Page 1

— No. 23

31st Year

What’s Inside

Student suggests rec fee referendum Too many outside groups use centre, says student

Employees for Excellence in Education ’99.

PAGE 6

to off-campus

users.

Student Michael Schriver sugmay stop pay-

gests that students

ing their $100 mandatory fee

if

poor treatment continues. “It’s a college recreation centre for students, not a YMCA,” he said in an e-mail to the Doon Student Association and to Spoke.

He

said

it is

we didn’t have it.” She said she regularly meets with Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation, and Kevin

ducks were dropped into

“I their

guess they are developing weight training and treadmill

skills,”

he

said.

In reply.

routine for students

Menage

Students,

ties

and

Schriver said, have

lege

was proud

been denied access

host them.

PAGE 12

four

He

petitors)

denied use of the

using,

centre at least four

never

put

the

times.

competition

down

club

had the place to

“Outside revenue

huge

themselves for a weekthree-day

tre.

March;

we

end

last

cen-

wouldn’t exist

didn’t

have

a

Menage admited

if

it is

it.”

DSA president

exclusive use of

president Ellen

Menage

said although she feels Schriver’s

Austin Powers: The Spy

vent about,

Who Shagged Me.

to

PAGE 10

it is

just something to

an issue that needs

be addressed.

“Any student issue is an issue we need to discuss,” she said. “It’s not something that can’t be solved.” Menage outlined in an e-mail to Schriver that the recreation centre is

COMMENTARY Page 4 So,

is

God out?

in

or

a division of the college and

it

per cent, and the demand for

Education program. The luncheon topped off several days of seminars and demonstrations, where staff members were

that the gathered

what the college’s programs have to offer and improve their personal and pro-

row, and trying your best to ignore

fessional lives.

three

invited to learn

Broadcasting teacher Dan Fisher had a fine time with his

limita-

James agreed

that

time for people

closing the

week is

who

a long

are training,

and tried to compensate those who were inconvenienced. The three complaints James personally dealt with were from faculty and a former student. He extended their membership for two weeks. James said he understands

People the

who

participated during

week munched on sandwiches

folio to concentrate

program. nursing Conestoga College President John Tibbits said he was pleased

more money

to other cities, colleges

the college and students.

versities that

“Outside revenue

is

huge for the

and uni-

were looking see

at us.”

DSA - page 2

PD

port-

on teaching

in the

with

spirit.

the

that, since applications to the

nursing program have shot up 43

E3 wasn’t just

body

to better

one’s mind, but other aspects of lives

their

week:

received a standing ovation afforded to her. She will be

moving away from the

and

time.”

“This gave us a chance to showcase our college and show it off

in

that

ures represented the mind,

and

her,

said.

than the revenue generated from

Davidson explained

a framed

offset the costs of running the cen-

Canada was,” James

with a laugh.

also reflected the slogan for the

McDonald accepted

know

people

from the logo, but we couldn’t stack them,” said Susan Davidson

running.

display presented to

of people didn’t

life.

tried to use the three

three tables surrounding the fig-

would

Schriver to explain the situation.

play involving a ladder and three tables was created to bring the

and salads as former professional Jane head development McDonald received kudos from Walter Boettger and others for her efforts in getting the program

to speak with

Schriver’s frustration, but

have been happy

nar.

what

and brings

room for the luncheon. In windowed comer, a large dis-

“We

events like a foot massage semi-

showing

for the event,

brass ring, adorned every table in

logo to

at

back

sitting in the

figures trying to grasp a

members could meet

and procedures. She said outside revenue helps tre,

The logo

general as well, noting that

in

all

me,” she joked.

Fisher said he liked the program

of

staff

Skills

“You’re

the

entire

crowd has problot from their

students.

building

use

the

tions.

lot

ably learned a

the

“A

fall

ue to rise. Event organizer Edith Torbay started her opening speech noting

the blue

under college policies

does

high-quality teachers will contin-

group, whom he led through copy-writing and reading on-air.

entire building for a

stinking the place out.”

faculty and support enjoyed an afternoon lunch June 11 to celebrate the end of “E3” week, the nickname for the Employee for Excellence in staff

ple tend to expect

without

gymnasts and dancers didn’t want sweaty weightlifters

comments were

a touchy sub-

Related stories, page 6

said he

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

“I guess the

ject because peo-

the place,” he said.

DSA

should

said.

Ellen Menage,

gymnasclub that had

was

tics

It

weekend

another it

for the rec

aren’t

we

by making fun of what they do,” she

is

By Chadwick Severn About 100

space (the com-

per-

week

celebrated with college luncheon ‘E3’

to

sonally has been

“A dance

©

col-

file

“Although we should still be able to use whatever

facilities

several times over

Theatre on the Edge.

said that the

Canada Competitions were

the space.

months.

13.

in May. He said no students would have access to the facilities for two weeks because of Skills

important to the college because of the great marketing opportuni-

past

Kitchener Westmount’s annual Duck Race on June

invited Schriver to speak with her. However, Schriver has declined any further comments with the DSA or Spoke. Schriver’s concerns started when he learned about the new weight equipment at the recreation centre

Skills

the

water at Park for the Rotary Club of Victoria

Canada Competitions.

be denied access to the recreation facilities because off-campus groups are using

the

plastic

the

DSA, and

to

to

of

little

feels it is a subject that have to be worked out by September. She also said the only way to get an issue with Mullan brought forward is through the

don’t

students

Thousands

rec centre,” she said. “It wouldn’t

will

Conestoga College student is on the college to change its policy on use of the recreation that

.

and

A

so

.

Mullan, vice-president of finance,

calling

centre

they’re off

exist if

By Andrea Jesson

become secondary

And

as well.

“Getting

The display

better

all

the

Tibbits ended the afternoon festivities

with a speech encouraging

the staff to keep striving to be

No.

1.

“I believe the next 10 years are

going to be the most exciting for this college,” said Tibbits. “I think

success success.”

is

going

to

breed


Page 2

— SPOKE, June 21, 1999

NEWS Bridge closure gives motorists headaches By Janet Wakutz

around (the centre span) we’ll divert traffic to the outside and

For those travelling to Conestoga

on Highway 86 the Frederick

Street

take

to

little longer due to reduced However, since the Ottawa Street bridge is closed, some have had to find alternative routes.

lanes.

who

ly

including neighbouring property

owners, because they realize

Stanley Park, said the bridge

closure

the job

a big inconvenience for

is

is

compete

it

when

will result in

better conditions.

her.

One woman, whose

I’m one of those people who takes the

same way

and when

that’s

me

bridge

I

“It has added about 15 minutes, both ways, to

Crews put the finishing touches of curbs and sidewalks under one of the four bridges being widened along the expressway. (Photo by Janet Wakutz)

drive.”

The changes to the Conestoga Expressway (86) have been planned in three phases. The first phase was the construction of the centre concrete barrier wall. The

will

hand

side of

Highway

who works

Louttit,

Consulting

Ltd.,

8,

there

The ministry hired

the consult-

ing/engineering firm to administer the construction contract for phase

two.

Along with

the widening of the

Expressway, there are four bridges

is

New

it

the

has not

By Janet Wakutz If you’ve driven on the Expressway during the past few months perhaps you’ve

seen workers dressed in white with breathing masks. No, they weren’t filmcoveralls

ing an ET visitation; they were adhering to Ministry of Environment standards for the removalof formaldehyde. During the process of adding expansion sections to the

bridges of

and Weber

enforcement

limit)

aggressive but

it’s

there for

Only the centre span of the Ottawa Street bridge remains, supported by Steel A-frames. (Photo by Janet Wakutz)

and during

the demolition of the Ottawa Street bridge, electrical ducts

had

The ducts

to be removed.

formaldehyde, a dangersubstance. Not only do

Ron

to

manager for the work, they must also dispose Louttit,project

of

it

according to Ministry

comes

the debris after a bridge

tumbling down? Louttit says materials, such

laser radar is being

and

motorists

Krug and Eckert streets,

standards. What happens with

used

to

keep speeds down for the safety of

contract

administrators for the Ministry of Transportation.

since

down

a reason,” he said.

go

Stantec

for

the

accidents

been dramatic. “The (speed

left-

said

in

the

construction started but

“A flyover is more like a bypass than an overpass,” explained Ron It

said

increase

.

manager.

to

site,

speed on the Expressway needed to be reduced to ensure the safety of crews after studies showed the average speed was around 120 km/h. Const. A1 Vandyken, with the Cambridge detachment of the OPP, said there has been a slight

second phase, currently taking involves widening the expressway to three lanes in both directions and includes widening of bridges. The third phase will see Highway 8 widened and the construction of a flyover at that point and will take place in late 2001

over the top and back onto the

is

Louttit said crews keep in touch with her every couple of days to inform her of their progress.

He

place,

Louttit, project

property

the Ottawa Street remembers when the Expressway was built in the ’60s.

adjacent

the time

all

not open to

get lost,” she said.

my

most people are fairtolerant of the construction,

Louttit said

lives

bridge comes tumbling

the rest,” said Louttit,

said.

Anita Fortes- Wilkinson, a library technician at the college

down

adding the traffic diversion will probably take place mid-summer. “We’re hoping it will be operational by the end of the year,” he

from Courtland trip

takes a

in

Ottawa Street

construction

ground up and reused,

He

recycled too.

say

s

it’s

a

workers.

Highway Ranger West Units, a management team out of

traffic

greater Toronto,

being worked on - at Krug, Eckert, Weber and Ottawa streets.

