year there were 4,43 1 Although older baby boomers may be retiring, the college’s recent popularity over the

months may have something to do with the number of jobs posted, said Karen

past few

Parrinder, student

“Being number

employment 1

assistant.

in the province

doesn’t

hurt,” she said.

Good

include student projects and that is sad, so sad (that we have

do this).” Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operations for the DSA, said the team’s spending was ridicuto

lous.

“I honestly think, if it

publicity has helped to nearly double

were

...

more money, we would have considered suing (the team).” She said a change in the grant program will give the DSA

more

control over

how money

spent.

is

David Suckling, a

certified

management accountant

ret-

from the Ontario government, was asked to comment on the controversy. He said maired

intaining control over critical,

groups

money

is

and that sponsored must clarify how

money is to be spent. He said he would food, gas

and

question

cellular

phone

expenditures.

come

will

increase as baby boomers

nursing,

more and more jobs

when they

retire,

twentysomethings

you’re worried about finding a Job, fear not. With the outer fringes of the baby boomers to students

team) is not a lot of money in the grand scheme of things.” Menage said the DSA does buy pizza after board meetings and for one Christmas party, but that it is not an everyday expense. “Yes, we do have a meal allowance, but it is not a let’s go out and get Burger King, and then two days from now we’ll go to Taco Bell.” College officials first said they would not comment because no money was donated by the school. However, after a more detailed search, Laura Eaglesham, director of finance, found the college had donated $500 to the team’s petty cash account. “This (donation was) expected to cover things that were not covered

money

If you’re graduating in the near future

retiring,

it

But Huang said there are other examples of groups using their

small \illage

FAGE20

DSA) how much

by a (purchase order). You don’t have a purchase order on items from Canadian Tire.” She said before the team gets any more money for their petty cash account they must explain

Boomers

Number of jobs

asked

Hare also denied Huang’s statethat Hare authorized the spending on food.

cash account. However, the budget they gave us, as far as what they

posed

I

ment

standable (expenses) for a petty

It

done.

(the

buy pizza all the time. Six hundred dollars (spent by the

set hut.

and the carpet tape are under-

or anything like that.

things

“Ask

mistake on the part of the DSA,” she said. “The first thing I have on the agenda (for the next DSA executive meeting) is to change the grants to groups’ policy, so it does not

costs to

Martin for a phone in there but I don’t think any action was taken.” However, Hare said Huang never asked for a telephone in the quon-

called the spending inapproriate.

1999 Rugt^ Woiid Cup vvill chaHenge Canada.

DSA

Solar car funds misused: By Brad Dugard

has taught the association that it needs to be more careful. “This was a really expensive

retire

number of jobs available to Conestoga grads in the past few years, she said. And many the

graduates

recommend

the referral services at

the college to their employers positions to

when

they have

fill.

While the report predicted jobs available in the

new

will

become

e-sectors of the computer-

ized economy, most of the jobs posted through

employment office are for technology and business graduates. So while the field of blue (business) and green (technology) slips on the job board may dwarf the yellow applied arts slips, it does not mean there are no jobs for the school of the student

applied

arts.

many employers go straight to program co-ordinators with job opportunities Parrinder said


Page 2

— SPOKE, Orientation

^ TSPOKE

Issue 1999

Increased funding to help Waterloo campus evolve Under-used campus By Angela

Clayfield

The Ministry of Training and Education is increasing funding Access

for the

Opportunities

to

Program (ATOP) by $78 million. This means a total of $228 million will

be made available to Ontario’s

colleges and universities over the

next three years.

Conestoga College is part of ATOP along with 25 colleges of applied arts and technology and 17

all

will benefit,

says president

go further,” Tibbits said. Conestoga College will have a total of 247 seats available in electronics engineering and computer programs in the fall. One of the ways the college will be expanding as a result of the ATOP funding is by making the Waterloo campus into an Information Technology Centre. “I consider Waterloo (campus) to be (under-used),” Tibbits said. The building is currently xmder con-

universities

across Ontario.

Funding

from

the

ATOP

is used to introduce new programs and upgrade equip-

“We is

are growing as

much as we

for 150 spaces. The program has more than doubled in the last two to three years to meet the demand.

“We

growing as much as we

are

can,” Tibbits said, but this

is only because the job market allows it. The job placement for technical

The outside of Conestoga's Waterloo campus was not complete by the Aug. 11 target date, but should be for the

programs

first

is

liy iftidsay

president

$136 million

to

may

in

President

be expanded by 15 computers by the fall and will eventually expand into the adja-

analyst

store)

will

cent classroom.

While it is always good to have more money coming into the education system, Tibbits

college

is

said,

not always able to

enough qualified

there

are

math

post-graduate,

will

be

campus Applicants must have

available at the Waterloo for the

fall.

a college certificate or diploma, university degree or equivalent

it

donate

to colleges.

According to a press release from the Ministry of Training and

liicy are

Leith said other technical programs are full with lengthy waiting lists while others are nearly

cla.vses. Putt

analyst

Education, the total investment in advanced education opportunities is expected to reach $364 million by the end of 2001. “The general situation is very

having taken in 154 applications

positive,” said Tibbits.

not

full.

is

30 and

The computer programmer (CPA) program is full,

day was

fairly busy,”

Hunter said he was hoping for an from people buying passes. If purchased early it would spread the workload over a longer period of time, instead of having everyone rush in at once. If you want to park in lot No. 12

4

those things in

the security office located across

paying

first

services.

Paying for a parking space is something you can’t get out of at Conestoga College. It’s one of Tibbits, college

“The

said Hunter.

Parking passes went on sale Aug.

Doon campus

from Door

in front of

4.

Prescription Drug Plan

Family Opt-ln

Opting out deadline is Mon., Sept. 20, 1999

closest to the business wing, pur-

chase a pass Last year the

Hunter.

earlier, said

lot sold out by Aug. 20 and the rest of the lots were sold out by Sept. 3. Passes are $117 annually in the green No. 2 and 10 parking lots and $158 annually in the orange, red and blue lots. This rate has remained unchanged for four years. Lots No. 11 and 3 are semester and daily parking and

can be purchased for $2.25

a day, said Hunter.

To purchase a pass you

In

deadline

Mon., Sept. 20,

1

999

is

need

by the deadline. No exceptions. More Information Is available at the DSA Office,

aro,sc ”

said Putt, refcrruig to

work taking longer than oxpect-

.Aug

amimg

1

Init

1

now

have everyplace hy the l'ir.st day of lo

According struciion

will

all

of the con-

benefit

the

“Wc

will be opening iqj five

state-of-tho-d

compute!

labs " said

arrive, except tor the

changed and are now

outMde.” he

Mid

stu-

dents.

new

.s.iid

to ('iiant .McGregor,

college pimcipal,

Mc( uegor^

mt)dern and

bright,

more .spacioua

for early birds

with the same timetable.

buddy up and share a parking

Repeat offenders are then ticketed. In the first two weeks of school Hunter said he just tries to make

space. One of the students will get a refund for their parking space

ble for the students.

and

the

a result,

will be

it

students will

made

available to

someone on the waiting

list,

said

the transition as

possi-

“We’re not here to beat up on people.”

Students

“We’re not here to beat

smooth as

should allow them-

selves extra time the first couple

up on people. Just be

of weeks, said Hunter. Also, read the yellow pamphlet on parking regulations and

considerate.”

become

Al Hunter, supervisor of security services

A

familiar with it, he said. problem often encountered is

students with decals parking at a meter. This

is not allowed and a be issued. Changes are being made to make

ticket will

Hunter.

At the beginning of a semester

when new

students are in unfamil-

surroundings, there sion in parking. iar

is

confu-

parking easier for students, such as making the road one-way on the south side of lots 4, 5 and 6. Also, because of a student’s suggestion, a parking spot has been

a student l.D. card and vehicle reg-

Because of this pandemonium. Hunter said around seven extra

eliminated southwest of lot No. 3 in favour of increased visibility for

istration information and if you have another car give the informa-

staff members are available to help

drivers.

students get parked.

will

tion for that vehicle also.

When

paying for a pass, cheques

Because the parking by the beginning of the ter,

there

there

is

a

is

a waiting

up semes-

fall

ticket,

Usually

good chance of getting

students

find

legitimate reason for parking in that

a

space, said Hunter.

Some

do happen to get a parking ticket and feel it is unjustified, then speak to Hunter. If you have a

lots fill

list.

Students should be alert to new

If you

or cash are accepted. Credit cards cannot be used, said Hunter.

M forms must be submitted to the DSA Office

m

“We had to make some chan^ due to some problems that

“Lvcrything .should be done in tunc foi when the sttaiesaiei

As

early response

tickets

Family Qpt

It was hoped the construction would be

tiiing

food and beverage kitchen). The Beaver Fhods kitchen was changed and there is now the jpotential for 13 new conunder

alTected by any

unfinished construction.

good parking

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security

at the

teachers to

and entire rebuild ing of the imci lor (excepi f<*r the the structure

tabs.

of physical resoiuco^i. said the teaching areas arc tlio priority because they don't want llie students and

and admissions, 20 spaces have been filled.

The capacity

president, pays for parking, said

&

to

vrmfc

Putt, director

finished b\

By Linda Wright

Opt-Out

companies

easier for

money

make

said, will

cconstructioTt

total funds.

experience.

Security ensures

DSA

which, Tibbits

Dave

contributions,

1

quite complete.

ciate registrar, student recruitment

talent pool is not there to

like

sector

i.sn’t

fill

students.

life

private

because

according to Jennifer Leith, asso-

skills.

Even John

The match

Ontario.

provincial government will

the

An applicant to an electronics or engineering program has to have excellent

community across

called systems

have to step ^ontid

few construction workm the first few weeks of

a

Hewlett-Packard has donated $400,000 to the college for equipment. This means $800,000 in

the spaces in programs such as electronics engineering and com-

because

new program,

The 3,600-squarc-tnetre >enot^on. included a new roof for

,

Students attending Waterloo campus of Conestoga

funding from the business

A

Gibson

^

The money from

it.”

Tibbits, college

struction for this purpose.

taxes.

Workers race to finish changes at Waterloo

ATOP is in addition

John Tibbits said the student access lab (across from the book-

(Photo by Undsay Gibson)

able.

only because the job market allows John

day of classes.

at the

private

College

“The

to 100 per

school have been cut back because of the job market. For example, early childhood education has been reduced by one section because there’s not enough jobs availcan, but this

ment.

puters

90

in the

Some programs

cent range.

that

when

(hey start school they will meet another student in their program

“I

he he said.

space,

am

flexible

students to

come

waive the

will

and

1

encourage

away.” Last year Hunter went to court twice over parking matters.

Students rules

are

who

in right

violate the parking given warnings first.

one-way signs and yield signs. After a review of all the ground plans, a sidewalk widening will take place on the south side of lot No. 4 and 5. Also, a sidewalk extension will occur alongside signs, specifically

lot 3.

Hunter said he encourages stu^ to make suggestions^ adding there is always room for improvement. dents

I


1

onv-/r\c

News From bathrooms

College with,

no

guide to Web

staff

life

can be tough.

New

surround-

new people and maybe,

ings and

to

at

www.doonsa.com.

desired food items and the use of the patio. Last-call at the bar is midnight

The to

cash bar with the alcohol being supplied by the pub. Also included in the agreement are

CBSA

friends.

become accustomed

new at

life

Conestoga

Association

Business

similar to the

is

DSA

geared specifically to the business stu-

is

dent.

Clubs:

bars in the Kitchener-Waterloo area, the

Famed

Bash

for their Biz

parties held at

CBSA holds fundraisers and other events throughout the year. For more information, phone the CBSA at

ports.

784-5220 extension 620. There are many other student groups and associations on campus. Some of these are

Doon Student Association:

part of international organizations, like the

The

DSA

an umbrella organization that provides services and support to students and represents the student body to governis

ment and to college administration. Founded in 1973, the association is composed of a mix of elected and hired staff. ed by the college along with tuition bills on DSA and is used to supply students with many activities and services.

leyball.

“But we’ll still be able he said.

Student services

The

help groups.

It

down on washrooms on campus.

deals with everything from

counselling to peer tutoring.

the

Woodworking Centre, the new technology wing and the business wing (known as D-

to 8 p.m.

lems

block).

bookstore

financial

of

free

The C-block

area on both floors that contain dual wash-

arranged by student services to

rooms for both sexes, although these washrooms are smaller than others on campus. The B-block, where the LRC and bank machine reside, is a tough place to wander through if you’re ready to burst. The closest washrooms on the second floor are in Aand C-blocks, while the fourth floor, where the law and security, administration, broadcasting and journalism students have classes (and where the Spoke office is located), is completely devoid of facilities. The third floor, where the radio program has its studios, labs and classrooms, is the only relief

with

little

college’s

visit the

Web

site

www.conestogac.on.ca and follow the links to

at

in range for these students,

student services.

of washrooms.

