Issuu on Google+

Cambridge

link

Charge of the Light Brigade

planned for

still

transit services By Chadwick Severn

the transit system could get per-

A

mission to next year.

Cambridge Transit bus paid

several visits to .Conestoga College on June 18, a surprising sight for many students who expect to see only Kitchener

Although Kitchener Transit ridCambridge yet, they can watch television while going to many other Kitchener ers cannot get to

Transit gracing the roadways of

The

visits

were part of a

transit

cities

by

destinations.

The media company Images

systems to prepare

for an eventual link

two

test

between the

framebyframe has installed pairs of televisions in five buses, and

via public transit.

“We were just looking at routing,

plans to install

timing and schedule adherence,” said Kitchener Transit planner Joanne Woodhall. The cities cannot put the link into service yet, since Trentway-

“They produce commercials and our own network with service information, community news,community events, and generally entertain people while on the bus,” said Roberts.

by the

“We are going ahead on our own make it work regardless,” said

The volume on

the

TVs

will

be

kept low, so that customers who prefer to do other things on the

to

Sandy Roberts, the supervisor of marketing and administration for Kitchener Transit. “We’ll move ahead (in the planning) and then

bus will not be distracted. Keeping the bus driver free from diversions

is

at

also important.

earliest that

provincial legislature for

1 1

years, after

winnin g

a by-election in 1988 and re-election in ’90, ’95 Ontario’s colleges

and

universities will

now

have a much clearer voice in the provincial legislature thanks to the recent

the government that a

new

announcement by

cabinet post will be

June 17 Premier Mike Harris introduced

and Growth”

cabinet, which,

among

other things, will split the Education Ministry

two

into

and

’99.

.

.

parts:

the Ministry

of Training,

Colleges and Universities and the Ministry of

professional with a

management and consulting

business, she first entered politics in 1973

Cunningham served for the Ministry

Universities

is

expected to place emphasis on

when

provincially as the critic

of Education during the

NDP

government and ran against Mike Harris for the leadership of the Progressive Conservative

petent and energetic cabinet that

is

is

a com-

willing and

- to position Ontario to

able to get the job done

compete with the best in the world and win. These are the men and women 1 am counting on to keep our province on the right track.” Janet Ecker, formerly the social services minister, was given the role of minister of education, replacing

Dave Johnson, who

lost his rid-

ing in the June election.

party in 1990.

ondary schools.

the minister responsible for

Quoted in the London Free Press, Cunningham said she is not disappointed with

The new ministry for post-secondary educabe headed by Dianne Cunningham, the MPP for London North. Cunningham has been a member of the

as intergovernmental affairs minister.

the role she will play in the cabinet.

new cabinet as one that will focus on keeping the economy strong for the 2 1 st century, the new Ministry of Colleges and

Education Ministry and

Education which will cover elementary and sec-

tion will

Ontario’s

?

preparing students for the job market. In a press release, Harris said, “This

A former teacher, educator and self-employed elected as a school board trustee in London.

created.

the “Jobs

uoKtan fnangie

provincial ministry representing colleges

By Brad Dugard

On

me

at the lOwapIs Park iO' (Photo tjy John Oberhoftster^.'

“We’ve had one or two comments see More perks - page 2

get permission.”

New

over

videos, and we’re going to design

province.

Woodhall said the

many more

the summer.

the transportation corridor set

would be

NEW TELEVISIONS

Doon.

th^^o

start the link

new cabinet

Premier: Mike Harris Deputy Premier, Finance Minister: Ernie Eves

In the last government,

Cunningham served as women’s issues and

Billing the

Palladini

Cunningham

Management Board Chairperson: Hodgson

Community and

Dave Tsubouchi Natural Resources: John Snobelen Solicitor General:

Universities: Dianne

Chris

Francophone Affairs: John Baird

Intergovernmental Affairs, Government House Leader: Norm Sterhng Energy, Science and Technology: Jim Wilson

Consumer and Commercial Relations: Bob Runciman Labour: Chris Stockwell Citizenship, Culture and Recreation, Seniors’

Hudak

Johns

Rob Sampson

Municipal Affairs and Housing: Steve Gilchri'it

the

happy with

either job.”

Northern Development and Min es: Tim Correctional Services: Social Services,

splitting

quite

Hardeman

Flaherty

and

am

Agriculture and Rural Affairs: Ernie

Winner IVaining, Colleges

1

Environment: Tony Clement Economic Development and Trade: A1 Tourism: Cam Jackson Attorney General, Native Affairs: Jim

Education: Janet Ecker

was a big proponent of

Transportation: David Turnbull

Health and Long-Term Care: Ehzabeth

.

“1

L^es and Women’s Issues:

Helen

Children’s Issues: Margaret Marland

Chief Government Whip, Deputy House Leader: Frank Klees


— SPOKK, June

Pa^o 2

28, 1999

NEWS Students volunteer time, gain experience

Pond

By Charles Kuepfer

neering student.s

levels

Habitat

ye&t$ ago,

shows

study

drastic

The prairie

regions have had their secondwettest spring on record

wi# a

56 per cent increase, while pidc^ amounts are down by 29 per cent in the Great I-ates-^ ipitation

Lammce n^on. Levels a eeme^n resources for the college,

concerned about the low water level of both ponds, especially the one located outis

side the cafeteria.

“We’ll need a lot to

bnng

.said

it

more run-otf

up to normal

levels,"

Milner. “It would be nice to

have more

in that area, primari-

for the fish in the ” die plant life ly

for

Humanity

current-

has two projects under way, one in Kitchener at 84-86 Sydney St. and the

The homes

are required to regis-

298

and fill out waiver forms. Volunteers must have their own

built

work boots. Hard hats and gloves are suppl-

at

are

pond and

ter

exclusively by volunteers,

ied.

who donate both

There are a number of volunteer positions to be filled, including general labourers and

their

time and skills to construct houses, from the laying of the foundation the shingling of the roof Ruth Black, who organ-

skilled

to

volunteers

izes

for

the

project, is thrilled at hav-

ous jobs concrete

Duma hammers some spikes into part of the sub floor. Habitat for Humanity building a house for Duma and he is obligated to put in sweat labour.

Cornell is

Black also recalled another college student, not from Conestoga, who wanted some drafting experience and drew up some prints to see

walling and taping, painting, siding, plumb-

could be interpreted correctly. She said students often simply volunteer just to gain some experience.

and

if they

“(They come) to see

how

really all

it

comes

together.”

Black has received about four applications from Conestoga College students wanting to help.

The organization

sent representatives, incl-

uding Black, to the college in April to speak

as well.

including finishing,

framing, carpentry, trim work, dry-

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

said Black. “ They’ve got and they get to work with people who have been in the trades for a number of years.” She said it shows that the youth have community spirit, givmg back to the community by volunteering their time. “The student volunteers are good workers, who are usually eager to help and participate.” students from Conestoga Last year, College’s Guelph campus helped build a garden shed at one project, while another student was a member of the building committee and

some duct taping

and semi-skil-

led labourers for vari-

skills

did

Milner said there are different opinions on what constitutes a low water level. However, he said the water levels for the ponds ate higher this year then they were last year

interest-

ed can contact Black at the Waterloo Region office at 7470664. All volunteers

ly

other in Waterloo Westvale Dr.

Anyone

teer.

“Absolutely,”

Barry Milner, director of physsaid he

a “positive

of others.” The Waterloo Region affiliate of Habitat

is

it

not too late to volun-

ing youth help out.

St.

ical

ady under way,

contribution to the lives

Water levels remain low in the ponds at Conestoga College’s Doon campus, despite an Environment Canada report saying that it has been the third-wettest spring on record for all of Canada, S. x The report, released June compares climate data from March, April and May to data

The

making

adults

While

opportunities.

the projects are alre-

is

encouraged after seeing more youth and young

By Charles Kuepfer

regional differences.

families,

tunate

anil

inform them of the present volunteer

Humanity,

for

which helps build affordable housing for less for-

below normal

jfrom

to conslruclion engi-

ing and electrical installations.

Habitat for Humanity was founded in 1976 is

a non-profit Christian-based organiza-

has built more than 70,000 homes worldwide. In Canada, about 300 homes have been built to date, while 27 homes have been built or renovated in Waterloo Region since tion.

It

the organization

moved

into the area 10 years

The latest project was completed last month at 260 Dolph St. in Cambridge and was made possible by the efforts of 174 ago.

volunteers.

Broadcasting opportunities

Conestoga grad

Rangers

hired by Kitchener

at this time.

Milner

unsure if the water any time soon.

is

level will rise

The weather

something he doesn't pretend he l,ui pi edict and lie doesn't think others can, citmg the inaccuracy of daily weather reports The haimer’s Almanac had predicted a colder and wetter spnng but Milner noted tlierc have been three or fom heat wa\cs dlread\ The water' levels at both of the college’s ponds are aided by the water table, the level which the ground is saturated with water. The ponds are used for storm management.

Overflow water The one outside the collects the water

cafeteria

from west of

the main building including the

and D wings, and 12, located by parking

building’s B,

and parking

The

other,

C

lots

1 1

2 and 4, receives the overflow water from the pond by the lots

cafeteria,

also

It

collects

the

A

wing of the main building, parking lots two

water from the through

By Brian

Gail

is

A 21 -year-old who has just been hired as a

manager of events and

public relations, Conestoga grad

Lindsay Coombes, says being young, energetic and enthusiastic will help in her

A

new job.

graduate of the broadcasting,

radio and television

Coombes

1998,

program

will begin

gives

work

tive.”

OHL on June 28.

make

includes

that

six

of traffic sales and promotion research

“Without

experience at 570

C KGL

/

9 6

.

7

CHYM FM,

and a year of marketing and administration

background, think

I

her

OHL,

‘90s, so

down

the

culvert to a dry well, which

is

located east of Parking Lot 3.

The dry well

is

hidden under-

don’t

would have

tions.

“Without 1

my media

don’t think

Coombes young

1

background, would have (even)

will

be a part of

'a

her energetic qualities were cho-

who were

older and

had more traditional ideas. “With the team being so young, they wanted to reflect that in the front olTicc as well. (They wanted new, young

ground and cannot be seen by

to) give a fresh,

passers-by.

to the marketing.”

start

She said being young, and hav-

broadcasting,” she said.

She has always had a love of sports. With two cousins playing professional hockey, one for Nashville of the NHL and the other for Hamilton of the AHL, she has been around the game. And combining a love of sports with marketing was an idea she discovered Conestoga. “I actually

after

attending

wanted to be a sports

why

More perks

I

aspects of media rela-

ers),” is

said Roberts.

the best

is

“What

vol-

different in the

front than the back.”

currently available.

p.m.