The most visible work is the Ottawa Street bridge which is being completely rebuilt. The outer spans of the bridge have been removed and new abut-

DSA seeks alternative solution to referendum

ments are being poured. Motorists need not worry about the stability of the remaining structure.

added

Louttit said they have

A-frames to support the structure and prevent shifting. steel

“Once

the outside lanes are built

run radar and

issue tickets, he said.

Const. Vandyken

recommends

those using the expressway leave

a winch and can be

themselves some extra time. “It may be a bit of a headache for now but it will improve the flow of traffic,” he said.

for maintenance.

The .

are

Former Waterloo button factory currently houses an arts centre

continuedfrom page 1

From James

college

a

said. Skills

viewpoint,

Canada

is

a

recruiting tool for potential stu-

dents and wishes Schriver would look at the

broader picture.

“When Canada

events

are hosted

like

Skills

by the No.

1

said.

Despite the reasons, Schriver

wants better service in exchange for the fee each full-time student must pay as part as their ancillary fees each year. The recreation fee is $64,50, which pays for the use of the facilities and equipment. The athletic fee is $34,30, which supports Conestoga's varsity sports and their travel budget.

He

she said. “There’s able

college in Ontario, outside businesses look at us, and we look

good” he

adding that past referendums have failed because of poor voter turnout. “We don’t need to go that far,” said,

“referendum scare” to refuse payment of the fees would create change in the recrefeels a

ation centre’s policies.

However, Menage disagreed with the idea, because lary fees are collected

all

ancil-

by the col-

lege and distributed to the appro-

ways

work

to

it

out with the

administration.”

Menage

also said a referendum

would not “scare” the adminisbecause the DSA has a great working relationship with them. Concerns from students tration

are directed to the college

discussed

are

and

and

solved

accordingly.

“Our

administration

knows

they are here to support the students,” she said.

James said recreation and athfees arc mandatory in all

Gall

Off

When it was first built in 1 896 to produce vegetable ivory and shell buttons, no one knew that more than 100 years later the same building would house a non-profit, charitable organization, used to showcase the talents of local artists and performers. The Waterloo Community Arts Centre, formerly the Button Factory, is located at 25 Regina St. S. and hosts performances, classes, workshops and art exhibits. It is run by about 110 volunteers. These members help set up events like children’s painting and youth

campus

energy and creativity of just under

W region. Though resident groups

times a year, discounts on workshops, class fees, some show

K-W Chamber

six

tickets as well as a vote at the

annual general meeting. 1944, the building was

Until

used by Richard Roschman and Brother as a factory, making buttons out of ivory nuts and sea shells.

recreation centre provides what

“Some people you’ll see only a couple times a year because they

James said

like to

hand-sewn buttons was in less demand and zippers were being used extensively.

activities,

Menage

said the

DSA

is

cur-

And

come

in for a special event.

then there are people

who

are

Ultimately,

the

Roschman

Button Factory closed

rently

almost every week,” said Slier DiCiccio, administrator for

staff

the centre.

She said she has put in between 700 and 1,000 volunteer

of more than 50 housed a few different manufacturers and has undergone minor alterations, but it still resembles the original structure. In 1982, the City of Waterloo des-

working with athletics so students on campus will

be aware of activities and events at the centre.

“More people work than most

“Any increases in these fees, or any new fees, are voted on by the

said.

DSA

not enough people

out there

people think,” she

there

hours a year since she started her 1995, though it is a

position in

paid, part-time job.

The City of Waterloo owns

“There’s a ton of intramurals

know

about.”

building, but the centre rate organization

ble

for all

and

is

is

the

a sepa-

responsi-

operating costs.

The

“I think we’re the pioneer, that

way, in the region. initely

And

that is def-

mandate,”

the

said

The Peace Project from Aug. 2-8. The official reception, Aug. 6,

once a month.

combination of leisure and education.

only volunteer-run organization with a wide variety of activities.

amateur musician.

schools and, like Conestoga, the is a

visitors, the centre is the region’s

But as the clothing industry grew and required button holes that could be sewn by machine, mass produced plastic buttons were being sold at a cheaper price. Tailor-made clothing requiring

houses,

Choreographer’s Collective, Orchestra and Theatre on the Edge are regular like

DiCiccio, a freelance writer and

which are done

coffee

Button Factory its home. Since then it has been a welcoming place for the community and has become a forerunner in the K-

500 members is depended upon. Membership includes a newsletter

letic

priate sectors.

board of directors," she

more reason-

By Brian

its

doors in

1944.

Over

years

ignated cal

a span

it

it

as a significant histori-

and architectural landmark.

And

in 1993, the centre

made the

Upcoming

events for the sum-

mer, which include a lot of children’s

starts

programming,

will feature

an exhibition based on

nuclear and peace efforts.

be a visual

arts

show

anti-

It

will

this year, but

next year writers and performance

be involved as well. DiCiccio said the centre’s willingness to accommodate every

artists will

aspect of the arts

is

what

first

got

her involved, and in her six years as a

member

“It’s

she has learned a

lot.

multi-disciplined, that’s the

thing that interests me. That’s the' .it gets you out of your of the one (particular) art

neat thing. shell

.

that you’re into.”


SPOKE, June

NEWS

— Page 3

21, 1999

DSA prepares for fall used book sale By Michelle Lehmann

“It

has been a huge success in the

week from 10

form of recycling don’t want books anymore they can sell them,” said Hussey. “The sale saves books from ending up in the

from Aug. 30

garbage.”

past.

The annual used book sale, run by the Doon Student Association, scheduled during registration a.m. until 2 p.m.

is

to Sept. 2.

“I find these four days are just

said Jenn Hussey,

crazy,”

It is

coming and It is

“Students keep

Last year the

a chance for students to pur-

located in the

DSA

from higher

reference material

when they’re

in

the workforce.

The used book

sale eliminates

of textbooks, said

Hussey.

Jenn Hussey, DSA vice president of operations and used book sale co-ordinator, arranges some of the books brought in by students for the sale running during registration. (Photo by Michelle Lehmann)

“Students no

longer have to

they don’t have to advertise with personal phone numbers, no strangers will call them and they

collecting

money from “We have

people,” tried to

simplify the process for them.”

The used book sale operates on a commission basis. Therefore, a

book actually sells. Hussey said students simply leave the books with the

an invoice

made

is

DSA and

out with their

name, home phone number and

Students

address.

tell

them a sug-

Sajfert

gested price and the DSA adds 15 per cent on each book (eight per cent sales tax and seven per cent

commission for the DSA). The books are put in the book sale and the DSA keeps track of them with the invoice number.

The

DSA

plans to have a cash

only policy but will offer a return policy this year. “It’s

safe

and easy for the

survey showed 80 to 90 per cent of and college students have computers at home, but they often don’t have the software they

emy member

need.

to bring their

university

Students seeking pirate copies of pricey computer software applications

may

see light at the end of

the tunnel if they tap into e-acade-

Raju

such

products

said

as

statistical last

25 years, is currently selling for $38 at e-acade-

rently

ing in Internet-based software dis-

my.com, as opposed

the

and licence management promises it will lower the cost of popular computer software by as much as 85 per cent to college and

price tag of $199. This

is

partners with Stanford University

to its original

means you

also

sells

Microsoft Office 97 for $85, he

stu-

medium because

think about their books again.”

their

Hussey said

DSA

contacts students by mail to inform them which books sold, which did not sell and the amount of the enclosed cheque. Students have the option of claiming their unsold books from the DSA for approximately six weeks before the library takes

them away.

and colleges: Dalhousie, Memorial, Queen’s, Waterloo, Ryerson Polytechnic, Wilfrid Laurier, Guelph, Lakehead, York,

Toronto, Conestoga College and

Confederation College.

Rem

Raju,

CEO

“It’s like

a sandwich bag.

to

A manufactured CD encrypted

like

is

a sand-

bag.”

reduce prices and deliver licences

he is aware of the “crunch time” during exams, which means busy computer labs and lack of access to the desired said

ID

students:

direct

“It’s like

CD

is

Ziplock bag.” Raju’s company, which

is still

a

CEO

Raju,

of e-academy.com

However, the Kingston office is to Ottawa in July because they are recruiting new managers,

moving the

Other products offered by

Maple

e-

CEO

said.

“In this type of industry

it’s

hard

some

2000, Norton Crashguard 4.0,

ing

to

test

this

were

project

3.0

ANYWHERE

and

2.0,

pc

pcTelecommute 1 .0, Talk Works PRO 2.0 and WinFax PRO 9.0. If the software title you are looking for isn’t offered, let them know and they will try to obtain it for

“With affordable prices there ^would be less pirate copies,” the said.

For example, Raju

Utilities

and

idea

distribution.

CEO

Norton

are

will-

because they were interested in the possibility of a serious

said, a recent

book

a sandwich bag,” Raju

“A manufactured

software publishers,

tion of their products,

benefit from the used

sale,” she said.

software then unzips.

Toronto showed a promising number of candidates but the majority

profit loss due to illegal distribu-

“In the long run everyone seems to

chases software from the Net, the

include Symantec products AntiVirus 5.0, Visual Cafe 3.0 Standard or Professional, Norton

said

spent on concerts or

nights.

dial-up

years experience,” he said, adding

too often have to face

is

sale

budget and

through a modem, or going to the affiliate campuses. He said when a customer pur-

Symantec.

He who

money

movie

from the

into the

for registration

can be frustrating for the student,” he said. “So, why not have

home?”

the

profits

Waterloo

academy

the software at

She said the back

are put

Tinkering with toys

software. “It

dents, said Hussey.

headquarters.

