Page 1

CRTC approves college FM station By Brian

Gall

involved in about 15 application

announcement

approvals, said the

A new campus FM radio

station

which college president John

RtVQES

it’s

college, for the students at large.

Tele-

done that before.” Before the station can begin

I’ve never

communications Commission (CRTC). The station, to be located at 88.3 MHz on the dial, will transmit from the Global TV tower in

how

Paris.

going

Frisb^ action.

not for shareholders and not for an owner, it’s for the

“It is

school of communications has been approved by the Canadian

and

operations,

faculty

college programs,

“They

(faculty)

but

in,

we

about halfway to Toronto and London, south

down

together

details rmtil

we had

Fergus.

of time

the

licence because it

will take a sig-

amount to pull

it

together.”

big

is

and

actually put the

nificant

approval

John said

St.

will

the approval of

increase the col-

the station will

lege’s

upgrade

profile.

Calling

it

new

the

a great

and

strengthen

he added

asset,

all

communications programs at the

station

be a building block for will

college, but

future students.

hard to say whether the sta-

“I think

will

it

allow us to build a school of com-

munications.

lent cornerstone

to

do

more

‘The other part of starting date)

is

(the

it

we need

specif-

a

taken

start

not

place,

there is a possi-

students because

train

station could

in operation

new campus FM

the

communications

be by

Centre

in

St.

vice-president of Conestoga ’s

work on

Communication likely to start in the

semester when more programs begin and the student popfall

ulation

is

higher.

“The other three to four

part of

the sta-

tion are journal-

Studies, said the

more

$21,000 in debt.

Also slated to

Studies

for

it is

months

we need

to train stu-

new campus

ism students and people from the community. According to the official CRTC decision, announced July 17, the licence expires Aug. 31, 2001. When the college has completed construction and is prepared to

FM station will not just be for stu-

commence operation, it must advise the commission in writing.

dents in communications programs,” he said. Training courses will be avail-

and ready to start within 12 months of the announcement date,

dents because the

able

for

well as

Conestoga students as

members of the communi-

ty-

St.

in

John,

who

has spent 25 years

communications

and

been

If the station

is

applica-

financial aid administrator.

higher.”

Centre for Communication

Over 1,100 student loan

gram.

of students now. It may push the standards even

John,

come back,” she

who

and

ty

Pat

go away for a year and said. “They actually have to go to school.” She estimates that students can’t just

television pro-

“We have an

pro-

By John Oberholtzer

for

have been processed this summer, said Carol Walsh, Conestoga College’s

cast/radio

grams.”

vice-president of Conestoga’s

station is

550

excellent quali-

John,

St.

there

Financial aid office busy with applications

already

30-32 positions the broad-

will

not just be for students

spring of 2000.

Pat

said

in

the

that

bility

Conestoga.

applicants

have

date

to

He

about

three to four months to

discussions

about

applicants

are

this.”

Though ic

it is

tion will attract

It

be an excel-

will

mOES

weren’t going to

over Lake Erie and north about two hours, past

news and

IGdman stars in Eyes Wide Shut

St. John said. were consulted

sit

Tibbits said the

Nicole

must decide

to incorporate training into

will reach

It

especially excit-

is

ing.

Tibbits calls a “cornerstone” for a

Radio-Television

Conestoga

for

not constructed

tions

for

Walsh

the

fall

over a

Walsh usually gives a one-hour

September, the number will have reached 1,800 and another 700 students will apply for aid during the school year.

presentation on student debt to

that

While most students apply

for

loans prior to the

fall

semester,

Walsh

fail

to

their

said

money

some last

make

the entire year.

“We

have students applying for

OSAP

right at the deadline, just

90 days before the end of the winshe said. “They run out of money and realize they’re not going to have enough to get ter semester,”

through their last semester.” Students can apply for loans in the first 45 days of the fall semester

and

still

receive funding for

the entire year, she said.

Students receiving loans must

may be granted, provided the college applies in writing to the commission before the

must complete

12-month period, or any extension of that period, expires.

OSAP

by

expects

pass 60 per cent of their course load. If not, Walsh said, they receive a letter of probation and

extensions

receive full

three-year program will graduate

their next semester or risk losing funds for a year.

“And they

(ineligible students)

first-year students in the strate-

gies for student success class,

and

also talks to high school students.

Walsh sees co-op programs at Conestoga College as a way to ease

money

problems.

“All of our business programs are going co-op this year and we’ve had (co-ops) running for some years in the robotics and automation program and the woodworking technology program.” Students in the robotics program can earn around $7,000 in a 16-

week work placement, she

said,

while students in the electronics program can go out on a total of four different

asked

if

work terms. When

money problems keep

some people from

attending col-

lege or university, Walsh said,

“As

far as

Conestoga College is all of our pro-

concerned, nearly

grams are

full.”


;'

,

Father essential in development of daughter’s sense of worth takes a spe-

it

man

I

dad.

A

dad

is

someone who plays an active

and loving role his

in

child’s

Someone who makes

life.

am

He

daily

fortunate that

my mistakes like the

forgives

sacrifices to ensure his child is

And places his

happy. all

child above

Sometimes the impor-

other things that occur in the

hectic schedule of everyday

life.

tance of being a father

These are the fathers that deserve being celebrated one day a year. They have earned all of the presents, cards and cakes given with

goes unnoticed but a

on Father’s Day. Sometimes the importance of

that

a recent University of Waterloo

development of a

the

sense of self-worth

father’s role in the

development of a

study has found that a father’s role in

a

girl’s

self-worth

girl’s

time

play an extremely important part

weeks

girl’s self-

I

And

got into a car accident

my

after getting

me

he gave

me

licence.

a second chance

esteem, her ability to form close

by

emotional bonds with others and

He has always been there for me, even for simple things like giving

Scheffler’s

own

sexuality.

were

conclusions

extremely influential role models. My dad has helped me to find

humour

even when things appear dreary. He has shown me that through hard work and determination you can succeed. And he has stressed the idea that if you want to make things happen you must accept the challenges life throws at you. in

night early

an

life

OK to

me

that

gathered from a questionnaire that

examined the degree to which a

letting

me

drive the next day.

me my worm on my

work

$10, leaving

to the hospital

when

leg or putting the

to take

I

broke

is

Lesley Turnbull

to

'.;Ottt'

her laundry

it is

^

jump

girl

died July

not once, but twice,

on

continued her way.

,

5’2” rat-faced

by a

That’S-'

;

boy who took

the boys start-

ed yelling pro-

am a worthwhile person.

they?

al

ing in winter, far too

on Mile

are careless

many people

and someone has

pay. In this case

it is

the

to

little girl

and her family.

