Page 1

^

1

^ /Z

C^4~

Waterloo Region grabs the wheel K-W and Cambridge buses when

bus link between Conestoga Doon campus and

College’s

Cambridge

now

closer to reality

is

Region of Waterloo has approved a motion to take that the

over public transit in the region. The region made the decision late

month

last

merge the

to

municipal transit systems in Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo by Jan. 1, 2000. The

new

regional transit entity

also

have the authority

wUl

to bring

bus service to the townships of Wilmot and Woolwich. “The concept to regionalize transit has been approved, but we don’t have the details on it yet,” said

Sandy Roberts,

director of

marketing for Kitchener Transit. “We’re putting together the implementation plan now.” The region approved only two areas of amalgamation in June: transit and garbage pickup. With Kitchener Transit now in the hands of the Region of Waterloo, there are many changes in store for the system.

Roberts said that although the name “Kitchener Transit” is well recognized and respected, likely

is

it

the

new

transit service will

regional

have a new

name. view,

new name, a whole new image and a whole new logo.” Will the bus link between Doon campus and Cambridge start the morning of Jan. 1, 2000? Not likeaccording to Roberts. With only six months until the deadline, there are many other matters ly,

have

be dealt with first, employees, unions, transfers, monthly passes and that

like

a marketing point-of-

we

are going

to

merge with Cambridge

totally

Transit,”

said Roberts. “We’ll have a

whole

to

fares,

.

operations.

But Roberts did say the link has been in the works for quite some time.

“We’ve always tried to do that anyway,” said Roberts. “There’s the issue of the licence (for

still

Highway 8 corridor).” Trentway-Wagar is currently

the

the sole holder of a licence for the corridor, and expressed its con-

cerns in

The Record about

the.

region’s plans for entering that

market. Trentway- Wagar, as a private, for-profit transportation

company, wiU have a difficult time competing with a subsidized public transit system.

Under provincial law, Region of Waterloo has

the the

authority to request the rights to

corridor; the cities of Kitchener and Cambridge were never able to get the licence.

So what

will

change on Jan.

will be reporting

to

“By

region,” said Roberts.

1

?

the that

time they wiU have assumed the assets of Kitchener Transit such as the buildings

and buses.”

College FM radio station outcome couid be decided any day now CRTC deciding college will receive 88.3 MHz if

By Brian

Gall

gazetted, for a

new

FM

radio station could

come any time within the next two months, according to an information officer at the

COMMLNTARY ^Vh^ t'

is e\

CRTC.

4

SO afraid of fat?

ing.

The college made June of 1998, and

its

request in

if granted,

non-profit instructional

mission held a hearing May 3 in Vancouver, but decisions can take

2000 The

two

to four

months, Maria Dasilva

Twenty-three

en one

be seeking the radio frequency of 88.3 MHz at the May hear-

to

The Canadian Radio-Televison and Telecommunications Com-

said.

Page 2

was the only one or publicly announced

application

Conestoga College’s application

letters

of support

from local radio stations, politiand other parties have been received by the CRTC. cians,

Opposition to the application has not been filed.

Dasilva said that Conestoga’s

Doon campus groundskeeper Peter Higgins cleans up some dead brush around the campus on June 30. (Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

College groundskeeper battles stubborn weeds

the

“We

“From

meet

region takes over public transit

By Chadwick Severn

A

will

station

could be on the

a

campus air

by

.

would reach about halfway to Toronto and London, south over Lake Erie and north

station’s signal

about two hours, past Fergus. Broadcasting and journalism students would produce about 60 per cent of the content as part of their career training and volunteers are expected to help with alternate programming.

By Lindsay Gibson Taking care and maintaining the land at the Doon campus of

has to work on getting the grass to grow back. “Pesticide isn’t pesticide imless it

is

used on grass. Used on grass

Conestoga College would be a big job for anyone, but for Peter Higgins, groundskeeper for the college, it’s all about making sure

areas of high,

everything gets done. Higgins, and the two students hired to help him over the sum-

importance in terms of pesticide use and general maintenance. The Student Client Service Building is

mer months, pay to the land

close attention

and gardens surround-

like this

acres

will be attending the University of Waterloo in September - have

their

work

Due

cut out for them.

summer’s drought, a of vegetation, grass and trees have been lost. Before the weeds can be sprayed with pesticides, Higgins said he lot

to last

is

broken down into medium and low

ranked as a high low.

over the area. Higgins and his students - one is a Conestoga student and the other

like a herbi-

whereas ranked as

priority,

the far side of the lake

Building because that is what people visiting the college see

he said. But when visitors or anyone at the college take the short walk through the forest and see the area between the blue parking lot and the business wing they are bombarded with weeds. It appears the weeds have taken

more

is

The college

ing the Student Client Services

first,

it

cide,” said Higgins.

is

There are approximately 140 of land at the college, stretching from Highway 401 all the

way

to the field at the far side

of Doon Valley Drive. Higgins said there is constant maintenance to be done and right now he is focusing on cleaning up the area, mulching and getting rid of dead brush and trees. “I am trying to nurse some of the trees planted last spring through one of the worst summers,” Higgins said. The maintenance never stops he said, even in the winter when the gardens are not a priority. “It’s busier in the winter,” he said. “Between getting rid of the snow and keeping things clean there’s a lot to do.!’

»

*

.


New

big-box theatre will dwarf Princess and King cinemas On

June 28,

after

more

than

eight

movies I’ve seen in the last couple of years. Not that I have some kind of paternal bond with the theatre, but it’s a decent place that doesn’t deserve to be run into the ground

of de-

hours

bating, bicker-

council passed

amendments

the knees.)

rush

I

City

made

I’m worried the popular Princess

The other

12-screen,

downtown happen

over

my

desired

I use that term considering Marilyn

loosely

Monroe was chunky by

ob-

are

flavourless granola bar.

body weight, and

who

friends

my

One gram of fat

today’s

sessed with

standards, is not going to kill

calorie

me. I will not automatically expand like a blowfish sans

counting and weight gain.

They

spikes. If that should ever hap-

eat

food for lunch,

rabbit

if

and

when they have lunch, and prefer light

regular

the

dressing to

guess they think they’ll only gain a gram of fat because that’s all the fat supposedly stuff. I

found in

The

am

doesn’t mat-

it

by how people can calculate in their heads exactly how much fat and calo-

ter. I

baffled

of food. Why would anyone want to do that? Unless you are extremely overweight and you have a glandular problem, don’t worry about it. Moderation is the key. For example, I can eat just about

ries are in a dish

anything.