Rem

for students.

He

money, the DSA pays the government and whatever money is made goes right back to the stu-

from three cities in North America and the U.S.; Halifax, where they have their support staff and programmers; Kingston, which is their sales office; and San Francisco, their second sales office and main

wich inside a Ziplock is

happy

pilot project, operates

and founder,

said the company’s mission

sale is a

the students get

encrypted like a sandwich inside a

the following Canadian universities

the

at

after the sale, the

we’re here,” she

Raju said e-academy, which curemploys about 16 people, offers two purchasing options to

said.

said.

discounts through

delivering

in

software

can purchase five MINITAB s from the new online company for the price of one at local stores.

E-academy.com

e-academy.com

why

that’s

said.

purposes.

used for the

Currently,

and

Waterloo campus. Students need

MINITAB,

university students.

a bit more work for us, but

Computer Store, room 2018 of the math and computer building on

my.com. The products are legal and the prices are low. The new e-commerce specializtribution

said

another service for the students

dents because they don’t have to

E-academy.com brings cheap software to students By Ana

got shelving

courses,

their

The used book certainly won’t have the hassle of

student does not get paid until the

truck around school posting flyers,

DSA

books and added of the books that students for

“It’s

said Hussey.

the problems attached to the indi-

for students

Hussey.

it’s

level courses to use as

sale

list

need

office.

Hussey said she thinks there are

vidual

a

books from the sale the boardroom beside

more first-year books because more students keep textbooks

way

to co-ordinate the

chase a number of first- year textbooks, but very few second or third-year

also an easy

to get

a real killer.”

it’s

if students

back some of their money because textbooks can be so expensive, Hussey said.

vice-

president of operations and organizer of the sale.

a

It’s

because

8.0,

you.

Conestoga College students can register to become an e-acad-

now

to find

managers with 10

to

15

refused to relocate.

“However, in Ottawa there are of them,” he said. “There were people coming from every end of Ottawa.” Raju said while it’s still too early

piles

to

release

the

official

list

affiliated publishers, of all e-academy.com can say there will be approximately seven or eight major software publishers available by the end of July.

LASA

graduates Teresa Godfrey (above) receives a remote

control car from

Judy Hutchenson on the

fourth floor

June

12.

to pull twine through the ceiling, which was then attached with wire to hook up a new security system. (Photo by Brian Gall)

The car was used


How that

It's

to beat the heat can you beat the heat? That’s what I would like to know. All right, I could go buy an air-

of year again. The time of year when you have to wring your pillow out each morning

conditioner, but there’s always the

the world

goes around: money. Like

could

I

afford an air-conditioner.

And if I could, I wouldn’t be complaining about being so hot this time of year. I could get an army of oscillating

before the next night's

how

situation of

little

sleep.

The

time

of

year

when

the

best time to have a shower

is first

thing in the morning, at lunch,

when you get home from school, when you’re done work and one you go to bed. It’s summertime, and the heat wave right before

has already begun.

Living in an apartment can be one of the worst things you can do during the summer. Having heat from other apartments slink through your walls like a silent killer and eat away at you all night is almost as fun as throwing on a sweater and jogging pants at noon and running a few laps around the block. There is always the heat sandwich going on in my apartment and it’s getting to the point where I am ready to sleep out on the cold cement balcony or out in the hallway, where the air-conditioning is always set at a nice

them wage

fans, letting

war

their

on the sandwich of heat surrounding my apartment, but once again, the cost of this army would be higher than the budget for Saving Private Ryan. It would be cheaper to get Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Ed Bums and Steven Spielberg themselves to wave giant leaves in front of me, hopefully cooling me down a little bit.

Since

money

a problem,

is

what

other solutions are there?

home and

could go back

I

dig up

my good old He-Man kiddie fill it

put

it

pool,

with ice and cold water, and on my balcony. It would be

perfect.

could

I

come home from school my swimming

or work, throw on

trunks and hop in the pool, cool-

ing off in the process. But

we

all

know how much maintenance

level.

dress-

Ti/wcal Cana4T2tnTrtfSs1

A yri 25

for

there

is

to

A

having a pool.

So, what’s left? Is there any

way

working student to cool off? No. But I did try to be creative. I’ve found myself in the shoes of the Three Stooges, putting blocks of ice onto my head and letting for a

them melt to make me feel a cooler, and at the same time, a

Jg

bit

bit

light-headed.

found myself sticking my ice machines at work when it gets so hot you can’t take it anymore. I’ve found myself lying in front of the small fan that was given to me and thinking how nice a trip to Alaska would be right now. But none of these things cool me off as much as I want to be. They help for a few minutes a day, but other than that, I have to go back to my sauna/apartment at the end of each day, and sweat off the weight I gained over the winter to help me keep warm. I guess when the summer is over and it starts getting cold, I will be wishing it was warm again. But there will be one good thing I will be able to say this fall, when Old Man Winter will be getting ready to rear his ugly head again. The summer of ’99 was the best I’ve

head

Fr e 4 icMhloh'-

in

diet I ever had.

15

^

*C

parents

me

believe

as a condition of an offenders’

to

probation.

As

all

people ond chance. But as I’ve grown up I discov-

ered there are

exceptions to every rule. And

believe one

I

exception should be drunk drivers.

The House of Commons passed legislation on June 9 which they claim will be tougher on drunk drivers. The unanimous

new

approval of the law, to be in effect

by the summer, imposes sentences

read the

article, I

God

Taking

of the constitution So,

God in or

is

out?

believed in God.

Svend Robinson and about. 1,000 Other Canadians would have their way, any refIf

erence

If anything, Canada should be more accommodating for an in the '90s.

one time. Canadians were

tO

God would

u

t

to '

stiffer

drunk-driving

for

radio

ads,

education in school and promo-

and campaigns

activities

sponsored by large organizations or groups like the police and fire departments, businesses and even celebrities.

drivers

ple. I think the

who

people

inten-

and negligently break the law should be stopped. There is absolutely no excuse for chunk driving. There are so many

tionally

-

able driver, call

tough enough?

vision commercials,

ond chance

first-time offenders. really

must change. Public awareness of the irreversible dangers linked to drunk driving has increased though tele-

giving first-time offenders a secto kill or injure peo-

designate a depend-

someone

for a

house, take

ride, stay at a friend’s

(MADD)

force

upon

t

o n

i

the

ousted for

of

.

who want people

to recog-

nize that careless actions hold last-

Some of these

ing consequences.

members have

loved ones because of drunk drivers. The campaign wants people who drink and drive to understand they are not only placing themselves in lost

An article in the K-W Record on June 10 stated that under the

a cab, use the bus, or a

other possibilities.

danger, but that there are a

new

Don’t think I’m against drinking or even partying with friends, because I am not. It’s OK to do

of innocent and unsuspecting people on the same streets that could

legislation,

a

first-time

offender would face a

minimum

$600 instead of the cur$300. Police would be able

fine of rent to

demand

a breathalyser test or

these things, but there

everyone.

What

I

is

drinkers have adopted.

last three hours. Judges would also have the authority to

place to start but

order the use of an ignition lock

“it

the

the lack of responsibility

The laws

Spoke SPOKE

a limit for

do not condone

blood sample if they suspected a driver had broken the law within

is

number of

some

won’t happen to

become

number

victims.

Everyone has heard the horror about what occurs when someone thinks alcohol won’t stories

affect their driving ability.

are definitely a great it

easily

gruesome

reality

is

that to

The some

the

famous

parent, spouse, sibling or friend

me”

attitude

they are not just stories.

is

petition

,

-

P

with the signatures of about 1 .000 Canadians opposed to the mention of God in our country's constitution.

for those in "

'

:

-

.

who

The troubling part support of the peti-

-'Tv

:

the

Queen

If the

constitution

S'

-

.

s

:

God,..”

other than

a

problem

for

don’t ;he •

-

f

;T'

'

>

a

.

Oac

ognizes not only the existence of God, but recognizes His

supremacy as Unfair, isn’t

well. it.

The key word question

is

Or

is it?

phrase in

in the

“founded.” Canada

was founded on Christian prinWhether or not Canada is

ciples.

now

a Christian nation guided

by Christian principles, a topic which can spur much heated debate,

is

another question alto-

gether.

But history can’t be undone. Canada’s laws and parliamentary system just happened to be established by people who

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

must

be.

about

ing

our

national

God

our land

,

'

s.

'

_

:

Maybe someone

poses

Hopefully,

did.

changed, then there would be

is

.

didn’t believe in the

existence of God.

founded upon principles that e the supremacy of This

the

echoing halls of It must have been, par-

the expression, hell for

the wording in the con-

tiort, is

silence.

“God Save

to

-

Parliament

families.

MADD is a group of average citizens

the Lord’s '.You know, that art in heav-

recite

f|

Robinson

that

tional

out

adian eonsti-

Mothers Against Drunk Driving is one group people use to cope with the havoc impaired

alternatives

is it

to

if these laws are really going to act as a deterrent. It is hoped that the new law will send a stronger message that reveals a change in people’s attitudes regarding impaired driving. The message that should be sent to the public is one of zero tolerance. The law should be severe and inflexible. We shouldn’t be

offences and increased fines for

But

began

wonder

deserve a sec-

have

I

'

|

presented a

My

1

^

15 "C

be taken out of the Can-

Tough new law not tough enough raised

2S

for

l

|

How

time

Canadian

1

.

i

anthem?

or something

should be keep“glorious and

free”?