Lake, leaving the rest of us

driving

it

in the

first place.

the

was

girl

craft

on and

another personal watercraft carrying two 14-year-old girls, also from Waterloo, collided. three other girls held

injured until

girl’s

After finish-

Branigan

dry.

headed straight for the ,

gror^ of boys

himself to

1^0 had called to her earlier. She

chandisc.

with a

hit Jason Batisse

book to the face and a couple of. kicks to Batisse threatened tlicn

and

Branigan with a broken ,

At least that’s what Branigan, '

a'

cheek

rigfit

as the ‘“KicMn’ Vixen”, said happened. Batisse said the boys said

^d

ii^g^^^ome%>^of newly aequireti Tae Eo skills, T told one of my fneuds^ who usually '

my “hi” to her as she passed by. acts He said it wns two other guys :^^?^at ‘

bo^guaid

h^

only $250. That

is

rea%^mali2^..what

firmer grab of my then I knew ’^nt ha^ened?' Instead^ of

>met with

bottle,

now known

drive a person-

a crime in

i cBifc’t

that

itself.

stmted

shouting

me

lewd ^'^ie pulled

'

at

j|ust

frbm'

Watching the news and hearing what cottagers in the Muskoka area had to say about the horrible accident really raises a lot of

a personal watercraft

is

only $250. That charge

a crime

is

in itself.

has been illegal for anyone under the age of 16 to operate a personal watercraft under new federal

regulations 1999.

introduced

look at blame. In

when we

is

%ty .tough

on parents

to

keep

their children

safe.

is

also responsible

tragedy,

and should be

Ski watercraft for

the

Jet

It

is

owner

the to

owner faces enough to make

of the the rules and to

responsibility

know

abide by them. Unfortunately, due to the carelessness of

all

involved, a

young

dead and a family devastated forever. girl is

Issues

and

SPOKE’s

News

Editor: Chadwick Severn

Activities Editor: John Obcrholtzcr;

;

Student Life Editor: Andrea Jesson;

Photo Editor: Anna

Sajfcrt

Adam

is

wouldn’t' have

nothing better |o do in a park and sup*

been n:

sit

a preU ty woman that went by or ;t grown woman who just wanted to do her laundry and go

right

home? To me

young

1 do what Branigan did was but maybe it was a little

believe

harsh the answer

Branigan

easy.

is

'^the^^-^^or a

kick to the groin. Don’t get me wrong,

posedly, just say “hi” to

was obviously good reason.

to

kick someone so

in a place so vulnerable.

a strong young took a stand and let

Finally,

ticked off for a

woman

Branigan said this wasn’t the first time .slie has been verbal-

someone know that what they were doing was wrong. I wish I had done the same.

ly

assaulted by different

men

to May by the Doon The views and opinions expressed

funded from September

Student Assoeiation (DSA).

in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE arc not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by d:.I0 a.m.

Monday. Submissions are subject

to

acceptance or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

rejection

or

Wilson; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Frank and Christina Jonas

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-inail: spokc(ojconestogac.on.ca address

than to

Keeping Conestoga College eonnected

Production Manager: Lesley Turnbull; Advertising Manager: Michelle Lehmann Circulation Manager:

bunch of immat^^'bo^^^o ^^1^

SPOKE is mainly

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Lindsay Gibson;

A

who had

time.

watercraft stiff

case 'to me,

^ would you miemi

youngsters to drive them.

who should take the my opinion, the onus is

Spoke SPOKE

HmmmrSt

them think twice before allowing arises

However, the owner of the

This incident should never have happened. Any young child would

Ski

should be

him,

hit

There are reasons these laws are put in place, and I think the fine a Jet

The problem

It

same

ably at the

head above water

April

I don’t know about you but I have never met a nine-year-old girl big or strong enough to hold firmly onto the handles of a Jet Ski watercraft and steer comfort-

the

help arrived.

1,

a minor drive

riding

-year-old passenger

back when her

The

Unfortunately, the fine for letting

The Waterloo 1 1

is

my

questions.

wonder why she was ever

to

with an

watercraft

charge

upon

himself to inspect

ing her laun-

charged. Unfortunately, the fine

min or

it

fanil> at her.

can see how a parent, especially a father, can play such an essential role in a daughter’s life. In the end, my father may not be a millionaire, an actor or a scientist but he’s my dad and I wouldn’t want it any other way. I

for letting a

But, just like with snowmobil-

Ski watercraft

Six

chance to ride a Jet why wouldn’t

;

huTs dayj

'her

alone and she

Because of my parents, I have developed a solid sense of security about myself and know that I

Ski watercraft, and

16 after a Jet

accident

at the

,

_

leave

of Jet Skis should be held responsible for watercraft accidents nine-year-

is

It

.

cry or yell or whatever, as

Owners A

truth.

from her Parkdale horn in'" maie tm feel dtsa;^inted in ' Toronto. Nearing handled n situation that Ronccsvallcs Avenue, the to^me just 'days woman was taunted by a group story. of boys on bicycles. She told my friends and I the teens, who went to Loose were t. h a n e 18 and 19 While dancing, I was Louie’s in years old, to 00 on a grabbed in the butt,

left

old Waterloo

the

telling

whether Branigan should have assaulted one ofher assailants. ' I applaud Branigan for taking a stand, and not letting them get away with verbally assault-

attrao"*”

'

ycar-o^d woma

life.

She has convinced

in July,

Cor in me iiipilil:

believe in myself.

SchefHer, concludes that fathers

her comfort with her

life.

She has taught me never to settle for second best and to always

is crucial.

development of a

my

Both of my parents have had an enormous impact on my life. Over the years, they have become

in her neighbourhood. A bunch of boys made comments to her and she decided not to take it anymore. But the issue here is not who

a hot

Monday

long as you communicate your

The honours thesis project, done by psychology student Tanya

in the

that is certainly true in

the

On

women and

feelings.

crucial.

is

not important in

the development of

my

Waterloo study has found

being a father goes unnoticed, but

is

My mom is equally important in

recent University of

love

^

mother’s role

my

dad has always been a huge part of my life. He has always told me that I can do whatever I set my mind to. He encourages me, supports my decisions, helps me whenever he can but most of all he loves me completely and unconditionally.

kind of to be a

cial

hook when he takes me fishing. The study does not mean that a

woman’s perception of her father’s love and acceptance influence the kind of woman she will become.

Anyone can be a father but

Bar butt-arabbers have to be told

MS

tain

any libellous statements and

may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).

-


^ SPOKE

]

SPOKE,

N cws

Campus dream weavers $1 million doesn’t

go

story and Photos By Andrea Jesson

Just as

‘Td keep

my

really

crappy part-time job

sive foreign cars, elaborate vaca-

and exquisite homes. Out of 15 individuals randomly chosen at the college, only two said they would give some of the

tions

piss everybody if

I

had $50

to

Mike

off... But

the

million, I’d

buy some

to charity.

islands.”

Matt Gunzel,

Kenneth E.

Ltd.,

would

“I’d

go

to Paris.”

and

would Keri Halliday,

money to AIDS

former graphic design student

of Europe.

travel to parts

systems engineering student, said

Stevenson, woodworking and tec-

he’d leave the city and go to Australia after buying a car and a

hand,

“I’d

open a pharmacy

house. However, others had spe-

to

cific cities strip

help people get drugs.”

club and a bar,

spend

make more money, have fun with it

and party with

my friends,”

“I’d

said

folks.