I

don’t calculate fat

and caloric intakes; in fact, I don’t even know how to do it. (Frankly, there are better things

my

do with

can

time).

1

So,

whole bag of chips, and these aren’t any instead of eating the

wimpy small

“light” chips,

bowl

exercise and

full. 1

1

am

protrude and

1

take a

get regular

a healthy

weight. Meaning,

my

body

ribs don’t

only have one

1

chin. Still,

fat

the mystery of the fear of

eludes me.

1

A

friend of

down

I

may take

being built in the downtown area would just knock me out of my chair. But it did the complete

movie

Krispie Treat; get over

it.

Sure,

little chunk of 95 per cent puffed rice and five per cent everything else has 27 fat calo-

don’t fear the

ries.

And

sure,

unused calories

turn into fat but as long as

you

High-freq u e n c y machines are

it.

in

How the

insignificant

universe.

Or

maybe, you could have thought about

how

insignificant three

grams of fat are to your total body weight. If you think about it for awhile, you might lose another ounce.

dingy,

three-

storey

barn

somewhere

been

to.

mean

will

that lots of

hated walking to a theatre. Maybe that’s just me wishing for drive-ins

come back. Building a complex such as this

monstrosity in the

downtown

area

of Waterloo will most likely mean is

whjch

for the area,

And

always good.

will

it

mean

more jobs, which is also good. But what will be the effects of this new

boot.

I’m urging you to take advantage of King’s College and Princess cinemas now, because I’m sure they won’t be here much longer. And that’s a shame.

will

happen

to

my dear of

%

in

Anna Sajfert

By

Thailand.

the supple, greasy machines

sit

to be young girls; hard to identify their age and gender, for their physique is too fragile and bodies too undernourished. They sit silently but they work as fast as the machinery, which is spitting

.

into the closed space. Suddenly, a voice from nowhere

A

face twitches in anger.

flexes the muscles in his right

hand while clutching a two-byleft.

“Get back to work,” he yells to young labourers. “Unless,” tbe guard probes, “you want to work

the

harder.”

On May

10, 1993, the

fire

in

the

occurred

most

fatal

history at

a

Kader

Industrial

Toy

all

of toy

The toy company had'employed workers manufacturing stuffed toys and plastic dolls, playthings destined for America. The global commerce, it seems, despite its alleged modernity and whiz technologies, has restored the old barbarism that had long 3,000

been outlawed. Far away in southern Thailand, little

cheap labour and underprivileged workers can minimize the cost of Therefore, enterprises nations

-

profit

-

or rich

from doing busi-

ness in low-cost labour markets

where rights

absence

makes

it

democratic

of

much easier to sup-

press wages. In other words, the rich nations

fied.

fumes

industrial

production goods.

but 14 were girls as 13. Ninety per cent of the dead bodies were not identi-

it is

eight in his

other, while others gave into the burning flames. Among the 200 dead and 469

Company, young as

They appear

He

simple equation reads: We chose capital over human beings. If the cost of supply is the problem of capitalist enterprise, then

injured at the

children.

A

on the outskirts of Bangkok, After the factory guards were ordered to lock all the doors and block all exits, some young labourers jumped from the third floor, crashing on top of each factory

4

southern

capitalism

Spoke

like Silver City

Having a theatre

downtown

theatre?

w

draconian, bulky man appears before the young labourers. His shirt is soaked in sweat and his

are

the best

is

it

theatre I’ve ever

But what

shouts, “Fire, fire.”

we

of

friend. Silver City? It is a bit out

But what wonderful things could you have done with your brain instead of worrying about fat and fat from calories? You you know

to Silver

the trip worthwhile.

Who

was the

ounces.

as

way out

got on the

more business

either.

wouldn’t like those fantastic seats, surround sound and ample leg room. And it has a Taco Bell to

have the ability to walk, you’ll be fine. The energy you can get from eating two Rice Krispie Treats will let you jog for about six minutes. So if you’d rather play with your dog, go do that for a little while and congratulations, you just lost about four

life

buried

Silver City. Honestly,

however,

could have contemplated

to

Canadians pumping money into draconian sweatshops loudly inside a

it

it

at

don’t

I

Lastly, there is the question

saw some of the best

I

pounding

had too much fat and too many calories. It was a Rice

because

place where

Treat

Krispie

want to see

to think about the small-

mine once turned

Rice

a

the fat

that

light dressing.

fact is that

pen to anyone, war seriously.

few good movies

For those of you who don’t know me. I’m a bit of a movie fanatic, and you would think that the announcement of a new theatre

began

went

to

after their initial the-

I’ve seen a

er theatres. King’s College

I

that anticipation

Orange years

to Silver City?

opposite.

Star Wars,

people can walk to it and that just wouldn’t be the same. I’ve always

atrical run.

and what will

Each time

to the theatre.

about is Cinema. It’s the kind of theatre a I’ve always wanted to go to small independent cinema that isn’t afraid to show movies like Dune or Crash or A Clockwork

the Princess as well, and

I

in

area,

theatre

on the former Seagram land. There are two things that I was wondering after I read the article in The Record: what will happen to the smaller theatres in the

everyone so afraid of fat? I have some

an out-of-town theatre, is you get going

see

built

fat lurking

City, as

those inside steps are a real pain in

3,000-seat movie theatre to be

one or two grams of

in the downtown area would be a bonus. But what is so good about Silver

Waterloo

a

is

having a theatre exact-

same

that excitement rush

that will allow

Why

And

ly the

by the big hitters of the movie complex industry. (Even though

ing and voting,

Fear of fat drives some to obsessive behaviour

town.

women work

18-hour days

for a handful of rice.

Even worse,

at

our doorstep the

sweatshops are emerging as fast as worms come wiggling on the

ground after a rainy day. But why, at the verge of the 21st century, with the advanced technologies and eight powerful nations, is this barbaric work act alive?

The problem

is,

you

sec, just

Sl’OKH

Keeping Conestoga College conneeted

is

it.

of human because they advocate them for the sole purpose of boosting up their profits. Canadian dollars spent at popular stores such as The Gap, WalMart, Sears, Tommy Hilfiger and Toys ‘R’ Us, may go not towards are the

main

instigators

rights abuses

the

young

meal but

labourer’s

to

governments, the

their tyrannical

leaders of human rights abuses.