The truth is, even if changes were to be made in the constitution, it would take much more than 1,000 signatures. It would take the agreement of Parliament and seven provinces representing at least 50 per cent of the population. Something tells me that won't happen anytime soon. Sure, our country has its problems with high unemployment rates (the necessary evil of capitalism, they tell me), child poverty and the growing numbers of homeless. But having

God

in the constitution is the

of them. In fact, God may well be the very solution to our nation’s problems. least

mainly funded from September

to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Brian Smiley; News Editor: Elizabeth Sackridcr; Student Life Editor: Wayne Collins; Issues Activities Editor: Carly Benjamin; is

&

Photo Editors: Charles Kuepfcr, Ana Sajfert and Linda Wright Production Manager: Janet Wakutz; Advertising Manager: Eileen Diniz; Circulation Manager: Chadwick Severn; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Frank and Christina Jonas; SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke(d),concstogac.on.ca

DSA

logo.

out of errors

iu

advertising beyond the

space. Unsolicited submissions

d:30

a. m.

must be

amount paid

for the

sent to the editor by

Monday. Submissions are subject

to

acceptance or

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (.such as a

photograph).

1


Dane

Pleau, second-semester

and

robotics student.

A

automation

Holly Larson, first-semester law and security in September.

Tammy

Somerville, secondsemester journalism student.

kiss isn’t

always

Story by Elizabeth Sackrider

Photos by Angela Clayfield

he going to kiss me? Raymond leans in to kiss his date. Two lips collide in a fum-

The

bling adolescent peck, just as the

car headlights shine onto the

white wrap-around porch of your

mind whirls with

house. Your

a kiss

just

realize the car is about to stop.

This is your first date with dream boy Raymond. The sweaty groping for clammy hands in the movie theatre. Sharing a box of sunny yellow popcorn.

behind the

Is

come on. “And just what do you two

first kiss

think

you are doing?” an adult voice screams from the porch. So, your first kiss might not have been what you expected or what Shakespeare wrote about, but definitely the

it

life,

“My

The fan

turned.

still

hums as it cools the radiator while your heart just begins to heat up.

according

Raymond

in Indianapolis.

They expected the al

encounter to rank

first fully

first in

minds, but, for most people

leans in close.

sexu-

people’s it

was in my house said Dane Pleau, a

first kiss

with a friend,” robotics and automation student. “It was cool because we were taking the next step.” For others, their first kiss wasn’t as romantic but more of a playground experience.

is

to researchers at Butler University is

and the

vividly.

most memorable

experience of your

first-ever kiss

with their current partner.

The study results were taken from middle-class subjects whose first kiss occurred between 1977 and the past six months. In the halls of Conestoga most people remembered their first kiss

lights

the

thoughts of the evening as you

“My

ranked

first kiss

was

Grade

in

was no

“We

Conestoga College’s food and beverage program has earned a citizens feeding the reputation for of Kitchener- Waterloo. For the last 15 years, the program’s students have been cooking pancakes and sausages for 8,000 to 10,000 people annually at

management

Oktoberfest.

known for hosting gourmet which involves about 200 people

also are

But, back in

1979, they outdid them-

The college’s record- lasted a year in the record books. The following year,

CHQR

Radio and the Alberta Egg and Fowl Marketing board used 20,117 eggs to eclipse the Conestoga students’ record. In making the omelette, the college used 18 new garbage containers to store the

cracked eggs in a refrigerator

the Waterloo

campus

the

The following morning,

from the

col-

food and beverage manlege’s

agement

pro-

collabo-

rated with

the-

It

the chill of winter.

remember her doesn’t think

it

well and weighs so much on first kiss

her mind. “It

was

first kiss

“It

(the

was a big

kiss)

firstate in a car,”

was

surprise in

after

pan

cooked on a pan measuring 9.1 by 3.04 metres. It took about 20 people around two hours to crack all the eggs.

pretty good.”

just

a

peck on the

cheek,”said Larson. “I don’t really

know why it would be such

a great

memory.” Sandra Hawco, a counter person

Seliphab Phosalath said his wasn’t memorable. “It was in high school,” said the English student. “I didn’t think too much of it.” first kiss

.

.

.

Murphy, maintenance worker former OSA president, Kristin

replaces locker numbers around ;

/:

school.

Lehmann)

at

utes to cook.

Of there

CHYM radio to world’s

course,

were

a

few hitches on

and the

the

omelette took only eight min-

marketing board

was

and

the way. largest

omelette,

for

placing

Kitchener’s 125th anniversary.

And

it was no ordinary omelette. was made from 12,440 eggs and

cooked on a pan measuring

moved by on axles, but the axles collapsed. A crane and flatbed trailer were then used to move the pan. Also, the omelette was to The pan was

9.1

by 3.04

originally to be

it

contain 10,000 eggs, but organizers discov-

make it much largGuinness Book of World

ered they would have to

metres.

took .about 20 people around two hours

to crack all the eggs.

feat

landed

the

students

and

1981 Guinness Book between Records, right

the college in the

World

the world’s

largest

mince pie and the

er to get into the

Records. This meant getting another 2,440 eggs together from Zehrs.

Today, the record for the world’s largest omelette belongs to Swatch,

world’s longest pastry.

whopping 1 60,000 eggs

Beth Esenbergs, co-ordinator of the food and beverage program, said the omelette was a once in a lifetime thing, but noted that the college tossed around a couple of either big ideas too.

omelette ever.

to

who used

make

a

the largest

Esenberg said she doesn’t think the college will ever try something like that again. “It’s just

not the time for that anymore.”

our

she said. “It was

ing to the giant

was made from 12,440 eggs and

egg

Ontario

of

her

in the fall, said she couldn’t really

graduate from the college, said

Schneider’s had pork donated fat to keep the eggs from stick-

has been 20

The

Marcia Beisel, an accounting

Holly Larson, who will be entering the law and security program

night before

the omelette

dents

It

kiss

was behind a building,”

area in Kitchener.

years since stu-

It

was kind of a geek and the was just an experiment.

“It

she said. “I was about 13, but it wasn’t that bad for only being 13.”

-

said Esenbergs.

made near the downtown

selves.

create

name was Todd.” Somerville said she admits Todd

his

at Harvey’s in the cafeteria, said her first kiss was an early experiment.

the record-breaking event.

each year.

gram

Somerville, a journal-

tried to create the world’s largest

turkey sub and Black Forest cake too,”

It

Tammy

small culinary feat

By Charles Kuepfer

They

4,”

said

ism student at the college. “We were in a playground and

You were warned

World’s largest omelette

dinners,

Marcia Beisel, accounting graduate of 1996.

embrace, serious or playground, leaves lasting impression on students

First

The key

Sandra Hawco, Beaver Foods employee at the college.

Cliff

Laurin, security

guard, cuts locks off lockers on the fourth floor on June 8. (Photo by Brian Smiley)


Page 6

— SPOKE, June 21, 1999

STUDENT

Therapeutic touch: all the rage

Employees

Clayfield

“life

energy”

Stressed? In pain? Need help coping with an illness? Tired of what medical science has to offer? Therapeutic touch may be the alternative you’ve been looking for or could supplement your cur-

is

it

for

symptoms by

centred on the quantum physics of

commend-

able and respected, medical sci-

ence doesn’t always have all the answers according to Diane May, a registered nurse.

Therapeutic touch

a

is

body so

way

the

patient’s

it

ability

“The

themselves.

May

to

attitude.

‘The worst that could

it.

ancient beliefs

about

workplace,” she said.

more

nothing.”

is

be

life too seriously just makes a job more difficult. “Humour, laughter and attitude have a lot to do with success in the

to

happen

May

Diane

registered nurse

forces and a butchered version of quantum physics.”

the other (medical

tics

May

science or touch therapy), you eliminate 50 per cent of the options.” at the

“The worst

last

is

and still the worst thing can happen is the therapy won’t work. And though there is no certifica-

12

that

25 hospitals, three universities and

owner and operator of Harmony, which various workshops for medthe

tioners there practise

are

standards for

and guidelines

set by the Touch Network Anyone meeting the

ical professionals, registered nurs-

Therapeutic

massage therapists and anyone else who wants to learn about

(Ontario).

touch therapy. So what is touch therapy? It is described as a contemporary interpretation of several ancient

granted the status of recognized

es,

When

the

organization’s practitioners

May

criteria

and

will

be

teachers.

says therapeutic touch

is

being used by more medical pro-

body

fessionals

diseased or injured, the flow of

and

is

becoming more

popular with the public.

everyone’s level,” she said.

Those in attendance seemed not

By

Elizabeth Sackrider

ment,

it

and professional developwas the best ever kick-off

That

to

strives to motivate

experiencing nursing, personal

welcome

is

Johnson,

who

news

people to more successful and enjoyable

Other events at the conference included aromatherapy, starting a small business, vocal techniques,

work

and several computer-

investing

related courses.

lives.

“I really enjoy doing this work because it motivates people. My motto is carpe diem - seize the day,” she said. “The music is used to get people up, but it is also a natural part of me.” Aside from motivating people,

The conference

sessions lasted

from one to several hours each and were intended to help staff and faculty improve both thenpersonal and professional lives as well as providing an opportunity to

know co-workers

better.

ous conditions,” she explained. “It very holistic which means it

Susan Johnston, a health sciences teacher, attended a seminar

‘open to alternatives.” Johnston, who has been teaching

therapy, she said. For instance, to

years,

Conestoga for more than 10 is not stuffy and stuck to her

would take millions of orange

ways. In

blossoms.

we

don’t

know very

many well,”

Johnston was one of 25 college faculty attending the

workshop on

the ancient art of using essential oils to heal.