Matt

Gunzel, a second-year robotics and automation student, said he would also do something for his parents after he took a vacation, paid off his debts and bought a new car and a house. “I’d keep my really crappy parttime job to piss everybody off,” said Gunzel. “But if I had $50 mil-

go

to Paris,” said former gr-

design

student

Keri

Rob McIntosh,

a third-year engineering student,

electronics

interested in pursuing his flying

hobby and would buy a plane after giving some of the money to his

to

Halliday.

woodworking and technology

But Dave Kipp, also a woodworking student, said he’d be

where they wanted

Diane Santos, media relations technician for the rec centre, would give money to charity.

their million.

aphic

Rich Fedy,

Stevenson.

Gunzel, second-year and automation student, would pay off debts.

Karey Schnittker and Valenzuela, first-year

Gary

“Fd buy a

robotics

Rob

Not surprisingly, world travel was a popular choice for most people. Jim Cumming, Microsoft

mature.

Matt

away

far as forgetting reaUty,

Electric,

hnology student, said he would invest his money where it would

buy a cottage.

as a chance to get

Welk, also a contractor for Miller’s

automation student

charities.

other

Frie, first-year generbusiness, would continue her studies, but with a new car.

al

city.

general business students, said they would quit work and school

the

Vanessa

for

after paying off her student loan, buying a new car, moving out of her mother’s house and throwing

On Electric

contractor

Daniela

and cancer

Miller’s

a

Hunter Recreation Centre, said

give the rest of the

for

money

As

second- year robotics and

the biggest party ever, she

contractor

said

“I’d move up north to get away from everything and buy a cottage way out in the bush,” he said.

Diane Santos, media relations

Clark,

Clark,

from the

themselves.

Mike

Awde

buy a cattle and dairy farm. Some found that the million would help them escape reality. he’d

Miller’s Electric Ltd., said he’d use

The restdreamed about how they would spend the million to benefit

the

ambitious, second-year

robotics student Joel

the luxuries of life such as expen-

at

stu-

dent.

or

technician

radical

woodworking and technology

John Merrick’s remains. Most were interested in

money

more

follow

“I’d open a pharmacy, to help people get drugs,” said Rich Fedy,

said they wouldn’t .buy a K-car, a

Daniela Valenzueja, first-year general business, would travel to Europe.

find

dreams.

had $1 million” ran through the minds of many dream weavers on Doon campus July 15, but they coat

1999— Page 3

far

they’d

“If I

fur

July 26,

said he

would be the first student soon as he got his

buy some islands.” Gunzel wasn’t the only one who felt $1 million wouldn’t go very far. David Shepherd, a second-

the rest,” said McIntosh. “I should

lion I’d

to retire as

diploma. “I’d

buy a house, a car and

invest

year computer electronics engi-

be able

neering student, had high expecta-

especially with no mortgage.”

tions for his million.

As far as first-year general business student Vanessa Frei is concerne, she would continue in

of it to the free software foundation and with the other half I’d start up an anti-Microsoft charity,” said Shepherd. Some students, however, said “I’d give half

to retire

school, but

parking

on the

interest,

would be pulling mto

lot

11

everyday in her

Hello Kitty car from Japan.

Dave

Kipp,

woodworking and

technology student, would buy a plane.

Canadians making Frisbee history By Adam Wilson More than 100 human tres for students

resource cen-

from Yellowknife

to

Fredericton participated in a National

Youth Employment Frisbee Challenge on July 16. An estimated 10,000 participants, between the ages of six and 50, were expected to take part in the event that

was held across Canada. Under the National Youth Frisbee Challenge, members of the community were

Along with the Frisbee were

lots

toss,

there

of other events taking place

during the afternoon, including a barbecue, free face painting and a man

making balloon animals for children. There was also a concert featuring some local bands such as Wax Elvis and The Matt Osbourne Band, and special appearances by Ranger Tex, the Kitchener Rangers’ mascot, and the Moose from Moose Winooski’s, a

expected to throw and catch Frisbees for three minutes. The participants were arranged in lines, facing each other, no

restaurant at Kitchener’s Sports World.

The objective of have as many Canadians throwing Frisbees as possible, with the total number of participants serving as

“We

less than

the toss

50

was

feet apart.

records.”

said

event co-ordinator

Amy

Robinson.

The Kitchener- Waterloo event took place at Victoria Park by the clock tower July 16 from 1 1 a.m. until 3 p.m., with the actual world record attempt taking place from noon to 12:03 p.m.

is

to

generate awareness of youth employ-

ment

on a national level. The embodies the principle of the entire program, which is getting all members of Canadian society to work together as a team to achieve a common goal. While the immediate goal was to launch a world issues

structure of the event

was to genprogram and

record, the long-term goal

youth employment issues.

The program has 360 points of serv-

new category creGuinness Book of Records

“We actually didn’t break any records, we set the first record for the new cate-

any

Employment Frisbee challenge

erate awareness of the

Amy Robinson, event co-ordinator

organization.

gory,”

actually didn’t break

to

the first entry for the

ated by the

MP Karen Redman were on hand as judges for the event. The student centre program has been operating for over 30 years and helped more than 190,000 students across Canada find jobs last summer. The purpose of the National Youth tative for

ice across

Canada. All services are and employers.

free for both students

Some of the

sources available are job

Alfred Bone, co-ordinator of Moose Winooski’s, took part in the Frisbee challenge with the Winooski mas-

postings, information sessions, indiIn order for the Frisbee toss to qualify

a Guinness record, the Human Resource Centres of Canada for Students required local media and

as

vidual assistance,

summer employment

programs, resources and referral serv- COtt.

sources of surveillance. Lynn Meyers MP, Wayne Wettlaufer MPP, Waterloo

If you would like more information about the Youth Employment Strategy call the Youth Info Line at -800-9355555 or visit their Web site at

Mayor Joan McKinnon and

www.youth.gc.ca.

political dignitaries to serve as official

a represen-

(Photo by

Adam

Wilson)

ices.

Correction Government Gives. $266 Research and Development, Mohamed Hamoodi’s name was misspelled. Spoke regrets the In a July 12 story entitled

i

1

:

I

Million to error.


1

Page 4

— SPOKE, July 26, 1999

& Activities

Issues

K-W hosts By Linda Wright

Blind

Games for the

Ontario Powerlifting

disabled

Federation

(IBPF).

Although they spoke different languages, the athletes at Albert

McCormick

arena on July

16

shared the same dream of becoming a world champion.

Kitchener-Waterloo was

Games

host to the Ontario

1999 for the

Physically Disabled.

Athletes from Canada, the United States, Spain, Netherlands, Australia and Austria were representing

Games

The

countries.

their

included golf, precision

boccia, powerlifting and track and

There are three levels of blindwhich are B 1 B2 and B3 B is totally blind; in B2 you can see shapes and objects with narrow sightedness and some light perception; in B3 you have 10 per cent vision or a narrower field of vision, which is wider than B2. “Instead of seeing through a pin hole, you can see through a toilet paper role,” said Robert Truchon, world championship six-time record holder in the bench press ness,

category.

As

field.

One of

.