The Roost

at

one

(Photo by Linda Wright)

bookstore.

activity fee covers.

The The

DSA

drug plan costs an extra $71.68.

association also represents students at

ISO 9000

the

committee, alumni associa-

it

ing the summer.

parties

and special events.

Ian James, athletics and recreation

manag-

er at Conestoga, said people can even bring their

own food

as long as the event involves

And use of the and stereo is included. When booking the Roost people must sign a contract stating that the event will be a

students from the college.

and the college council. For more information on the

tion

services

being closed dur-

Located upstairs in the recreation centre, the pub has added two foozeball tables this year to complement its pool table. The bar is open Monday to Friday, 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 6 to 1 1 p.m. The Roost is also available rent-free on the weekends for anyone interested in booking

various committee and organization meetings such as the college board of governors,

Condor Roost will open the week of after 30 Aug.

DSA

or the

provides either drop by their

office in the Sanctuary or visit

them on the

pub’s satellite

TV

is

When

the

with a tiny pair

usually paeked with people through-

The bookstore

and will be

“The

is

set

a

new

up

is

services director, in an Aug. 1 1 interview. There is also a Harvey’s and Mr. Sub, which are located in the main cafeteria

through Door 4 and downstairs. The cafeteria offers hot meals every Wednesday that cost between $3.50 and $5. Items such as chicken on a bun and mashed potatoes and roast beef are offered, said Sandra Hawco, cashier. Hawco will sell hot dogs or tacos on an

on Tuesdays and basis, Thursdays from 10:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m. from a cart set up across from Roasters cof-

main Dazs

In addition to selling books, the bookstore sells Sherpa (fuzzy) shirts, which are popu-

Conestoga jackets.

Feeling in the

mood

across from

will be

open from 8:30

fee shop.

and

a.rn.

Gourmet

go

to Roasters cof-

coffees, specialty teas

pastries are sold. You’ll find Roasters

Door 4. Sub To Go Go, which

reg-

sale.

Haagen

Drumsticks and Chips Ahoy cookie ice cream for $1 .45. If you need something to wake you up on

emblem and other items. The bookstore’s return policy requires

books to be returned within two weeks from date of purchase and a receipt is required. If a book is on sale, it is consid-

cream? The

that cost $3.15 a bar or

that first day of school,

ular

for ice

cafeteria sells bars such as

Kitchener Transit bus tickets, day planners, calculators, stamps, playing cards, college rings, knapsacks with the Conestoga

The bookstore

which

room 2 A2 O 8

ovens in today,” said Tony Chappell, food

to go.

ered a final

chain at the college

in Dooners,

in corridor 2A200. Pizza Pizza people just brought the

located in

fee shop.

winter,

growling and

Doon campus.

Pizza Pizza

Then the bookstore, located in the main building through Door l,is the place

the

starts

alternating

need course books and other sup-

in

The

closed on weekends.

your stomach

plies?

lar

is

you’re wondering where you can find something to eat, there are many food choices at

out the day.

Still

8:30 a.m

Food

The largest bathroom on campus is the one Door 3, by the bus stop. However, this

Conestoga’s

Monday to Thursday and

to 4:30 p.m. Fridays starting Sept. 7.

section has a standard central

Tutoring can be

and 4 or

be taking first-year computer programming analysis, looks for course books at the Doon campus

(Photo by Linda Wright)

newer parts of the school, such as the

or personal prob-

For more information, their office is located between doors 3

will

Janet Koster, a Harvey’s employee, is ready to serve you. Harvey’s is located in the main cafeteria.

Clean, spacious facilities can be formd in

Counselling can be received for academic,

cost to the student.

of the services include: the Sanctuary student lounge, fax service, and photo scanning service. Some of these services carry additional charges above what the

facilities

several places where you’ll have to hold it while tracking one down. Here’s the low-

the grand-daddy of

is

jects

Some

now

is

the

Conestoga College’s Doon campus has plenty of washrooms, although there are

Student Services:

help in most sub-

who

the music

sponsoring the Roost, Brick Brewing Co. of Waterloo. All available beer on-tap will be Labatt products though a variety of bottled brews are still available. Labatt’s

replacing

charge.

Pelleyn,

pump

parent organization.

career,

Randy

to

out,”

International Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). For these groups you may have to pay a membership fee to the

A student activity fee of $54.50 is collectbehalf of the

and everyone must leave by 1 a.m. James said volleyball used to be another option on the lawn and music was played loud enough for players to hear outside. Now that shrubs and a walled garden occupy grass space there won’t be room for vol-

Student except it

Conestoga.

There are many clubs and student associations at Conestoga. These are a few that can help you with various services and sup-

Conestoga College

at

life

begin

Hopefully, this guide will help the

student

— Page 3

1999 Orientation Issue

to bar:

A survival By Spoke

SPOKE,

is

located

in

Dooners, alternates between deli sandwiches and submarines. The hours of operation for each restaurant are posted outside of the main cafeteria entrance.

Briefs amounted

DSA update considering

Ontario Student

leaving

the

Community

College Parliamentary

In a scathing report released to

DSA executive in DSA president

August,

Several on the

DSA

that perhaps leaving the organization, which has 14

25 applied

arts

early

considered.

matter

is

A

members (of

and technology decision on the

expected later this year.

Ellen

Menage

said the quarterly meet-

ing of

OCCSPA,

attended by Menage and vice-president of education Michael Harris,

City

buses merge

While Kitchener Transit prepares to carry Conestoga’s

dents this September,

it

is

stu-

also

ready to merge Cambridge Transit by the end of year. A link between the Cambridge and Doon campus is with

getting

board said

colleges in Ontario), should be

Association.

the

more than

infighting and social events.

The Doon Student Association is

to nothing

in the in

works, but likely will not be

service

until

the

new

year,

according to Kitchener Transit marketing and public affairs manager Sandy Roberts. In the meantime, Doon students can make use of the existing No. 10 and No. 16 buses to get to Fairview Mall and

Glen Forest

.Mall.

Four-month bus passes for fulltime students will be on sale for $169 at Doon on Sept. 12 and 13. The early morning express bus will

be back

the

downtown terminal every

this fall, departing

school morning at 7:30 a.m. and arriving at the college just after 8 a.m.

Doon numbers up There were 264 full-time dents

at

Doon campus

this

stu-

sum-

Bruce to according Middleton in the registrar’s office. There were also 31 full-

mer,

time post-secondary students

who

were taking part-time classes this summer. Final numbers for the but not available, are fall Middleton says a good estimate is to take last year’s number of fulltime students, which was 4,200, and add five per cent to it, meaning 2 0 more students are expected this September. fCompHed by Chadwick Severn)


— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue

Page 4

SPOKE

A

Commentary

Journalists at top of hatred heap thing

“First

reduce the size

weight championship fight as commentators feel the need to declare a winner and a loser, while pages and pages of newsprint are soaked with instant analysis in the next day’s papers, as if this one event was the whole campaign. Inciting an emotional reaction is also a favourite trick of television types. A few days before the elec-

of

tion,

we

do,

kill

let’s

the

all

media.”

This

quotaa slight

tion,

of

variation

Shakespeare’s original call to

the

legal

seems to be the rallymore people today. Both broadcast and print journalists seem to have risen to the summit of the public’s slag-heap profession,

ing cry for

of hatred, outdistancing lawyers, and used car salesmen

politicians

as the

most reviled

Certainly

creatures.

can

television

be

blamed

for the somewhat superfinature of reporting. In the recent provincial election camcial

paign,

much was made of Dalton

McGuinty’s performance in the debate, where many pundits skewered him for being uneasy and wimpy. Image and personality seemed to be more important than ideas to many media analysts. Another problem arises from the overmagnification of the debate itself

almost like a heavy-

It’s

CKCO

reporter

Janine

Grespan met Howard Hampton as he campaigned in this area. But instead of asking him about an issue which might be of some importance to citizens in this community, or another question of any significance, she wondered what he thought of a new poll which showed that only three per cent of Ontarians believed the NDP could win the election.

A

Hampton answered he didn’t take stock in such polls and really, what did she expect him to say? Should he have sighed wistfully and trudged back up the steps of his campaign bus? It might surprise Grespan to know that some people vote for a candidate because of ideology. On a wider scale, the number of news channels and amount of frustrated

that

Communities

information

today

available

astounding, and this

ot\

is

another

is

problem.

Postman,

Neil

in

Amusing Ourselves

book

his

Death, makes a connection between modem society and Aldous Huxley’s 1932 novel Brave New World. Postman contends that Huxley to

correctly predicted a future

“the truth would be

where drowned in a

sea of irrelevance.” In the age of oversaturation, how important can a story about mass

Timor be if a) no supporting videotape and, b) the story is sandwiched between a peppy commercial and Susan the weaker bunny’s fiveday forecast? Furthermore, there may be some historical and emotional significance to the death of John slaughter in East

there

:

is

Kennedy

Jr.,

but

doesn’t really

it

warrant hundreds of reporters being camped out at Hyannisport. I often wonder why, instead of every news agency sending a journalist to one event, there couldn’t be a pooling of resources so some reporters could be freed up for

more

investigative journalism.

Maybe

the answer

is that

conglomerates

scores of and newspapers and they might not want to offend any questionable companies or industries who account for bigtime advertising. Especially if the conglomerates own the companies themselves. Perhaps the most obvious reason

for the loss of respect for reporters is the rise of the celebrity journalist. In the United States, Sam and Barbara and a host of other talking heads emphasize opinion and con-

frontation over

can

when the

Ontario Court of Appeal ruled that starting the day with

still

remember standing

from the Bible in public schools violated the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This decision led to the amendment to the scripture

beside my desk in Grade 3 singing O

Canada in my prepubescent voice.

Education j^ket that brought the moment of silence. Even as a 10-year-old, I was happy, and dare I say it, relieved.

I

remember the wooden desktop with

my

for the day.

I

I

more

remember

could respect other religions and the diversity of my classmates. Even in high school when there

the jade

seat.

But to

cannot remem-

this day, I

words to the Lord’s

Prayer. It’s

not because

it

was removed

from the opening ceremonies of

The truth is, know the words then

the school I

didn’t

I

attended.

I used to lip-synch and hope no one noticed. I do remem-

either.

I was out in the hall with the one classmate who was a Jehovah’s Witness.

ber wishing

Religion

down my

more and

it

supplies out, ready

green accent of the legs and the

ber the

began to appreciate

was

throat at

never forced home. My sis-

and I went to Sunday school once; I didn’t like it. Not because of the reasons that seen} logical to me now, but because it was held in a church basement that reeked of mildew and white glue from too many macaroni art ter

creations. It was 1988, and most of you twcntysomcthings will remember

as I got older because

was no moment of

silence,

I

I

almost had a respect for the government responsible for banning the prayer from my classroom. An

amazing

feat in itself since politicians are so hard to respect.

Now there

is

a coalition of com-

munity members who want to bring the Lord’s Prayer back. More than 100 Ontario mimicipalities are supporting this and I hope they fail. First, there is the

religions

about

to

the

respect of other worry about. What

children

Muslim,

Islamic,

who

are

Buddhist,

Jewish, atheist (and the list goes on and on. ..) who will be suddenly

confused by the onslaught of

Christianity

morning? I’m the first to

first

huge

it

Spoke

at

in

the

to say if

you want

so, but in this

home.

It’s

the par-

month marks

This

the

25th

My

guide their

study as a community and have Bible thoughts as a

took

fully

obviously

a

not in political

low

with

age,

and

were already scratched.

As

looked over the photos, questions began running through my mind. I decided to talk to the purchaser, Jim I

Allen,

who is my step-grandfa-

He remembered when he found the

dom. Centering out children

years ago.

to

stand in the hall during the Lord’s Prayer makes them feel like theninferior

and

many in

media would prefer to take the direct step to movie stardom, and the

avoid the inconvenience of being a reporter.

targets

leather straps

had crum-

My

out. It was a Minolta Autocord with a C.P. Goerz-berlin lens, he said. He opened the back and said the film was the size of a postcard and it took only eight exposures. He handled

the camera like he just used

ther.

album

are

journalistic

I looked for a name and found England Thornton Pickard on the bottom of the camera. He said the camera was older than both of us together. He set that camera aside proceeded to get another camera

which had

correctness, but in religious free-

for bullying

lasting

worn off too,” he joked.

them to me. I handled the tin photographs carefully, as they

beliefs

the

out of the

means only Christian children behave and leave their side arms at home. It doesn’t matter what religious sect you belong to, if you bring a gun to school with the intention of blowing away yoxir classmates, you have bigger problems the complete lack of religion.

them

1999,

effect of Watergate is that

envelope,

handed

step,

Men, Woodward and were portrayed by Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffinan. The irony here is that in President’s

Bernstein

“If you were as old as this camera, your straps would be

Furfaro. Loosely translated, this

regressive

Bob Woodward

and Carl Bernstein. In the 1976 film based on their book All the

the contents

turned yel-

is

Watergate story.

bled.

community, it reflects on the way you conduct yourself,” says Guelph councillor Rocco

this

fame of the two Washington Post reporters who broke the

The

step-

father care-

“When you

Second,

anniversary of the resignation of President Nixon, and the rise to

Photos a door to past

children in spiritual matters until they are ready to find themselves.

at

a photo an auction about 50

tin pictures in

it

yesterday. “I

as

used to photograph as many three

weddings

a

in

Saturday.”

step-grandfather

studio

Photocraft,

Durham,

in

called

Recently, my step-grandfather ran into a lady while he was in

Ont.,

the hospital and she said he had

owned

photography

a

most from the moment of silence since there is no prayer or

behind the drug store. He said that he didn’t know a lot about the tin pictures because they were made before his time. He guessed around the

ritual involved. If anything,

1800s.

tos into colour.