The session was

part

of the colleges’ Employees for Excellence in Education conference held from June 9-11 at the Doon campus. In just over an hour those attending were taught the basics behind aromatherapy and given a chance to concoct their own scent. Instructor Margaret Bell, who is a certified aromatherapist and reflexologist, first explained to the

left

by

CHYM FM

in front

(Photo by Michelle Lehmann)

emotional well-being.” plant material to create one drop

she said.

and automation student,

works to restore the physical and

on aromatherapy June 9 because she said it is really important to be

things

picks up free records of the LRC.

training

and

is

“There’s lots of merit in

robotics

told Edie

also a songwriter

aromatherapy techniques

fact, she thinks it is important to keep an open mind about alternative ways to heal.

Ellul,

member

is

Workshop teaches

at

Free turntable tunes

Rose

faculty

Torbay, the chair of the college’s

Johnson

performer who has just released her seventh album. She was also named Hamilton’s woman of the year for 1992.

tion for therapeutic touch practi-

in

healing practises.

One

irreverent

effects,

colleges,

the Victorian Order of Nurses.

Ventures

happen

mind Johnson’s

to the conference.

Johnson brought several groups of staff and faculty to the front to help illustrate her message. Doon campus principal Grant McGregor was one of her first “victims,” she said, because of die position he holds with the school, “I like to pick on the head honcho because it brings them down

She says that therapeutic touch has been tested as thoroughly as most drugs that have harmful side

has taught approximately

community

that could

nothing.”

at the college.

years at 15

and said that she was one in the them to

take time to learn about the therapy.

Doon campus

20,000 people over the

understands there are skep-

beginning. She encourages

June 7 for the one-day workshop as part of the continuing education

program

a

life

Both treatments are important, because if you “eliminate one or

May was

little

than

hodgepodge of

This

help.

is

songs

light-hearted

explained her message that taking

peutic touch can

offers

Through

touch) appears

where thera-

is

nental breakfast at 8 a.m.

‘theory’

Jude Johnson encourages Grant McGregor, Doon campus principal, to snort like a pig during her keynote address to staff and faculty on June 9. (Photo by Brad Dugard)

tell then-

deal with

She

blue room cafeteria at the Doon campus following a contithe

interspersed with jokes, Johnson

what can be done for them and leave them to

May

It is also the message she brought as keynote speaker to Conestoga’s faculty and staff at the Employees for Excellence in Education conference ’99, held June 9 to 1 1 Johnson entertained the staff and faculty for about an hour at the opening event of the conference in

of (therapeutic

patients

is

life is

about.

is all

some

said

doctors

what Jude Johnson

But according to Caroll, the theory, based on some of Einstein’s theories, has been taken too far.

heal

to

Accentuating the positive and eliminating the negative in

energy rather than metaphysics.

can function properly, thereby, improving their quality of life by enhancing relaxing their

By Brad Dugard

near touch to help the flow of

energy through the body. There are many skeptics who go out of their way to debunk the practice. For example, Robert T. Caroll, professor of philosophy at Sacramento City College, wrote in an essay that therapeutic touch was a pseudoscience not worth the tax dollars being spent to research it. The focus of therapeutic touch is

highly

patients to deal with

obstructed or

said therapeutic

touch works with the body’s electromagnetic field by using light or

rent therapy.

Though

is

May

depleted.

for Excellence in Education ’99

College employees attend conference

or faulty logic? By Angela

LIFE

group in

that

aromatherapy, at least

this country, is

more

art

than

science. “It

is

It

of the essential

a

self-help

application

this is not for seri-

oil

amount of

used in

this

create a single drop of jasmine

This equation equals a high cost for a

\\V

little oil.

Johnston said the found in health food

oil

Body Shop and

specialized

at

can be

stores,

The

offices like Nurses in Touch in Waterloo. Sandy Shellenber, an associate of Bell’s and a registered nurse and a reflexologist at Nurses in Touch said “some oils cost more than others. But you really get what you pay for.” holistic

Susan Johnston (left) looks on as another participant mixes her scent at the aromatherapy seminar. (Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

A vial

of 10 millilitres of tea tree oil costs $13.95 and 15 mL of essential rose oil is valued at $18.60 at the Nurses in Touch

of your body. If massaged it can go straight through your blood-

office.

stream or

Bell

further explained the oil,

once obtained, can be used as an inhalant, as a massage or ingested. However, in this country, ingested oils

which implies

takes a tremendous

are

not

commonly

the oils can affect different parts

can affect your joints. vapour or steam it can have a mental or emotional effect.

“There

used

cations

Depending on the application,

effects.

because of the potency.

it

If inhaled in a

Bell,

is

benefits in both appli-

of essential oils,” said adding each has different


SPOKE, June

OFF CAMPUS FEATURES

%un

in

Factor (SPF), Ohashi said,

amount of time With summer quickly approachmany students are packing up their beach bags in preparation for ing,

hot, sun-filled days at the beach.

brought

usually

is

but for those

along,

compared

indication

about an Ohashi

an

said

There are

tan

skin cancer.

“Basal and squamous cells are two different types of cancer and are usually related to

continual

exposure to the sun,” he

said.

Ohashi said melanoma, which

malignant is the worst of skin cancers, is usually caused by short, intense sun exposure and usually doesn’t start showing until the early 40s or 50s. It only takes one severe bum to increase your chances of skin cancer important to wear sunscreen because during the 1930s, the incidents of skin cancer were about one in roughly 1,500,” said

To

one in about

it’s

Paba

“Parsol it

is

important

is

covers the

UVA rays.” much

not used as

any-

effective,

reactions,

it’s

it can cause allergic Ohashi said.

There is a difference, he said, between generic and brand name

wear your

sunscreens.

“Ask your pharmacist

“Gels are water soluble so they are easier to put

Ohashi. “The sprays are convenient but don’t give you the thick layer of protection you want.”

He

that is going to cover

dif-

in

UVA,

UVB

said that creams

are heavier

and lotions and stay on a little

better.

for a broad spectrum sunscreen

sunscreen

on but don’t give

as long lasting protection,” said

“Buy the best sunscreen you possibly can,

me is Ombrelle an SPF of 30 or 40,” he

which to

and UVC,” Ohashi advised. If you’re going into the water, he suggests using a waterproof or

Extreme

water-resistant sunscreen.

contraceptives as well as certain types of antibiotics sensitize the

“Waterproof ones last longer than water-resistant but both eventually wear off after about 40 minutes,” said Ohashi.

He reminded people

that the sun

in

said. It is

important to

know

that oral

make it a lot easier for the bum, he said.

skin and

skin to

“Students tend to not take sun seriously because they

the

reflects off the water,

already reached the point of maxi-

the water the light

mum exposure,” said Ohashi.

itself intensifies.”

you pro-

towards going to a higher SPF because it doesn’t do any harm

Ohashi said that most consumers don’t put on

that will

help

and the cost factor doesn’t usually

enough

vent things

Ohashi

said

he

would

more

15,

Kim

Papp, a determatologist in Waterloo. Papp recommends Neutrogena, PreSun, Coppertone and Solbar

k

When

:

i

buying a sunscreen

^ it

young and

are

it

important that

it

contains certain

“You want

Ohashi that

ratio

is

skin’s

The best sunscreens, Ohashi

exposed part of the body,” Ohashi said. “So a four-ounce bottle, the-

UVB

Ohashi

said.

and now

pre-

cancer and

UVC”

UVA,

now

like

about half a teaspoon for each arm, the face, the neck and each leg plus any other

to protect against all

said

what

it’s

tect

sun-

“A good

three bans of ultra violet rays:

is

off

screen and thickness important.

ingredients.

feel

more

they’re a bit

invincible.”

“By bouncing

lean

SPF area. recommend a min ium SPF of preferably SPF 30,” said Dr.

making

intense than direct

sun.

enter the

Sun Protection

calculate Hie

Ohashi recommends using a cream or lotion as opposed to gels and sprays.

you

last

and you stay out for an hour, once you reach the end of the hour, putting it on is not going to help you any further because you have

sunscreens.

|k

ingredients.

more because even though

“Some say that reapplying is the way to go. Other experts say that once you put on an SPF of four

“I

“It’s

oretically, should only about four applications.”

Ohashi. because

about reapplication of sunscreen, Ohashi said.

dramatically.

gsvii

say you can't be wrong if you always

opinion

who

said, will have a combination of about three to four types of

“The ingredient families are cinnamates, oxy benzone or bezonphenones or salicytes,” said

the

ferences

susceptible to

less

“Now

;

sun.”

Bill Ohashi, a pharmacist at Shoppers Drug Mart in Conestoga Mall. Ohashi said that those

125” gg

said.

amount of time you can spend in the

has

Ohashi,

hour,”

get

that

aren’t

songs

of four to

skin

easily

is

“You multiply 15 by the SPF

all

been damaged,”

Popular

amount of time it takes unprotected skin to bum. “If it takes 15 minutes to bum, than an SPF of four would give you protection for

“From a medical that a tan is is

the

takes the skin to

to the

used.

your

it

become red with sunscreen

who want to tan, it may not get

point of view,

— Page 7

the sun can turn into deadly cancer

By Lesley Turnbull

Sunscreen

21, 1999

the aging

“The thick,

texture is

leathery

you see on some people

a result of too

much

tanning,”

said Ohashi.