,

well as not being able to see

Jones from Tampa, Fla., was com-

very well, blind people encounter additional problems such as trou-

peting in blind powerlifting.

ble balancing

competitors, Edie

the

She has been competing

games

in the

for six years in the squat,

bench press and dead

cate-

lift

gories.

Jones and the other athletes were staying

She said the food, the

University.

room and

Laurier

Wilfiid

at

the people were excel-

tion.

One

and depth of percep-

obstacle blind people

have in common with their ablebodied counterparts is weight. Before competing there is a weigh-in and Ae athletes have to be a certain weight for their

Todd Fayta, from Michigan, practises before the

category.

wore sweat

who is from North Bay,

Truchon,

said to get into shape he has to lay

lent.

nice to have an air-condi-

“It’s

off the pizza and beer a

week prior

tioner in the room,” she said, even

to the games. If he’s overweight,

though the weather here is like a cold front compared to Tampa. Just because the competitors are

he has to sit in a sauna, or sit in his van and sweat it off. As an example of how ridiculous the sport can get, Truchon told a story that happened in the United States a couple of years ago. Two university students, who were in a weight-lifting competition, went to extreme measures in order to lose weight quickly. The students

mean

blind doesn’t

they get spe-

cial treatment.

The

rules

that

apply to the Powerlifting

International

Federation (IPF) are the same rules that are followed for the disabled athletes in the International

Games

suits that didn’t

allow

and kept them sweating. As a result, the two (students) became dehydrated and

their skin to breath

died.

Truchon doesn’t think the sport worth dying for. The most he

is

was skip breakfast or few meals, he said. Another

ever did cut a

Games

area of concern in the

is

drugs.

Drug

mandatory

testing is

Games because

at the

the standards are

same as other Olympic-recognized sports. While waiting for the the

Weightlifting sport gives

man purpose

disabled

powerlifting competition begins for the Ontario

for the Physically Disabled.

in life

(Photo by Linda Wright)

drug tester to come from Ottawa, Anthony Young, a five-time world championship record holder, from Queensland, Australia, and his son, Daniel, were walking around the arena. “There’s a lot of rivalry arormd here,” said Young, who has lifted as much as 628 pounds. Daniel thinks his dad

is all right.

“He just

keeps on winning,” he said, as he handed his dad an orange juice bottle that

he couldn’t manage

to

get the lid off.

Brian Gall

the

him brain

driving accident left

for the

damaged. Ten years ago, Glen Luckham of

Columbia was

British

senger in

coma

10,000 available posi-

tions.

Those chosen

will have the

seriously

opportunity to learn about the

was a pascrashed. He was in a

federal government, though that

injured after the car he

for four months,

is not the sole pxupose of the program.

and his

injuries resulted in celebral palsy.

But Luckham

director

everything was so well organized

and the people were so said.

class

fiiendly,

he

The hospitality was first and made him feel at home. little

welcome’ and we

saying ‘you’re

feel

it.”

job with the federal government is the core of the program. This

According to the Web site for Federal Student Work Experience Program, 90,000 full-time high school, college and university students apply

most teens think about graduating and looking forward to the future. But for one young man his dreams crashed after a drunk

executive

Federal student program offers 1 0,000 jobs By

18,

of the Blind Sports Federation. Fowler was happy that the games were in Canada because al

Australian

“I love the

Daniel said he likes weights, but

By Linda Wright At

It was the first time Daniel has been to Canada and he was helping out with the games. Joining Young and his son was Young’s coach Ian Fowler, nation-

prefers soccer.

inventory

is

administered by the

Commission of Canada. Hiring departments, offering student positions, submit a

Public Service

request to the commission to

begin the selection process. After a search is conducted, students are chosen at random by the computerized system, in order to offer equal access.

The commission then

contacts

Chris Bates, co-ordinator of

candidates by phone to check

and

K-W’s Hiunan Resource Centre

today competes in powerlifting

for students, said there is never

competitions.

a shortage of applications for

on their interest and availabilty. (They usually refer five names for each job opportunity.)

the government program.

Finally,

very popular in this region. There are a lot of people

students and assess

He was

rebuilt his life,

recently in Kitchener-

Waterloo

Albert McCormick Arena as a competitor in the Ontario Games for the the

at

Glen Luckham, with cerebral palsy, competes in the powerlifting competition held July 16 at Albert McCormick Arena. (Photo by Linda Wright)

Physically Disabled.

Luckham competed

Luckham keeps busy speaking

coach,

Hatch says now when Luckham looks in the mirror he likes what he sees and weightlifting gives him a purpose in life. “Glen is

said after the accident the doctors

very dedicated to weightlifting,”

“What

adds Hatch.

happen

in the

pow-

category for persons with cerebral palsy (CP).

erlifting

Jack Hatch, didn’t expect

Luckham ’s

Luckham

to live.

After coming out of the coma,

Luckham

weighed

only

98

pounds. Inactivity caused him to balloon to 238 pounds, but today

he weighs pounds.

“He looks

in

at a

like a

muscular 150

Greek Adonis,”

says Hatch.

Hatch met Luckham in the hosand got him interested in

pital

weightlifting

Games

in

Room,

Westminister, B.C.

the in

Canada

New

Luckham self if he

laughingly asks himis

dedicated, stupid or

He can

250 and

“It

is

who qualify.” He added that

the

program

secondary

pose along with seeing how the government works. “They (students) gain real work experience that involves a lot of teamwork.” Departmental programs

accredited institution

include opportunities in nation-

exists.

says your

Canadian

year of school are eligible to

Luckham is

students

the

asks-

the worst thing that could to

response

is

Luckham

you?” The students’ death.

says

that

the

worst

living with a disability.

He

very frustrating.

among

Physically Disabled in Nottingham, England. He has also competed in Marbella, Spain and Dubai, United Arab limirates.

to

Along

with

weightlifting.

a full-time secondary or post-

high school students about the dangers of drinking and driving.

mind says one thing and your body says another and it’s

the

either

by phone or in person. To be eligible you must be

also serves an educational pur-

pounds for two repetitions 1,600 pounds on the leg presses for two repetitions. He won a silver medal and came in second in the World Games for

lift

contact

them

to

Revenue Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard and citizenship and immigration,

stupidly dedicated.

departments

thing

is

After the learn

Luckham

accident,

wished he had

died.

At

1

8,

he had

everything over again.

Not being able to talk was awful, he says. “If can save just one life, then it 1

is all

worthwhile.”

al

defence.

others.

Although there

is

no deadline

for applying to the general ing, certain

list-

departments access

the record earlier than others.

A

computerized national inventory of students seeking a

returning

next

must

student to

studies

an

in

who in

is

the

academic term, and meet the minimum

age requirement to work in the province where the job Preference Students

is

given

to

citizens.

who

work part-time

are in their last

until the

com-

pletion of their last academic

term.

Departments may ask you to provide proof that you meet these requirements.


& Activities

Issues

SPOKE, July 26, 1999

— Page 5

Nursing grad achieves childhood dreams By Lindsay Gibson

system of staff, family and friends. “I’ve learned it’s OK to be upset and shed a few

We all have childhood dreams and most of us outgrow them by the time we hit puberty, while others never stop dreaming and work towards making them a reality. Conestoga College nursing graduate Sabrina Hartman, has already fulfilled all her dreams and more at the age of 22. Growing up, Hartman talked about becoming a

tears,” she said.

who

nurse with her grandmother,

few

gram

at the

pus

right

waste.