“We have a pretty cool logo, and we have fans that really come out

Woodhall said other service improvements are on the drawing

she will

with press conferences

and merchandising is all part of the job. She will organize any events that players might be at, and all of the promotions during the season.

ideas.

Web

to bring in

some

Coombes wants

three-year

said

the

course doesn’t isolate students into just writing copy or 2innouncing.

“In fact, most of the people

know from my working

I

course that are aren’t

full-time,

all

of

the other things within the broadcasting field. There are so

for

team and increase the amount of merchandise that is

sure the media has

write) and correct stats, as well as

Hoping

Coombes

program,

different things

continued from page one not really complaints (from driv-

ume position

player profiles (which

With marketing being a full-time class throughout the

announcers. They’re doing

Roberts said the five buses have been in service on a variety of routes for a couple of weeks, but were all placed on one route last Wednesday so that a group of people could speak to customers to get feedback on the T'Vs. Kitchener Transit also has announced that Sunday service on the No. 7 Mainline to Conestoga Mall bus will be increased by four trips, with new arrivals and departures from the mall at 9:45 a.m., 10:50 a.m., 6:20 p.m. and 7:05

all

Making

dealing

front ofl'icc at the rc-build-

sen over those

know

I

Her includes

she added.

bus

it

can lead

many

to.”

riders

looking

are

and

point.”

position.

course at Conestoga, so it got me interested more in marketing than

took the broadcasting program.

at

Conestoga helped her get her new

support for more merchandise wouldn’t be hard, getting

broadcaster (before), that’s

what to give from a standmarketing

she said

training

But marketing is a big part of the

support the team,” she said.

And

“To switch sides is very easy to do because I know both. Being in the media, I know what for,

Lindsay Coombes

to

the media.

they

job.”

ing Rangers, and said she thinks

early

from working in the media to assisting

(even) gotten the

work at the Guelph Storm of the

I

in radio will also

easy for her to change

my media

How

tire

it

years

gotten the job,” she said.

inserted in

Her experience

With a resume

and the buildings between them. The water level in this pond can be adjusted by a weir, a door-likc device which regulates the

that water could flow

be creating my own ideas. It me a chance to be innova-

to

in

with the Kitchener Rangers of the

10,

of water. The pond was excavated and a culvert wa.s

ing some experience in sports marketing with the Guelph Storm, where she worked for her college co-op placement, will help her to be creative at the Rangers. “Before I was working with ideas that were already put together. With this, I am actually going

creative

to

get a

site for the

board, but implementation will

have to wait until funds are available. One change awaiting those funds is full Sunday service on the No. 12 Fairview to Conestoga route. “It’s

do

something we’ve wanted

for

several

years,”

to

said

Woodhall. “If anything, you’ll see it

next year.”

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH 5 days/40 (Aug. 4-8

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SPOKE, June

NEWS

Loft holds Record’s history

By Brian Smiley

When

Last month one of the daily

region’s history. Stanton, 27, said

ticket

he was amazed to find newspaper plates of the Kitchener-Waterloo Record from 1949 covering the insulation in the loft of his home on Pleasant Avenue in Kitchener. He discovered the plates while he

Parking Lot

now

vending 1 1

machines in was damaged and

the bill has

pome

in.

Al Hunter, supervisor of security services, said the damage was approximately $3,000 and the meter is now fixed. “I believe the machine is going to be reinstalled today (June

was adjusting wiring in the loft off the master bedroom he was renovating.

— Page 3

Mgter damage estimated at $3,000

By Andrea Jesson When Brad Stanton opened the door into the loft of his 48-yearold home the last thing he thought he would see was a little bit of our

28, 1999

1

8),”

Hunter

He

said

said.

the perpetrator succeed-

ed in removing the machine, sometime on May 15 or 16, damage was done to the internal mechanisms and base of the machine, necessitating the $3,000 repair. People who wished to park in this lot were asked to report to security to pay the daily charge, while the meter was being fixed. Hunter said there were no complaints about the inconven-

opened the loft door, turned on the light and instead of dry-

appeared as though someone tied a chain to the

was covered

machine and tried to remove it from its pole with a vehicle. A report was filed with the Waterloo regional police and the

“They’ve been pretty accommodating and we’ve been pretty accommodating,” he said. The machine is enq>tied daily and Hunter said because of the

investigation

time

“I

wall, the insulation

with these plates,” he

said.

After close inspection, he finally

were from May and July 1949. “I was amazed and the exciterealized the plates

ment

hit

me when

I

realized they

were nearly 50 years day,” he said.

it

continuing.

is

ience.

when

the crime occurred,

Currently, Hunter said the police

there wasn’t any

have no suspects.

the machine.

money

left in

old, to the

It was only after Stanton had a discussion with his neighbour,

Mike Sauchuk,

how the prints

that

he realized

got there in the

first

place.

Sauchuk,

has

78,

on

lived

Pleasant Avenue since he

was 21

Brad Stanton holds up the newspaper plates he found while renovating the insulation in his loft. The plates are dated from editions of the 1 949 K-W Record. (Photo by Andrea Jesson)

years old and told Stanton that he

helped to build the home he is now living in, almost half a century

The Record. He contacted Lynn Richardson, The Record’s historian, to let her know of his discov-

ago.

Sauchuk told Stanton he helped neighbour and friend. Bill McGowan, build the house in 1949. At that time, McGowan was the managing editor at The his

Record. Stanton laughed, remembering Sauchuk’s impression of his friend as being “a tight old sod” for lin-

ing his loft with newspaper plates instead of diywall.

Stanton said that being a handyman himself he had suspicions

about the structure of the house before he spoke with Sauchuk.

He

could tell the house was self-made compared to all other houses because of the different characteristics it

possessed.

to

Home Depot

anything like

it

couldn’t find

I

to fit.”

Because the house was Stanton ter.

s£iid, it

has

its

The wood beams

self-built,

own characin the work-

shop above the garage are red cedar and the doors are three inches narrower than any other door. Stanton said his neighbour is full of stories about the year he

and McGowan built the house and he specifically remefnbered

summer ing wall. He

the

they built the retain-

said the wall took the summ er to build and was made of broken up concrete from the sidewalks of downtown entire

Kitchener.

“The baseboard and the vents are handmade,” he said. “If I went

Stanton said Richardson was of his findings, but said they have no value because The Record has all the stories compiled on microfiche. However, she did say they have only one other like them in The Record’s museum. On the negative side, Stanton was warned by Richardson that the plates could contain asbestos because they are from the old lead pressings used 50 years ago. It is

thrilled to hear

known

not

Stanton realized

how

these works of history

precious

may be

to

for sure

Al Hunter, supervisor of security services, stands in front of some of the items collected from lockers and stored in a new room off

the loading docks

or if they have any at it

(the content)

cent that’s

OK,”

50 per cent

is

all.

was

five per

Security claims

a threat to yoiu

health.”

leftover belongings By Brian Smiley

one time.

It

will also

be equipped with two video

recording units. Students and staff travelling through the halls in the college’s

main campus

at

Doon may be wondering

what people are doing on ladders, taking the roof

What these people are doing lation

is

tiles

beginning the

from

instal-

of cords, which will carry

wires to the

new

closed-circuit tel-

and the other may play back a previously recorded tape. The two monitors will be located in the security offices. Hunter said the cost would total around $9,000, of which a substantial amount was donated by the Doon Student Association. Hunter said the cost of the project is also being

evision system being implemented

This the itor

is

the first step in setting

new cameras, which activity

will

strategically

the college.

up

mon-

around

Currently two former students are running cords throughout the

wire

in

soon, and then

the cameras installed.”

school so wiring can be put in place.

“We’re hoping to get the wire in resources and students do that and then the cameras Al Hunter work,” Hunter said, in reference to installed,” said A1 Hunter, supervithe wiring. supervisor of security services sor of security services. As for the camera installation Back in May, Hunter said the itself he said the suppliers of the cameras were being set up to procameras will do that work. vide safety and security for the All told, the supervisor of securistaff and students at the college. These cameras will ty said by employing some of the people around the

A and B wings of the col-

lege, but eventually throughout the entire school.

The cameras,

up with a multiplexer unit, will monitor up to 16 different locations

set

allow security to

college to do the work, the cost will be greatly reduced.

Work project.

will continue throughout the

summer on

numbers are

m. Al Hunter, supervisor of security services, said his staff cut 450 locks and inside 126 lockers were items that students

“We

try to

left

effort to

the

it’s

the student’s

Hunter said that

room

last

August

placed the items in a D wing. However, this

in the

year they have their

own room

off

the loading docks in the A-wing,

near the security offices, where the property

is being stored. Items were catalogued and placed on shelving in the room, until security begins trying to con-

tact

the

students

belongings.

who own

the

Hunter said minor

items, like lunch bags, are tossed out, but things that are

worth more

are stored for six months.

we

like to

said.

security guard opened had valuables

worth more than an estimated $1,000. If these items are not picked

up

within that time frame. Hunter said they are donated throughout the college and community. stuff

we can

use,

tainly try to re-circulate,”

Books

we he

are given to the

cersaid.

Doon

Student Association (DSA), scientific

responsibility.”

stuff,

he

One package Cliff Laurin

“The

behind.

make every

“but ultimately

security

“We’re hoping to have physical

soon,

jbe primarily located in the

locks have been cut and

lockers emptied the

contact them (students),” he said

offset in other ways.

“We’re hoping to get the

at the college.

will record

were warned about

leaving items in lockers and now, after

One of those VCRs

“The high value try to give back,”

Students at

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

said Stanton. “But

Security cords being installed By Brian Smiley

the B-Wing.

in

how much

asbestos content the plates have, “If

After putting the puzzle together,

all

ery.

calculators

to

special

needs, clothing to the Salvation

Army and

knapsacks to the boy

scouts.

Since there are so

many

items

need to be picked up. Hunter is working on getting some help in locating the people who own the that

property.

“I’m going to approach the DSA and work on this with us,” he said. Students will have until around January to pick up any items they to try

may

want.

located in

The

2B 1 6.

security office

is


Courts no longer lenient with the young offenders same province. Judge Malcolm Macaulay decided to send 18year-old Warren Glowatski to a prison for adult men. Glowatski was found guilty

At the age of 1 0, when most boys are interested

in

sports,

toys,

month of beating

playing arcade

earlier

games

Laboucan sex-

and drowning 14-year-old Reena Virk in a suburban tidal pool and received a mandatory sentence of life with no parole

ually assaulted

for seven years.

and

going

to

Adam

movies,

who was

a three-month-old baby

Macauley

in his care.

a

At 11, Laboucan raped and drowned a three-year-old child

man

in a

June

the

in

18,

British

Supreme Court, became Canada’s

Columbia Laboucan

youngest dangerous offender. Judge Victor Curtis ruled that Laboucan should be jailed indefinitely because he believes there is a high chance Laboucan would reoffend when angry or under stress.