Again, a western corporation investments chasing strategic based on cost advantages (offered through repressive societies) cannot be expected to partake in advocating human rights.

They haven’t

before, they aren’t

and don’t bet the enteiprises are going to suddenly shift focus on the less advantaged in the today,

near future.

mainly I'undcd from September to

May

by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). Tlie views and opinions expressed in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in

the views ot

SPOKE

are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

SPOKE

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Lindsay Gibson; News Editor: Chadwick Severn; Student Life Editor:Andrca Jesson; Issues/Activities Editor: John Obcrholtzcr; Photo Editor: Anna Sajfert; Production Manager: Lesley Turnbull; Advertising is

Manager: Michelle Lehmann Circulation Manager:

SPOKE’s

Adam

Wilson; Faculty Supervisors:Jerry Frank and Christina Jonas;

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spokc@conestogae.on.ca address

is

logo.

out of errors in advertising

beyond the amount paid for the must be sent to the editor by

space. Unsolicited submissions

a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or M5i tain

Word

file

would be

Submissions must not

helpful.

any libellous statements and

con^^K

may be accompanied by

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE July

12 , 1999

— Page 3

Should there be tougher laws against swearing? & Photos

story

By Angela

Clayfield

Shawn Bradshaw, a second-year law and security administration student, assured me he doesn’t swear because it’s a sign of poor taste. Then he spilled his coffee on the pavement. Perhaps it was an attempt to prove himself, or perhaps it was an accident. Either way, he didn’t swear. If he had, and there were children within earshot, he could have found himself in serious trouble. Recently there have been cases of people being punished for swearing in public.

And

punishment

was

critics

a

say the

little

too

extreme.

25-year-old computer programmer from Detroit could spend 90 days in jail for letting a string of curses fly after he capsized his canoe. There where children within earshot and under a

seldom used, or known, American law he was charged with swearing in front of minors. Another little known fact - in Canada, under the even less familiar Radio Communications Act, you may not swear on a citizen’s band radio. Trucker Ron Schofield found that out when he led a convoy through a small toAvn in southeastern Saskatchewan in poor weath-

RCMP

An officer pulled him over after hearing the profane language. Although the

man was

able to

avoid the charges in the en4 he lost his job and his wife because

of the incident.

Of 15 students and visitors polled at Conestoga College, seven said the measures taken against swearing were extreme and eight were undecided. Most

when asked if they had ever sworn, either snickered or

people,

bowed

Sue Carpani, a firstyear general business student. Carpani admits to swearing partly out of habit and partly out of

ple,” said

frustration.

depends on the

“It still

situa-

guess it depends on who you’re with and who you’re talking to. I think the basis is that if you’re offending someone then tion, I

you shouldn’t

A

er.

nursing student, said it’s .“an absent-minded kind of thing most times,” but for the most part he does not swear. “It’s not appropriate if you’re saying anything that offends peo-

their

head and

said: “Well,

yeah.”

Donny Byrne,

a second-year

be. So you have to look at who is around you and if it’s going to be offensive to chil-

dren.”

The

Canada

Foundation

for

Innovation announced on June 23

an

investment

research

in

Canada’s

community

that totals

$266 million to

help

in capital investment

promote

institutions,

research and development.

“Today’s announcement represents a major infusion of capital

that

will

leverage an additional

$339 million

in funding

from part-

ners in the public, private and vol-

untary sectors,” said David Strangeway, president and chief executive officer of the CFI, in a press release.

Though Conestoga College

did

not receive a federally sponsored grant, Fanshawe College in

London announced of

.

$126,000

to

their receipt

me

is, when you’re with a bunch of people and they are swearing and then they realize that there’s someone aroimd, whether it’s a child or an adult, they say ‘hey. I’m sorry.’ And then they turn aroimd and they start taUdng to their friends and they start all over again. Why do you say

you’re sorry if you don’t

mean

it?”

Sorry

not the only word that

is

seems to have lost meaning. “The big f-word is very wellknown,” said Ray Mayorga, who will begin construction technolo-

gy

in the

fall.

way of letting and

I

“I guess

it’s

just a

it

has a meaning

at all.”-

The

favourite four-letter profan-

of choice has so many meanings now that it has become easy to use it as a noun, verb, adjective and adverb. All people polled said

by Conestoga

to help apply

Conestoga did not qualify for this grant because it was set up specifically to aid in the area of research

Rose Marie

Ellul,

third-year

robotics student

Donny

second-year

Byrne,

nursing student

was not necessary

to constantly

even out of frustration, unlike Bala, a general arts and science English student, who admits to cursing if he doesn’t get something he wants.

Myron

“People should be able to speak said Larry Brown, a first-year general business stu-

properly,”

As

dent.

Brown

said he does not swear.

million to help

far as the eventual banish-

ment of

vulgarities

from the

English language, settle for

we may have

to

acceptance.

“Language changes over time it’s a matter of where you draw the line. There is always anjrway so

going to be things that are offensive,” said Carpani.

research and development

and development. “If we had research and development projects then we could apply,” he said. He said he was unaware of any such projects in the works at Conestoga. “It is

something

we

should con-

something I would be batting for,” he said. Hamoodi said if any department at the college had a desire to compete for research and development grants, then Conestoga would apply, but it would have to be a new and innovative project to It

is

CD

College

4.25 93.9 1.85

University

Other

qualify for funding.

“You have

to prove (to the CFI) your research was different than what has been done before.”

The funding application states people with brain injuries have problems with attention, concentration, longer processing times, longer times to set memories, word finding, language problems related to using higher level lan-

research institution and will

com-

grants: the first for an Internet-

sending researchers around southwestern Ontario with the job of assessing

guage

pete with universities (for fund-

based technology education for teachers, and the second for appli-

computer

institutions

that

Deb

Prothero, partnership coordinator at 'Fanshawe, said their tive in

for such grants, said he believes

it

curse.

ity

acquired brain injury support systems. Ihired

Larry Brown, first-year general business student

the stress out a bit

don’t think

project

recently

Ray Mayorga, construction technology student (this fall)

said she doesn’t like to hear swearing but, when it comes to slips of the tongue, there should be some kind of allowance. “The one thing that really bugs

investigate

Mohammed Hamoodi,

first-year general

business student

dent

sider doing.