She says looking at how the patient must feel about not being able to care for himself or herself helps her to relate to them and makes her job easier.

At

a son to

lost

okay

it’s

tears.”

pathophysiology class, where there

impiediately began working part-time at

St.

Mary’s

Hospital in Kitchener as a registered nurse on the pal-

care/medical floor, where she helps patients with end-stage cancer and other diseases in the final liative

She works on the floor where most deaths occur in the hospital, but Hartman said not all of the patients on her floor die. “Some come in for pain control and comfort management and go home again.” Hartman said she learned a lot at Conestoga, but dealing with death and dying is something her teachers couldn’t quite prepare her for.

been fine and she

of Health

By Angela

Clayfield

on her support

when

that

a team effort,” said Hartman. Being a nume in a hospital means working either day shift 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., afternoon shift 3 to 11 p.m., or evenings 1 1 p.m. to 7 a.m. Hartman likes working evenings because there is more responsibility and problem solving involved when the doctors are not

around.

up in Becoming a nurse “I hate getting

their patients.

Quebec gov-

ernment.

make

when

legislation.

their point then I think

fine that they

do

that,”

to

it’s

Jeffery

registered practical nurse in

Ontario, ity

who

has less responsibil-

than a registered nurse (RN),

makes more money than a tered nurse in Quebec.

Quebec can make up

regis-

An RN

in

to $44,072,

just off the national average.

“When you homly

start

looking at the

rate for these people, we’re

talking

$16

to

He

says

responsibility

as poorly.

Nurses,

whom

Jeffery describes

backbone of the health-care

system, put in up to 24 hours in

one

said she

Nursing graduate, Sabrina Hartman proudly holds her diploma. She is currently working part time at St. Mary’s Hospital. (Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

no

He

and gets paid

says Bouchard has

properly compensated.” The problem is not just with nurses in Quebec. Ambulance technicians have threatened to go

put the nurses into a professional

on

dilemma, meaning they have been forced to choose between higher wages and the health and safety of

Quebec has

“No

strike as well.

He

says

the

government

of

either put nurses at the

bottom of the priority

return

list

or every-

one in Quebec

is

underpaid.

unlike

other

governments

meaning, if a nurse from Quebec wanted to work in Alberta they would have to take the exam tion,

“Unfortunately that government, in

Canada, has not recognized the importance of treating nurses with appropriate salaries.”

Nurses in Quebec do not write Canadian national examina-

the

to prove their

competency.

However, “they do the same thing in Quebec as we do here,” Jeffery says. “Why would they not be paid a fair salary?”

nurse wants to compromise

the health and safety clients

Patience

(patients),”

such

ing

a

is

a virtue

strike.

Eventually the pressure will get to either the

Quebec government or

shift

health system cannot

with a mountain of

fall

too far

behind.

He

adds that when the strike be such a backlog of surgeries and diagnostic procedures like X-rays and finally ends, there will

CAT will

scans that the government have to hire more nurses to

make up

He

$23 an hour,” he

says. “That’s unbelievably poor.”

as

for

the nurses, he says, because the

says.

A

Hartman

at point of

receiving proper health care dur-

13 and 14 so negotiations could

do

true

,

work

began on June 26 and was called on July

a two-day truce

to

come

want to try different areas of nursing and maybe teach one day down the road.”

the 47,500 nurses defied back-to-

over three years.

what they have

a dream

isn’t sure yet.

of their he says. “It would be awful for any nurse in the province of Ontario to stand out in front of (a hospital) when they know that the clients need to be cared for. That is the worst possible professional dilemma... and yet they have to do it.” Jeffery says most patients are probably willing to put up with not

“If that’s

is

goals beyond finishing her degree,

that

immediate 10 per cent catch-up pay increase and another six per cent over two years. Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard will not budge on his offer of five per cent

illegal

the morning, too,” she said.

Hartman, who will be attending the University of Western Ontario in London in the fall to take her. bachelor of science and nursing degree. As far as

else

much

became

the

she has time.

no one

Quebec cannot back now because they deserve what they are asking for, says Bill Jeffery, dean of health sciences and community services. The nurses are asking for an Striking nurses in

strike

requires

“It is all

many hours with

responsibility.

turn

The

patient

plans,

Sciences and Community Services says nurses deserve 6 per cent works

take place with the

if

“I just

relies

Dean

strike

ops care deciding

She also oversees the RPNs who do the majority of the practical nursing and helps them out

Quebec nurses

The

assesses

and devel-

individual.

stages.

it’s

she

patients

lishes goals for the

some courses were harder hardest part was doing independ-

wasn’t an assigned teacher. Hartman graduated on May 7, 1999 and represented her graduating class as co-valedictorian. She

She said

be upset and shed a

to

high

after

like her

is part of a team of other (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs). As an

Sabrina Hariman, Conestoga College nursing graduate physiotherapy, for example, and estab-

Doon cam-

than others, but the

work

Mary’s, Hartman

RN learned

school in 1996. She said ent

St.

registered nurses

leukemia at the age of nine. “She always told me I would make a good nurse and said I remind- “I’ve ed her of the nurses her

son had,” Hartman said. the attended She three-year nursing pro-

People often ask Hartman how she can be a nurse, changing bedpans and cleaning up other people’s

for the overload.

says in nursing, a passion for

caring for patients it

is

important but

can’t be everything.

“You can care for so long and then it doesn’t matter anymore,” he says. “You have to be

Lineups were long at the Registrar’s Office July 13 as students waited to pay their tuition prior (Photo by Lindsay Gibson) 1 4 deadline.

to the July


Page 6

— SPOKE, July 26, 1999

PO

SiInUrdlejn t]Liilre It

Emotions

harder than a hockey puck

hit

By Lesiey Turnbuil

“I didn’t like

The puck glided across the ice at a tremendous pace, picking up more speed as it

was shot

into the

air.

slow motion, the spectators swivelled their heads to the left, and watched with

puck

home

life

travelled towards the

team’s bench. In seconds, the puck

She

Teresa Bricker,

Teresa Bricker, four months later at the hockey arena. (Photo by Lesley Turnbull)

Bricker arrived at the hospital all she was worried about was what the score

She had taken Tylenol 3 and was extremely nauseous, but she didn’t want to miss seeing the Condors’ last game of the sea-

was back

at Conestoga College, where the second last game of the season was being played during the national playoffs.

“I

was upset because

game,” she

I

was missing

the

said.

The next morning the Cambrian team her flowers. The Conestoga coach called to see how she was doing.

sent also

people stopping by and calling. \^en you have such you really appreciate what you have

“I really appreciated

the house

a scare,

a lot more,” said Bricker.

The Conestoga Condors hockey team won the game that day and went on to the gold round to win silver in the Nationals. Bricker, the manager of the Condors since September of 1997, went to watch them win

Mary’s Hospital.

how

important fiiends are,” Bricker said.

in the last

few minutes of play.

son.