On

same day and

that

in the

Glowatski

immature

who

should

is

young

serve

his

sentence in a federal institution

I

am

help.

relieved that the courts are

coming down harder on young offenders who commit unimaginable crimes such as these.

No good

can come out of being on these types of criminals. The best help we can give them is tough punishment. We’ve come to a point in time when we cannot allow young offenders to not be responsible for lenient

do.

Too many young adults have viewed the law as something that

manipulated and

easily

is

something that

their records as

can be easily erased with time.

As

a

need

things

Laboucan

like

Glowatski

to

who do

children

that

horrible

and

we

society

realize

did

are

not

and shouldn’t be given leniency due to their age. “just”

said

ti’oubled,

where he can get

pond.

On

this

what they

children

my

mind, I gather criminals one category no matter what the age. What difference does it make whether they are 1 3 or 3 1 ? If a young adult executes a plan to hurt or kill someone, then what difference does their age make? If they’re big enough to commit the crime then they’re In

into

quences that go with

And

with the big boys and adult prison, so be it.

can just hear one of those overbearing announcers if Dallas had lost - “Brett Hull could spend the rest of his life being haunted by the ghost of

Brett

this

Hull whacked

puck past minik Hasek to give the

D

o

Stars a 2-1 overtime win over the Buffalo Sabres

and

isn’t exactly

Cup,

pumping

my

I

couldn’t

help

the

I’m

fist in

many hockey

sure

reaction, but I

had

air.

fans had this

my own special my ring finger

reason for breaking

on the low ceiling

in our base-

ment.

Was

it

a tragic circumstance,

especially to guys living in card-

their first

Stanley

I

Lord Stanley.” Not having a Stanley Cup ring

Dallas

the

sacred honour.

because I’m a huge Dallas

board boxes underneath the overpass who, for all we know, are wearing jackets made out of Hull’s father’s old toupees.

No, the reason

my

was

girls in

in

elation

that

most

to

goal,

total.

annoyed by Irv Weinstein, Ed Kilgore and the rest of the slightly biased Buffalo media, I would

ting together to draft a

have preferred to see the Sabres win rather than have the Cup be used for target practice by the

assists in the playoffs.

NRA

for the next year.

my no

handshake).

will never

total

one point of

for second place, although be sure to give him a hearty

I’ll

pool consists of several guys get-

hopes will

by Mike com-

closest

Sadly, there is

petitor to within

money

team of each participant the most goals and

assisted

Modano, brought my

I can’t skate, I can’t shoot a puck, I can barely roll off the couch, but I can win cash betting

whom

eke out a victory.

season ends and I’m reminded of this sport I love (gambling)

be quite the same. To me, the measure of Wayne

Gretzky’s greatness

not in his

is

slick passing, deft stick-handling

This procedure can take four or

served at his restaurant in Toronto,

hockey fanatic pours over scoring statistics and picks anywhere from 10 to 20

but in the fact that he has often

Golden Brett was going to get his championship ring after all these

players. This year

years?

were taking players who were not only retired, but were also

been excluded from hockey pools. Gretzky scored so many points in his years with the Edmonton Oilers, one could have picked the Great One and Shania Twain (who really only had one good year) and

deceased.

still

Was

Not

I

excited the high-scoring

really.

1

don’t quite under-

wave of sentimentality overtakes some sports fans

stand the that

when

a veteran player

is

denied

when someone

15

Most kicks

Spoke SPOKE

is

we stopped realized

say,

we

everyone 20 bucks and the

importantly, in,

at

cruised to victory.

You were fun but you never

to

News

anti-abortionists

when

Dr.,

Room 4B15,

women do

some ce^s

in the best

Is

It

just

me,

if

ties, tragic

don’t their

01

believe

when

comes

it

in

events such as rape or

and teenage pregnancy

are valid casons for a i

woman

to

so

committed and the bombs go off, sound a trifle, contrived^ g little too precise, for something supposedly thrown together at a moment’s notice? Long-time advocates of prochoice, including myself, no longer

it is

mother and fetus a pregomicy is terminated.

incest,

press statements, issued quickly after the mur4ers

woman No law

Various tac^iss such as medical eomphcdtiops, fetal abnormali-

move-

their

boo.st

behiveen a

should regulate, what with their bodies In

stnke, using events to

is

interevt ot the

an abortion clinic getting

like

bombed

efloits, to soul bone-

and her eunsac’u.c

literally

moment

the

anti-

media \ umpires,

^sit^^^ons that involve crisis or

legally.

Abortion is not murder; unwanted cells, are being removed safely and legally before, diey develop and grow

coincidence

to our adversaries.

some members of

risks to ^ the mother or can be handled safely and

fetn:|

into a

human

being.

Abortion should be legal and

the

press and law enforcement cora-

available to all

women.

Kiteliener, Ontario,

is

mainly rundod from September to

N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke(d),conestogae.on.ea

May

by the Doon

Student Assoeiation (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in tills newspaper do not necessarily reflect the \iews of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKI' are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain llie

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

damages amount paid

shall not he liable for any

out of errors in adx ertising beyond the

Editor: Elizabeth Sackridcr;

Production Managers: .land Waknlz and LcslcyTurnbull; Advertising Manager: Eileen Diniz; (Jrcidation Manager: Gluulwick Severn; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Ifrank and Christina Jonas;

299 Doon Valley

abortion

me is the

"What really infunatcs

will only

it

more -atrocities The

choice as a f(Km of contraception. The decision to have an

arrests

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Ufe Editor: Wayne Collins; Issues & Activities Editor: Gariy Benjamin; Photo Editors: Gliarlcs Kuepfor and Anna Sajfcrl;

is

one who used to be a paid member of .Missionaries to the PreBorn. There .she was, marching with a sign, bragging to the camera of her many

SPOKE

Editor: Brian Smiley;

address

continue choose

saw a young

1

too

lhe.so

won me any money.

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

SPOKE’s

television

Wliile

watch Wayne,

women to

if

given to

j

I

dry shouidn?! go unchecked. i believe in the right of a woman to je|m«iate a pregnancy before fci il viabi'iiv .md I tci if it is of 1 irm to the life of the mothei 1 do not support pro-

protestor,

tragedies

is

their increasing

hui

of

continues.

media foinks

aboiiionisis aie

ensuring

capture

There’s a note of sadness as the

or the delectable chicken wings

five hours, as each

on

have the right

way

placement

attention

create

to

On

.

stories

horrific metdents.

the

urc.s:

winning

players

outraged

But as things turned out, the old boys came through and despite not having any players in the finals, I

redneck. Despite years of being

I’m concerned,

much

I

decidedly long of tooth.

how

far as

believe fhe-

bomb

Bomque, Macinnis, Clark) were

managed

md

tive rights,

at

with the media's

di-ssali-jtactujn

dwitulling' number of abortion clinics. Our quest now must be to channel our anger into productive meas-

players (Yzerman,

around

raunities

of reproduc-

our nations

many of my

111.

f

hmuUing

am

end of

'

and supporters

The joke around the draft table year was that I was using the scoring totals from 1989, since

the state of Texas put the red in

Nope. As

so other

activists

this

on which combination of players will score the most points. For the uninitiated, a hockey

Stars fan?

Like

many

attacks

Canadian of pastimes, the hockey pool.

at the

<

must have the right to choose

living

the playoffs.

(Hull’s

my

for

victory

winner claims the pot

Women

it.

means

that

if

Everybody into the pool: a great Canadian pastime When

r

big enough to take the conse-

arising for the

space. Unsolicited .submissions must he sent to the editor by V:,l()

a.m. Monday. Submissions are subjecl to acceptance or

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

WortI

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submisstons must not con-

may be accompanied by

illustration (such as a photographi.

an


STUDENT

Greg Kraus, robotics and engineering student

Kristin

Murphy,

computer program

SPOKE, June

LIFE

— Page 5

28, 1999

Matt Gunzel, robotics

Donna Ryves,

Matt Fitzgerald,

Doug

and automation student

journalism student

computer program

engineering technology student

analysis student

analysis student

Burrell, electronics

Are students stung by the athletic fee? story

& Photos

Out of a random survey of 10 students at

By Andrea Jesson

Doon Campus

the

In

the

the

past,

Kenneth E.

June 15, seven said that students should have the choice to pay the athletic and recreation fee based on whether or not they use the facili-

students’ right to use the facilities

they pay for at any given time during the hours of operation.

Concerns from a parent, directed the college, about why his daughter should have to pay a recreation and athletic fee when to

facilities,

was

one incident which started the

when

ketball

the

Skills

Competitions are going on.”

Wood

lege should not

the fees if they are not athletically

with the lack of space and time

ties.

available to students.

Murphy, a CPA student, said students just pay the fee because it is on their tuition bill, but

automation student, said his concerns lie with the fact that the facilities just are not up to par. “I haven’t seen any improvement in a long time, so why should we pay if nothing gets improved,” he said. “The weight room is pretty pathetic.”

students pay

inclined and don’t use the faciliKristin

“If they can’t

in

admits that a lot of students don’t

the summer,

to

dum on

pay.”

even know the fee exists. “It should be like any other club where you just pay as you go,” he

the athletic and recreation

make it available we shouldn’t have

Roger Wood, also a robotics and

student believes his rights as a student are violated

automation student, agrees with

because he has been denied access

the availability factor.

to the recreation centre

when

side events are taking place.

he

ities,”

“Try playing bas-

said.

said.

However, some students

“You can never get into the facil-

out-

n., 1

By Michelle Lehmann

A place

.

that

is

an electronic engineering technology student.

big classroom with couches.

on campus as the addition for the

cial

Sanctuary begins.

Sanctuary.

The DSA has been given around 225 square metres of space for the student lounge, on top of the existing 675 sq. m. “The construction will bring about some major changes,” said EUen Menage, president of the

Doon Student Association. “We’re

wiU be a

spe-

in

the

built

“The bar wUl be there aU the time, but only licensed for special

We

wiU use it to seU pop for our movie nights.” There wiU also be a new televievents.

sion lounge to replace the one lost

when

the

FinaUy,

DSA offices expanded. the DSA plans to have

building an addition, not a separate

restaurant-style booths along the

because we stiU want the Sanctuary to be an open-concept

windows so smdents have more space to sit.

area for students.”