Two-month-old business gets a jump on the competition

Bike rental business rides high at Riverfest By Wayne

A

Collins

new Cambridge

business proved the

best things in life were free, for at least a day, during

Cambridge’s annual Riverfest

on June 12. The annual event provided a great chance for new entrepreneurs, Gord Zomer and Scott Logan, to introduce their two-month-old business, Cambridge Bike Rentals, to the community and participate in

an event they’ve attended as family

men

in past years.

The company brought 10-12 of their new bicycles to Riverbluffs Park last Saturday

and offered free rides during the day to anyone interested, said co-owner Zomer. “This is our first year in business,” he said, “and because we’re new, events like this

are

(great opportunities)

for

good

public relations.” friend/helper

Ron Campbell,

are lifelong

and have always support-

ed Riverfest and other local projects in the Waterloo Region. “We’re all bom and raised in Galt,” said Campbell, “and we have lots of good friends here who want to see us make a go of it.” The men said their wives were initially skeptical of the idea, which took flight over a few beers and a game of darts in ’s garage one night. Still, they said,

company and even

is

“Our wives have (also) given us the time and space to do this,” said Zomer. Time is something the men seem to maximize to the fullest. Besides driving a delivery truck for Shoppers Drug Mart in Cambridge, along with Logan, Zomer also works full tim e for the City of Waterloo’s parks and recreation department. Logan, according to Zomer, is the quiet one among the trio, but also the most entrepreneurial among them.

definitely a family effort,

their daughters

helped with such things as teaching them the ins and outs of

to the

is

located next

GTO service station on Highway 24,

just past the

Concession Street bridge.

Bicycle rentals cost $20 for five hours or $35 for a full day. Zomer said they would

on a two- or threework out well. If suc-

also consider renting

day basis cessful,

if things

the

men want

to

expand

their

business to Waterloo and diversify into other areas of what they call a “family fun business.”

Despite a hot humid day at Dickson men said they were looking for-

Park, the

ward “It’s

to the day’s events.

a great

clay for

er with their kids,”

parents to get togeth-

Zomer

said.

“It was basically (Logan’s) brainchild and we all put our own money together to finance the operation,” said Zomer, adding that they bought 20 bikes from Canadian Tire and put them together

“We

themselves.

They describe

don’t

owe

anything.”

the bikes as “comfortable,

easy-riding classic cruisers,” which also

feature

Both Logan and Zomer, plus another residents of Galt

Cambridge Bike Rentals

using computers to run the business.

buddies”

“bike

attached to

them

and

trailers

for riding with small

children in tow.

“We

have one

mom

child to test ride the

who’s bringing her

new

infant carrier

Zomer. “The child has cerebral palsy, so our main concern is later today,” said

safety first.”

Campbell, who works on Transport Canada’s committee for seatbelts on buses, agrees that company’s main focus must be on safety. The businessmen, who are great bicycle enthusiasts themselves, have tested all of the bicycles, said Zomer.

“We

like to ride the

Grand River

quite frequently ourselves.”

trails

Gord Zomer

(left) and Ron Campbell said they were glad to spend the day at Cambridge’s Riverfest on June 12 because it was good public relations (Photo by Wayne Collins) experience.


Page 8

— SPOKE, June 21, 1999

STUDENT

LIFE

engineering grad

Civil

successful

Continuing education registrations up for ’99

workplace

in

By John Oberholtzer

logues, or calendars, which

out each year:

By Carly Benjamin

civil

Some people never learn, but at Conestoga College others never

spring/summer,

my

stop learning.

will

According to statistics provided by David Stewart, director of con-

which

“I

Sheldon Mustard, a graduate of Conestoga’s

now

the award on

engineering pro-

use

resume

and

may

it

me

come

winter and

fall,

Stewart said on July 23 there

be a front-line briefing all

in

the co-ordinators from

gram, continues to use the skills he developed while attending the

help

one day get

tinuing

college.

my

foot in the

31,451 registrations for continu-

centre

he

ing education courses at the vari-

provide staff members with infor-

said.

ous campuses for the

mation on any new requirements

Mustard has been accepted

1998-99.

As

part of the civil engineering

to

door,”

program, third-year students were asked to complete a project that would provide them with practical experience for future employment. Mustard, along with group members Paul Douglas and Steve Pletz, received the honour for Best Land

engineering program at

Development

the University

Project.

sponsored The award, by Jamesway Construction, came with $75 and a certificate to commemorate the achievement. Mustard’s team selected a Farmer’s Market

Road

site

on

close to the

Kitchener-Waterloo expressway. They then developed the structural design for a hotel, banquet hall and fitness centre. “We chose that piece of land because that area could benefit by having those facilities to accom-

modate the tourists Mustard said.

in that area,”

placement of

and park-

buildings, foundations

ing

lots.

number of would hold was

Even

fairly well,

the

spaces the lot taken into account. The project did not involve any architectural work.

to

attend in the fall.

plants.

hope to earn a degree in the mechanical engineering program as well as computer science, a

The mechanical engineering program he will be taking at Western

“I

double degree.” He said he decided to further his education because he wanted to focus more on the development side of engineering, rather than

the logistics of

how at

things work,

Conestoga.

“University will allow

me

to

explore other avenues,” he said. “I will be better qualified for

any

future positions.”

The

knowledge

he gained engineering course dealt with structures, such his

as bridges

to put through a

he

civil

and sewage treatment

will focus

on different types of

provincial survey is done every two years for continuing

education courses at

alt

Ontario

community colleges and includes questions on the whole experience of each student, Stewart said. Stewart said the college uses a

with people from the information

and the

registrar’s office to

About 210,000 copies of the

model of setting up programs, which means

includes around

1

,

1

00 courses but

problem.

“One of my biggest concerns when I first got foe jobs was ‘where do

a week goes by where either

somebody”

Mustard is currently employed at Johnson Engineering Consultants, in Stratford, Ont. where he spends much of his day working on Computer Automated Design (CAD). “Conestoga provided me with the real world skills I needed to stay competitive in today’s job market,” he said. In the future Mustard hopes to

ating schools

all

I

these

don’t get

un from

an

or

solicited

a

different

there are other people in the oper-

get ideas for

I

courses?”’ he said, “I don’t think

solicited

who

cal-

endar will then be distributed, Stewart said each catalogue

decentralized

industrial manufacturing.

work

the various programs will meet

getting ideas has never been a

said.

A

Sheldon Mustard, a civil engineering graduate from Conestoga, won award for Best Development Project. (Photo by Carly Benjamin)

Western Ontario and of

through

fiscal year

according to provin-

cial surveys,”

which he learned

The project involved various details including the

were

tremendous number of students every year and we seem to do it

mechanical

plans

there

for continuing education courses.

“We manage

the

in

education,

proposal

Stewart instructs people to sub-

run continuing

mit a one- to two-page proposal

education as another aspect of

which includes what they want to do, who foe audience is and how

their departments.

“The program managers and cofrom the various schools do their own thing." he said. “They develop the courses and the programs because they have a better feel for what the community wants and then we ordinators

consolidate

in computer-related design

it

in the catalogue.”

There are three different cata-

many hours As for foe

foe course will take.

he said foe

future,

biggest challenge

is

to continue to

meet the needs of foe community. “The tail-end of foe baby boomers are

going through but there's a

whole new generation who are very computer literate who have different demands,” he said.

work, such as computer simulation for various developments.

Special needs counsellor winner

Independent Living award

of

By Linda Wright

Casey said it’s a to work with

treat

Your home decor

is

often a

reflection of your individual taste,

so your office

same

style.

may also reflect that

“Believe in yourself

and anything is possible” reads one of the plaques that sits in the office of the Independent Living

Award

tran-

educational

or

options.

was

says he

in

a state of

“Oh god what do

I

do now?” he

WATERLOO & IEEBKKIs: 884-7376

Burger Kmg)|

down memory

road,

said.

when you know

you’re

getting old" he laughed. from Wendy's)

823-5341

drive

Rick Casey, special needs transition counwon the Independent Living Award in the career development catergory.

from

Brantford which is a 30-mile hike to the college. A lot of special-needs

sellor,

(Photo by Linda Wright)

students

have to schedule their

lives

around

Project Lift, a transportation service for the

granted such as going to a show or grocery shopping, said Casey. “Everything is usually on the fourth shelf at the grocery store, which makes it hard for people in a wheelchair to reach for for

certain products.”

the

life

He

was wonderful to touch base with students from the college and see what they are said

doing now.

it

ty

had been awarded

Award

for

1

easier for

special-needs population

in

is

recognition receive for

ments

a Five Star

990.

This award

handicapped.

city staff in Kitchener to complete an application form to the Five Star Award Program sponsored jointly by the Secretary of State, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the National Awareness committee. Following this application form, city staff in Kitchener were notified by the Office of Secretary of State that the Kitchener communi-

“That’s

(Across

at 5

prepare for

Kitchener.In 1990 Casey assisted

he

Between Harvey's

his

to

a

student

of the shock, he said it was a real honour and a fun night. The awards presentation was like taking a trip

Street N.

remembers

quadriplegic

said. (Across from MtDoncffi)

In spite

402 King

said.

Casey has made

inated.

6227774

admire he

Most people take simple things

shock when he heard he was nom-

893-2464

always

a.m.

He

(frninrimn Tire Iron)

“I

their motivation,”

who had to get up

employment

KITCHENER

and

barriers.

sition counsellor, as well as other

Casey won in the career development category, which acknowledged those who have facilitated

S

sig-

nificant obstacles

nominees, were honoured at an award ceremony held on May 19, at the Country Hills Community Centre in Kitchener. The Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region hosted the event, handing out six awards to people and groups who improved independence for people with disabilities.