Walter Gretzky,

say they have nothing Gail

PUS was

campus

until the present.

nudist

group,

the

for

swims every month from September granted, he scheduled

University of Toronto Naturists

Their

(UTN), had just finished an interview with another university newspaper when the journalist

ticipants.

requested a photo for the story.

“So I said, ‘Why not get a nude shot of me?”’ the 26-year-old asked. The full-frontal picture appeared in Ryerson Polytechnic University’s paper as part of Lundy’s attempt to spread the word about UTN.

The club is not even a year old, having only started in September of 1998, but Lundy has been pracand says it’s a habitual thing now. While studying in Europe he learned of a Dutch group that has been around for years

1967.

student

JNSN

group

that

similar activities as

much

larger,

is

a national

engages

UTN,

but

in is

with thousands of

members. While in Europe in 1994 Lundy became a member of the Dutch group and continues to renew his membership. While there he also attended events in

France and England. He found starting a group of his own to be fairly easy. Filling out the

paperwork

The doctor had told her that if she had any problems she should see a doctor, but Bricker said she doesn’t want to have a spelook at it now. “I’m afraid they’ll want to take out cartilage or put tubes in and I don’t want any-

Gretzky’s father,

cerned about her teeth than her nose. “I had to wait weeks to get them fixed because they were loose and sensitive.” On her first day back to school, Bricker felt like an alien. “People would glance and quickly look away and look back again. I knew they were just curious but

I felt like a freak.” Bricker said she lost an enormous amount of self-esteem after the accident.

more needles or

scars,” said Bricker.

She had decided earlier in the year that the ’98/’99 season would be her last with the team.

“This just solidified

my

decision,” she

said.

She said she had gone two years with sevand pucks. “Before the game I had even thought

eral close encounters with sticks

about how lucky I was to make it through two seasons without injury,” said Bricker. “I guess

I

jinxed myself.”

Although she had been content with her looks before the accident, she realized how she had taken them for granted. “You never appreciate what you have until

mubh it’s

almost taken away,” she

said.

“That goes

for anything in life.”

Cranking out

killer riffs

to hide

to

become

a

cam-

pus club and asking the faculty of education to use their facilities for co-ed nude swimming were the only obstacles. When the request

Word has

UTN

leyball

first

that attracted 37 parEveryone involved so far has had nothing but positive comments, though the participation level has been modest. About 12 people attend every swim, the club’s main event.

He

has a theory as to why there have never been any disturbances.

“The reason

it has all been so because when you’re nude you have nothing to hide.”

He

is

said

whole

a

different

dynamic would be brought in if he allowed people to wear clothes and just watch club meetings.

“The real crazies, the perverts and everything, never come because they would be in a position where they can’t hide from

who they really arc.” One of the reasons started

would

was try

it

UTN

to educate, so

was

people

and sec nudity is not and not the least

really a big deal

sexual. The average age of members is 25 and up. There arc always more men at swims. Lundy guesses few women participate because of the way they arc portrayed by the media. He bit

believes

look

like

women the

feel

they

must

digitally-enhanced

revealing pictures of models and

therefore

have

its

conception. In the

Lundy

advertised by

putting up hundreds of posters on

campus, creating a Web site and being mentioned on of T’s radio station. Since then, the club has been covered in The National Post, The Toronto Star and Campus Canada magazine. Lundy has also been interviewed by nine US. radio stations as well as one in

U

event was a nude vol-

game

positive

definitely spread about

since

beginning,

nude photo in broad daylight. The founder of Canada’s first a

since

longer

dence.

Though it was -5 C outside, Thomas Lundy offered to pose for

tising

Wajme

had witnessed Bricker’s accident the day before and approached her. “He said he had been worried all night and was glad to see I was OK,” said Bricker. After the accident, she was more con-

University of Toronto nudists By Brian

me

cialist

accident.

realize

just after the accident. (Photo courtesy of the Bricker family)

When

Everyone behind the bench moved at once. Minutes after the accident, Bricker was rushed to hospital in an ambulance. She had a broken nose and two chipped teeth and required stitches to close the dime-sized hole where flesh used to be. “I’m very lucky,” said Bricker. “I could have lost an eye, dislocated my jaw, received brain damage, or been killed if the puck had hit anywhere else on my face.” Her parents were waiting with two of her friends, Laurie Campbell and Danielle

made me

eating takes

my my

than before.”

her face in her hands. “I freaked out, screaming like in an oldfashion horror movie,” she said, recalling

“It (the accident)

on her nose

mouth open and

found

However, even more horrendous was the sound of Bricker’s screams as she realized what had just happened to her. Blood rushed from her nose and Bricker cradled

Laiuieville, at St.

felt

fig-

felt

“I still have trouble breathing through nose,” she said. “I have to sleep with

the bone.

March 19

I I

her doctor did an amazing job and is healing fast and is hardly noticeable now.

The sound of impact was sickening. At first it was a soft sound, as it hit the skin,

the

picture taken and

can change or end.

the scar

Condors.

it

my

“Life’s too short,” said Bricker.

slammed into the face of Teresa Bricker, the hockey manager for the Conestoga

and then a loud crack followed as

want

didn’t belong at a bar or a club.

ured if I did catch a guy looking at me it was because of my scars and not because he thought 1 was attractive,” she said. The accident made her realize how fast

In

intensity as the

1

less

self-confi-

New Zealand. And he turned down an offer to appear on The Late Show with David Letterman. Though three days in New York with all e^enses paid was tempting, Lundy says making a wacky video of him and his swimmers was not what he had mind. Taking a positive, humorous attitude along with him on his quest, Lundy said he finds the idea of people being uptight about nudity in

comical. “1 think it’s funny because if 1 had a swimsuit on, which only hides about five per cent of the body, I wouldn’t be considered nude. And it just seems like it’s right out of a Monty Python film. It seems so funny.” While he was dancing to music accompanied by bongo drums at a yoga club recently, Lundy was so hot he told the owner he felt like getting naked. She wouldn’t go for that although she allowed him to

take his shirt

oft'.

“But maybe next knows,” he said.

time,

who

Bassist Adam Webb, a third*year accounting student at Conestoga College, played with Wax Elvis during the Frisbee-throw event for Kitchener-Waterloo Career Connections on July 16. (Photo by Anna Sajfert)


SPOKE, July 26,

PO

1999

— Page 7

1-1

S1[1Urdlein t]Lii:te

Building relationships Director of

development seeks college

and government

links with industry

By Brad Dugard

having

after

Andrew

for

governments

MP

for

cooperate in the future.

“We

is

Kitchener-Waterloo, in Ottawa,

Hamoodi is why best. That does Conestoga College hired him

for four years before joining

nine weeks ago.

to

Building

relationships

Mohamed

what

Conestoga.

“The

His new job as director of development requires him to form relationships between private industry, government and

government wants us succeed but they don’t want to be handing us money all the time,” he said. “If we can access some funds that will go to expand and modify some of the

the college.

college’s

programs that is where I come in ... to lobby on behalf of

create partnerships These situation for wih-win involved, he everyone gets the Conestoga said.

the college at the federal level (of

a

government).” In Hamoodi’s case, lobbying

projects.