“It will be actual tables where students can play games or study,” said Menage. The DSA plans for construction to begin July 1 and hopes everything will be complete by Aug. 14. “We are working on a very hectic and rushed schedule,”

area,

DSA has

The

uses for the

created

new

some good

space located in

the hallway just beside the lounge,

some lockers and classroom 1B20, said Menage. There will be a separate games room, a used book store/tuck shop, a special events

new

bar, a

television lounge

and

restaurant-style booths.

The new design will have a sepagames room with aU of the

rate

games, except for the pool

Menage. “The reason

tables,

said

is

so

said.

“We

the

basic

Menage ing

for

walls and a

little

are look-

cement by

paint

August.” for the isolated area

when nooners

are held,

sm-

dents can StiU play the games,” she

She said the taken out and

ceiling will be

new

lights will

said.

be added to give the Sanctuary an open-concept

fere with

feeling.

“The activities won’t interone another.” There will also be a used bookstore year round so smdents have access to those books at any point in time, said Menage. A part of the used bookstore will also sell various DSA paraphernalia and event Items.

“We

haven’t finahzed what wilT

won’t look like a classIt will resemble a bar and that will make it more inviting for smdents.” The games room and used bookstore will have garage doors to give the room some “It

room anymore.

character, she said.

it,

somebody so

we

can’t

should

all

2.

Room

want

it

we

don’t

use

it.”

However, Roy Moore, an electronics engineering technology student, beheves that the money students pay for education goes towards services that each student uses, so students should have the choice on paying in terms of how often they use it. “Just like a YMCA,” he said.

Matt Fitzgerald, a said although

CPA

student,

a lot of smdents

complain, the funding needed.

is

probably

wouldn’t be able

to afford to stay if students didn’t

pay,” he said.

Doug

an electronics

Burrell,

engineering technology smdent, and Petra Lampert, a journalism student, asked

pay

if

why

they don’t use

they should it.

with bar, tuck shop, booths

close for

mck shop.” bar

socialism;

use of the additional facilities because there reaUy is nowhere

think the Sancmary looks lik e a

events

fees.

“We are definitely looking for a new feel because right now we

area in the used bookstore for a said there

a

designated an

Within the next few weeks, students, staff and faculty can expect to see more construction workers

Menage

journalism student, said she doesn’t have time to use it herself, but believes the students should pay the “It’s

later to

“It (the centre)

Donna Ryves,

afford to pay

help out,” she said. “If

pay now, we might find reasons

redefines the student lounge

sacred or gives asylum

exactly be sold,” said Menage.

“We have definitely

like

Rob McIntosh,

Doon Student Association Sanc«tu*ar»y:

Matt Gunzel, a robotics and

Greg Kjaus, a robotics and automation student, isn’t happy

“It’s booked aU the time, but it’s booked solid aU summer,” he said.

The

I

ties.

debate about recreation fees. Recently, a student came forth with suggestions about a referenfees.

pubhc school system and

don’t use that either,” he said.

also believes that the col-

make

the

is just

another tax students have to pay that they don’t get any benefit from. “I have to pay taxes to

CAMPUS QUESTION

of

Conestoga College on

Hunter Recreation Centre has been under fire concerning the

she doesn’t use the

beheve the fee

to be totally separate

We

from

the school.”

The design wiU aUow the DSA to hold more night events like showing sports on the big screen. If the students enjoy the atmosphere

more, they wUl be willing to come in, grab some nachos and watch the game. Menage said. “We hope more smdents Uving in residences, houses or apartments in the area wiU make good

As

them

“We wanted with the

to go.”

for decorating, the

DSA

has

already decided on the purchases

and where everything

the past five years.

will go, she

said.

The DSA wants things up and running by registration week. New smdents wUl become familiar with the area because they have to get photo IDs taken in the Sancmary. Menage said the cost of the addition wiU be covered by a surplus of money that has accumulated over

money

to

do something would last,”

that

Menage. “We didn’t think it spend the money on an expensive concert where only one group of smdents would be able to said

was

fair to

participate.”

The DSA had been thinking about expanding for awhile and once the school allocated more space, the decision was easy, she said.

“Hopefully, everybody likes the changes in the Sancmary,” said

Menage.


'

Page 6

— SPOKE, June 28, 1999

OFF CAMPUS FEATURES

Scuba

diving: fun ® Rick Linton takes a

By Brad Dugard

As

dive. Alicia Waller

was nervous but

excited as she slipped on her

mask

said

dive and,

was her first while it was in a

pool,

unknown can be

the

it is

some

and snorkel before strapping on her scuba tank.

for the cost

of certification, Bruce Kingsbury not as high as

might

people

think.

It

For the person

who

not sure if scuba

is

is

for

them, he suggests tak-

intimidating.

Bruce Kingsbury, owner of Groundhog Divers on Victoria

ing a scuba experiences course. For about $25 the

given some

He

suggests getting the best

quality

mask

right

since the correct

from the

fit is

start

important to

the comfort of the diver.

“There is a big difference between a good scuba mask and one sold at (a department) store,” he said.

Open water

compo-

training, a

nent of the basic certification,

done

in Wiarton,

summer

the

factivity for

is

Tobermory or

of shipwrecks in the Great Lakes but only approximately 900 have

been discovered. He added that the site they visit in Tobermory is actually part of the National Marine Park Fathom Five which contains numerous shipwrecks. Other classes offered by Groundhogs include scuba rescue, divemaster, assistant instructor ice

diving and instructor.

The Groundhog dive school

Presquille, Ont.

Street North, Kitchener, said that

prospective student

nervousness before the

classroom instruction and then taken into the training pool to experience the underwater world. “It is an opportunity to get wet and see if scuba is for them.”

also available

recognized by several scuba asso-

once the initial open-water training is completed including the advanced training course that allows

and provides product and support. For more information call 742-5415 or see their

divers to explore shipwrecks.

Web

Groimdhog provides everything

Miller said there are thousands

is

first

dive

not imusual. However, he quick-

ly added,

scuba diving

is

also one

so,”

he

As

of the safest sports on the face of

said.

a certified instructor for the

According to Scuba Diving magazine, recreational scuba diving is

Handicap Scuba Association, Kingsbury has instructed blind, deaf and even paraplegic people to

safer than football, baseball, vol-

dive.

and even bowling. “(Scuba) can be a very dangerous sport if the rules aren’t fol-

Yvonne Kingsbury, Bruce’s wife, who also runs the store,

would

added sometimes the physically

begixmer class.

the planet if the rules are followed.

leyball, tennis

lowed,”said Kingsbury. “But if divers follow the rules they were taught it can be one of the safest recre-

training

is

cost

“The main

qualification

you need

to dive

the

is

Bruce Kingsbury,

owner of Groundhog Divers

Kingsbury

is

challenged

do

learn

and

quicker

sometimes a case of

their

desire to succeed in a challenging activity,”

she said.

when

scuba store

good idea

retain more. “It is

to dive is the desire to

By Janet Wakutz

that fact

demonstration. The Happy Harmonica Band, quilting display, The Edwardian Ensemble in the Freeport Church and horsedrawn wagon rides throughout the

sion to

day.

June is senior’s month and Doon Heritage Crossroads celebrated

by offering free admisthose 55 and older on June

16.

Coimell, supervisor of

Doon, said seniors out and about

getting

including local retirement groups and other senior’s clubs.

our bit in recognizing

they are a valuable part of society,” she said.

The

senior’s

day

program

included an Orchestral Regina

starting out is a

keep costs down. “To start you can spend between $270 and $500 to get the basic

Bruce and Yvonne Kingsbury are the owners of Groundhog

equipment,” said Miller.

divers in Kitchener.

here

and

to

Seniors came from as far as Newmarket to enjoy a picnic, wagon rides

and

touring

the

various

he

said.

the other

hand.

Bill

Hills,

also of

Kitchener, had been

never

Doon He

to

before.

had

he

said

about senior’s day at

read

Doon

the

in

paper.

“It

makes a nice change from the normal routine,”

grounds Doon.

said.

he

'

Originally and

Clarence Wilson

of

Ancaster,

from England and retired for years.

10

said

near Hamilton,

Hills

came

today’s age

to see if

Alice’s granddad’s picture

hung

he’s

glad he

lives

Seniors enjoy a wagon ride as part of the Heritage Crossroads.

Arriving

“These engines were used in day and they’re asking questions,” said the younger Leis.

“There’s quite

“We

cJo

our

bit in

recognizing they are a

England where

his

steam and eoal were used a lot

Wendy Connell, supervisor of programs at

longer

Doon Heritage Crossroads

of

here,”

Kitchener (houghl

was Elsie Broughton,

Ken Broughton

(top from left to right) and Jerry MacMillan (seated) from Newmarket celebrated their wedding aniver-

saries at

Doon on June

1

6.

(Photo b? Janet Wakutz)

it

great

6 at Doon

Allen Lcis and his son Ted, who volunteer at Doon to present and

Doon putting

answer

questions

on a day for

antique

engine,

seniors,

already

talked

people by noon.

about

said to

they

their

had

several

Elsie and Ken Broughton, all of Newmarket, were gathered on the porch of Seibert House. The

house,

Doon

located

originally

Kitchener,

was

donated

in

to

in 1964.

“I’m really ifiterested in the gardens and the way they are laid out,” said Elsie Broughton. Jerry MacMillan, seated on the porch, said “I’m enjoying looking at all the girls, they’re

my

age.

eouples,

wedding anniversaries on the same day

Flora on the weekend and has vis-

friends celebrating their

was

have been

1

Getting in for free was just a bonus.”

Two you,” he said.

that

“1

than Allen

Leis said.

he

said

few from

a

people

valuable part of society,”

church group, Helmut Janzen

on Senior’s Day June

(Photo by Janet wakutz)

their

the

Hall of Fame.

festivities

in

and not 100 years ago. “It makes you appreciate what a modern convenience does for

still

in

with

seniors month

enjoy coming

buildings and at

(Photo by Brad Dugard)

before always

I

back,”

On

Coimell said senior’s day is just one of the events Doon plans throughout the summer. The next event will be an antique car show on Canada Day. Connell was enthusiastic about a theme day scheduled for July 10 when they will host an Edwardian wedding.

Alice

Jean MacMillan,

www.groundhog-

equip-

as

far

Doon Heritage Crossroads celebrates

“We do

at

goes Scott Miller, an instructor with Groundhog, suggested starting with a good quality mask, snorkel, fins and weight belt. Renting air tanks and a wetsuit at a

desire to do so.”

“The main qualification you

at

site

divers.com.

$125 for the six-week

As

challenged to scuba dive.

enjoy

sales

ment

certified to instruct the physically

programs

ciations

like to take a course, the

is

needs to be a “fish”

Wendy

is

except the bathing suit and towel.