Before long, he was getting his old dusty cameras down

That afternoon was like going back somewhere in time. I imagine in 100 years someone

in the

play-

ground.

As

it

stands, atheists are benefit-

ing the

catnap.

it’s

a

Those who are religious

have that moment to say whatever they want to themselves and feel content.

Religion

be religious do

case do

thing

ent’s responsibility to

tmth and detach-

ment.

Lord’s Prayer to schooi systems I

now own

television stations

return the

raiiy to

^

is

a private issue best

expressed in a reflection, lic

now

moment of

silent

in effect at a

pub-

from their storage areas. “This is a treasure,” he said as he took an old wooden camera carefully out of a plastic bag.

taken her wedding pictures 32 years ago.

Because there was no colour he used oil paints and oil pencils to turn the phoin those days,

will look at an old photo and

have as many questions as I did. Hopefully they will find someone to answer them.

school near you.

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

mainly funded from September to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Lindsay Gibson; News Editor: Chadwick Severn; Student Life Editor: Andrea Jesson; is

Features and Issues Editor: Michelle Lehmann; Photo Editor: Linda Wright; Production Manager: Lesley Turnbull; Advertising Manager: John Oberholtzer; Circulation Manager:

SPOKE’S

Adam

Wilson; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Frank and Christina Jonas

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spokc@conestogac.on.ca address

is

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9;30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection

or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect tile would be helpful. Submissions must not

MS Word

tain

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by (such as a photograph).

illustration


SPOKE, 1999

Orientation Issue

— Page 5

Student Life How to get started at Conestoga: A few things to remember By Angela

Clayfield

here

But try not to feel overwhelmed. “Take a deep breath and try not

and get drunk every night,” he

to get stressed out,” said Shari

year construction engineering.

“You

You may be fresh out of high school and not sure of what’s expected of you and what to expect.

You may be going back to

can’t expect to

Gross, library technician.

said.

Suzanna

Chow,

journalism, had

.si

school and need to adjust to being a student again.

give.

remember from high school or some other

she said. “You’ll

Shaun Kemple,

college experience are the same.

off.”

third-year construction

You

All the things you

engineering

“Don’t party,” slacking

start

Chow

homework; you still have term papers, exams and deadlines. These things are all

gested

very important to surviving col-

as

stiU get

lege.

the lifestyle

It’s

need to adjust

you may

So you’re here. You’re a

stranger

in a strange land, but don’t worry,

also sug-

new

not to get stressed

Kemple

out.”

many people

———

meet new and interesting people who are likely just as homesick as you are. Puttock,

before you buy your

and other

“I met a lot of people through

living at

couple of hundred bucks.”

have Bryan Telford,

a

better

——

and automation

ond-year nursing, said you need to keep up a

House phere,

atmosguess

again.

the survey of students

Life in the post-secondary world is not like it is in the movies. There is stress and anxiety and

organized.

tasks that can’t

College life should be taken seriously said Shaun Kemple, third-

that final

social life - a small one, but a social life.

The theme throughout was to get

be avoided, project you should

like start

now.

maze

that is

Doon campus and you need directions to the

washroom, ask a facor whoever you pass

member

ulty

next in the stand that

People will underare new here and

will

in the right direc-

hall.

you guide you

tion.

Here are a few other things you

may want to keep

in mind: “Get here early to get a good parking spot,” said Nelson Coombs, second-year general

business.

He

advised making sure

Juraj

Medek,

ESL student

you park where you

are supposed because the security staff are very particular about such matters. to

If

However, if you are expecting an Animal

third-year robotics

said.

and automation

ty

If you’re lost in the

time.”

Andrea

Sutherland, sec-

home.

“Don’t live at home,” he said. “Stay in Rez, you’ll probably

books. Save yourself a

intramurals,” Bernardo

second-year

should have stayed in residence instead of

weeks

Puttock,

information.

Getting involved in activities sponsored by the Doon Student Association (DSA) is a great way

Ryan

Ryan

second-year robotics

because they have valuable

year nursing, suggests new

sports

said to

not be afraid of talking to facul-

“Wait a couple of

in

in

studies,

Shari Gross,

Bernardo, third-

involved

your

iibrary technician

activities.

Nelson Coombs, second-year general business

try

robotics and automation, said he

get

you need

If

direction

to say in a recent survey

students

help.

‘Take a deep breath and

to

.

Gross

pointed out another reoccurring theme: don’t be afraid to ask for

stu-

Cristina

second-year nursing

mil ar advice to

more just like you. There are even more who were in your shoes at some point. And here’s what some of them had there are hundreds

Andrea Sutherland,

second-year

dents be open to as possible.

to.

come

you are from another country, Medek, Enghsh as a second

Juraj

language student, said to make

you dress for the weather. Bryan Tedford, third- year robotics and automation, suggested new sure

students could save a lot of money they wait to buy their books; often the book is not required or is

if

seldom used. “Wait a couple weeks before you buy your books. Save yourself a couple hundred dollars.”

Shari Gross, library technician

College health co-ordInator reports campus accidents By Michelle Lehmann

Conestoga College.

There are

campus commitDoon, Guelph and the

three specific

When an employee is injured in one of the shops or a student falls in the hallway they go to the health office for treatment from a doctor, but once they leave the office their

accident case

is

not

closed.

tees;

smaller Waterloo, Stratford and Cambridge locations, which she advises and one large college committee where she sits as the

colleges statistics each year and find areas of increasing risk and

tor at the college.

ther inquiry, she said.

out,

records kept and investigations

made,

all

tasks that require a full-

“I’m a generahst,” said Kim Radigan, health, safety and environmental co-ordinator. “I do a Uttle bit of everything involving health and safety at the college.”

As

the co-ordinator of health

and safety for the past 12 years, Radigan has five main aspects to her job: working with the four health and safety committees, following up any accidents reported on campus, ensuring the college adhere to the health and safety

legislation,

advising

any

common

elements

among

the accidents.”

She

said legislation

is

another

es from the inquiry, the college

major part of her job that has her working closely with physical department the resources, responsible for the building and

hires an expert in ergonomics,

all

hygiene or whatever the area may be to find answers,” Radigan said. Accidents can happen any-

and ventilation systems. “I’m here to ensure the college is complying with all health and

and

“Working under the Ontario

of

Occupational Health and Safety Act, I pay attention to changes in

“Every accident report comes through this office and I investi-

conform with them and go beyond whenever possible.” Radigan is also responsible for advising and informing college managers of their duties regarding health and safety and supervises health services and

“When

a specific concern

aris-

industrial

and at anytime Radigan must follow up on

where

all

them.

gate any that are related to health

and

safety,” she said.

employees on their responsibihties and supervising the health

Reports and forms are filled out for the safety committees and the

services area.

academic operating committee which is the major management board at the college, said

Radigan said there are four health and safety committees at

records also help to review the

issues.

time health and safety co-ordina-

filled

“I report to them, do any follow up required on the accident and investigate to find ways to prevent such incidents from reoccurring,” said Radigan. “These

chair to discuss the college-wide

These committees address any concerns related to health and safety and usually lead to the creation of sub-committees and fur-

Forms must be

Radigan.

aspects like fire extinguishers

safety

legislation,”

she

said.

the laws, try

to

get the college to

training.


6

— SPOKK, 1999 Orientation Issue

Female student takes on a non-traditional By Anna

Sajfert

a car in Toronto

you asked Rose Marie Ellul where she would like her life to be 10 years from now, she would say: “I'd better be had known little Rose 10 years ago, and asked her the same question, you would have received a reply something like: “Thirteen children, no husband, no financial difficulties and living in the basement apartif you

exactly

is

the

chopped my

fingers

“1 have high tolerance for this stuff,” she said, while pointing to the healed

fingers.

in

“I’m lucky I have fast reflexes, otherwise I would have lost my wrist.” Ellul said she is best described as a determined, persistent person, who had her whole life mapped out at age six.

student

months

away

many

there were too

from

she entered Conestoga College.

She said she found college much easbut once accustomed to the new pace it became more challenging. “I chose to study robotics and

more on her mind than binary numbers and Newton’s laws of physics.

automation because

“I will never understand

how

Her biggest fear is failure: centring on one job and then failing to come through. She said her worst faults are not handling criticism well, and not

students. Instead,

exchanging vows with her fiance. But aside from her determination to get through her wedding “in one piece,” Ellul is an outstanding student with a

ier

little

I

like to

giving herself credit for a job well done. Ellul has worked as an intern at companies such as CIS and has been

work with

my

certain

people in society can abuse their families, children and pets,” she said, adding she was in distress when she read about

hands,” she said, adding the tasks can be a little difficult at times due to an injury, which caused nerve damage

robots.

in her right hand.

best,

my

chopped

“I

fingers

offered

work abroad,

in China, building

“I like to see things

work out

College health office operates By Michelle Lehmann Many

students

new to

the school

clinic on alternate days are Dr. Jodie 'Wang and Dr. Ajine Marie Mingiardi. Both work at other

find themselves unaware of the

clinics in the region.

many

“The on-campus medical clinic offers the same servic-

services

offered

at

Conestoga College and it is imporwide range of

tant they realize a

health-care services exist. The health and safety

ment, open to College students,

Door

3 across

Conestoga

is

located by

Room 2B02

and is open Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is a nurse on duty at all times.

shots are mandatory and will be

Radigan.

She said students should bring a health card and student card with

The

encourages everyone

clinic

to get vaccinated for a small fee.

“We

said Radigan. Services available to the students include allergy shots, blood pressure tests,

phys-

Radigan, the health, safety and environmental co-ordinator for the college, said the doctors’

for a cost starting at $3, said

hours have not yet been finalized but both will be available a few

Radigan.

hours three days a week. The two female doctors working in the

policy on vaccinations recently. For students in health sciences, the

health, safety

the basic

and

drugs

office has

changed

its

“We do book

into the

also gives out

non-prescription

like

Tylenol

and

environment

Turns.”

co-ordinator

Radigan and Weiler also provide information on topics

The health

walk

office at any time,” she said.

Kim Radigan

icals

“If the problem

appointments, but

if someone walks in and a doctor has time, they will be treated,” said

is not medically suggest the student try some form of counselling offered at the college,” said Radigan.

no doctors

such as

stress, nutrition,

eating disorders, depression and

sexually transmitted diseases.

She said the health office works

we

based,

duty, the college’s nurse,

“The nurse

and drug prescriptions. Students can also receive a doctor’s note from the clinic

Kim

there are

attention can

clinic”

closely with student services because they find many of the elements cross over.

visiting the clinic.

Trish Weiler, is available during regular office hours, said Radigan. “Students needing first-aid

a walk-in

office or

pregnantreatment of sexual-

ly transmitted disease,

on

act just like

a family doctor’s

first-aid treatment, tests,

them when

When

es as any other walk-in clin-

cy

a walk-in clinic

like

free.

ic,”

depart-

all

from

Rose Marie Ellul, a third-year robotics and automation student, works on a night-light assembly line for her Aug. 18 presentation day. (Photo by Anna Sajfert)

for the

and

I like to see people get what they deserve,” she said.

high

in

a

faint.

Rose Marie Ellul and automation

joked and automa-

open

to

chemistry class,

came down on her right hand and sliced her fingers. But she didn’t

high school”

child,”

OAC

her

in

the glass

engineering department because

“I

Conestoga College, who

12

She said while attempting

window

robotics

Ellul, a third-year robotics

tion student at

school,” she explained.

12.

Ellul, 22,

married!”

ment at my parents ” “I was brain dead as a

Aug.

was in the honours’ applied physics program at the University of Waterloo in J995, but dropped out after one year when she couldn’t transfer to

It'

However,

was dragged behind

the rottweiler that

role

“Similarly, student services will advise a person to visit us if they require medical treatment for their problem.”

Radigan said the health office keeps up-to-date information on outside organizations and will refer students to

community

pro-

grams, specialists and other support groups for help.

“We

act just like a family doc-

tor’s office or a

walk-in

we

offer,

will

clinic.

we

there are any services

If

don’t

them

refer

elsewhere for help,” said Radigan.