385 Fairway Road

who have

overcome some

He

winner.

Rick Casey, a special needs

USED CD

individuals

the highest form of

a

its

community can

overall accomplish-

in integrating

a disability into

persons with

community

life

including the Five Star Areas of transportation, housing employment, recreation and education. Here at the college, Casey has

many changes for specialneeds students. Conestoga College has been willing to embrace change, said Casey. “That’s why seen

stayed with the college so

I’ve

long.”

Casey's office reflects his work in

helping

students

overcome

obstacles.

A

picture,

from

a

which he reottfd

student

University,

reads,

at

Nip^J g “It’s

about

belonging, giving each student the best opportunity for success.”


STUDENT

SPOKE, June

LIFE

21, 1999

— Page 9

%iore than scars

abuse underestimated

Pattern of emotional By

Eileen Diniz

Lawrence said that she experienced more aggression then anything else and it totally destroyed

Everyone has heard of physical abuse and the scars it leaves but what about emotional abuse and

her relationship. “I felt like everything

lasting scars.

its

or

This type of abuse wears away at

of self-worth and trust in their It

things and

own

nature, constant criticism, intimi-

and anger. Surprisingly, abusers suffer from these same feelings. “I believe abusers are insecure

and dealing with many feelings at once,

boyfriend.

Some

Lana Lawrence, a

are

1

5-year-old,

had emotionally abusive

relationship.

(Photo by Eileen Diniz)

and

The abuser may also withhold, which includes refusing to listen or communicate. Countering is another form of denying and this is when the abuser denies any feelings or views the victim may have

Aggressing includes name-callblaming, threatening and ordering. ing, accusing,

The aggressor takes a one-up position and invalidates and rela-

from their own. Minimizing is when the abuser doesn’t necessarily deny what happened but tries to question the recipient’s reaction to it by making comments such as “you’re too senthat differ

sitive.”

Trivializing

form of occurs

this

when

is

a

more

subtle

type of abuse and

it

the abuser suggests

what you’ve said or done

is

unim-

portant or irrelevant.

tionship. In a less (Erect form, the

may

demean

try

to

and by saying

“Emotional abuse, as well as physical,

they are helping and advising. Denying is when the abuser

the victim

will

leave or something

will

only last for so long. Sooner or later

more serious

will

happen, and then what?”

refuses to acknowledge reality and

says things like,

Lana Lawrence

never said

“I

15-year-old victim

that.”

emotional

own view

edged. You also have the right to be respectfully asked something instead of ordered, not to be called names, live free fromoutbursts and accusations and criticism. If you or anyone you know is being abused, you should educate yourself and consider seeing a counsellor, to help you understand the impact of your abuse and healthier

ways of

show

relating to

pamphlet suggests “Emotional abuse as well as

others, the

physical, will only last for so long,” said Lawrence. “Sooner or later the victim will leave or something more serious will happen,

and then what.”

Preparing the

Addicted to bad love 15-year-old By

include

support, having your

you

control

their partner

basic rights in a healthy

and having your feelings acknowl-

minimizing.

abuser

dom

Have you ever known a relationship was bad for you but stayed in it anyway? A so-called bad relationship is actually an addic-

to leave a destructive situation.

“Our relationship came down to constant fighting and abuse. Eventually, I stopped caring about him and numbed myself, but I found it hard to leave the situation because I was so used to being with him,”

tive one.

It is not going through periods of disagreements or unhappiness but rather involves

said Lawrence.

continual frustrations, stress and the feeling that

knowing the relationship is bad for you but you do nothing to end it; giving yourself

is

just out of reach.

This kind of partnership destroys a person’s selfesteem and may prevent you from making any kind of progress in your life. The people involved in this addictive relationship will

have

little

enjoy-

ment together and may experience loneliness and rage.

Lana Lawrence, a Benedict Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge, said she was once in an addictive

15-year-old student at

St.

would always end up

“I

me

Signs of being trapped in an addictive relationship include:

inaccurate reasons for staying in

ging him to take

back.”

and

Lana Lawrence 15-year-old student

I

that

I

became constantly

began not

thing and even started to

fail

to care about any-

my

courses in high

school.”

By

Many

people stay

in this type

of

rela-

tionship because of

much

tired.

me

back,” she said.

was going out with this guy and stressed

thinking about

it

“I

fought so

it;

and feeling anxiety and fear; and taking steps to end the relationship, only to end up suffering from physical discomfort that is only alleviated when you are once again with your partner. “I would break up with him and start to feel sick to my stomach and not be able to eat, sleep or do anything. I would always end up callbegging him to take ing him and begending

relation-

ship and it drained her of everything.

we

way

describes her abuse

girl

Eileen Diniz

happiness

financial arrangements, shared living conditions and children, the

pamphlet states. Also on a deeper

level the reasons listed

were

beliefs such as that love is forever, that the victim

remaining in the relationship you are setting

yourself up for constant stress, less energy, lower resistance to illness and

may even become depend-

ent on alcohol or drugs.

The students services pamphlet, called Addictive when you are involved in this type relationship you rob yourself of your ^ssential freedoms. These include the freedom to pe your best self, the freedom to love your partner through choice and not dependency and the freeRelationships, states that

all

also believe that does

I

relationship

There are general patterns of abuse listed in the pamphlet entitled Emotional Abuse outside the

undermines equality in the

but

not give them the right to impose on another as they have.”

“He used to call me all kinds of vulgar names and try to control who I went out with or spoke to.”

denying

these

fear

manipulation and the refusal to ever be pleased. Lana Lawrence, a 15-year-old student, said she went through this type of abuse with a former dation,

aggressing,

all

bad about

People who have to deal with abuse often feel powerless, hurt,

can include anything verbal in

They

feel

it.”

and perceptions.

student services office.

make me

did

He was

always trying to control

the victims’ self-confidence, sense

feelings

I said,

wore was wrong.

is not attractive or interesting enough to get anybody else and that being alone is terrible. The deepest level was an unconscious feeling, which usually came from a person’s childhood. The pamphlet states that an adult may feel needy

and therefore be vulnerable to dependency. Strategies for overcoming an addictive relationship listed in the pamphlet include making your recovery your first priority, becoming selfish and seeing a medical professional.

Ian

MacDonald, groundskeeper, prepares the

new landscaping at the Rec Centre after the Skills Canada competition.

the

soil

to lay

around

new seed

(Photo by Michelle Lehmann;


— SPOKE, June

Page 10

21, 1999

MOVIE REVIEWS

movie

Will this

bring balance to the Force? Samuel

By Adam Wilson

young Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor), go

been a long wait, but I finally got to see Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace, and there is only one word I can use to describe it. Wow. No, wow is an like

Amazing

is

as they arrive to begin negotia-

Darth Sidious, an evil Jedi, sends an order to kill Qui-Gon and ObiWan, and the story takes off from

more

leading up to

release,

hype lives up

good thing

that has

its

to every single

the

all

Everything you could ask

been said about it. And more. It would be easy to say this is the

movie

I

probably not

might

that I

like

same

for in

will see all year, but true.

As

don’t want to give anything

away for those who have

The

yet to see

so

much

to

it.

when two Jedi Qui-Gon Jinn (Liam

plot begins

Knights,

Neeson) and

his

.

.

apprentice,

movie goes along, embargo plot falls to

a

slave

named

boy

By Brian Smiley Austin Powers: The Spy

Who

billed as the only other

is

Shagged movie to see

this summer, other than the blockbuster Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. Trying to live up to the success of the first movie, International Man of Mystery, proved to be an insurmountable task. This

and may be a movie you summer. In the Spy Who Shagged Me, British agent Powers (Mike Myers) is back battling sequel

want

falls short

to avoid this

Dr. Evil (Myers).

Dr. Evil is

still

the

Anakin

This sequel Me

the

background. Other plots are piled one on top of the other, until there is so much going on off-camera, that all we can do is watch what is happening on the screen at the time. Not that the ever-growing plot is a problem; the other plots that are introduced are the perfect foreshadowing for what is going to happen later in the movie, and for the second Star Wars prequel coming out in 2002. Qui-Gon meets an eight-year-old

see a good, old fashioned sci-fi

say about

.

the

trade

flick.

is

plot

Skywalker, who if you didn’t know, grows up to be Darth Vader.

tion with the

as the Jedi Knights

more, but again, giving away key plot points is going to

Neeson

is

Wan

we

excellent. are perfect

cheer

out for

world domination and in this movie the doctor travels back in time to the ’60s to try and steal Powers’ mojo and foil him once and for all. While the movie does have its funny parts,

and fight his way out of a two-on-one situa-

is rotten,

Myers, since he co-wrote the movie, forgot that there would be other characters in the movie and therefore wrote all the laughs for his

own

Oriental-style costumes and cold

characters.

The

for this

acting

two

make

all

action figures,

in the galaxy, the

of the T-shirts,

Halloween coselse related

Star Wars, looks a thousand

Darth Maul, even though his one line in the movie was overdubbed when production was finished. And I guess the pod-racing sequence was good. I liked other

more in the movie than that, was fun to watch. Phantom Menace is everything you could ask for in a big-time, things

but

it

summer movie. There is most of

a plot, but

used as a setup tool for the next two movies. There are lots of explosions and action it is

sequences, but they help

move

story along. Everything

is

the

perfect

about this movie. I only wish I didn’t have to wait three years to see the next one.

baby, yeah!

a sequel

movie every

years.