________

This does not mean novice diver the

need

More

Once someone has decided they

ational activities.”

in the water. It fact,

is

were on their saw an adverpaper and decided

MacMillan,

who had

visited

(but different years)

ited St. Jacob’s

way

he wished he lived closer so he could contribute what he knows, from living in the era depicted

to St. Jaeob's,

tisement in the to stop by.

Jerry and Jean

MacMillan and

at

Doon.

many

times, said


8

STUDENT

— Page 7

SPOKE, June 28, 1999

LIFE

Survey says: students rank Conestoga #1 By John Oberholtzer

Durham,

Georgian,

Loyalist,

Niagara, Sir Sandford Fleming,

A provincial survey for commuconducted in the semester shows a major-

St.

Clair and St. Lawrence.

colleges

nity

1998 fall of continuing education students at Conestoga College give

ity

good or excellent ratings to the college in most categories. The survey, which is administered every two years, was filled out by 86,938 continuing educa-

grams.”

“More and more people are coming back for certificate

types of

director of continuing

was with

director of continuing education.

three size categories (small, medi-

um

or large) and Conestoga

in

the

medium

group

education

“The survey looks at everything from cafeteria and bookstore hours to teaching and learning,” said David Stewart, Conestoga’s

^

and

ing,

programs.”

munity colleges and the results were compiled by Compustat Consultants. At Conestoga, 5,860 students completed the Schools are divided into one of

section of the survey divided into five divisions: information and registration,

and

perceptions, teaching and learn-

David Stewart,

sizrvey.

The main

is

services, general satisfaction

com-

tion students at 23 Ontario

covers the whole experiencefrom the time students register to the time they graduate from pro“It

safety.

The other section asks students questions on their personal background and computer prefer-

equipment as good or excellent and 73 per cent found the library resources to be of a high quality. However, one category where colleges scored poorly

all

was

in

the price of books. Seventy-five

the largest

number of continuing

“More and more people are coming back for certificate types of programs,” he

tory.

own

The teaching and learning divion the other hand, showed

sion,

extremely positive results. Ninety per cent or more responded good or excellent in the following cate-

In the information and registration area, more than 87 per cent of students surveyed said the

gories: instructor’s

the

helpfulness of registration staff

fulness of assignments.

knowledge of of course content and usehelpfulness

subject,

instructor,

Stewart said questions asked in the second section determined

demographics.

It

women between

showed

that

the ages of 35

to

made up

education students.

per cent of Conestoga students rated the prices fair or unsatisfac-

ences.

and overall ease of registration was good or excellent. In reference to services, 67 per cent rated classroom or lab

and 44 who may be looking return to the workforce

The college

said.

also

conducts

its

evaluations for continuing

education courses. Students fill out questionnaires so the adminis-

and the teachers can evaluand weaknesses of each course. “I think a lot of (the teachers)

tration

ate the strengths

because they then use it to and change things for next time around,” Stewart said. “In the big, bad world of customer service, I don’t think you can get any better than value

tweak

it

their courses

that.”

International students get

taste of winter sports

first

By John Oberholtzer Summer

has started and the beckoning, but all Seliphab Phosalath wants to do is

beach

is

play hockey. Phosalath, an international stu-

dent from Laos, hasn’t yet had the opportunity to lace up a pair of skates, but he and some of his friends put on their running shoes and recently got their first taste of

a winter sport.

with broomball before something with skates.” With the aid of

trying

Larry

of international education, Punnett arranges various special events for the students.

In the past month, they’ve gone at the Brunswick Frederick Lanes, travelled to

bowling

Wonderland and movie Happy

Canada’s

and on the ice. “They don’t have classes on Friday so this is a really good turnout.” The students are enrolled in an English language studies program where they learn communication, grammar, conversation, listening comprehension and reading and writing skills which will allow sliding

Rechsteiner, the college’s director

watched Gilmore

tures of the students slipping

the

in the student lounge.

On

them

eventually

to

attend

a

Canadian imiversity or college program.

Some international students stay Rodeway Suites student res-

aroimd 20 international students

Jtme 26, the group was to travel to Toronto to see some

at the

who

tourist sites.

idence, while others choose the

homestay

to the ice at the recreation centre

Cummings, who teaches writing and grammar to interna-

on Jime 18 for a friendly game of

tional students, said

broomball.

students at the broomball

Phosalath was one of a group of currently

are

enrolled at

Conestoga College and

Alycia Punnett,

who

is

who took

the activ-

Jill

arrived in

Canada

most of the

six

game

weeks ago.

They’ve come from countries

Cummings

program ^ where, explained, they live

with a local family and have more of an opportunity to practise their English.

she talks

over the world, including China,

about the students’ interest in Canada’s national sport.

Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Korea and

Meanwhile, back on the ice, Bi, who was shivering at the beginning of the game, was

Colombia.

now

ities

co-ordinator for international

students, smiles

“They

all

she said.

want

“We

when

to play hockey,”

thought we’d

start

“They ties,”

all

really love these activi-

she said as she snapped pic-

Monica Himmelman, an alumni services officer, shows an example of fundraising items. (Photo uy Cariy Bonjamin)

Alumni services raises money at convocation

Maonan

By Cariy Benjamin

fiiames have already

ordered and paid

sweating.

he said as he wiped the perspiration from his glasses. “It’s hot,”

The biggest moneymaker

“Students can claim Iheir frames

alumni services centres around graduation ceremonies, when roses, frames, cameras and gradf nation photos are sold to gradu-

by presenting their receipt and wc will frame tlieir new diplo-

doors of alumni hall to

processing.

sell their

breath.

Due

to the

volume of

sales at

last year’s convocation ceremonies, the number of roses ordered this year increased by

50, to 1,000.

were available in wood for $50 or brass for $45 and both came with a mat Three volunteers were to be at convocation to frame diplomas immediately after graduates Tlie frames

-

received them.

Monica Himmelman, an alumni

services officer, said order

forms for frames were sent out with the convocation packages last

month

for the students’ con-

venience.

.

a game

of

broomball at

(Photo by John Oberholtzer)

spot.”

Disposable cameras, equipped

with a flash, also were to be available to students for $20. That price includes the cost of

Roses sell individually for $3, packages of three cost $9 and groups of six are $18, which ineltdes a water pick and baby’s

Bi take part in

mas on the

and their families. The organization was to have a station set up just inside the fund-raising items.

Maonan

she said.

for

ates

International students Seliphab Phosalath (left) and the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre June 1

been pre-

for,”

“One hundred and seventeen

Himmelman said graduation caps coidd also be purchased for $10 as a

traditional

symbol of

students’ accomplishments at

school “Grad caps are a big

seller,”

she said. “Students like to buy them as a souvenir of their success at Conestc^a College.” Himmelman said there is not a

huge markup on the items being sold because the purpose of the fund-raising is not to gouge the students.

“The graduates have earned day and

this

make

it

we

are trying to

special for them,” she

said. “Prices are kept reasonable

but

still

provide alumni services

with a profit.” She said alumni services has been fund-raising at convocation for;

about three years and the

experience has always been positive.


Page S

— SPOKK, June

28, 1999

STUDENT

Dog

trainer utilizes

LIFE

unusual techniques

By

Eileen Diniz

realize

Alcohol and alcoholism affects

When someone

says,

it’s

strate things like fitting different

men and women

collars on,” she says.

ways, said Diane Penman, an addiction counsellor

Along with

Miller

most people would think time for a beer. time,

But when the host of a seminar called Dog Training as Easy as 12-3 says it, her dogs know it is time to go out for a walk. Linda Wiza, support staff in the .special needs department at Conestoga College, and her husband Walter, were sitting around one evening watching T'V and came up with the strange dog

says.

Wiza brings

Kit,

in a

green knapsack filled with items, including: Cothivet, a herbal spray for first-aid treatment for cuts; Pepto Bismol, for severe

it’s

command. “A Miller beer commercial came on one night and that’s how we came up Avith the idea,” she

different

for

in a

ing in a woman’s, so the alcohol

more ends up stream.

Other herbal remedies include bitter apple spray for chewing,

Another reason alcohol is more dangerous to women is the fact that they have more fatty tissues

and skin scratching. your dog is suffering from arthritis, glucosamine or shark If

When someone

says,

gel

it’s

most people

would think

it

dog

for

which

stores

reasons.

“They usually do very good because they eome in during the early stages of alcoholism.”

“There is a rule of thumb; men drink to celebrate and women

excessively

different

added.

that

women need

to

“They should educate themselves and be extremely cautious with alcohol especially if they are using it for the first

be caretakers,” she said. “They are supposed to be nurturing, not out and about.” The foreword of the Alcoholics

tolerance or even amusement on a male drunk, but recoils in

She added

Students should know and understand what effect alcohol could have on them, she

ly socialized to

society

tends

to

from

distaste

a

time.”

Women

“Most look

She also said

of with

woman

are in an experimental

everyone,” she said.

women are cultural-

for

are in a

they want to have a good time and be accepted by

drink or are alcoholics.

“In society

when they

social setting, she said.

“They

men

comparison to

holics in

students start drinking

mode and

There is also a higher social stigma attached to women who drink or women who are alco-

quickly for women,”

caps,

new

lives.”

Anonymous (AA) handbook states,

Penman

Many

drink to medicate,” she said. “Actually, people drink thinking it will help them manage their

“The process eventually causes damage to the internal organs of all people who drink, but more said.

for treatment.

that there

safe use of narcotics,

no

is

which

is

growing in popularity at campuses across Canada and the U.S.,

in

or alcohol,

alcohol

is

even though

considered legal.

is

time for a

cookies that are available at the

Co-op

store

ple in attendance.

Previous years have attracted about 1 5 people to her seminars. This year Wiza says she might have been competing with other that

were in the same

slot.

Being a dog owner, she had a hard time finding answers to her dog questions, so she conducts the classes in a question and answer type format.

The questions vary from housewhat kind of dog breed makes the best pet. Labrador retrievers are notoriously bad for chewing, says Wiza. Chewing tends to run in training problems to

certain breeds.

One of Wiza’s dogs, Kit, an Australian shepherd, accompanies her to the dog-training semihim

in to

demon-

Michelle

Lehmann

in

Guelph.

Other items Wiza recommends and books. “I must have over 60 (dog) books,” says Wiza. “I stopped are videos

counting.”

The Art of Raising a Puppy by The Monks of New Skete is a good book she says. Wiza also recommends the video Sirius Puppy Training by. Dr. Ian Dunbar.

The video is available at Blockbuster in the wildlife section. “It can be watched over a weekend,” she says. Dunbar teaches obedience, commands, housebreaking and temperament training to help you with your new puppy. Puppies are better than older dogs because mature dogs are harder to train. “Older dogs have more baggage,” says Wiza, “With puppies you can train them the

“We

and co-ordinator in student services, is part of the team dedicated

make it a little less come to our door

making student

life easier at

for help,” she said-

“It .seems to

help if they recognize a face.”