Learning Resource Centre offers research help By Adam Wilson

The

LRC

services

For those students

who

are just

beginning their college lives at

Doon campus this fall, there is a place where they can always find a friendly face, as well as all the information for almost any given topic.

The

Doon

Learning

Resource Centre (LRC)

offers

to

many

the

different

students

at

Conestoga College. There are computer workstations, but you are not allowed to use them for personal reasons. “You can’t check your e-mail or work on an assignment,” said Douglas. “The computers in here are for doing research

or

located beside the security

looking

for

main building on campus and offers stu-

information.”

dents a vast array of servic-

located to the

is

office in the

They

es.

right

New

students are given an

session arranged by their faculty in

LRC

at the

in

the

LRC

and

the semester.

“These information

the

Services desk

beginning of .ses-

sions are used to help the

of

Information

information the

are

Ann

Earl

have a number of databases on them and CD-

how to use Library technician ROMs that of our resources,” said can be used. LRC co-ordinator Jill The databasDouglas. “The session is designed es, EBSCOHOST Masterfile and students find out

all

to

fit

their

program

specifically.”

Douglas said this year the LRC is going to offer a couple of open sessions where anyone can come into the library and be shown how to use the centre’s resources.

resources for information on people,

politics,

law,

broadcasting,

business, current affairs and

much

more.

The LRC also has many other CD-ROMs like CanadaPhone and PRO CD FAXbook, which are the telephone listings for 12 million

Canadian residents and businessand a CD-ROM version of Encyclopedia Britannica. es,

The

centre also has a

Human

Periodicals are shelved to the left of the information services desk.

They

are in alphabetical order except for the most recent issues,

which are shelved separately from back issues. Back issues, except nursing journals and magazines on reserve, may be signed out from the LRC, but the new issues do not

The

LRC

uses a computer-based lists

all

of the

books, audio-visuals, government publications, pamphlets, annual reports

and magazine

titles

that

the centre has to offer.

Doon

also has a

Microform

for

room the

periodical index table or

on

CD-

the

ROMs able

availat

the ter-

minals.

Any

Library technician

magazines

to register at the Circulation Desk.

longer has on

centre

no

With the Microform machine, you can read its

shelves.

the film or fiche as well as print

any

articles

you want.

You may

first

material

you need

two books per subject at one time and are allowed to keep them for a period of two weeks. One renewal is sign out

It

-

sign out

from the LRC. But

LRC

returns to regu-

hours in September. will be open from 8

a.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Fulltext

the

services,

also provides stu-

lar fall

student,

member can

door.

LRC

The

Susan Lee

EBSCOHOST

that

cir-

dents with photocopiers, Thennofax, which is used to make overhead transparencies, study rooms, seminar rooms and audiovisual rooms.

faculty or staff

Canadian MAS and the CBCA (Canadian Business and Current Affairs) all contain thousands of articles from Canadian and U.S. magazines and journals. All of these are excellent

by the

Along with these

both microfiche and microfilm, which can be used to look at old copies of newspapers and ers

LRC

place the books in the dropoff slot in the LRC work-

computer

students to use. This machine cov-

located inside the

on a

Articles

specific subject

catalogue, which

available for loan.

returning materials, you should put them in the drop boxes

tre.

can be found on the periodical indexes located on the

opportunities.

is

When

culation desk. After hours,

Resources Development Canada This station allows students to explore careers and search for job

what material

leave the cen-

(HRDC) computer

workstation.

allowed unless there is a request book from another patron. Some reference books are not loaned out. The library staff can provide further infonnation as to for the

Thursday.

Monday

Friday,

it

is

open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday it ha^ limited services,

p.m.

open from

1

to

4"

Douglas stresses that students always be offered a helping hand in the LRC. will


SPOKE, 1999

Student Life Wealthy eating By Michelle Lehmann You’ve heard

it

time and again.

Eat more fibre. on fruits and vegetables.

Eat less

Munch And be

fat.

sure to get

enough

calci-

um. But faced with a new lifestyle and a demanding class schedule, the furthest thing from most students’ minds is nutrition. Despite immense pressures, important for students to

immune

systems.”

Clarke said a big adjustment for

away from home

students

time

first

for the

lack of cooking

is their

becoming bored cooking

skills or

only for themselves.

“Due

need for convenhave become

to the

ience, students’ diets

two food groups

are grains

and

meats.

Eating fruits and vegetables, at every day, is essential

growing, we need calcium to help keep them strong,” she said. Dairy products are particularly important for young

in the burning of energy,” Clarke

usually do not get enough milk

said.

and therefore diet.

like milk, yogurt their diets

ple.”

possible.

in fibre,” she

“The guidelines for healthy

said.

Hospital.

and low

Clarke

said

must

students

“Students tend to have busy schedules between classes, home-

remember

work and a

into every meal, paying particular

part-time job, finding

time to cook becomes very cult,” she said. “But that

diffiis

no

include something

to

from each of the four food groups attention fruits

and

dairy products

to

and vegetables.

The

other

However,

some food people

consider to be grain products are often high in fat. Muffins are deceptively fatty grain products, she said.

Another important part of a

stu-

Httle

women who

calcium in then-

By Angela

Clayfield

Because of changes

effort to get

make a conscious more dairy products to

and cheese

because

it

into

reduces the

risk for osteoporosis later in life.”

The other necessity diet is

in a student’s

meat or meat

alternatives

that contain iron, protein

and some

vitamins, she said.

“Unfortunately students tend to

to the health

with universities

University.

College of Nurses decided that the

first

class

from

university.

The decision

to partner colleges

came

after the

will

glitches

institutions.

The

details

and two

of the

report will remain confidential

October pending government The committee consisted of four academics each from colleges and universities, Minister of

Nathan Devey hitches a ride on a roll of carpet, as Chris Hanlon, from Champion Flooring in Kitchener, pushes him

until

approval.

(Photo by Linda Wright)

Journalism grad anchors herself at addition to freelancing

Entering the print journalism at Conestoga College in

1997,

Amanda

Fickling

knew

she

would be attending a college with a good reputation, but she never dreamt that the program would lead her to work for CTV in Toronto. Fickling has always been interested in working in television, so

started to

During her seven she wrote for Provincewide and news programs as well as doing some producing.

in

Kitchener.

months

there

was responsible for timing out making sure we went to commercials on time and that we were out of the news in time for “I

the show,

programming,” she Currently,

said.

Fickling

is

as part of the requirement of the

Toronto working for

journalism program she went to work at CTV for her eight-week

Canada

work term placement. Fickling

national newscast.

first

worked on the assignment

desk, as

an

editorial

assistant

before being trained to write for News 1, an around-the-clock news first month she was hired on as a freelancer. knew I was always interested Wl television. When I went for my internship it just reinforced what I

channel. After her

BI

already loiew,” said Fickling.

for

work at CKCO

AM

as

back

CTV

in

on

production co-

ordinator and on the network’s

She has gained a lot of valuable experience since she completed program at journalism the Conestoga in November 1998, but said she would like to be in front of the camera at CTV one day. She said beginning at the net-

work ity is

local

is

very difficult and the real-

she will have to

news

station.

start at a

needed to be a

Jeffrey described

home care as “a He said

hospital without walls.”

can’t

do

that in

someone’s home.”

Students entering the nursing

program this fall will finish thendiploma program in the usual three years and use the experience to complete a bachelor’s degree in science of nursing at McMaster University in one year. Students will be expected to conthe

duct research just as a regular uni-

smdent would. Those who are currently in the nursing program will be grandfathered out and will become registered nurses. They will have to upgrade their competency to earn versity

degree

granted

entry

RNs. Jeffrey said 85 per cent of nurses come from community colleges and only 15 per cent come from universities. By 2004-2005 all nurses will be required to have a degree in nursinto practice for

ing in order to practise.

A

their degree.

Nurses with diplomas, including and those who have graduated will have to work towards a degree faculty at Conestoga College,

survey was done by the Col-

through continuing education to

lege of Nurses and produced by

update their skills and identify their competency.

the Canadian Nurses' Association

CTV

where I end up. It be out in the middle

“I don’t care

will probably

of nowhere,

but

that’s

where

reporters have to get their start. I plan to come back to Toronto and one day take over Lloyd Robertson’s job,” she said. Fickling came to Conestoga after graduating from the University of Western Ontario with a bachelor of arts degree. She said she learned time management skills at Conestoga and said she would not have survived without them. She also said the workload was differbecause ent from university instead of having a lot of work spread out over the school year, she had homework every night. “You are the only one that is going to help you get through life; you must be able to rely on your-

Then

“And finally, I work well under stress; of that combined helps me with

self,”

all

EXPERIENCING COURSE DIFFICULTIES? PEER TUTORING MA Y BE ABLE TO HELP YOU WITH SUBJECT SPECIFIC DIFFICULTIES.

A PEER TUTOR IS AN ACADEMICALLY STRONG SENIOR STUDENT WHO CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH ONE TO ONE TUTORING OF COURSE MATERIAL.

she said.

learned to

my current job.”

that

nurse or another colleague, you

“Basically, now we have to marry the two distinct identities, college and university,” said Bill Jeffrey, dean of health sciences and community services.

offered solutions in joining the

is

skills “because unlike a hospital, where you can go up a corridor and grab your charge

practical hands-on experience, there are a few glitches in funding and administration.

which examined the

what

The study showed

assessment

more

Jeffrey is a member of a nursing education implementation committee that produced a report

nurse.

nurses will have to increase their

being theory and leadershiporiented whereas colleges offer

program

Uke fig bars, and crackers. Keeping in mind that money and time are hmited commodities in a student’s life, Clarke said an affordable and quick yet nutritious meal can be macaroni and cheese with a can of tuna, some fresh vegetables and a glass of milk. “Healthy eating doesn’t have to be complicated.” pretzels or cheese

because hospital stays are much shorter than they used to be and the availability of home care has increased, nurses need to have a higher level of competency.

differ in teaching practices, univer-

In

at least six

Cunningham, Assistant Deputy Minister David Trick and two cochairs - one from a college and one

sities

CTV, she

She suggests drinking

glasses of water every day, limiting sugar and alcohol and trying

to decide

system, future graduates from Conestoga College’s registered nurse program will soon earn degrees in nursing through an arrangement with McMaster

By 2001

By Lindsay Gibson

Two to three servings a day are enough. For those who don’t eat meat, Clarke said fish, eggs, tofu, beans and lentils are a great source of protein.

Health Ehzabeth Witmer, Minister of Education and Training Diane

begin their bachelor’s degree in the science of nursing at McMaster. This is when all the blocks and barriers to the program should be worked out. Since colleges and universities

to the college.

it

said.

sensible snacking

“They need

B

more expensive,” Clarke

Turning a diploma into a degree

town

Rolling into

“Our need for calcium spans a Even after our bones stop

good health. “They are high in fibre, low in fat and a powerhouse of nutrients, like vitamins A and C, which aid

tered

human

fat

is

for

eating and living are quite sim-

is

Karin Clarke, a regisnurse at Grand River

high in

skimp on buying meat because

Clarke.

lifetime.

fuel, said

properly, because food

eat

dent’s diet is dairy products, said

least five

She added students should be encouraged to eat more grain products like pastas, breads and cereals to get the most fibre fill

it is

— Page 7

not necessarily complicated

is

excuse. If students don’t eat healthy foods, they’ll only add strain to their bodies and weaken their

Orientation Issue

APPLY IN STUDENT SERVICES ROOM 2B02


Page 8

— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue

SPOKE

Feature To pierce or not to pierce, Stories and photos

By Lesley Turnbull “I

Some people

body because of be different and some

pierce their

their culture, others to

just

do

it

to

Carrie

that’s the question

had

told

going to get

be cool.

“I

my mom was I

it

I

had

A

couple weeks after getting the piercing,

done

it”

“I don-’t

“And

“1

had always wanted to do it,” Sehiel said. "But 1 probably wouldn’t have done it if 1 didn’t have Melissa Diebold (a friend of Schiel’s

Carrie Sehiel,

20

also got her belly button pierced) there.”

Sehiel said she

was 98 per cent excited and two per cent

scared before she had

When

the needle

it

was

is still

a little red.

cool.

who

1

Sehiel said, her skin around the piercing

actually

Sehiel,

20, got her belly button pierced because she thought it would look

going to gel it done had actually done it,”

I

Sehiel said.

done but she

couldn’t believe

my mom was

had told

but she couldn’t believe

Sehiel arrived

home and showed

her parents her

mom told her she was quite surprised she had gone through

inserted into her skin she squeezed

Diebold’s hand and said “Ow.”

with

touch

wash

it

it

unless

with

salt

have

1

to,”

water when

she said.

it

starts to

look irritated.”

who

For those

body part

are thinking about getting a

pierced, Schiel’s advice

to think

is

about it carefully. ‘Think about it for a long time and make sure you want

did hurt,” said Sehiel.