Sue Carpani,

Rose Marie Ellul, a third-year robotics and automation student,

Government gives $266 By Brad Dugard

Myron Bala, English level 4 (general arts and science) stu-

was both new and innovathe way it would conduct

research.

Fanshawe

would be

programs

that

are

designed to help those with brain injuries function better in society.

skills

and

social skills.

Prothero said this grant is unique because it puts college research

on the same

level as

universities.

She said the federal government

recognized in

budget that

three other Ontario colleges qual-

colleges had a lot to contribute to

ified for funding for four projects.

its

last

the area of research and develop-

ment.

“From

this

(Fanshawe)

point will

forward we

qualify

as

a

ing),” she said. “This is a strategic plan Fanshawe has chosen to fol-

low.”

Of

the

Sault College received a grant to set

$266 million given to round of grants

institutions in this

up a northern centre for sus-

tainable

Seneca

resource management; College received two

cations

in bioinformatics; and Sheridan College received a grant

an interactive visualization environment laboratory. for


r

Potential

NFLers tackle

future at

Conestoga

Hardnosed coaches

former Calgary Stampeder Larry said Dawson Robinson. Robinson’s talents are exceptional and he feels Robinson has a

high-schoolers

help

sharpen

their

at all-star

camp

skills

future in football.

“There’s

some pretty talented Dawson said. “But

athletes here,”

the mentality

By Andrea Jesson

is different at

and universities

leges

in

col-

the

States.”

analyzing every play his six-foottwo, 230-poimd son made, while

However, if it was up to coach and scout Ron Dias only the dedicated players with a strong work ethic and good attitudes would

picking the brains of coaches to

make

many other parents, Gary Dawson stood along the sidelines Like

determine whether his son was

camp

started off coaching football at

and some won’t.” Dawson’s son was one of about 50 high school football players, most between the ages of 16 and

the

pared to meet their fate as decided by coaches and scouts from across North America. The all-star football camp, held from June 27-30 outside the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, was worth the time and get the players into shape, said coach Ray Cabaris. effort to

“The coach can’t make you a better football player, only you can,” said Cabaris. “This all

camp

about quality time and

it

is

paid

off.”

University

of

Waterloo, the

McMaster University and University of Buffalo.

He

18 years old, spread across Conestoga’s soccer field June 30.

piunped with young men pre-

a collision

Dias said he has been scouting young players for colleges across North America for 13 years, but

camp at the Doon campus. “Some will get it

yet

it’s

sport.”

the value of a football

adrenaline, the

to find the mentality

not a contest sport,

presents an

opportunity for these talented kids,” said Dawson, discussing

Exhausted

to the pros.

for the sport,” he said. “This is

scholarship material.

“This kind of

it

“You have

Players from the All-Star football

camp

practice

on Conestoga’s soccer

field

adnaits that his harsh

tem-

perament towards the players comes straight from the heart. He knows the disappointment of fail-

June 30.

(Photo by Andrea Jesson)

ing to

make it to the pros himself,

and said the only way to get there Cabaris continued to drill into inds of the young players

the

m

ing that his son

it depended on whether wanted to attend college

upper United States attended the four-day football skills and believes the camp

camp an

game of repeti-

to pursue a career or simply to

and practising the little things is what it is all about.

play football. “He’ll probably choose some-

mentals of football. Most of the

a year-round job,” said Cabaris. “You have to know how to do your ,best all of the

where warm,” said Dawson. “He

players,

has to get out of high school first, but I’m sure the college or university will have something to do

looking for football scholarships. He said the camp is a way

with football.”

United Statte. Ainon ftie* prosqjective NFLers was Scott Robinson, the son of

that football is a

tion

“Football

is

^

'

time.”

When

asked about his' son’s camp, Dawson responded with a lau^ suggestfuture after the

Dawson

said players from high schools across Canada and the

is

asset in improving the funda-

Dawson

believes,

are

tb%roniot&,1pDotbalL talent to the

is

through the right attitude at the

right time. is a special breed and only happens at a special time, so you gotta do it now,” he said. His final lingering words were a

“Football

it

question.

“Have you made your coach know you?” asked Dias, as he reminded the players, “it is not \niio you know, but who knows you.”

Special needs office

Learning opportunites project offers one-on-one support Topics such as homework, how an assignment and time

By Linda Wright

to tackle

one of the Group of Seven

She is Conestoga

management

skills are dealt with,

she said.

in

components

needs

Gresham’s

Although not a famous

involvement include a

her

known

Gresham provides an individual approach that is tailored to the students needs and experiences.

Practice

makes

perfect

also

the

as

the writing centre.

of

Part

her

work

and water, which reminds

learning

her of the out-

with the practical aspects of

Lynn

to help

is

abled

doors.

dis-

students

She

learning.

Gresham,

looks at what the

learning skills

specific

part

of the LearnOpporing

take notes for the student, or the

student could use a tape recorder.

in

portrays a boat

is

pating or taking notes, but the learning disabled student might

have a different style of participating, said Gresham. In this case, a note-taker may be brought in to

peer group, and

of her One of photos

adviser,

a

They home-

work group,

photography, which is displayed on the office.

why

isn’t partici-

the project.

she does

walls

question

to

department.

artist,

may

There are two

College’s special

Students

person in their group

Learning

skills

Gresham.

advisor Lynn

(Photo by Linda Wright)

tunities Project

lenges

for a

devises methods

Gresham provides onc-on-onc

them

to deal

with these challenges.

To

year.

for

student and

the

for

which has been under way

chal-

are

raise student

learning

awareness of the

opportunities

project,

support to students with specific

Gresham and her co-workers run

learning disabilities.

workshops

As part of the project peer group, Gresham helps students with spe-

for Student Success.

cific learning disabilities deal

day-to-day college

life.

with

in the

course Strategics

“It’s not just me, we are part of a team and we work together,” she

said.

The Kitchener under-16 tice

on June 30.

Spirit girls

soccer team met at Conestoga College for an all-day prac(Photo by Michelle Lehmann)


SPOKE July

12,

1999

— Page 5

Multicultural Festival Story and photos by Michelle Lehmann

The souvenir

was a

flag table

favourite of six-year-old

Bowman and friend Lisa Wells. This year Bowman War flag to add to his collection.

Luke

bought a

Civil

Sqq the world without leaving your backyard smnmer

or most people,

F

is

a time to head to the

Paramount Canada’s Wonderland or visit family and friends. But for Dale Bowman, summer is an opportunity to spend the day

cottage,

at

Sadna Kapitan performs a tional

experience far-away countries, exotic foods, ethnic

music and

afford to travel to other parts

The

Bowman is one of them. The local Waterloo woman has never left

Bowman’s

27.