Gregory said for people to

that

important

it’s

know

that the stu-

is

destigmatized today, making

cr^

to get counselling,”

said.

part

“It’s

requirements for

semesters.”

tions, learning

One way .student services helps become familiar with

people

by visiting all first-year for Student Success classes. During this time counsellors introduce themselves and their scrvice.s, said Gregory.

is

a resource

get a lot of students

ing in,” Gregory said.

com-

“We

are

booked wall to wall fall and winter

The counsellors fry to normalthe whole process because

ize

she of personal

many

growth and gives

new

for all students.

people

opportunities.”

Throughout the summer, student services is busy reviewing resources, working on meeting

ISO

certifica-

about legal issues and developing workshops and support groups. (ISO is an inter-

everyone needs help or comfort

nationally recognized standard

sometime during

quality).

“1

think your

school,

their lives. life

is

not just

everything that happens to land on your plate at any given time,” Gregory said, life

is

“'nicrc’s all sorts of pieces

impaet

She

how

.said

tliat

you're doing,”

she thinks conn,selling

it

located at 215 King St. S.

“We need to know happi^ng off campus

said Gregory,

with the services.”

throughout the

College for 15 years, Gregory said it is hard for people to come in and ask for help or admit they have a problem.

women,

“People need to realize you don’t have to be siok, bad or

selling.”

a counsellor at Conestoga

for alcoholic

what’s

dent services office

absolutely

a support centre

easier for people to ask for help,

Conestoga College. “All of our services fall under an umbrella of counselling,” said Gregory. “We do personal, academic, financial and career coiui-

“We

is

not just for the sici, bed

is

try to

Home

in

Waterloo.

(Photo by Eileen Diniz)

intimidating to

Carol Gregory, a counsellor

Alcontrol

way you want.”

Counselling

is

alcoholism drink

who

their bodies,

say that

to

dealing with

cartilage

beer.

time conducting the dog-training conference, that had about nine peo-

Strategies

their blood-

in

Penman went on

men and women

chase shark

(E3)

fourth

them

and

as fast

the

for

you can purMiller time,

program that was held June 9,10 and 11. It was Wiza’s

As

down

alcohol.

doesn’t like

ees for excel-

to

in

caps are available

cartilage gel

not broken

is

fur biting

If your

lence in edu-

By

lack-

is

in Oakville, Ont.

The confer-

nars. “I bring

man’s stomach and

These supplies can be purchased at the vet or the Pet Supply House

Herbal Select.

workshops

because of an

cement.

College.

time

women

enzyme in the human body. The enzyme is more plentiful

which hardens the pads of the paws when in contact with hot

from Zehrs under the brand name

cation

She said alcohol

women. is more dan-

gerous for

allergies;

Wiza held a question and answer forum June 10 at Conestoga

ence was part of an employ-

at

support

a

centre for alcoholic

Euphorbium Formulation, and Pad Tough,

runs;

member

and senior staff Alcontrol Home,

same condition.” Penman said she occasionally has students come into the home

they

realistically

drink.

entirely

in

that

match a man drink

can’t

By Linda Wright

game

Drinking a dangerous

of

the

is

ISO

for the

Student services is analyzing every practice and process

college.

die college has to ensure

all

pro-

cedures are intact, she said. Counsellors are also working hard to establish clear, legal protocol for themselves iuid for the students regarding issues of pri-

vacy and when ties,

to alert authori-

said Gregory.

She said some of the workshops

Student services offers a great deal of information on stress,

orders,

Something the counsellors arc

summer

medical

practices

di.s-

and

support groups.

“Wc must go community

through

referrals

student services olTers assist stu-

dents

with

test

anxiety,

self-

esteem issues, time management and study methods. Student

skills all

to

of

oiu-

ensure

they arc accurate and up-to-date,

services

is

els for the

lesbian students. ..

She said even tiiioiigh few go to schemi dofm|^|hie sum.

pie

spending a great deal of time on this

<&r

also developing

mod-

support programs for

mature students and for gay and

mer. counsellors arc stilTwilliag

toAelp

-^0 matter how busy we are and no matter what time of year it is,

our services are always,avad-:

able

fbr Gregory.

the

'

studentsf"

satC'^'

For Gregory, counselling .is a

She said

that usu-

when people come

for help,

positive thing. ally

it is because something has turned for them and they are

ready for some significant changes in their life. “It’s

a privilege to be able to

sit

down with someone, hear what they want to improve, offer suggestions and be a part of the|||fe journey,” she said. “1 really thin^P it’s

wonderful to be able to actuthem change.”

ally see


SPOKE, June

ISSUES AND ACTIVITIES

\ife By Eileen

side Gregory’s office states.

Have you ever felt like you enough time to get

everything done?

Time management

the secret

is

“It is

People should be aware of their biological rhythms and use them to their advantage. They should break tasks into smaller segments and reward themselves once these are accomplished. They shoul4 also, be aware of physical characteristics of the work environment, which may hinder success.

didn’t have

of dealing with this feeling and accomplishing not only what has to be done, but also lots more. Often, people feel confused, and compromised, rushed frustrated when they have a lot of different things to do.

“It is

Carol Gregory, a counsellor with student services, looks at time

a process of how

balance

management a little differently and more realistically. “I look at (time management) more as life management,” she

life,

to

not just

school.” Carol Gregory

“Everyone has a different value system of what they want in life and how to go get it.” Awareness of some contributors to a positive attitude can help lead more effective time to management, the student services

a process of how to balance

not just school,” she said.

She said students should also learn to balance short-term and

long-term goals, which include social, personal and academic aspects.

the Swiss cheese effect.

It is

“Work on

a project and break it down, piece by piece, to get to your goal,” she said. “Take a look at it on paper and then look at what is possible and what is not.” She added that whether it is a topic, research or a phone call for a project, the main thing is to start somewhere and it won’t be so overwhelming. Specific techniques to managing

goals, whether they are life goals,

weekly goals or daily goals, what is important.

foreseeable crises.

student services counsellor

Gregory added

time management pamphlet, out-

life,

time are outlined in the blue time management pamphlet. The techniques include developing an overview of what you want to accomplish, identifying goals in your life that are important, and

said.

— Page 9

1999

manage time

skills

Diniz

28,

that identifying

is

anticipating

sevens ?rJ*1

Dealing with test anxiety or tension can interfere with your prepare and perform on tests and similar events.

ability to

and

deadlines

(Photo by Eileen Diniz)

Performance affected Waterloo Park Mutual Music Festival takes over

Sounds

of

Summer on

Test anxiety a stress response

one-year break

m By

Eileen Diniz

Gregory

By Lesley Turnbull Everyone

has experienced some- nervousness oi tension before a big le.sl or othci impor^ tant event

The Waterloo Park Mutual Music Festival replaced the Sounds of Summer Waterloo

'

noimal and

City of Waterloo.

help

Sounds of Summer Waterloo Music Festival has featured such bands as the Tragically Hip, Big Sugar, 54:40, the Sky Diggers, Colin James, Wide Mouth Mason and many other well-known bands.

motivate

The

for

lasted

“Now

it’s

at that

sits at her desk surrounded by posters and brochures for the Waterloo Park Mutual Music Festival.

(Photo by Lesley Turnbull)

Band;

and

were

Forever” - a

Duke

tival.

Waterloo

Concert

“Ellington

is

be taken on

to

the

at

it’s

,

velop 3

Scheduled in the special tent for

at that

new

was the Numus

15-year mark again...

..

.

shell

it’s

time to de-

direction.

special events co-ordinator for the City of Waterloo

___________

Waterloo Park on June 26,

was to feature The Fletcher Valve Drummers, Beverlie Robertson and Poor Charlie, the Pat Skinner Duo, the Matt Osborne Band and Mel Brown and the

Concerts

Home wreckers.

mascot - Duck Maestro. Face painting was offered by the

27, performers

were

to

Annual Fund-raising Read-A-Thon with Dr. Seuss as the author.

For $1, kids were to be able to receive a tattoo of the festival’s

a distress response.

is

different

from

fear.

It

takes an internal form, with a

One is a direct result of lack of which

consid-

may be on and answer them by integrating ideas from notes, tests and lectures. Gregory said deep breathing will help, in the case of anxiety, because in an anxiety attack the blood moves away from the head and brain. questions you think

the test

“Deep breathing will help move the blood to the head and brain where

needed,” she

book

increase anxiety.

been an interesting three-

ice

“It’s

called

On the day of a test 'ou should avoid anything that may

growing out and people sitting under the it

Boyd McDonald,

vendor

is

Carol Gregory, a counsellor with student servic-

considered ration^. Gregory said, according to a

of a violin with a tree

City of Waterloo,” Miller said.

fruit

The nervousness anxiety.

throughout the semester and try to master the main concepts; ask yourself

techniques are also helpful,” she said.

Pizza, Charles Street Fries and an

cream and fresh

have

learned

panicking and overreacting; this would not be

illustration

The festival was sponsored by The Mutual Group and supported by The Record, Brick Brewery and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony. partnership with the Mutual

Group,

information

yon

said.

way

the

all

ered a normal, rational reaction. The other type is being pre-

Children’s

pianist;

cramming for tests. Combine

preparation,

tree.

“It’s

should avoid

ed the festival’s brochure and

Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra; Willem Moolenbeek, saxophonist, and

Wish Foundation. Angelo’s Chicken, Domino’s

''

local artist, creat-

of

the

Carol Gregory

ety.

a

anxi-

'

ety.

You

for Humanity.

Colleen Miller poster

in

On June

going to

also

help with Habitat

to

help finance their trip to Halifax to

the west side of

include:

that

happen.”

vague sense that something bad is going to happen.” There are two types of anxi-

popcorn and drinking boxes

Centennial band

is

to

minimize

student serx'ices counsellor

it

way

a good

can be a problem and

es, said

isn’t.

Preparation is

how-

“It is

Ben Hodson,

“Now

be

site at the fes-

Girl guides were to be selling

Ellington tribute. kids on Sunday,

to

Music Festival was free of festival,

what

It

is

and

i.itioii.il

Colleen Miller

into

develop a new direction.” Although Sounds of Summer organizers charged $15 for entry to the festival, the Waterloo Park Mutual

The

vague sense

ypr^are and perform

again,” said Miller. “It’s time to

charge.

fear.

interfere

mark

15-year

from

something bad

Too

ever.

years

15

was reincarnated Sounds of Summer. it

different

with a

ner\ ous-

Approximately 10,000 to 15,000 people have attended each year. Miller said Waterloo Days, which was the original Sounds of

then

decide what

takes an internal form,

much 11C.SS.

negatiw

thoughts,

-

“It is

to

us.

should identily the use the

porsotuilny tyiie they most and fdem'ity

rational

lire

ing.'*

stop anxiety, she said,

'.liideni

____________

1 hchc feel-

special events co-ordinator for the

Summer,

a

m their lives.