“It

When

done.

I

it.”

And

for those

who need

a

moral support she

little

said,

“Take a friend.”

it.

Choosing a professional can ensure safe piercing

Range

of

body parts

to pierce After making the decision

of your body time to decide where and

to pierce a part

The Waterloo Region Community Health Department has a brochure on body piercing that includes a checklist for choosing a safe piercer.

Make

sure:

• to take time to shop around. Check out different artists and ask the piercer if they have done your type of piercing

many

before.

• the place

Good

clean and in good repair. and a sink to wash hands are

is

lighting

also necessary.

• a

is used for each piercguns are not to be used. They are not accurate and are not sterile.

sterile

needle

ing. Piercing

“The piercer should wear fresh

fresh gloves (for each piercing) and

it’s

should wash their hands,” said Egan. The jewelry used, for the piercing should be designed for that specific

body part, Egan

wouldn’t hurt

“It

what exactly you want This

(for

each

piercing)

and

said.

should wash their hands”

• eyebrow • nostril • nasal septum • nasal bridge • tongue • lip • nipple • navel • various genital areas

questions.

In May of 1999. the Ministry of Health produced a personal services settings protocol that has to bq fol-

“There’s saying,

lowed but according to the brochure, piercers are not

by Doug

says,

health inspector for the Waterloo

Region

Community Health Department

Marco

(the

famous

modem

it’,”

it,

said

it

protrudes,

if it doesn’t, tattoo

Marco

Vicario,

professional piercer for Tora

Tattoo in Waterloo.

lacking.”

Vicario said people have gone beyond that

Vicario, professional

piercer for Tora Tatto

‘If

pierce

Egan. “That way you can see where is

a

think it’s said Malloy, one of

piercing movement, that

A health inspector inspects tattoo

knowledge

I

the gurus of the

piercing process) step b\ step,” said

Cathy Egan,

of areas

• ear cartilage

of the piercer’s work).” said Egan. The brochure also ad\ i.>es steering clear of am one who cannot answer each and every one of your tures

their

list

• ear lobe

(to see pic-

and piercing shops once a year. “We ask them to go through it

a basic

is

to pierce:

licensed.

gloves

to

pierce.

and have pioneered surface piercing on

in

Waterloo, displays his

flat areas.

facial piercings.

He also has flesh tunnels in both ears. • cleaning products and sterilizing equipment, such as autoclaves, are

and used. Autoclaves are the only acceptable sterilizers. • aftercare instructions are provided • the piercer clearly explains the available

procedure and consent forms are used.

Piercers must keep the consent forms for at least, one year, Cathy Egan, health inspector for the Waterloo Region Community Health Department said.

Egan said the piercer shouldn’t be under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

“(Also),

Step

the

1

Vicario

marks the area to be pierced.

piercer

should wear

Step 2

The

skin

is

clamped.

Step 3

The needle

is

inserted

and held with a cork.

I


.

.

Feature

Body

-

piercing

By

xmhealed area can cause infections. These include hepatitis and

for your

body

piercing, follow the instructions

Roman

your professional piercer provides you with. There are

infection

different instructions for various

until the area is healed.

parts of the body.

“o” or “u” shaped rings are removable only by the piercer 1 if your pierce site looks

is

really

for the Region of Waterloo

is really

Cathy

said

important,”

Egan,

health

Waterloo Community Health

inspector

for

Region

the

Department.

The

department’s

brochure on piercing suggests: discuss aftercare instructions

1

with your piercer. Make sure you leave with written instructions

wash

your

hands

before touching or cleaning the pierced 1

area don’t

1

anyone touch your

let

piercing during the healing period 1 healing time varies from two to

six

months. Facial piercings

heal quicker as they are exposed

do not remove the jewelry

Some

remember

1

that

body

fluids

There are parts of die body

move

that

difficult to pierce

and

SKanc piercings have more risks Dr. 'fed Erb, a physician

Kitchei^

said the nose

is

i.s

performed by the Maasai Africa,

Vicario, professional piercer for

Tora

It

s.iid

primitive,”

see

help yourself heal.

Marco Vicario, professional

“Whatever you do stay away from heavy moist-/

could be fatal “I’ve never

b^penang. Maybe fhere% but I

tt

it

has and cases

b^ .dcK^tunented

know th^etically

it’s

possible, so things like that for

sure are dangerous.”

The tongue can be dangerous because there are serious blood vessels that would have to be surgically repaired if they were

said

deodorants, dyes and perfumes,

^

irritate

that

spirituality

belong to a smaller sub-culture you have to be heavily decorated with lots of facial piercings,” said

rights

Vicario.

and of pas-

,

sage, so people

Marco

look

Vicario, professional

history and see

piercer

all

Tora Tattoo in

and

of

things

“(People pierce their bodies)

are important to parts

usually to be different and xmique and for the shock effect on the previous generation,” said Dr. Ted Erb, a physician in Kitchener.

of their culture.”

piercing.

one

in

and out it

s

Vicario said decorating body is especially

of the chair

Erb said infections can range from local to blood-bomc and can include such exotic types as hepatitis, HiV, and necrotizing

damaged. Vicario said. “The tongue actually seldom infects as it has gotid blood flow does

said.

do that

that people

Parry Brooke has a tongue

breaking up with somebody, divorce, marriage and age, Vicario

these

intense

Waterloo.

People pierce and tattoo their bodies to mark an occasion in life like birthdays, graduation,

other

at

cultures

for

is terrible,’’

said Erb.

commonly

strep,

called the

BECOME A TUTOR

flc.sh

eating disease.

“Other than infection the main arc trauma complications

‘The tongue actually

seldom

infects

beause

(getting

it

Share the academic knowledge and experience you have gained with another student experiencing subject specific difficulties

torn out) and keloid

excess scar formation (an reaction as seen on the cheeks of some African tribes where it is

has such good blood flow

it

Tutoring

deliberate).”

led Etb,

Erb had one

Kitchener physician

office

man come

who had

develop self confidence achieve a passing grade

to his

pierced

assists students to:

understand course material

.

the

mid-shaft of his penis.

“He could have ended

Vicario said because of his

cxpenencc.

the

tongue

^

“There are some shop that don’t do tongue piercings because they’re responsible,”

They don’t know enough about it to do it so that’s said Vicario. fine. It’s

treating

to rip

being responsible and cliente, not trying

your

them off”

^traditionally;

it

cm be v^ry togcrous.

QUALIFICATIONS

Erb said the earlobes have

him to

pierce but without experience

his

reproductive capability- easily.”

is

You must have

shown themselves

a

minimum of 80%

in courses

and enthusiasm toward working with others, and good communication skills tutoring,

be iimoeuous. Eib has had patients come in

an

interest

with 1^ infection after getting their

body pierced and said the is usually removed and

BENEFITS

jewelry oral

and topical

antibiotics arc •

applied.

“The usual problem

is

scarring

after,” said Erb.

Paid an hourly wage

Excellent opportunity to review course material •

Develop valuable

skills

MAKE A DIFFERENCE •

Step 4

The is

ring

inserted

and your

unqualified.

belly

button

Professional piercers warn against self-piercing or piercing by those

is

changed forever.

Melissa Diebold, piercing model.

Vicario,

professional piercer

serious

said

it

Marco

our culture lacks

would

.

people

would say I

and

for

“Some

j

history

of these intense

all

things

and

Tora Tattoo in

probably the easiest for

of

the

Waterloo.

ces,

a

heard

of

piercer

never

properly but a serious infection

people look at other

whole

the

“It’s

get plenty of rest to

things that

passage so

rights of

clitorodectomy.

cultures

Dr.

bad infection be caused by piercing if you are taking cate of \icjric)

serious spirituality and

before a circumcision or

modern

Tisaioo in Waterloo.

should

that our culture lacks

in

usually

ritual

infection

can be carried there. \ny thing around the nose like he .septum can piercing dangerous Marco agreed

not such a (piercing) so to

thing

idea

it,”

getting

it’s

it’s

“Some people would say

out to insert large

or clay plates and ear

piercing and stretching are

a spe-

case as blood drainage

throt^ the btain and

in

big

remove the jewelry 1 eat well and

but w-hen

others.

cial

it

wooden

swelling or pus) see a health professional but don’t

Piercing risky both aie

the ancient Egyptians,

stretch

to the air

such as blood saliva or semen that come in contact with the

that

of Central and South America pierce the lip and

urizers, fragran-

health

“Now

more popular,

who want

tribes

oozing

Cathy Egan, health inspector

“Aftercare

among

among youth be a part of a group.

important to

and courage, navel piercing was a symbol of royalty

infected (pain, redness, heat,

important.”

wore

centurions

virility

do not play with your jewelry, as it can cause skin tearing and

that

“Aftercare

— Page 9

new trend

nipple rings as a sign of their

1

1

Orientation Issue

Piercing goes back centuries

HIV To properly care

SPOKE, 1999

old tradition,

Aftercare important Stories and Photos Lesley Turnbull

GET INVOLVED Apply

in

Student Services

Room 2B02


Pago 10

— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue

The Doon Student Association provides services and organizes activities for the students at the boon Campus. The DSA represents the voice of the students to College Administration on issues affecting policy and education. All full-time students at the boon Campus are

HOW

members of the boon Student

Association.

THE OSA f UNPEG?

^^^A

is

funded through a compulsory student activity fee of $54.50 paid by all full-time students of boon Campus. The fee is collected by the College on behalf of the bSA.

OSA Mission STATEMENT

The bSA

Is

IS

committed to addressing the issues that concern membership, while providing opportunities for social and

its

educational advancement.

Mggw

Ellen

wm m$m meemms €&sm»fwes

Menage, Karl Garner, Promotions Co-ordinator

President

Jenn Hussey, VP Operations

Ramy Michael, Promotions Assistant

Becky Boertien, Director of Student Life

Kim

Kroeker,

Janie Renwick,

Promotions Assistant

Administrative Assistant

DSA for more information on services, activities, and opportunities to voiunteer. Contact the

Scott Lichty,

Promotions Assistant

Telephone: 519-748-6131

Fax:

519-748-6727 information hotline; 619-748-5220 WWW: www. doonsa.com

e-mail: listen(o)cioonsa.com

Sharon Van

Hemmen,

Accountant ext,

8DSA


i

SPOKE,

1999 Orientation Issue

%

K€2 WELCOMING PARTY GB8Q September 6, 3:00 pm, The DSA arid volunteers will be greeting Rodeway Suites residents ond helping them to move in to their new home

OUTDOOR MOVIE

-

Featuring

and blankets

-

6:30 pm, cutsije this movie is outside!

main cafe.

Tuesday, Septemf>er 7, 11:30 am, T}ie Sanctuary

Featuring comedion... Simon

SPORTS WORLD O yes. ...it will be fun!

-

one of the summer's blockbuster hits. and popcorn is free!

FREE NOONER

RE2.

Rez

^crtfay, Septemfjer 6,

Bring your lawnchoirs

Admission

at

B.

Cotter

BUS PASS SALE 7

TRIP, Tuestfay, Septmef>er

- September 7, 6,

^

13,

3 foyer at lOam - 2 pm, $1 64,00 - 4 month pass & $4 photo ID Door

FREE B-B-0 G CONCERT 10:30 am - 3:00 pm, Free burgers & pop. Wear your WOW, I

- U/etfnest|ay,

Outside

This is

f>y tfie

September

6

pontl

a licenced event!!

AM t-shirt today!

FREE NOONER Featuring.

. .

-

TVurstlay, September 9,

11:30 am,

He

Sanctuary

“My Dick". an educational comedy about homophobia, . .

safe sex, sexual stereotyping,

macho myths, and so on.

MOVIE OF THE WEEK

- fritlay,

Yummy!!! Free popcorn.

. . .

with

S eptem!>er 10,

11:30 am,

Tlie Sanctuary

a free movie!

DSA INFORMATION FAIR - ^ontfay, Septeml^er 13, 11:30 am, Ue Sanctuary What is the DSA anyway? What other departments are here at Conestoga? Come find out, and see what you can do to get involved.

CASINO

-

Tuestlay,

September 1^, 11:30 am - 2:30 pm, Tfie Sanctuary

hand with lady luck. Blackjack, over & under, and the horse races are some of the games of chance. Don't miss your chance to win great prizes!

your

Try

just

/? INTERACTIVE

GAME

-

Wet|nest|ay, Septem{>erl3

''10:30 am - 2:30 pm. Hie Sanctuary {Don't worry.

BLUE JAYS BUS TRIP

-

. .

it's

^:30 pm

safe.

. . .

and legal

departure

Don't Miss This! Toronto Blue Jays vs. The New York Yankees! Purchase your ticket at the DSA office for onty $30, includes transportation via coach. [All tickets

are

field level

100]

uovn Of THt WUK - Fridas, 11;30 am, He Sanctuary Free movie

CONCERT II

17

& popcorn.