Bowman.

“It’s

The

war

with

said the festival has

Overall, the event

some-

crowds

nic food tents, dozens of information

the

booths set up by community groups,

reflect

Park,” said

Bowman. at the festival

Bowman

In previous years,

and lamb shish kebab

at

50,000.

at

Vietnamese

the authentic spring rqlls

made

Bowman

at the

“The

tent.

“The spring rolls were so good a dozen to take home,” she said.

that I

festi-

zoo around

crowd estimates were between 20,000 and

This year the crowd was about half the normal

size, said

Although numbers were smaller, the people working at the food tents remained friendly and the man at the Vietnamese tent thanked

and tasted dohnades (stuffed vine leaves) But she admitted her the Greek Orthodox tent.

was

attended the

Bowman.

tent,

favourite food

Bowman, who has

the park.”

and experiment with a number

the Egyptian tent, savoured the currie chicken at the

Caribbean

not said

val for the past five years. “It’s usually a

said.

said she tried a donar

did

that idea,

“There was a poor turnout because of the unpredictable weather and the Mutual Music festival held in Waterloo

People were able to take advantage of the wide variety of

of cultural cuisines, she

was

Bowman.

and souvenir tables and a stage with lively musical and dance performances. “I have to admit I mainly come for the food. The gourmets from around the world are woncraft

food booths

hit

a success but the size of

thing for everyone. There were 10 eth-

derful,” said

was a

my family again this

year.”

Centre for the past 32 years.

Bowman

Bowman. “The festi-

val definitely

Multicultural

civil

flag to his collection,”

said

festival has been a fimd-raising

K-W

six-year-old

because he added a

an experience,” my chance to see

the world.”

event for the

ritual at the

son Luke gets a souvenir flag each year. “This year he was excited

K-W Multicultural Festival in

quite

free to the public

Bowman house.

Kitchener’s Victoria Park June 26 and

really

was

festival

and has become a

Canada but was able to visit India, Egypt, Greece and Vietnam at the

said

32nd

Multicultural Festival.

of the world and

“It’s

tradi-

at the

traditional dancing.

Most people cannot

annual

dance

Indian

went back and got

Cut out: Carla DeSantis performs a traditional Mexican dance in complete costume.

Left: Members of the Mexican community perform the Las Alazanas a courtship dance, which reflects joy and sensuality between a man and a woman.

Right:The Bosanica Dancers

crowds with a wedding dance

entertain the traditional

originating from Bosnia.

for sampling his food, she said.

festival really

makes

for a nice family outing,” she said. “It’s dif-

ferent

from the usual dinner and a movie and

year.”

®

I

look forward to

it

every


SPOKE July

12,

1999

¥ Adaptive technology available at Conestoga By Lesley Turnbull

and

adviser;

Marlene

Breen,

provide

clerical support

Imagine being able to tell computer what to do without using your hands, or having it speak whatever you are •typing letter by letter, word by word or in complete sentences? To some students at Conestoga College, it’s now a dream come

Lyttle

a

Project, Sue computer technician for

Lyttle,

Dragon

Naturally

providing,” Lyttle said. “The thing is, unless we effectively track some of the components that we are offering on the Learning Opportunity Project, we won’t

know

“It’s

Speaking,

Lyttle said the people

software.

not being used, then we don’t want it. It’s not successful. So I’m trying to research as many different pieces “If

dis-

abilities.”

Opportunities a pilot project which June,

Sue

designed to

is

Lyttle,

of software solutions so that have a choice,” said

computer technician

new support services to increase the academic success of students with specific learning

Kurzweil 3000 and Inspiration are

disabilities.

also available.

Conestoga is one of eight sites at post-secondary institutions in

products

students

test

Ontario to receive provincial funding totalling $30 million. The college will receive

$2.7

approximately over a four-year

million

Lyttle.

“We

as a recognition organizer which

useful

Marian

disabilities

L)mn

specialist;

Gresham, learning skills adviser; Charlie Matjanec, employment

said,

at

grammar

Lyttle

said

who

“We have a little item here called AlphaSmart,” said Lyttle. “It’s a

the college over the

You can take

into the classroom

and type your

notes up.” Lyttle also

ogy

develops tracking

and data analysis programs

a

isn’t

$30,000 you

most

question

students expect to be asked, unless

they

have loan sharks and members of the mob in their study groups.

i

huge cost of

reality is the

a college or university education these days means many students

can be done early on. “Every financial step (students) take their first year of college or imiversity is a first,” she said. “They’re in no way prepared for these steps when they start.”

recommend

that while in school,

students keep a close watch on

and always pay

their credit rating

will

be faced with a mountain of

the

debt

when

The authors also compare the pros and cons of bank loans

While

they graduate.

tuition is a

the cost, living es,

and

textbooks,

major part of travel

expens-

phone

bills,

food and entertainment costs all add up to a not-so-grand

which could mean some students go from graduation ceremonies to living under assumed total

names. Jennifer

minimum

balance.

offer different services.

Smiley

said

graduates,

Students

with

Savvy which provides

students with

important inform-

ation about student loans,

management,

credit

money

eards

and

debt reduction.

Students must

more matters

education

when She

on

they’re

school, Smiley said interview.

demanding

start

lists

financial

still

in a

in

high

telephone

learning

how

to budget, talking to parents about

money and applying for entrance scholarships as three things that

student

schedule are two tasks that must be handled within six months. She also notes that there is a

college.

1997, have written a called Clueless? Not!:

Financial

disabilities

to

know about

of different forms but be involved, with

actually

the software.”

learning disabilities is good.” Lyttle said it’s nice to watch the

She said she is trying to encourage more students to become

transformation of people they start using the lab.

specialists.

“They usually

are working at

The learning experience is what L3dtle said she loves most about

summer.

her job.

have

“I

start off

intimidated by the

when a

little

number of com-

puters and

by the end of thenusage in the lab you can see the change,” she said. “The confidence grows and this is great because that can only assist the learning process no matter

not

previously involved with learning disabilities,” she said. “I teach part-time as well as this job and I have experienced

been

to

“1

attend

for

both

some

students

university

and

directly

who

I

I

part-time

Most students find it

realize that the

BA

is

a starting off

point,” she said.

juggle schoolwork, a job and a social

life.