Music Festival this year. “We’re trying to develop a new vision and focus for Sounds of Summer,” said Colleen Miller,

before

said,

lb help

K-W Symphony

worked out very

and the

well.”

pared, but

is

still

entitled The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edward

Bume,

there are four personali-

ty types

when dealing with

anx-

tains

getting ‘1

and

caffeine)

the worrier, and the victim.

says

and

focusing

“Sugar, caffeine, pop, including Mountain Dew, (which constressors,

perfectionist

is

“Relaxation

iety: the perfectionist, the critic,

“The

it

known

iifc.style

not

like

enough to

Gregoiy

arc

slctj), ii

I

rca.se

addcci.

should’; the critic says ‘what’s

anxiety,”

matter with me'; the worrier has the Cata.stroph ic thinking and says ‘what if’; and

information cm be found in the pink prrii.nlilct. entitled Test Anxieiy,

the

the student services of:

the

victim

.says

‘I

can't,”’

More

uicsidc ic

c.


Page 10

— SPOKE, June

28, 1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Y2K bug throwing new problems By

Y2K

Elizabeth Sackrider

When

Jason Mask, a software

technician

at

the

college,

first

primarily affects computer

systems running by dates, such as those of banks and insurance com-

Computer programmers

panies.

heard of the Y2K problem over seven years ago it didn’t mean much to him, he said.

30 years ago didn’t take into account the upcoming year 2000 and used only a two-digit system

The computer problem was in distant future and nobody could predict the chaos which would erupt. “There wasn't any way to grasp how big the problem was back

for the dates.

the

then,” he said.

Y2K proved to be a very nasty computer glitch sending banks, hydro companies, and a lot computer users into a frenzy. who

For those

don’t

know

yet.

Computer consultants

the world have been struggling to get the problem under control by redesigning their software and doing Y2K tests.

According to Mask, the computer problem is basically under control at Conestoga College. “There won’t be too many problems now,” he said. “Hardware has been doing testing

Slurpees beat the By Elizabeth Sackrider

The cold drinks with

The sun

glares through the wind-

shield of your car.

The sweat

drips

off in little beads from your head and your legs are stuck to the seat in a gooey mess.

As "

the temperature soars to the

highs of the summer, everyone needs some relief. ultimate

One of the most popular ways cool

off,

especially for students,

648 King St.W. in Kitchener. “Sometimes we get up to 500 kids a day.” The neon-coloured slush in a cup as been called by fans an instant cool-down.

“As soon as the icy stuff

hits

tongue,

the

way down to my belly,” Megan Vandercherchove, an

1 1

know,” said Conyard. The Slurpees are pop syrup, water and carbon dioxide combined in the mixing machines This simple recipe had added up I

for to a great profit for the variety

chain since they started to for a dime in 1966.

sell

Omar Knedlik. At

Slurpees weren’t took the marketing gimmicks of the 7-Eleven chain a big

the

cold runs

-year-old Slurpee fan.

all

refuse to admit

Mask

first

hit;

the it

to increase their popularity.

In 1966, 7-Eleven purchased one of the $3,000 mixing machines. prices have inflated to

69,

79,

89 and 99 cents. One-and-a-third litres of the slush now is yours for $1.09, if you can carry it out of the store.

Y2K even

exists.

disagreed with the larger

companies and said the problem was, for the most part, under wraps.

“The problem

under control

is

ever 5ovhere,” said Mask.

“Most

of the major firms have done their work.”

Firms may have done their work, like any virus, Y2K keeps throwing new problems into the equation. According to Tenagra Systems, most companies do have their major computer systems worked out but problems arise in but,

other arenas.

As they search problems

for

potential

occur after the millenium, a few non-computer devices were identified, that

will

machines that won’t print January 1, 2000 on the top of incoming messages, air conditioning units which won’t run and main control panels which cease fax

to function.

According

to

Tenagra Systems

and other Y2K-reiatcd sites, a majority of European countries believe the computer glitch is an American plot. When Stephanie Moore of the Giga Group Inc. was interviewed by a French journalist he bluntly asked her if the problem was hype just so American consulting firms could get money out of France.

What

new millenium

the

will

bug bring with bedlam?

Complete

it?

a cause for concern,” said

“It is

Mask. “But it’s not really that big of a deal. Don’t run out and buy three months worth of food or anything.”

heat

The drinks come

pop Pepper and

in various

Dr.

like

Coke. They also come in

fruit

flavours like orange and lemonade.

summer South Land introduced coffee-

Just this

Corp.,

flavoured Slurpees, which offer competition to the new Tim Horton’s iced cappuchinos.

So what

Since their origin, the Slurpee

my said

“The Slurpees are just pop syrup

According to South Land Corp. (owners of 7-Eleven), the recipe began in 1959 by Dean Sperry and

at

Problems with embedded chips and foreign countries that ing.

flavours,

is

how many kids we get in,” said Ian Conyard, who works at the 7-

As for the Y2K problem outside of Conestoga.’s walls, it is another story. According to Microsoft and the Year 2000 forum by Tenagra Systems new problems keep aris-

made

them

depends on the day as to

Eleven located

are not

ice.

as far as

test.”

summer

to

the Slurpee. “It all

over

all

by setting the clocks ahead and by completing a Y2K compliance

at firms •

the attraction to the

is

icy drinks?

Most kids who consume the frozen drinks say they like them because they beat the heat and give “I

them a sugar

rush.

Chuck

love Slurpees,” said

Renon, from Elmira. “I don’t know if I would survive without them.”

A survey done by 7-Eleven found the average age of the Slurpee buyer to be around 29 years old. “I

am

not a kid an3miore, but I said 24-

for these things,”

live

Chuck Renon enjoys an orange Slurpee outside 7-Eleven.

year-old Renon.

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

Catch-22 worthy of revisiting

Remembering

By Angela

Clayfield

find a used copy of the book, alone a new edition. I couldn’t

let

Once you’ve read part of the

it you become theme and you can’t get

away from it. You can’t avoid reading

once

it

been put in your

it’s

hands. If you don’t read it you’re missing out on one of the greatest books ever written and if you haven’t read it (and old enough to have heard of it) you must be living under a rock.

Catch-22 has been reprinted once more for what seems like the zillionth time since its first publication in

1961

(in

printed

1 1

first

its

three years of existence,

it

was

times). This time,

it

includes a preface by the author,

Joseph Heller. It may only be a few pages or but

it’s

You

fact

that

fiction.

He

it

writing

started

first

novel, in 1955

took six years to get

it

to

print. So if you want to be a writer and you think you’re taking too

Good who wait.

long, don’t worry.

Don Helm, whose grandson Shawn was a classmate Mark Gage, a Cambridge youth (who drowned Parkhill

Dam

on Aug.

12, 1998) visited the

dedicated to the memory of Rodney Nicholson last week.

site

Gage and

in

come of

the

new memorial Const. David

(Photo By

Wayne

Coiiins)

to those

Heller,

any

like

things do

fine

can’t put a rating

it

after

was

it

nalist

author,

ing

printed. In 1962, jour-

Richard Starnes published a

with the words:

will,

time.”

(sometimes

why

again after 38 years? Catch-22 was reviewed years

column praising Catch-22 open-

find in a run-of-

paper back discount rack.

ask

on a book

a great book, sure, but

It’s

review

twists the English language in a

the

don’t

can do that to the reader, but six out of five comes to mind.

way you won’t the-mill

they

character dies you feel the loss.

-

to write

but

ask,

because they want to keep flying missions. It’s complex, but that’s the catch, Catch-22. His description of each character is so intense and detailed; when a

for

Catch-22, his

and

they

most inspirational

anyone who wants or

so,

even get

wrenching and downright strange. It’s the tale of a Second World War bombardier named Yossarian who tries in vain throughout the whole book to get himself grounded on terms of insanity so he doesn’t have to fly any more missions. He learns that anyone who doesn’t want to fly missions is sane and those who want to keep flying are insane. But they can’t be grounded either unless

novel

off

It’s

funny,

shocking),

heart

1

think,

live

a

“Yossarian

very

long

it

at the library

because

was booked in advance. I had to borrow a copy and then be withit

out until

I

my

could find one of

own. I talked to many used bookstore owners and was told time and ag-

is always someone looking for a copy, but to no avail. If a copy should find its way into

ain that there

their archives

it

doesn’t stay for

very long.

There are few words worthy enough to describe this book. It’s funny, which is a great surprise if you only knew of it as war novel. I didn’t know it was a comedy when I first picked it up and then 1 couldn’t put it down. I brought it with me everywhere I went in hopes of a spare moment so I could read a few more pages. 1 was this weird girl with a book attached to

my

Heller will invite

you

character.

unturned That’s the

It

into the life

He

leaves

was nuts. you and of every no stone

in their psyches.

the

reader. You’re to

hands.

eaptivate

book

Catch-22

for

damned

be stuck

until

to

you

the

finish

it

It’s true, he's alive and kicking and just as popular as he ever

because you have to know how it^^ ends. Once you’ve finished it^V you’re damned to be bored with-

was.

out

It’s

next

to

impossible to

it,

so you pick

it

up

again...


;

SPOKE, June

VIDEO REVIEWS

9ar Trek vs. By Wayne One way

Collins

Paramounfs

to &njoy

Star Trek; Insurrectioti flick

is

to

avoid George Lucas’s Star Wars

Comparisons are

have to be destroyed ,if he can’t be repaired. When Picard investigates, he finds something strange about the Ba’ku, the race the survey team tvas observ-

“there is the ruling element of

ing.

its Prime Directive, which was designed to Ihnit the arrogance of powjer, by forbidding the federation from interfering with the natural development of

The

inevitable,

Wars - no match

Star

Enterprise

command team

consirtong the science fiction

discovers there is

cravings of today’s audiences, but hordes of Trekkies out

sur\'cy

team

more

to the

they’d been

tiian

the Federation subtle, ous.;

insidi-

of enemies.”

other

As

civilizations.