- Vy/e4nestfay,

/ ages event.

Septtrrfcer

September 22,

Tickets available in the

CONESTOGA 6:00 pm, DSA office.

tiff

???

— Page 11


5

Page 12

1

.

«

— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue

Athletics

and RecreatioH

Intramural Sports Intramural Programs Include:

Co-ed Slo-Pitch Touch Football Co-ed Volleyball Co-ed Basketball Contact Hockey Men’s Ball Hockey

I<7^^-2000 Intramural Schedule Note: Your team must have a captain or representative at the Captain’s Meeting.

Session

I

Registration

Activity

Captain’s Meeting

Co-ed Slo-Pitch

Sept.

7-1

Sept.

Touch Football Tennis Tournament Tournament date scheduled

Sept.

7-1

Sept.

Sept.

7-1

Sept.

5

September 21

2

Session

Registration

Activity

Co-ed

for

@ 4:30 p.m. 1 5 @ 4:30 p.m. 15 @ 4:30 p.m. 1

Volleyball

Hockey Hockey

Non-contact Contact Ice

Ball

Co-ed Basketball

Captain’s Meeting

@ 4:30 p.m. 20 @ 4:30 p.m. 20 @ 4:30 p.m. 20 @ 4:30 p.m.

Oct. 12-20

Oct. 20

Oct. 12-20

Oct.

Oct. 12-20

Oct.

Oct. 12-20

Oct.

3

Session

Activities to

be posted

for more information piease contact Mariana Ford at 74g-S220

axtASZ

Extramural Sports Activity

»^Date

i,

Men’s Fastball

October 8

Contact Hockey

February

1

Co-ed

February

1

Volleyball

Please contact Marlene Ford at

74^-5220 ext.4S2

for registration and tryout Information


SPOKE,

Athletics

1999 Orientation Issue - Page 13

and Racraation

SAC

Jobs!

(Student Athletic Committee)

Looking for employment? There are many part-time

employment opportunities within the Conestoga College Athletics and Recreation Department. Below is a list of part-time positions available for the

academic

year. For

tion or to

1

999-2000

more informa-

apply for any of the

positions listed below, please

contact the Recreation Centre at it

Aihl€|^45promittee!

It

c

e the

com

involves the organization of students. As a member of. atuable lead^ship )

•nstrat

nsibinty

and your ybilitvP?

witha All

positions are for

one year and

it

is

based on a

honourarium. Please contact Marlene Ford at

748-5220

ext.

452

for

more

information.

748-351 2.

Scorekeepers Timekeepers Varsity

Team Managers

Mascot (Ciiff the Condor) Hockey Game Announcer Videographer (demo tape required) Photographer (samples of work required) Concession Attendants Condor Roost Bar Staff Athietics Receptionist

Varsity Tryouts Women’s

Softball

Coach Vince Denomme Monday, August 30, 1999

4:30 p.m.

Diamond One

Men’s and Women’s Outdoor Soccer Coach Geoff Johnstone Monday, August 30, 1999 Soccer field

4:30 p.m.

Men’s Hockey Coach Ken Galerno Tuesday, September 7, 1999 Recreation Centre Arena

5:00 p.m.

For more information piease contact the Recreation Centre at 748 - 3512 . i


^ Sports

— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue

Page 14

Three

billion

people

SPOKE

may watch

Fourth Rugby World By Brian

.

Cup coming

*

Gall

Though

An

audience of three billion peoexpected to watch the 1999 Rugby World Cup kicking off Oct. 1 in Cardiff, Wales. ple

is

Twenty countries, including Canada, will play at 1 8 venues throughout Great Britain and France during the month-long tournament. Five groups of four teams divide the countries into Pools A, B, C, D and E.

he

group on to quarter-final action.

Launched as a tentative

with

1

affair

6 hand-

their

positions

they

World Cup

And

who

a (Internet photo)

cylinders

all

finished third in

Parffey agrees.

strong favourites playing against us,” he

games, every four years. The last tournament held in 1995 was one of the biggest sporting events ever watched on Ty with an audience of more than 2.5 billion. Pat Parffey, coach of Canada’s World Cup team, said they want to use this opportunity

world ranking and hope to progress pass the pool round. Canada has been involved in the last three Cups, so it would have been a disappoint-

either

England

or

New

Zealand,

(who

in

1995) imminent.

Fiji

and Namibia pose a threat as

would face

“We were

beaten 40 points to 29. by Fiji in the Pacific Rim tournament but we really did give away about 19 points on intercept

is ,

Canada

in

is

world rankings and that game win in the pool

Cup,

you have leadership, energy, school spirit and time to spare don’t search any further for that perfect

round.

throw in our

job opportunity. Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation, plans to spice up the

recreation centre and

is looking for 10 talented students to help him do it. With the dedicated students who

will

make up

this year’s

Student

Athletic Committee,

wants

to

school

James said, he promote events and boost

spirit.

In the past,

has not been suc-

cessful because of lack of leader-

ship and involvement with the rest

of the student body. This year, howJames hopes to recruit stu-

ever,

dents that have the skills and qualities

SAC

required to add “flavour” to

and make sure the students

are aware of

all

the athletic events

at the college.

centre

areas of study, but

the skills they can offer

make

a dif-

to

be a jock, but they have to enjoy

want

to

^ committee,” he said.

be part of the

So

far,

working relationship students’ needs.

said.

As

In the past there

was

SAC,

stu-

them when they enter the workforce and it should also look good on their resume. The experience

to

to benefit the

little

co-ordi-

between the two associaand James said this was probably the initial problem with promoting events.

will also assist students in fields

such as sports management, recreation leadership and marketing. tive’s role

tions

“1 get a little ticked otf

when

the

DSA

goes off campus to plan events when they could come here,” he said.

representa-

As of September, however, James hopes to sec some changes in mar-

them to assist assistant manager of

keting and promotion of events in co-ordination with the DSA.

athletic

requires

Marlene Ford, and recreation, in organizing, promoting and informing the student body of intramurals and varsity events. James said the more students arc informed about such

To help with promotion, the DSA has allowed the recreation centre to open an information booth Sept. 13 in

the

upcoming

Sanctuary events.

to

in

1991.

SOUTH AFRICA

^

.

-

Beaten

-

final-

1987. - Third place ish in 1995. -

Current cham-

pions.

ists In

'

-

fin^

Never lost a

World

Have Won 12

Gup

game. This year

is

second appearane. their

By Linda Wright

nation

a representative of

The student

Lost bronze

medal to N.Z.

facilities for fitness

Association have initiated a closer

depends on the time put into it and what they have to offer,” he “It

this year. -

FRANCe

Five Nations

Cup winners

Recreation centre offers

James said, the recreation and the Doon Student

ference.

athletics

“They don’t necessarily have sports and

apply from,

-

lot

down

1995.

s.

-

(college) to support our

varsity teams,” he said.

dents will gain confidence, helping

SAC

Humber

trip

Runners-up

SCOTLAND

games

more student involvement and school spirit. “The kind of thing I see is SAC

planning, co-ordinating and convening. He said students usually all

.

rather

events the

organizing a bus

-

three.

we

clearly,

would

.

If

.

think

I

will be the critical one to

The skills James is looking for vary depending on the position being applied for on SAC. There are 10 positions available that involve marketing, promoting,

qualifying.

Quarter finalists in 1995.

New

Recreation manager seeks students for sports committee By Andrea Jesson

side tie top

^

Australia in the

placed ahead of

fiinished out-

-V?' in 1987.

Tri-Nations

Parffey added that Fiji

Have never

-

Semi-finalists

11*

first

quarter-final

rather

Zealand absolutely destroy

Fiji.”

-

in

defeat in - Defeated U.S. ' 31-14 in

- World championsin1991.

...

"ZJ'f

“After having

Whidden said. “So it would not be a far-fetched expectation to think we could come back from that

1987.

Australia

And

obvious.

watched

trys,”

and beat

is

the

cup

Best performis a

in

whom Canada

well.

to increase their

up

matchwith

-Won

ance

-

quarter-

final

NEW ZEALAND

CANADA

finished second

sai’d.

Both

it.”

the

pool round,

Rugby World Cup operates the

Canada

If

proceeds

“They’re traditionally one of the top six clubs in the world so they will certainly be

like

go for

TEAMS TO WATCH

diffi-

cult.”

Canada’s manager, said they will have to be firing on ’95.

team,”

England crushed the Netherlands 110-0 in qualifying, coach Paffey said facing the English should not be different than facing anyone else. “That doesn’t matter. You just go out and

players play in

be

quite

Don Whidden,

against France Oct. 2,

hemisphere

they

could

make up Pool C along with the Canucks.

northern

a

well-organized

and Namibia

Fiji

with

get

through

France,

October

Whidden said. And knowing

South Africa (winners of the 1995 Cup). So if

picked na:tions in 1987, the

Olympic

is

be dark horses because a lot of

qualify,

Though

each

(Photo by Brad Dugard)

to

round.

in

tournament

Parffey said they are “I think they’ll

said.

finishers

move

Don Whidden, Team Canada manager.

team hadn’t

the

each of their pool-mates in the first round and the top two

play

first,

not to be taken for granted.

ment if managed

change often, he said Canada would currently be ranked between 11th and 15th in the world. And with two of their first three games against higher ranked teams it could be rough for the Canadians in the pool

Teams

year’s

this

Namibia’s

in

promote

If staying in list

for

the

shape

is

on your

semester,

fall

Conestoga College’s Kenneth Hunter recreation complex has just what you need. The facilities include; one Olympic size arena, a fitness gym, four lighted tennis courts, one 400-metre speed skating rink, one soccer pitch, one double gymnasium, two American E.

size squash courts, three softball

Rick Brown says he works out regularly at the

diamonds, four horseshoe pits, one classroom and one licensed sports lounge.

The

arena

broomball

offers

hockey,

and speedskating.

The arena

also contains an upper level indoor running area (8.5 laps/miles), a concession booth and gondolas for the press and television coverage.

The fitness gym and weight room include a nine-station universal

Gravitron,

weight a

-

machine,

universal

cable machine, grip machine, incline bench, dumb bells, three stair-

gym.

(Photo by Linda Wright)

masters, double sit-up bench, chin-up bar, three windracer exercycles and two stationary bikes.

When

you

start

stressed and need cise, take a

to

getting

some

exer-

break and head over

the recreation centre for a

work out. Hours of operation are, in the fall, winter and spring, Monday! — Friday 8 a.m to 10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday noon to

6 p.m.


SPOKE

Fixing

SPOKE, 1999

By Andrea Jesson

more

recognition, says rec

speaking with

Record

CKCO

and The

to see if they will profile

Conestoga College’s manager of and recreation believes

student athletes at Conestoga.

Conestoga’s athletes aren’t getting the recognition they deserve.

sports include hockey, men’s

athletics

Although

Conestoga

Currently,

Conestoga’s varsity

women’s soccer and women’s

and soft-

College doesn’t have as many high profile

ball.

varsity

approximately eight years ago eliminated many of the college’s varsity teams, but the intramu-

sports

as

other colleges

manager

long as the students show

interest.

Unfortunately, usually only varsity sports get media coverage, but

James said there are also some ented athletes rals

who

tal-

play intramu-

and deserve recognition just

much as the next athlete. He said he hopes last

as

James

said

financial

cuts

Wednesday night

year’s

volleyball

game

and universities, Ian James said Conestoga should be getting the same media coverage as other

rals offered at

schools.

up

“We want the local media to pump up our athletes a little

sports.

basketball to ball hockey,

“The music’s pumping and the

more,” he

he said the recreation centre will organize any intramural sport as

courts are crowded with people

said.

James said he

the process of

is in

for

From

the

Conestoga make minimal varsity

will continue to

be as popular

year with students,

staff,

this

faculty

and alumni. He said it is the kind of good time he likes to see at the recreation centre.

having fun,” he

said.

Soccer season may suffer due to OCAA regulations

Godfrey,

amts around

campus

By Andrea Jesson Playing more league games is going to have a negative physical effect on Conestoga’s soccer teams this year, said soccer coach

Geoff Johnstone.

When

the Ontario College Athletic Association (OCAA) met

May, Johnstone

in

said.

Royal

Military College put pressure on the committee to add four more

matches

six-game schedule.

to the

don’t like the idea,”

“I

Johnstone.

“It

puts

said

down our

practice time.”

“Some students may think,

I

can’t afford to

flunk out.” Ian James, athletics and

Murphy, maintenance worker, helps in the Sanctuary with renovations. (Pholo by Mtchelle Lehmann) Kristin

manager

recreation

Johnstone said the smaller colwill suffer more because unlike RMC, training is not a requirement for students. Daily leges

physical exercise all

students

at

is

mandatory for

RMC, meaning

soccer players are already

their

physically

fit.

Johnstone fears

less time for practice

may harm may

students physically, and they also

suffer

Conestoga

academically at because of time

restraints.

Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation, said the OCAA is trying to improve sports, but does-

always realize the effects it may have on a student’s academic life. n’t

“Some

students

may

think,

I

can’t afford to flunk out,” he said.

Johnstone, however, believes

it’s

not just a student’s schooling that

be

will

affected.

After

the

women’s team lost in the first round of playoffs because of injuries last year, Johnstone said

year it is pertinent to increase coaching and squad size to release this

^•^^^pt^ruction worker John Benson pours concrete

the

at the Waterloo camipus. ^Photo by

l/fr

— Page 15

Student athletes may get local media coverage

up the campus

Athletes deserve

dfc^^^novations

Orientation Issue

-Am

pressure physically on the

team.

Severn) ~

In the past there have been

1

5 or

16 players on both teams, but this

year, Johnstone said, the squads

Johnstone

will increase to 18.

said

Registration and tryouts begin

the

week

of

Aug,

29

and

Johnstone said increasing squad size probably won’t be a problem because 50 to 60 men and approximately 20 women try out. As far as James is concerned.

it

is

a great coach, but he

will be interesting to see

what happens

this

new schedule. He thinks the

season with the

additional

will have a negative impact

games on stu-

dents and their lives at many colleges, and the schedule may need revision again next year.


Page 16

— SPOKE, 1999 Orientation Issue CONESTOGA COLLEGE

CONESTOGA COLLEGE

CAMBRIDGE CAMPUS

STRATFORD CAMPUS

WELCOME

WELCOME

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS

WELCOME

WELCOME

WATERLOO CAMPUS STUDENTS

GUELPH CAMPUS STUDENTS Automotive Service Technician Apprentice

Food and Beverage Management Microcomputer Software

— Year

Industrial

1

Mechanic (Millwright) Apprentice

General Machinist/Tool

Certificate

& Die/Mould Maker Apprentice

Plumber Apprentice

Employment Training Readiness Welding/Fitter Apprentice

Personal Support Worker

Employment Training Readiness Systems Analyst

Carpenter General

Continuing Education

General Metal Machinist Industrial Maintenance

RETURNING STUDENTS Food and Beverage Management

Mechanic

Welding Engineering Technician

Welding Engineering Technology

— Year 2

Continuing Education

Employment Training Readiness Training and Development

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS

Welcome

to a

new

year

at

Conestoga

College.

Whatever your area of study, Conestoga

much

has

to offer

-

excellent faculty,

outstanding curriculum, high-quality

As ly

we

approach 2000, it is a particularexciting and rewarding time to be at

Conestoga.

Now

that

we

are recog-

nized as Ontario’s #1 college, our challenge and opportunity is to continue to

move forward

to

hope

ties for

and

involvement

diverse as varsity ics,

and opportuni-

in activities as

and intramural

athlet-

peer tutoring, student government,

clubs and student events.

encourage you to be an active member of the college community, making Conestoga a great place to be and helping shape an even brighter future for our achievement-oriented instituI

you will find the 1999-2000 academic year one that advances you towards your educational and career goals, and one that calls forth your that

very best

tion.

efforts.

Please accept All

services,

even greater achieve-

ments.

I

facilities

of us are fortunate to live and

work

my

best wishes for a

successful year.

an area that is so economicallyproand dynamic, so clearly a leader in moving Ontario and Canada into a position as a major force in the

Dr.

global economy.

President, Conestoga College

in

gressive

John W.

Tibbits


.

SPOKE, 1999

Orientation Issue

— Page 17

mspmtm September

10

am

S 18

8, 9, -

2

pm Monday, August 30

^oof 3 ^oyer

ees«>

X

/

§0(M1<.(!)(!)

10

you are away from home for the

...if

you are experiencing personal problems?

first

...if

you are not sure your previous study habits

will

work

for

you

stressful too. Change means an ending and even if you are welcoming this change, it’s natural to resist new ideas and ways of doing things.

in

you have questions, concerns about anything?

wait

Don V

hesitate.

We are here

William Bridges, who writes about transitions, says four things can help us through that uncomfortable time between the old and new. First, try to do things that make you feel to help

See a Counsellor in Student Services at your campus

FREE AND CONFIDENTIAL! in to

more

you

succeed.

Drop

DSA Office at 748-5131

As you begin your new semester at college, you will begin the process of change. Whether you are leaving your parents for the first time or you are parents leaving your children, the transition will fee exciting and perhaps a bit

College?

t

information contact the

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: CHANGE

academic problems?

you are worried about tests, presentations or your placement?

Don

more

time and feeling lonely?

...if

...if

am - 2 pm. The Sanctuary

l^li^iBlgJBIBlBlBlglBIBIBIBIBjaglBigjgiBigigjgigjgjgjgigjgigjgigjgjgjgjgjgjgjgjgjgjgjgjjig

...if

.if you are anticipating

Thursday, September 2 For

&SoO)@

What Do You Do ...

. .

-

Room 2B02 Student Services Doon Campus or call us at 748-5220 Ext 360 or 337.

in control,, like getting the information

way around. Understand that

Student Services Ofiice/Guelph

Campus Ext.

to

I I

time and if you feel overwhelmed, it doesn’t mean going to school was a bad decision, you are just in transition. Find support systems in your family, old friends, new

I I I I

this is a transition

your teachers and coimsellors in Student Services. in mind your purpose in coming to school; focus on this outcome. Remember you are not alone in this transition time. If you do need more support, come to Student Services, inside friends,

And finally, keep

Door #4. Counselling Student Services OflBce/Waterioo

you need

find your

services are confidential

and

I I I I

I

free.

224.

Campus 824-9390. lsluBl@lBIBlBlBIBlBlBlBlBIBlBIBIBJBlBIBlBJBigir3lFili3fi3fi3IBlBlBlBJBiB[BigigiBJB]gfgjgfgjg] (g

TRIPS New York Yankees

Thursday, September 16

vs.

Wednesday, September 15 4:30 p.m. departure Tickets $30, includes coachline transportation seats are Field Level 1 00 - Infield baselines Doon Campus students are permitted 1 guest Tickets on Sale August 30, 1999

Conestoga College Recreation Centre

Tickets $12 IVvailable at the

DSA Office. Saturday, September 25

8:30 a.m. Departure Tickets $25, includes coachline transportation

Doon Campus students are

permitted

1

Tickets on Sale August 30, 1999

guest

I MOTHER EARTH WITH tPEOAL 6UEST

PRESENTED BT


IS

Tajii'

SPOKK,

-

New By Brian

Off-Campus

1999 Orientation Issue

Trial

album among the best

hardcore music

in

Gail

quolc-filled.

“If you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if

you

w'ish

to

A

hardcore band

inside

their

I

sake. What’s been destroyed can

new'

be replaced,” Bennick hollers. Ilis voice is complemented

CD.

strong

album. Are These on Equal Vision Records at the end of July, seems almost like a serenade Trial's

Our

I

about

“What we want we must ereate. What we risk will be regained. What we’d assume we must for-

bold bold

a

of is

avoiding eomplaeeney.

be a devotee of

truth, then inquire.” statement emulated by

fhc sixth

Unrestrained,

tracks.

latest

Lives?,

with full-sounding backing vocals

released

from

a

group of 23 people.

Are These Our Lives? ranks

among

the

tribute to this thought, originally

albums

I’ve

coneeived

by

Nietzsche.

Violins

have just moved in with 25 Ta Life and Turmoil if there were such a thing as a home for hardcore

writer

Friedrich

and

cellos

included. Classical instrumentals

CD and also But calmness and peace of mind is not what the rest of the album is about. It’s a storm raining with awesome new-school hardcore, pounding along an old punk path lead listeners into the

escort

them

going in a

An

new

Trial

would

Having completed three

tours of

the United States in support of their previous releases. Trial

Trial

band.

sounds a

Slayer

like

lot

Cro-Mags

and get

direction.

tight

new hardcore

heard.

kings.

out.

amazingly

best

when they Powerful hardcore

rolling.

by killer guitar playing, mixed with pimk-influenced

A

bass lines and drums.

near perfect combination emerges.

The

quartet from Seattle,

beats led

in

are

Vision

1994,

is

formed

a part of the Equal

Records

lineup

that

includes

Earth

Crisis,

108,

Converge and a bunch of other great hardcore bands.

Serious lyrics by vocalist Greg

Bennick, are noticeably long and

travelling

began around the world in

August. The only Ontario listing currently posted on their Web

site(www.plusminurecords.com/tr ial) is in

Toronto, Sept. 16.

s.power ^

The members of “Celebrating om: poy?er’^ is the

fhome

years Take Back the Ni^t march that will be held on Sept. 23 for women who are protesting violence against for this

women. “We want to support wom^ in knowing we have personal power to make choices and to make change,” said Iliana Pressman, a member of the Waterloo Region lake Back the Night organizing committee.

Pressm^ in the

said

march

women

“We

hopelth a iar^' marefi.” eoimnittee

who work tions

the organizing'

women

include

women’s organizawell as community

for

as

end at Kitchener city approximately 8:,30 p.ni. where we will have refreshments and entertainment,” Pressman

arc volunteering time to plan the march.

“We want power

to

to support

The committee

women

women

make choices and

to

is

looking for

volunteer

be

to

violence against

to

exists

t\ight organizing

The City of Kitchener

"The cummiUcc

women

(from)

comprised of

is

all

over

to gather there at 6:30 p.m.

year) than last year” she said. “I

march around 7 p.m.

conuTiunity,

many of whom

the ;iro

xolimteering their time (for the march),” Pressman said.

The march Victoria

downtown

Park

will

begin

clock

Kitchener.

at

tow'cr

Women

the in

are

and

is

also

march. “We arc ending at the Kitchener City Hall and they are lielping us pay for that,” she said. “So there

Pressman, the

committee

Prc.ssman

welcome

.said

to

marshals to escort the march to ensure it’s safely completed.

“We

ask w'omen

who want come

volunteer, to do that, to

to

to

men have

be

Back the Night organizing committee, is encouraging Conestoga College women to

women

‘for some

will

it

attend the march,” she said.

so that

The committee

is

they

selling temporary tattoos.

She said that many people arc involved w'ilh the march.

flyers so if

community

partners

“Sometimes in helping,

we'll

women in

can

attend the march.

planning on

Pressman.

“Many

Pressman, a member of Waterloo Region Take

Iliana

the

helpful if their partners care for

we

do a half-hour marshal women,” said

by

volunteered their time to prepare the refreshments.

the children

will

arc

attending the post-march gathering at City Hall. For a few-

the clock tower at 6 p.m. because training for tliosc

comes

that men participate

years a small group of

and needs to end, as well as to feel empowered. Approximately 200 women marched last year but in the past the numbers have been higher, “I hope that there are more women (marching this '

individuals.”

course, every w'oman w'ho " out to march

make change,” lliiina

said Prcijsman.

agencies

many players involved that help support tiie march. And ot

knowing personal

member of Walerloo Region Take Hack

take part

women

with this event;

arc

in

to be in solidarity

with other women, create awareness in the commtinity that

help

and organizations as well as

assi.sting the

women who their

will

hall at

need

to pul

up

arc interested

ways other than:

(Photo by Lesley Turnbull)

marching, they’re welcome to

Pressman said. She can be reached

call

me,”^

at

741-9184.


4

A

SPOKE

.

SPOKE, 1999

.

Entertainment

New / Mother Earth album empty Fish,

Sonic,

One

More

1

By Adam Wilson

Another

Isn’t it great when you buy the new album from one of your

Sunday. They brought the fans in because they

s

I

i

favourite bands

your mind?

and

When

it

just

blows

the guitar

work

awesome, the lyrics are phenomenal and all of the songs are memorable and stick in your mind is

for hours after listening to the

CD

were band

ture

The band has

on the album sounds

after the

anything like

IME

used to sound like. If you’ve seen the music

album and

Edwin’s depar-

from the band, I Mother Blue Green Orange is a departure from their old style of music,

bassist

had a popular fan base, attracting more

which was fast-paced, driving

And

songs, with an eastern influence

following

females to concerts than males.

and amazing guitar

Before

Edwin

original

left

lead

singer

the band, they

They brought the fans

to

shows

with mainstream hits off their

first

two albums. Dig and Scenery and

New tries

also

that

Guitarist Jagori (Jag)

son.

Void.

is

the only tune

Earth’s fan base might dwindle.

their fans for a rea-

the

This

that

Now,

Too bad I Mother Earth’s (IME) Blue Green newest release. Orange, is nothing like this.

from album.

Summertime in

release of thenthird

happens be the first

single

music.

for the first time.

five

the

good

played

five.