Lome Rogers foimd

hard, but learned to deal with

make

and

the

best

students

to

courses or

consider

business

some kind of

practical

training.

Generation

Y

arc

much

more focused on what kind of job they want to get when they’re applying to colleges and universities,” she said.

to piNipoiiL luithcr studies so

of his

Rogers,

graduated 22, from (’onestoga College in 1996 a

diploma

hi.

could work and decide what he wanted to do During this time, he continued to work at thg doughnut shop and also got a )ob at T in Hortons After a year at Tim Hortons,

it

it

situation.

it is.”

'Rogers

now working

is

at

Fast Eddies in Waterloo wdierc he is

die assistant store manager.

As

| | |

as

far

school goes, Rogers has decided to continue his education through correspondence courses at the University

of Waterloo,

where he

to

get

degree

| | |

I

will

I

his

I

as

in

ccrtitied

general

business management.

He

started in the elec-

communication program, but dropped

I

had looked

at electronics

v

computer

tronics

He

first year.

programming (as a career choice), but always

liked business,

said the one-year

business

management

so

and what

ing,”

he

Conestoga grad

always liked

going to school full-time did effect him.

to

education out of his

pay for his

own

pocket,

“It

came down

ment,”

he

to time

said.

manage-

“To say it would be

worked many jobs while a student to help pay tuition and other

didn't have an effect

school costs.

“It)s hard when you have something due and you have to work first and all you want to do when you get home is watch TV"

“(Working) is ju.st a fact of life.” he said. “I had to make money.”

While

the, ^ItoSinesS:'"’?

Waterloo. In the

got into account-

who had

on

said,

said.

Rogers,

mnch'x

get into the accounting course at

Rogers was promoted to store manager where he made enough money to buy his first car. Rogers said that working and

1

sd

experience working

Lome Rogers, him

had looked at electronics, computer programming (as a 1

got into

accounting.”

expect in the business field.

career choice), but

I

of the industry must have helped

gave him a overview of he could

good

1

Rogers,.

having

side

course wasn’t too in-depth or challenging

business, so

High youth unemployment and the burden of student debt arc two factors, which Snell believes arc causing more high school

at a family-owned doughnut shop in 1 Imira After he graduated he decided

difficult to

“I

think people arc starting to

“1 think

By Adam Wftson

out after the student

a

loans and setting up a repayment

College

in

after

consolidating

growing trend

Empowering

on the software,” said “And also to train staff that

Conestoga College graduate

with

versus government loans, as well as explaining how various banks

Smiley and Cynthia Snell, both of whom graduated from the University of King’s

book

(Photo by Lesley Turnbull)

are going to, have to

four

people (students) to demonstrate

to

In Clueless? Not!, the authors

But the

who

Learning Opportunities for adaptive

hardware used

finds balancing act tough

owe me?” This

are

for the

of the

train

Lyttle.

are adaptive technol-

specialists

By John Oberholtzer that

one

“They’ve been training hard on the software so they’re going to be ready for September when we have the biggest influx of

it

Burden of debt a concern for students “So where’s

there

some

for

home.”

students

computer technician

holds up technology.

and to

Lyttle,

Project,

use, Lyttle said.

assistance.

portable keyboard.

Sue

piece of software that provides them with the assistance that they need so they can buy it and have it

a speaking dictionary and

with

the technology

“They attach themselves

very

management,”

The Language Master, she thesaurus

are:

home

voice is

pmchase

to

Lyttle said.

Seven people are involved in the project at the college including

The others

time

for

Often students will use the lab ground of the software and hardware before they decide as a testing

hardware

such

is like

Mainland, co-ordinator; Rick Casey, secondary school liaison counsellor; Barry Cull, learning

have

also

period.

Lyttle.

it’s

really

Learning last

working on

feedback and the tracking of the

technology to assist

people with learning

student services. Project,

good component or

a

it’s

the project rely on the students’

provides this type of adaptive technology in 2B22 to students who have been referred by the special needs office or

began

if

not.”

the project,

The

usage of

the facilities using the computer and the adaptive software we’re

Software like TextHelp and Aurora will verbally repeat what you type into the computer. Software like Dragon Dictate,

Opportunities

evaluation for

“I track their (students)

as

speech,” said Lyttle.

Learning

the

to

on

training

software as well

hardware in the lab. “We have software here that converts speech to text and text to

true.

Thanks

provides

specialized

statistical

the project.

he was attending Conestoga, Rogers worked

lying,

future, he he has both

short-term and long-term goals. In the short term, he wants to gain as much experience as he

can and work his way up in the business world. His iong-tenn goals include owning his own business, possibly a restaurant or

a nightclub.

However, he doesn’t want to be 20 to 30 years. “1 can see myself doing t|[||^ in the rat race for the next

for 10 years, then

who knows^^

,


bating disorders a problem for college-aged women Anorexic By

women

often function below their potential wishes not to be named. “I was so secretive and hid what I was doing

Eileen Diniz

Do you

on a and then

stare at yourself

daily basis, or overeat

force yourself to vomit or use laxatives? If so, you may be suffering

from a severe eating disorder. Anorexia nervosa is a disruption in normal eating habits characterized by an all-consuming fear of becoming “fat,” a pamphlet entioutside the student services office states.

Anorexia usually

a diet

starts as

attempt but often leads to 25 per cent loss of original T)ody weight.

may

It

also involve compulsive

exercising,

I

loved.”

People with anorexia are often

on a daily basis

able to function

activities

One

out of every

women become and

five to

00

1

anorexic

20 out

of

1

00

Bulimia, on the other hand,

is

a

followed by purging through

vom-

use of laxatives, the

iting or the

,

the

also possible,

seizures

are

pamphlet

states.

acid in my vomit. It came down to me never smiling for fear of some-

one noticing and asking ques-

Cambridge woman

the

tions,” said.

college-aged

One out of every 100 women may become anorexic. Estimates

also suffer from eating

of the frequency of bulimia vary from five to 20 out of 100 in college-aged women. The pamphlet also, states men may suffer from

women become bulimic. Men disorders, but -in far

smaller numbers.

ature.

cycle of uncontrolled binge eating

damage due to vomiting as well as damage to the throat and esophKidney problems and agus.