Hamoodi

said these partner-

ships are the key to Conestoga’s success.

“If

knot with

college

the

-

establishes

-

sectors

College, works

development

of

at

Conestoga

(Photo by Brad Dugard)

his office.

and will be land a job,” he said.

“This

is

one of the main tasks of

rhy job here.”

from Iraq

who

emigrated

Canada

to

1988,

in

aware of the partnerships of

keenly importance is

Hamoodi,

new primarily the Information Technology centre at Waterloo campus and the machine shop at the Guelph campus.

Photo expert offers advice

He

new job way

said his

is

about defining the

really

colleges.

Obstacles

and

can’t operate independently

from one another. We are in this together. We have to find a way to work together and that is really the key to (Conestoga’s) success,” he said.

The best way to get money, Hamoodi said, is to maintain a high level of success at the college and be willing to form alliances with the private sector. “I think once you prove to those who are in a high position that the only option is to work together,

wisdom

think

I

will

prevail.”

He said he does not have one specific goal in mind when he thinks of his future at Conestoga; instead, he has a general principle that guides his course through life.

“My

cial):

the

private

will be recognized

networked to

in

director

ties

graduates

then

.

good

and

public

the

Mohamed Hamoodi,

the

ties

is

of the college to the government officials that hold the purse strings. He said there are a few college projects that have been because of the approved college ’sgood reputation with the governments (federal and provinselling the merits

cash to grow, necessary ndustry gets highly qualified graduates to hire, and the bragging gets government rights on the success of the

employers

worked

Telegdi,

goal

to face, confront

is

and succeed

in every

challenge

dream of being vice-president or president. My goal always is to look for the challenge, face the challenge I face.

don’t have a

I

and win

it.”

make

in life

student more dedicated By Angela

during a 'presenLition to a press photograpliv class at Conestoga

Ciayfieid

camera tricks and really good equipment These are the basic.s needed to be a good photographer, said Matt MeCarthy. who has been taking pictuies for 'ITie Record

The Ixiyalist College graduate reminded the students they feel good won't always about what they are shooting,

for 2fi years.

but

lithics,

Really

good

equipment

is

you

don’t

invade

peoples

getting

in

their

especially it

has

at

to

accident scenes,

be done because

it’s'

he finds they leave him alone if he tells them he's just doing his job and occasionally asks for their excuse (for being tlicrc). “That will shut them up pretty fasjt.” he said. In his job McCarthy takes pictures of everything from news to

by

onlookers to get a shot, spccta-

are just as

seem too

but there

difficult,

many

“The key

is

tricks to shoot-

not to

make

the

food look like vomit,” he said. This is achiev’cd by using soft light

and colourful plates and

McCarthy shared a few essenwith the up-and-coming photographers that will allow tial tips

them

to

go home happy

end of the

at the

and what they do. “If you can do this, you can say, ‘I did a

is

good

You can go home

job.’

happy.”

good thing to remember is that some jieople don’t like photographers and a

they get angry. a

good

idea,

He said

it’s

when shooting

often inci-

dents like a house fire, car acci-

dent or disaster, that you let them know you’re there and

sometimes they won’t care. Lastly, he says, if you can get a picture that’s kind of cool, why not do it?

“They (accident photos) are

(Photo by Angela Ctayfietd)

schedule allows.

not about the car that’s been McCarthy said. crunched,” “They’re about the people.”

“I’U

work once

His

sumer. “It (collife)

“It’s

Kitchener.

not the tuition fee,

think

it’s

I

reasonable.”

second-year

LASA

few has

he

consider-

private

investi-

gation.

He

the

of

out

eighth

nine

Bradshaw knows

the

is

to in

living while being a student, hus-

more

father

is

a task most

not

the

tuition

reasonable,”

it’s

fee,

is

the

I

said

Bradshaw. “It’s the $30,000 that could accumulate for living balancing act between college and family is the biggest challenge for Bradshaw so far. However, he said he is determined

The

complete the program one way

Most same

the

second

and

program

LASA than

is

improve

some

the

policing

more

said.

starting

private investigation

their

in

much

it

Bradshaw

take time and feels

in

year

last

appealing,

to

students

path

rather

realizes

much

is

and the money

because

He

expenses.”

start-

company

sector

private

interesting

good.

take

other students don’t experience.

said

investigation

like goal he'd a pursue and admits that working

recently learned that the cost of

band and

own

ing his

importance of family and has

children,

last

ing a career in

student

draining.”

to

said

over the

been

Sean Bradshaw,

and

Bradshaw years

is

mentally

think

involve renova-

and construction and expansion at Price Costco in

As far as his professional aspirations,

financially, physically

moon,

in a blue

summer jobs

at

the college this

his

tion at the college

on

construction

at

in

but not on a regular basis,” he said.

student

working

when

only

but

school,

“It’s

Second,

longer. Despite the pressure,

Bradshaw works part time Canaan Construction while he’s

without the support of his wife,

Being

day.

come back to the newsroom with more than a headshot, he said. The point is to show the reader who Ihe person First,

much

husband and father of two, said

lege

garnish,

Record photographer Matthew McCarffty gives a few tips to a second-semester photography class at Conestoga College.

but

school,

hard to

it

own hves while in Shawn Bradshaw,

tion

privacy

feel

students find

fashion, he said.

not

sometimes make him

may

Taking pictures of food

McCarthy says once he has pushed through a crowd of tons

Most

handle their

ing food as there arc to shooting

food.

to

face he said

have to take the courses one at a time and therefore it will take

By Andrea Jesson

another year at Conestoga would be out of the question. “If she wasn’t behind me I wouldn’t even consider coming back,” said Bradshaw, a secondyear law and security administra-

their job.

have

helpful because with a large lens

College.

like a "bf!: Iiiagin' ghoul.” but

his

company

it is

his education

own will

necessary

by taking

part-time business courses.

Although he

feels his ambitions

how he

deals with the

or another.

are high,

‘Trying to juggle her (his wife’s) schedule and mine has been really

obstacles of life will determine his

hard,” he said.

Whether

it’s

night school,

correspondence or

Bradshaw

said he’ll

finish the required courses to get

his

diploma.

However, he may

future in the LASA program at Conestoga College. “So far I’m scheduled to come back in September,” he said. “And I will be, unless I’m a last minute pull-out.”


Page 8

— SPOKE, July

26, 1999

By Anna They

Sajfert

Nightingales practise three times a week, two hours a day. They have performed in most

are young, talented

and they sing

like

nightingales.

The Dutch Nightingales celebrated

their

60th anniversary at Kitchener City Hall July 1 7 with an outdoor concert.

About 50 people came to hear and watch the European choir of Oosrerhour, Holland, sing and dance in the summer heat.

These are

children

absolutely

major European cities, including Vatican Citk and have travelled as far as Iran and

met

lacking talent

organizer’s shortfalls such as failure to

provide food necessities and adequate shelter-

By Angela

ing.

“That’s

when

I

said to myself,

‘I

better job organizing than that.’ I love to help.