“the force” is with

Berman

also.

story of Picard s realization

-

like'^most

Insurrection,

that

“this

said,

is

no matter how-

the

.small

Star Trek productions, seeks

the group of people might

not only to glaze the view-

be. the principles of the and Picard is soon forced to Federation will be upheld." choose between disobeying a Reprising their starring roles direct order and violating the Prime' Diredi^. The team, as Wl W'illiam Rikcr). who directed the turns out, is merely a cover for a film, Lc Var Burton (Lt. Cmdr. plot to kidnap the Ba’ku en Geordi La 1-orgc), Michael Dorn

eyes with special effec^ but poses questions to bur human, er’s

morals and probes our

intellect.

photr^aphy (m the film began in Los Angdes on Match 31. 1998. and wrapped on Principal

outdoors in Lake Sherwood, near

'Ihousand Qaks, CaKf,, and the motailains above Lake Sabrina in

told

Abraham), the-Sdn’a leader has discovered the planet is bathed in metaphasic radiation, which

What

Sienra Nevada.

reverses aging.

the Ba'ku.

Enterprise are, as usual, spell-

Although fliese scenes featured such science fiction imagery as miniature flying drones and the

u race of only 600 people, have, the Son'a. an aged and dying

usual electronic gadgetry, the film clearly devoted itself to

Picard confronts his superior

binding and spectacular but some of the “human” encounters arc a bit stifl'. if not corny at times. This cast has an obvious rapport, after making 79 tclevision episodes and three films together, but Data’s comedy bits

human

much

as Star Wars clings to technological tanissues as

i"

tasy,

Vihiea Gaqjt. " Jean-Luc Picard

l^ms

that’Lt

Cmdr. Data (Brent Spiner) has run amok and taken a ciiltured survey team hostage,, his first concern

is

to

race, w-ant.

Admiral Dougherty (Anthony Zerbe) vwth what he’s

officer.

only

learned

find

to

that

1

Douglierty and the Feden

,

(Patrick Stewart)

Getting ready for the links

Star Trek has always been about

no doubt, know^ that them

there,

— Page 11

more

the

itself,

and pethaps more

28, 1999

we Data, who will

t%) brass are part of the scheme. “After

all,”

said the admiral.

Why

“they arc only 600.

they .stand progress?”

in

.should

way

the

of

]

Now that it’s out on ' Trekkies can sip

Nathan Goetz, 21, of Simcoe, a second year general business student at Conestoga, prepares a display. Goetz is

wine

f*

manager of inventory control at Gotfquip Inc. in Waterloo, a wholesale distribution centre for golf equipment.

assistant

i

Producer Rick Berman said

(Photo by Janet Wakutz)

Don’t tamper with Hitchcock’s Psycho By Anna

Sajfert

One bad move, more misway and a

takes along the

Hitchcock classic

is

now

in

shambles.

Director remake of

Gus

Van

Sant’s

the

’60s

thriller

Psycho was a bad idea

to

begin

with.

Why tamper with the greatest American classic? Hitchcock’s

seminal horror film is ranked No. 18 on the American Film Institute’s list of the greatest American movies of all time. Van Sant’s first and most obvious mistake w'as to suppress emotion from behind the cameras. While filming the remake, the crew inadvertently

out a filming

left

major

aspect, the feeling.

The remake

there-

fore lacks tension,

horror

shock Those

or

value.

who’ve

experi-

r.

around 95 per

was shot according to the original is not true. Approximately 60 per cent or less was shot by the book if you bear in mind that the scene in which Lila Crane and Sam Loomis meet the town sheriff outside a church was left out of Psycho ‘98. In the key scenes Van Sant does

follow the original set but sets his own angles. The actors are now framed and positioned dif-

up

ferently.

He

makes

majority

a

medium

of

ups, which enhances the play of

feeling unaf-

fected

by

frigid

presenta-

this

shots close-

psychodrama. Psycho ‘98 is not a creation” as

Some

it is

total “re-

a “re-tooling.”

modifications of the plot

While the plot

are evident in the first minutes

reproduction will

of the film. The late version stars a fly in the dingy motel room. Another scene where the director

the disengaged, costume redesign blind you. will Don’t expect a ‘90s avant-garde

show fashion because what Van Sant gives you is nothing less of

dressed in

Crane Heche) Audrey

Hepburn’s

’50s

Marion (Anne (Internet photo)

that

will exit the the-

leave you feeling

‘.liout

The claim

cent of Van Sant’s film

Hitchcock’s

tion.

i)

landslide.

enced the original atre

luKt

wardrobe. Other mistakes are in the retooling of the entire plot. Van Sant vitiated the rising action, the climax and the denouement, which take a great

attempts to over-dramatize action is

the infamous

USED CD 385 Fairwoy Rood

KITCHENER {Conottion Tire rlozai

Norman Bates

masturbation scene.

This time

S

1

1

(Atrass

wtofKifei

V Kjf lif ^

movie segment is louder and longer as Vince Vaughn (Bates)

the

intensifies

his

uncensored acting

skills.

While the plot point the

is

modified

in

new Psycho, the vast majority of

the dialogue remains the same.

Overall, retooling a classic

foreshadowed

fall.

was a

B^«en Hovey's & Burqer ftw)

884-7376

(Atrosfrom

823-5341


Page 12

— SPOKE, June 28, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT Dayglo Abortions release seventh album

Big Sugar blow mind# and ears at the Turret Concert Review By Adam Wilson

They played a wide

The Pepsi Taste Tour came to the TYirret on June 18

back

with their second concert in the

Canadian rockBig Sugar. Having seen Big Sugar once before, I knew that I would be series featuring

ers

in

for the

loudest concert

band’s Marshall stacks lined up all over the stage confirmed

Too Big Without You and a very spirited, showclosing rendition of Oh Canada in which Johnson proudly dis-

what I already knew. I wouldn’t be hearing anything

played the Canadian flag on the imderside of his gui-

would ever

Canadian drunk punks still smokin’ and swillin’ CD By Brian “After

Gall

all

World,

these years,

we do

it

just for the free beer.”

Taken from the opening tune of their new album, Death Race 2000, that says it all for the Dayglo Abortions.

Review

Stupid

was

Songs)

pumping out their classic punk rock. With the return of The Cretin, who was missing for the last two releases, the band is back to play-

crazy, toke-filled

“After

all

these years,

I’ve

never shed any

happy

tears. I’m

just to

be here, drinking

all

your

beer.”

both Little Man in the Canoe and Corporate Whores, is on the new one, he gets a bit shafted for singing space.

But

that

is

the only thing worth

complaining about. This album is considerably slower than the Gymbo albums, but like the song After All These Beers says, it’s been a long time since they started (around 1981),

and the boys deserve credit for continually putting out rock.

awesome

punk

A

greatest hits album, (Stupid

of

in

the June.

for the

band. Packed into a smoking hot rod, the band is pormding along the road on the cover of the CD. And they’ll be skidding their way across Canada while on tour all of July and August. Ontario shows include: St. Catharines, July 14; London, July 16; Spiderland in Marmora, July 17; and Toronto, Aug. 1. issue,

Canadian albums of the ‘80s were spotlighted. Dayglo’s Feed Us a

After All These Beers,

Fetus, released in 1985,

Death Race 2000, released in June on God Records. It has it all. The Cretin supplies his warped, comical lyrics of old and prime guitar riffs. And the vocals, which are supremely recorded, sound even better when both singers tag-team on a few tunes. Cool caricatures of the band, done by Gymbo, make up the artwork for the sleeve and look better than any boring, posed photos would.

An amazing

live track is

added

made

the

as did albums from Bryan Adams, Blue Rodeo and Corey list

Hart.

The Dayglo Abortions deserve more than this, but it’s a start. They’re the kings of Canadian and Chart deserves a “cheers” for saying, “Nomeansno

punk

may be deeper thinkers and DOA may be more respected, but when it comes down to defining stupid, ignorant, dirty, snotty -punk rock,

nobody

beats Abortions.”

the

Dayglo

hear.

I

Seeing the

Police’s Bed’s

for four to five hours

tar

after the show.

and played behind

With no opening act, you knew as soon as you walked into the Turret that you

Seeing the

his head, not messing

band put so

way.

were in for nothing but a hard rock/blues

into

show that would blow your mind and

their lesser

eardrums.

known

Big Sugar was supposed to hit the stage

songs

at

10 p.m., but

up a note along the

making

Gordie Johnson, hit the stage, crowd erupted with a frenzy and each band member cracked the

.

Big Sugac 'op^^ with the second single, Better Get Used

To

It,

off their

most recent

album. Heated. As soon as Johnson picked up his guitar the loudness began. Ear-splitting solos and heavy distortion were used throughout the show, but didn’t take away from the overall performance. The lyrics weren’t buried under the music so that you couldn’t hear them. But you don’t go to hear Johnson sing. You want to watch him play.

Big Sugar’s

there just

because they won free tickets. Whenever the band played one of

big

the

left

:

ten to Big Sugar, and

who was

with the crowd salivating for an extra half-hour. crowd was When the lights went down and “Mr. Chill” amazing. Kelly Hoppe, Garry Lowe, original Big Sugar drummer A1 Cross, and the icon himself, Fantasy,

a small smile,

There was a decent crowd at the show, but it was easy to tell who was there to lis-

much work

their

hit

Diggin’

A

songs like Hole, The

Scene,

Turn The and If I Had My Way, the fans went nuts. But it was Lights

On

songs like Goodbye Dear Mr. Wild Ox Moan and Train,

100 Cigarettes that made the show. Seeing the band put so much work into making the lesser known songs big with the crowd was amazing.

Johnson Canadian

is

easily the best

of all time. People will dispute this, but seeing him take a four-minute guitarist

song and add five minutes of wild guitar playing and soloing in the middle makes a true Big Sugar fan appreciate their music even more. If you haven’t seen Big Sugar, I highly suggest getting a ticket to

see

they’re

them the next time in

town.

don’t like Big

And

if

you

Sugar, you’re

two

missing out on a great band

hours and 10 minutes, including their 15-minute encore.

that deserves all the publicity,

set lasted for

awards and accolades

it

gets.

Kensington on summer national tour

^d^mb And

summer

In Chart magazine’s February the most influential

ing the style of their infamous

Two Dogs record. Though Gymbo, who sang on

end of Death Race

Fans of early Dayglo albums will not be disappointed with

is still

inebriated

the

2000’s final song. It gives listeners a preview to what will be a

After almost 20 years, seven

albums and 32,000 beers. Dayglo

onto

released in late ‘98, and supplies all the goods in their portfolio.

variety of songs from their last three fulllength albums, 500 Pounds, Hemi- Vision and Heated. They played two songs from the E.P. they released between HemiVision and 500 Pounds, called Dear M.F. They even found time to play a cover of The

St.

they’re heading

CSti^di-Ju ne

west

ter

19,

vlarfhe Dayglo Abortiona in

Canadian toun They ac.. In July.

Victoria,

c^red '

Ni


Digital Edition - June 28, 1999