“My teeth began to rot. The enamel was coming off due to the

which can cause nor-

such as menstruation to stop, according to the liter-’

mal

from everyone

Disorders available

tled Eating

but far below their potential. Some people starve themselves to death while others are consistently underweight, but this does not

both disorders, but in far smaller numbers. Experts don’t know exactly what causes anorexia or bulimia, but most agree that the disorders involve biological, psychological

and social

factors.

my problem was wanted to be super-skinny,

“I feel that

that

diminish the perception of being

I

People suffering from bulimia are more likely normal weight or

“fat.”

the models, but I loved eating.

overweight, and bulimia

and not

guilty and depressed after a binge, which over time can prevent normal thinking and behaviour.

suffered from bulimia for

Bulimia’s cyele can cause a per-

pamphlet

states.

way

seen as a

usually

is

to overeat

gain weight. “I

approximately two years and it was the hardest time of my life,”

woman who

said a 23-year-old

A person with bulimia may

By

feel

son to feel depression, isolation

and low self-esteem. Physically, it can cause tooth

sional help. Hospitalization often necessary in severe cases.

from

ever

felt a

lo.ss

of

self-confidence, a high sensitivi-

a poor body image, or a failure to acknowledge personal accomplishments? These are all signs of low selfto

criticism,

media and what they think

low' self-esteem.

;

Barb Kraler, a counsellor with student services,

.said

some

situ-

ations in college could put stu-

dents in 'a position where they

'*Women express

their

discontent with them-

selves

demicdly, but

they

will

more than men,

we

hear about

it

they don’t feel

the next time,”

fail

ety is trying to

tell

“Many men,

soci-

them.

these days,

are

steroids

things

and those kinds of to

get

that

muscular

a positive feel-

Kraler said the student serviccb

she said. Everyone has a part of himself or herself that they may not like but

department usually offers a selfesteem workshop during the fall or winter semester of each year. She said that some of the skills workshopi» and exercises

Self-esteem

is

self,

and w'ho they are. Kraler added that tliis doesn't mean if you don’t like something about yourself, you can’t they accept

it

“Not all of us have the perfect body. Not all of us are as smart

days, are also feeling

sit

next to in

you should feel OK about you and who you are ”

more.” Barbara Kralen student services counsellor

and evaluated in terms of tests and assignments'.

“For someone with low selfesteem to begin with, fiiese situations can be difficult, because ttie student is not feeling good about himself” she said. Self-esteem gets tested a bit more while you are in school, gi^said. Sometimes the counselsee students who are doing 1 well academically but still suffer

not just

a woman’s problem} many suffer from it as well.

“Women

express

frieir

tent with themselves

are being judged

is

more

“Most gays/lesbians coming out have a fear of being harassed and looked down upon,” he said.

“They

fear if the fact that they are

gay/lesbian

comes out

Kraler said. Students who came out and felt safe took the group

don’t care one

from student services counsellor

there, she said.

with students’ workloads and things like that, GLAD doesn’t continue from year to year. Sometimes, some“Unfortunately,

teach include being aware of the

body who’s been

negative messages you send to

graduates.”

yourself daily; self-affirmation, wdiich is how you can change the

safe

negative feelings; looking at the

at

positive things about yourself;

and surrounding yourself with support and people who are positive.

“Once you get on cycle

it is

hard to

the negative

temembw and

what positive you have.” realize

qualities

really involved

Kraler said gay students can feel coming in to see a counsellor student services.

Steven,

a

member of

GLOW of

(Gay/Lesbian

Liberation

Waterloo), the

longest running

will

and that he experienced few negative reactions. He added that there was a significant amount of positive reaction but most people just

muscular body.” Kraler,

it

spread and they won’t have control over who knows.” Steven said that coming out is

steroids to get that

they have tojtake

flian

of yourself. She added that with women, although some men suffer from it, body image is a major reason for low self-esteem. She said that women are always trying to look a certain way, based on the

said Barb Kraler, a coun-

with student services.

then everyone.

different for everyone

Barbara

men, so we hear about it more.” There are many influences for both men and women that go back to childhoo4 she said. Your self-esteem may be affected by how you were treated as a child and how you were told to think

it,”

not

anyone else; telling others and meeting other gays and lesbians; and being out to a select number of people and telling

She said student services may once again initiate a meeting or two to see if there is any interest. A few years ago counsellor Joan Magazine, sponsored the group,

men

discon-

A support group that provides homosexuals a chance to meet and talk may be in operation this fall at the Doon campus. The group is called GLAD, an acronym for Gays/Lesbians at Doon. “We don’t know whether it will be running this year but the sellor

still

She said self-esteem

own homosexuality and

necessarily

want

“Many men, these we

one’s

Eileen Diniz

opportunity’s there if the students

change'it.

as the person

By

also feeling they have to take

she said.

^

Nelson Harrison, maintenance worker at the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, paints the soccer goal posts for (Photo by Michelle Lehmann} the summer season.

is

body.”

Kraler said.

school, but

so

if

good about themselves then tlicy think it was either jast a fluke or

ing about one’s

esteem.

.

the only

is

“They may be doing well aca-

ty

I

was wanted

realized bingeing and purging

put to the fes?, Conestoga opens door to gay and counsellor college, says lesbian groups

Eileen Diniz

Have you

like

way to eat what I and not gain weight,” she said. In order to deal with the disorders, a person" needs to admit they have a problem and seek profes-

Self-esteem in

Recreation housecleaning

has

way

or the other.

GLOW is

organized through the University of Waterloo but welcomes others students and people

from the community. “It is a place to meet and

feel

he said. “I think that is important because very rarely can someone reach the top level (of coming out) without having a safe

safe,”

place to meet other gay/lesbians.”

Steven added that people should out to their level of comfort. “There are also many advan-

come

tages to, at least, partially

coming

university group for gays and les-

out if you are comfortable enough

bians in the country, said a number of students come out in their

to

college/university years. that coming out conof three stages: admitting

He added sists

do

it,”

he

said.

For more information on GLAD, contact a counsellor at student services. For more information on GLOW, people can call 884-4569.


Funniest movie ever does hot deserve restrictiorP By Brian

The point of

Gall

says,

Trey Parker and Matt Stone are now, officially, pioneers. Creators of the rudest, funniest and best show on television, the pair has come up with a one-of-akind film in South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut. It cannot be compared to any

ridiculously funny

is

the

movie

I

Southam Parker,

Baldwin and

(MPAA), has given

their

it.