Track to

good

a

track also

and

Astronaut

Edwin tenure with IME.

too hard to sound like his

Bruce Gordon have slowed guitar pace to a near halt. drummer Christian Taima is suit,

allowing

IME

completely slow their music

riffs.

lead singer Brian Byrne

during

their

Tanna and

to

down

to a Radiohead-ish crawl.

no standout tracks

imtil

video, you’re only hearing half of the song.

you get

to

proven formula IME has used on their two previous albums. It is obvious that IME listened to a lot of Radiohead sometime during either recording or writing with songs like Good for Sule, Gargantua and When Did You Get

Back From Mars? The

latter

sounds like IME stole guitar riffs from Radiohead’s song. Just. Trying to listen to this CD all the way through is a tough task. With only two stand-out tracks

(Summertime in the Void and Cloud Pump) and too many songs that

sound as though they’re trying IME has done noth-

to be ballads,

ing but hurt themselves with this

was in IME’s nature to take what could be a four-minute song

album. It should have been so good, that they could look at Edwin and say,

and

“Look

It

stretch

it

out to seven with the

some eastern instruments, bongo drums and Jag’s guitar help of

us now. Look where

at

are without you. This

My

biggest problem with this

album

is

how

far

it

strays

from the

album

is

we the

best thing we’ve ever done.”

But what

riffs.

Listening to the album, there are

— Page 19

without Edwin

Not

like

Quite

Orientation Issue

instead

is

IME

asking

will

Edwin

be doing can

if they

join his solo project’s band.

Nature and art meet at Victoria Park By John Oberholtzer

Queen’s University in Kingston, where she

Her charcoal and oil canvas A Banana is Just a Banana is an example of her intuitive

was

approach.

Kocsis graduated from the fine

program

arts

Victoria Park may be a long way from the Louvre, but Heather Kocsis and Paula Svetic were more than happy to display thenworks in an outdoor environment on the afternoon of Aug. 14. The two local artists were selected,

among

several others, to

be part of an art e xh ibition sponsored by the KOR Gallery and Studios of Kitchener. The exhibition runs every Saturday in August in the downtown Kitchener park.

For the 24-year-old Kocsis, a printmaker whose works include screenprint collages and mixed media paintings, the location was familiar territory. One of her pieces, Victoria Park, was part of a she collection of paintings

at

initially interested in art

like to eventually get

my

A

lages, entitled

Swing

inspired by her

of people have the same kind of photographs from their youth,” she said. “(Swing Shift) is personal to me, but others can relate it to a certain time period from their own lives.” lot

Svetic, 25, has taken art courses

uses a combination of drawing and

area.

painting in

ed

from

the

University

and

many of her works.

in

known about the person-

of the greatest English poet

William

dramatist,

Or

is it

by

created she Gardening/Reflecting, a large canvas she worked on for several months. “I like to

do things from

me

as

I

was working

my

came

in the

garden,” she said. “I started layI was hearing or songs that were popping into my

ering in sounds

head.” Svetic

has also displayed her

works at outdoor shows in Toronto and Windsor. She hopes to attend teacher’s college and she summarized the dream of many young

when she eventually make

people

said, “I’d like to

a living as an

artist.”

a series of three charcoal and oil paintings entitled A is Just a Banana by Paula Svetic. These paintings, along with those by other local artists, were displayed in an exhibition (Photo by John Oberholtzer) at Victoria Park on Aug. 1

One

of

Banana

.

Love exhibits

the Bible

celestial fire

-

inspired to write a

Shagspere?

The Sweet Swan of Avon, as Ben Johnson called him, is better known for the inconsistent ways of spelling his name (some claim there are 4,000 ways), as well as for the 814,780 written

words and

1,277 speaking characters in his plays.

He is also well known for his ^fcphed vocabulary, having used *I^P866 different words in his plays as compared to the 6,000 different words used in the Bible. (Again,

learns that the original the play

Sea

was Romeo and

name

hearted

Romeo and

Juliet

Ethel, the

Romeo and

Ethel, but the original plot never

existed past Will’s imagination.

English woman, Rosaline. (Later in the movie, it is grotesquely revealed that the fille de joie’s

manners are singularly repulsive.) Will is suffering from writer’s

man

with more ducats

Although Viola’s arranged maris now a matter in the hands of Queen Elizabeth, she nevertheless gives in to an awaking romance with Shakespeare. As the play Romeo and Juliet unfolds on stage so does Will’s and Viola’s relationship “offstage.” There are parallels between the fictional play and the events of riage

was based on

We meet Shakespeare as a young, talented but miserable playwright, nicked Will, who spends most of his time flirting and romancing a promiscuous

play.

than feelings.

for

Pirate’s Daughter. In reality,

the deceased idea of

new

But by the time cross-dressing, between Kent and Viola, comes to an end. Will learns that his soulmate has been promised in marriage to Lord Wessex, a cold-

it.)

But, even more so, he is renowned for his one immortal love play, Romeo and Juliet. In the movie Shakespeare in Love, now on video, the audience

Sajfert

Shakespeare.

of

Waterloo’s fine arts program. She

or at least helped write

al life

Svetic explained the process

which

to

“A

since high school and she graduat-

Little is

there.”

viewer.

of downtown Kitchener. She chose this theme as part of a recent youth services project that was started to keep young artists in the

By Anna

it

point of view and this idea

some claim Will wrote

g p

were

Shift,

own childhood

and

photographs, and are meant to convey universal truths to the

Shakespeare

y

master’s

possibly from the Alberta in University of Edmonton, so I can teach.” pair of her screenprint col(degree),

was

eating a banana one day looked interesting and pretty,” she said. “I didn’t have a specific idea - it just evolved from “I

“But contemporary art fascinated me much more,” she said. “I’d

described as a creative investigation

w

con-

servation.

block.

He

can’t think, concentrate

or write yet he has the entire village chatting behind closed doors

about his

new

play: “Well, there’s

this pirate and...”

And

Nevertheless, Will

blank.

soon

auditioning male actors

starts

for

his

play.

new actor by name of Thomas Kent. After

In walks a young, the

only a few verses, Shakespeare

is

aroused by this soft-spoken talent but loses him as the actor bolts out

of the theatre for fear his identity may be revealed. Soon Shakespeare meets a sensational woman, Viola de Lesseps, an elite character who lives on the

same

Thomas. It’s love at for the two and Will gets

estate as

first sight

the film.

The

movie

themes of

sparked

is

rivalry,

with

impersonation,

cross-dressing and disguise; love,

tragedy and comedy. Shakespeare

would have

liked

it

himself


Paj»o 20

— SPOKK, 1990

OritMitatioii Issue

Entertainment Punk fans caught Spider’s

in Story and photos by Brian Gall

groups have made a England.

Due

web

from

trip

amount of broken behind in the past. Spider asks that people bring alu-

a

York and Quebec carry punk

minum

16.

lovers to a small village called

dogs and cats and a

Marlbank, Ont.? Punkfest

bring their pets to the parties as well, so glass is a danger to their

Why

would vans from places

like California,

only answer.

Nova

An

Scotia,

New

is

the

estimated 600

people descended upon the town (located about an hour and a half past Peterborough) with a population of only about 300, July 16

and

17.

The festival has been running annually since 1991 with weekof camping and bands. It marks the birthday of its founder. Spider (Warren Hastings) who turned 63 this ends

full

glass

to the

left

containers.

He has lot

several

of people

feet. Cash donations and/or dog and cat food are appreciated and given to Animal Welfare. This year’s performances were highlighted by Victoria band Dayglo Abortions as well as Toronto bands B.F.G. and

Freedom Denied.

A

new Web

(wvm.punk-

site

of Montreal (above) kept the fire.

performances were highlighted by the band Dayglo Abortions (bottom right).

crowd (below)

The weekend Victoria, B.C.

1

has assigned eight police officers to cover the seene. There was a Spider information centre in

Marmora directing people to the new secret location. Some say Punkfest won’t confor long in Marlbank because of complaints of unruly kids wandering onto neighbour-

tinue

ing properties asking for water and a massive amount of garbage left

behind. clerk treasurer

for the Municipality of Tweed,

year.

said

ties

destruction of the environment.

an

After

Marc Talon,

new location until Friday, July By Friday at p.m. the OPP

Gary Thompson,

He also holds smaller parthroughout the year on long weekends.

entertained by eating and juggling

problem was a bylaw from Tweed (a municipality which Marlbank falls under) wasn’t made aware the event had Part of the

officer

injunction

made down

imposed by the Township of Marmora and Lake, Spider was forced to move the festival from

“total

I

can’t

blame

for the injunc-

tion.”

Consequently, Spider has been ridding the site of trash since the

As of July 26, he was still bagging garbage to take to the dump. Claiming charges against him party.

Splder (Warren Hastings) fest.com),

which

mation

on

the

is

under infor-

festival

upcoming party said he

still

some

is

construction, offers

and

Spider thinking of having dates.

shows every weekend now and updates will be posted at the

Web

sit.

With a campground of roughly 50 acres and about 20 bands playing over the course of the weekend, the crowd didn’t seem to mind the move.

here,

them (Marmora)

Spiderland Acres to Marlbank. Without a special events licence

year’s celebration.

caused

“After seeing the mess they

was

(which requires all events to have permits stating that the grounds would be inspected to ensure proper washroom facilities are available, people have access to drinking water and all structures meet the building code) Spider had to use a friend’s land for this

Punkfest

are prejudicial, he said bylaws

which

state a three-day party such as his only require a permit when extended past three days, have been changed and aimed only at him In order to convince a lawyer he had something to defend, he collected several hundred signatures for a petition. And now he is suing the Township of Marmora .

But not everyone

is

as happy

about Punkfest as the punks. court injunction recently

A

Punkfest is the only event of its kind in the area. Bands come

imposed by the Township of Marmora and Lake could lead to charges against Spider. The injunction outcome has yet to be

from all over Canada and the United States and a couple

decided and accordingly, officials will say little about the case.

and

its

chief administrative offi-

cer Frank Mills,

Marmora Reeve

Lionel Bennett as well as a few other officials in charge of the injunction.

“There’s a long, long are going to be

list.

many

There

charges,”

Spider said.

Spider said he wilt battle his

way through

court.

And

if

he

is

awarded any compensation there won’t be any news about it until

when the courts reconThough he said he has no

the fall

vene.

plans to forget about the ordeal, he is not going to worry about it. “I don’t worry about nothing anyways. If you worry about things you never tackle them and

you’re just wasting energy.”

Jackie and Hilary the tragic story of By Anna

Sajfert

is an apothelong-celebrated theme in the history of classical music: “Madness behind

of

the

genius.”

A celebrated English cellist, Jacqueline du Prd, and her sister Hilary du Prd share a fictional but realistic childhood.

The

film features two insepara-

ble sisters

who

live in a utopian

world of classical music inspired by their mother, the pianist. Iris du Prd. The young girls learn to swirl their bodies like leaves in the

wind

sodies.

tempo

to the long, loud rhap-

During

the

their bodies

dawn, their hands mingle above their heads, and

Jackie, however,

ciatness”

Hilary’s “ordi-

fined to a wheelchair.

the bodies jerk like marionettes.

quickly rises

nariness.”

Their childhood is inspired by the high alchemy of Bach, Beethoven and Debussy; their adolescence with fire and fame. Although Jackie is driven by passion and ambition more than Hilary is, they both pursue a utopian world: the sisters are knowledgeable only in music. This musical isolation ends for the elder sister, Hilary, when she falls in love and marries Kiffer Kinzi. The newly wed couple settles for a country life outside of London, England, feeding chickens and raising two chil-

to

October 1973, at the age of is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and dies from the disease on Wall Street’s “Black Monday,” Oct. 19, 1987. She

like the sun at

Jackie and Hilary

osis

“adagio”

rise

slowly

British cellist

dren.

fame and

(Jackie

and

felt

soon the youtig genius is travelling the world playing in Italy, Germany, Austria and Russia.

threatened

The young

and their relationship became a union much celebrated and com-

ture

talent

by age

lished star

piece

is

is

an estab-

18.

Her signa-

Elgar’s

Cello

Concerto in E minor. Although talented and famous, Jackie

is

tacking psychological

fulfillment.

when

Hilary married

Kiffer Finzi. In turn, she married the pianist Daniel Barenboim

mented upon in the media.) At one point in the movie,

Unable

to perform, she is con-

In

28, she

dies in Hilary’s arms.

Jackie and Hilary is a film about the relations between the

Jackie loses touch with reality; she becomes delusional, promis-

remarkable British cellist Jacqueline du Pr6 (1945-87) and her sister, based on the 1997

A

cuous and overly moody. The

book

a wandering, lonely soul

intensity of Jackie’s aching psy-

amidst a world of the elite, but she will not admit she was in

che is conjured when she is found in the woods, her naked body covered in bloody cuts.

Hilary and Piers du Pr6. Jacqueline’s story is, nevertheless, a tragic one. Endowed an extraordinary musical her active career lasted ll^R

She

is

pain.

Rather, she makes Hilary aware of her

her sister

own

“spe-

The her

last part

of the film traces

worsening

condition.

Genius

in the

more than a decade.

Family by

Digital Edition - September 01, 1999  
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