You always get blessed (for helping others),” The organizers ran into minor frustrations when two local families cancelled.

Album Review iv

scrambled for housing, but it worked out in the end” she said, “For example, one family in New Hamburg has decided to care for six choir members.”

Big Daddy

soundtrack If the songs on the Big Daddy soundtrack are any indication of

night.

their travel

the quality of the movie,

Adam

Also, they receive gifts from the

3 p.m. Friday afternoon, the spectators held firm in their seats while 45 choir members, between 10 and 20 years of age, sang in 10

always,” said Tony Schoones, who has been the choir’s director since 1972. While the Nightingales may collect

including English, Dutch, French, Russian, Polish, Italian and German. It was their seventh visit to Kitchener-Waterloo. Caroline Parks, volunteer, organizer and

adding the choir’s performances are

languages

their bigjgest fan, said the

members

top-ranking

group consists of

only.

3

“In the three graduating ranks, ^ere there are Finches, Tkmouses and Nightingales}, it is

only the to

last ‘bird’ that gets to travel

^e world” she said.

and sing

lit

with passion. “They sing

Tike angels.”

the

to

top-ranking

By Brad Ougard

* * *

your goal in life is to see Nicole Kidman in the buff, and I know it is, go see Eyes Wide Shut, the newest and final instalment in Stanley Kubrick’s long distinguished career.

However, if you want to see a good Kubrick film you had better

head to the video store because you won’t find it playing at your local

Famous

Players.

Sheryl

Kubrick has,

in his other films,

emotion that

is

in the

in

it

its

Crow has

forever ruined

htoe, originally done by Guns

ing the group’s Kitchener-Waterloo ‘^events, another company was super-vising the Niglitingales.

choir,

the

Roses.

and dan Latigeweg perform" the ethnic Shoe Dance at the DCftch Nightingales concert. Dotfth

was a disaster.’”-^ She heard on thelfadio about the

fof'

(KnotonyAnnabajtert)

tale of despair

a seductively beautiful temptress who purposefully sends her husband to the brink of insan-

with her wily ways. Set in New York amid the “squalor” of the upper west side, the movie takes the viewer on a twisted journey through the depths of human corruption - drugs, sexity

wooden

in the first half

of the

’n’

with the result being as broken top. The only remake that is a slight

improvement version of

their seats as

human mind, Kubrick likely want-

she described, to her husband, her

ed a certain amo}mt of confusion and xm-realism within Cruise’s

by George Harrison. I’m not a professional musician and you may only catch me

theatre

Many men

squirmed in

all-consuming

young naval

attraction

officer.

to

a

That descrip-

tion is the catalyst for Cruise’s

While Cruise’s.acting is wooden and awkward, Kidman’s is grace-

feel

acceptance.

While Kidman’s performance may win her an Oscar, Cruise plays his normal stolid self -

it,

ly twisted films that explore the

truly believable.

descent into darkness.

to

viewer -

absent from this

just not the

in the

movie and unconvincing in the second half. Kidman, however, is

of absolute power - with the intent of showing the viewer the lengths

which man can go

it’s

Kubrick did not intend for the audience to be slightly confused. Being a master of psychological-

ual depravity, and the corruption

to

Somehow

same without a guitar solo from Slash and the screech of Axle Rose’s voice. Sorry, Sheryl, you just can’t compete with that. The majority of the album is an attempt to put new spins on old songs. But there seems to be too little (or way too much) effort put

ful.

Unfortunately, the chemistry

Kubrick hoped to acquire by using a husband and wife team is absent.

However,

this is not to say that

character.

This film

effective as a

singing if

I

Shawn

is

What

Mullins’s

Life? written

is

don’t think anyone

is

not for everyone. If you are looking for a light-hearted night at the theatre with no think-

do know: open your mouth when you sing Rufus Wainwright. Or should

ing required this movie should not

I

be on your

is

list.

If, however, you want to see and judge for yourself the work of one of the finest filmmakers ever, then go see Eyes Wide Shut.

around, but there

say

Bob Dylan,

The one

is

one

it’s

thin g

hard to

surprise,

I

tell.

a different

sound from Spice Girl Melanie C.

now I have never heard her voice accompanied by anything heavier than Bryan Adams and Until

he’s

gone

soft in his old age.

The mental images created by the songs are perfect for the

Sandler

awakened emotion

to

would

my ability to enjoy Sweet Child of

into

If

and

listen

I

had

I

entirety again.

of goodwill. they mostly woiry^ abdut ^ ^ding local* families to care ^^d House die clnidreti. Patks said before she began otgahiz-

is

Movie Review

director

spin,

promise myself

never

Eyes Wide Shut disappointing *

one

^d

“it

Currently

After just

‘These children are absolutely marvelous,” she said, her eyes

soundtrack.

just gestures

She

-,.^ ,.

for the

approximately $ 1,000 at a concert in

Holland the majority of their performances feature a goodwill offering, he said. “It’s never been about tiie haoney, and it’s not about money,” said Parks,

different

make up

to

After just one spin, I had to promise myself I would never listen to it again. It’s proof that most of the music industry is too busy to come up with an original

of Holland and collect other goodwill donations. “There are financial struggles

Even though the temperature rose to 30 C by

away

loss.

cities

volunteer organizer

hope

I

Sandler has some cash

stored

at concerts.

Caroline Parks

.

“We

expenses through part-time jobs, and most importantly, through profits col-^ lected from selling their CDs and

sing like angels.

Clayfield

could do a

“They sing everywhere they go,” Parks said adding the simplest qf the choir’s good manner include singing to people who offer them their services such as to restaurant managers and bus drivers. “They greeted Mayor Carl Zehr witli the song We’re Much Obliged” Parks said, adding the mayor met with the Nightingales and group volimteers

The Nightingales cover

marvelous. They

soundtrack

Iraq.

Thursday

Daddy

Big

Nightingales sing at

quiet

flick,

Adam

from montage

moment

in the

dark.

to a

The

soundtrack gives a good indica-

of how the movie unfurls. If I known this music went with the movie, the idea of boy meets girl etc. might have crossed my mind. With the exception of Limp Bizkit’s Just Like This. No romantic boy meets girl imagery tion

movie. In 2001; A Space Odyssey, a sense of wonder enveloped the viewer as surreal scenes transported the audience into the future. In

Full Metal Jacket, the viewer

was

taken back to a time and place

hadn’t

where men became animals and because of that transformation a

there.

generation was

of it, funny or to remind the listener of that part of the movie, but Sandler’s dialogue, though typical of the characters he plays, isn’t really fiinny unless you’ve seen the movie.

lost.

Each of Kubrick’s films was deemed a ground-breaking film; that

is,

until this last curtain.

Eyes Wide Shut is a sexually charged thriller starring Tom Cruise as Dr. William Harford, a man tortured by desire and torn by jealousy. His wife, played by Cruise’s real wife, Nicoie Kidman,

The album

features

from the motion

was designed

So

dialogue

picture. All

to be

Adam

words and gestures of Sandler himself as seen in

Billy

Madison,

in the

(raspberry).

thumbs down

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