After sneaking into the theatre,

Kenny and Cartman become amazed by the film’s nonKyle, Stan,

stop use of four-letter words. Their

finds the third

justice.

school and at home. Mothers Against Canada, sparked by Kyle’s mother, is only one result of the “filth” coming from America’s neighbours to the north. Censorship is imposed. Terrance and Phillip are arrested and the U.S arranges their execution. When Canada drops a bomb on the home of Hollywood actor

Ten bands for 10 bucks

brothers

his

protest,

in

war breaks

out.

And

does

so

in the U.S.

tag

no need to force a on this film. AA yes, but only because of the mass amount of swearing. Otherwise,

says,

They have no morals. They have warped their very nature are filthy.

my

son’s mind.”

it’s

money

raised from the

show

Sheer

K-W

the Humane Society. Tickets were $5 in advance and

Ford hoped to raise a few hundred dollars for the

$7

at the door.

charity.

Mostly club clothes were modeled at the show that had the audience whistling in approval. Sequins, fun fur, fake leather and velvet were used to make the clothes. “I like weird material

is

and

like to

By Linda Wright What do law and mon? Nothing,

and

security

fashion designing have in

com-

except a recent

designers presented their

fashions in the show. They were Annissa and Lydia Bellenie, Diana Austen, Lesley Ordiway and Ford. Sisters Annissa and Lydia Bellenie recently opened a store called Delirium in Waterloo and Diana Austen is opening a new store in Cambridge called Cherry

Coated. Lesley Ordiway is a co-op student at Forest Heights school in Kitchener, and Ford hopes to

replaced

with something far

it

worse,” he said.

was

outfit,

employed

K-W

by and

Fashion displayed her

Alliance designs through them. Now, she has branched out on her own, so

laughing. She also tried to hat but

didn’t

it

fit

make

that

side project, she says.

and classmates backed her up on her new project. Ford’s

teachers

friend’s

she

was

invited

wedding and

to

At

New Year’s

made

look for matcliing jewelry.

work with

to

hem

things up,” she says.

Before buying

it,

Ford had never

sewed except in a home economics class in Grades 7 and 8. Ford says she almost failed that class. She made a tube dress that

at

in

Ryerson Polytechnic University September 2000.

clothes.

Ford bought a sewing machine she thought would be really conit

and

enter a four-year design program

make

expensive.

venient. “1 just bought

port-

complimented Ford on her dress and since then, through word of mouth, she has been designing and making

and fun,” she says. She has a lot of fun designing unique backs to her outfits and also likes to provide a matching choker so her clients don't have to

stereo.

stereo,

up her

a

Already havFord went to exchange the gift for something else. Instead of buying a bunch of little things she says, she wanted one thing. So it would have to be a

to build

didn’t have a

red velvet dress that touched the

ing

She hopes

folio within the next year,

a

Her designing career all started at Christmas when her father bought her a

I

Ford.

a dress. Everyone

Designing and making clothes

would

on her head. saved me was

thing to wear, she decided to

became a

outfits

show?”

Sheer Ecstasy

in

became

fashion.

“how many

to put in a

was supposed to fit snug and for someone slim. “It could have fit someone 300 lbs.,” says Ford,

When

in

asked,

need

previously

Deneatra Ford had been in the program for a year when she interested

year became interested in fashion. She had three designs of her own completed, and asked the owner if she could put her fashions in a show. “Hypothetically speaking,” she

year.

piece

“The only thing

at

Ford started out modeling for Fashion Alliance and after a

K-W

walk wearing a fake leather two-

the cooking part of the class,” says

just ran her first fashion

she can start putting a portfolio together.

make designing a full-time career. Ford, who came down the cat-

graduate of the law and security

Stages Nightclub.

29;

was OK. So every time they told to take something out we

The owner said if she came up with 10 outfits she could showcase them in the next show. Ford came up with the required designs and opened at Club Abstract last

program

show called Sheer Ecstasy

(Phot

it

us

flashy outfits,” said Ford.

Conestoga grad

June

it, so, because they were so pissed off, they made it 10 times worse and resubmitted it. “They came back and told us that

restricted rating

make

Ecstasy will go to the dogs. Deneatra Ford, a law and security graduate, modeled in and organized the show, which was held at Stages Nightclub Jime 30 with 1 50 people in attendance. All proceeds from the show will go to

of opiy $1 d,

way

Fashion benefits humane society All the

terror F

their

they had to cut

rated R.

There

weeding

Parker said they couldn’t believe

“Canadians by

character

they should get a

end.

movie has an AA accompaniment) rating in

(adult

And

just for

convinced the classification sys-

that are under 17 with a parent or

it

with their

tem to actually make the movie more offensive, and funnier in the

rating

every province but Ontario. Here,

charity-fashion

Ten bands playedj|^l^®|^'n^

R

guardian.

Five

Of l^n

an

attached to Canadians in this movie. In a joking manner, one

By Linda Wright

Countdown To

it

it

through the crap imposed by the MPPA, who reused to even give South Park an R rating unless some scenes were cut. Their persistence and attitude

In Canada, the

made of the

has been

Kids

can only see

uncontrollable laughter.

Much

medal

article.

Alec

Movie Review

see

Parker and Stone deserve an award for this production. In all of Hollywood’s glittering trophy ceremonies, no honour does them

who directed the film and

shared the writing and producing

pornographic film. Asses of Fire, comes to South Park all of the kids

Waterloo event offered

be

with Stone, says that the Motion Picture Association of America

at

feversa!

in

to

have in

new vocabulary

And

happens

most graders

to see

to blame.

it

“But blaming Canada for the of the world is just as ridiculous as blaming Marilyn Manson or blaming us,” he said in a recent

trouble

want

case

who go to

parents will have a blast.

state

Canadian flatulence-lovers Terrance and Phillip (who appear on the TV show) are the main

When

children

Canadians.

ever seen.

focus of the plot.

somebody

for this

other movie in content or hilarity.

This animated musical

the movie, Parker

that everyone is looking

is

floor. “It

One of

Eve, Ford

was very

a

sexy, but classy

her favourite fabrics to is

fake leather, which

she has sold a few pieces of She

buys her materials in Toronto, along Spadina Avenue, where there are 30 stores to choose from. “If you’re looking for something,” she says, “you would be sure to find

it.”

All eyes were on Deneatra Ford June 30, as she modelled in, a^^

organized her at

first

fashion

shU^

Stages Nightclub. (Photo by Linda Wright)

Digital Edition - July 12, 1999  
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