If that’s the

case he

better prepare a

more

for

the

little

third

instalment.

Austin Powers: The

Spy

classes.

man

selling

comgood versus evil, which may be the only thing making this movie re-

like to

not as funny.

man

plot isn’t

Scott counters his father’s idiocy in comical

every opportunity.

of course, Darth Maul,

plicated,

fashion, deriding and lambasting his father

The scene where Dr. Evil and Scott appear on Jerry Springer is a classic comedy moment; however, this scene occurs at the beginning of the movie and primes the audience for a letdown. The ensuing scenes are

And

the baddest

abandoning Dr. Evil’s camera t im e.

deemable. Myers has gone on record as saying he’d

at

Leia.

pets’

Apart from Dr. Evil’s son Scott (Seth Green), there isn’t another character in the movie who is even somewhat comical.

Heather Graham, as Felicity Shagwell, needs some serious

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

is

swirl

most of them are provided by the three characters played by Myers: Austin Powers, Dr. Evil and Fat Bastard. It seems as if

child-

great with her

demeanor throughout the movie which are the complete opposite of the other Star Wars princess,

Liam Neeson Ewan McGregor Natalie Portman Jake Lloyd Samuel L . Jackson Director George Lucas Screenplay George Lucas Playing at: Silver City

spin,

flip,

is

movies.

the

for.

Starring

stunt man. Park looks amazing in this movie, as he uses the dark side of to

as

times scarier and badder than Darth Vader. Ray Park is great as

not an actor, but more of a

the Force

Star Weirs

queen, Amidala,

to

ble-edged lightsaber, fending off two Jedi Masters at the same time was truly amazing. Park, who choreographed his sequences,

the

Portman

tumes and everything

Maul (Ray Park), QuiGon and Obi- Wan. Seeing Darth Maul work a dou-

fight

in

Natalie

(internet Photo)

looks, acts and has the

complete aura of a Jedi Knight throughout the entire movie. McGregor bears such a striking resemblance to Sir Alec Guinness, it’s hard to imagine that two different people have played Obi-

movie for some people. There was just too much to like about Menace. Although everyone said the most amazing scene in the movie was the pod-racing sequence, I found my palms sweating and I was sitting on the edge of my seat ruin the

own

The Phantom Menace.

Jedi.

The casting was Neeson and McGregor

Obi-Wan feels a disturbance in the Force when he first meets Anakin. There

good

jedi in

during the epic lightsaber duels between Darth

Phantom

as

the movie, but there

movie.

see

I will

Menace. This movie stands alone and I will say that this is the best sci-fi movie of the year. Forget The Matrix or eXistenZ, go see Phantom Menace if you want to

I

summer

There was a

more, but not on

level

a

There will

probably be something the

starts.

there.

This movie, with

that’s

trouble

tions,

it.

best

As soon

to stop a trade blockade.

It’s

understatement.

to negotiate a deal

Jackson as Mace Windu, a

L.

is

Who

Shagged

Me

rated PG-13.

Her

appealing looks don’t

make

up

for

the

fact that she is a terri-

5 days/40 (Aug. 4-8

hr.

Guelph) TESOL teacher cert, course (or by correspondence) in

comical actress and should search for new genre. At a least Powers’ original romantic ble

was English

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SPOKE, June

ENTERTAINMENT

Go

^luch ado about

Shakespeare By Janet Wakutz

Love

in

Conversations shared by the two during tasteful love scenes por-

Never was there a tale of more woe than that of Juliet and her Romeo. The eloquent language of

tray

Elizabethan stage

rounded out with witty humour and such skillful acting that one might find themselves forgetting they are in a movie theatre and not at a live performance. The story told is one of true love, forbidden and enviable, and

beautifully

is

translated through the

skillfully

written and artfully acted movie,

Shakespeare in Love. The movie that cleaned up at the taking home seven Oscars,

Academy Awards

for best picture,

their

inspiration

passion and become for the words of

Romeo and Juliet. The beauty of guage

the poetic lan-

is

Caulder’s goal is to get Powell to open up to him in order to find out the circumstances of the murders

In the new film Instinct, Anthony Hopkins plays an anthropologist who has so thoroughly immersed himself among a family of gorillas in the Rwandan jungle, he has lost all sense of who he is and what used to be important to him. There’s something profound and unshakable in his soul, but it’s buried so deeply it takes a psychiatrist (Cuba Gooding Jr.) the entire length of the movie to draw it out of him. This quest to unveil some sort of greater truth about the world we’ve made for ourselves is the main strength of Instinct, although the underlying theme is somewhat muted by doses of implausible melodrama and

and possibly get Powell a fair hearing, although Caulder’s motive is purely one of self-interest to further his

gate family walking through the jungle. Not only does

slow the pace, but the viewer could also start imagining possible parodies. If this were a Mel Brooks movie, maybe one of the gorillas would break out a deck of cards. The best moments of the movie come in the second half, as Powell tries to explain to Caulder that he didn’t spend two years living in the jungle like an animal, but as a human did 10,000 years ago, before society became dominated by competition, war and greed. In a clever bit of filmmaking, a flashback scene in which Powell aids his family of gorillas in a fight against hunters is followed by one where he comes to the defence of a meek mental patient who is being attacked by a sadistic guard. Overall, Instinct borrows themes and ideas from movies ranging from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest to The Shawshank Redemption and has a this

restless

scenes, anthropologist Ethan Powell (Hopkins) is

American story told

and

enviable... without the

is

one

of true love, forbidden

transferred from a

happy ending.

prison

to

a

Rwandan

correctional

facility in Florida.

He

has

two Rwandan park rangers with a club and refuses to speak a word in his defence. Looking like a cross between Jerry Garcia and Charles Manson, Powell breaks free from the security guards at the Miami airport and goes on a rampage. It’s somewhat far-fetched and almost comikilled

cal to see this paunchy, white-haired

man mow his

way through

supporting actress, art costume, score and screenplay, manipulates the emotions of the audience. Tastefully

most of all passion, without the happy ending. The costuming is breathtaking,

weaving the story of romance with humour and sadness, the

Elizabethan image. Queen Elizabeth I, played by Judy Dench, is enjoyable and provides the audience a character they can relate to. The costumes worn by Dench and Paltrow look that

actress,

director,

audience

and

is

forced to both laugh

cry.

Gwyneth Paltrow (A Perfect Murder) plays Lady Viola, who with

shares

Joseph

Fiennes

(William Shakespeare), a love so deep and passionate it will evoke the emotions of even the most

unconcerned viewer. Set in

with

1593, the story begins

playwright

Shakespeare

as

is

the set design that creates a

believable

much more

closed

down due

to breakouts

at

its

core.

Unfortunately,

its

pure heart.

No shadows here

the acting and the eloquent, artful

forbidden to take the stage. Lady Viola disguises herself as a boy

writing.

and acts the part of Romeo, a work in progress. The play unfolds and is written by Shakespeare as their relationship

will be released

Although Shakespeare in Love on video later this summer, it is well worth the price of admission to experience the elegant, admirable performance on the big screen.

A need

(left)

message

of

There are many things to be

arcelie Watts

thoughtful

there are several layers of Hollywood flab covering

the plague.

appreciated with Shakespeare in Love, not the least of which are

Exeilence conference.

Meanwhile, an ambitious young psychiatrist from Miami named Theo Caulder (Gooding Jr.) presses his mentor (Donald Sutherland) into letting him get a work placement at the facility where Powell is being housed.

the University of

backdrop of cold, grey stone buildings and muddy streets on to which waste is thrown during a time when the theatres were often

He

plays out.

a horde of beefy cops. After all, Hopkins doesn’t exactly resemble Jackie Chan.

opulent against the

meets a woman (Paltrow) who loves poetry and longs to be an actor at a time when women are

experiencing writer’s block.

career.

anthropologist and his surro-

opening

the

own

Caulder does get Powell to speak, and in several flashback sequences we see Powell develop his relationship with a family of mountain gorillas. Unfortunately, this involves long scenes with Powell and the gorillas looking at one another, and the

tedious exposition.

The

— Page 11

with instinct, wait for the video

By John Oberholtzer

In

21, 1999

to

know

ien did

we

start enrolling

at

Conestoga College? Don’t

worry,

he was

just

(Photo by Chadwick Severn)

basis

and Lesley McConville give information

groundhogs

for the

Employees

for

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)


— SPOKE, June

Page 12

21, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT

Amanda

“The audience is part of the show...that’s something people never get from television or film. ”

stops

in

Marshall • Kitchener

By Lesley Turnbull

TV no

A

substitute for

fell

over the crowd as the

dimmed and

appeared on the stage in the Square on June

improv troupe

local

hush

lights

When Amanda

silhouettes at the

Centre

12.

Marshall began to

sing behind the curtain, the

crowd began to cheer, lights lit the stage and the curtain dropped in front of her.

The concert was about two hours long, without a break, but no one

seemed

to mind. Marshall was full of energy during the entire show. She jumped and skipped around the length of

the stage,

waving her hands and

flipping her long,

wavy mane

ed

air.

good

to

be

back

here

tonight,” Marshall said.

Canadian-born Marshall asked throughout the night and waved at people as she sang her rock and

.

By

Brian Gall

not to offend anybody... the suggestions you get from the audience tend to be the very

There are way too many borshows on television every night. But there is a ing, repetitive

improvisational

live,

thing that

you are trying

to

avoid.”

comedy

Rochl started the group in a form, as

alternative,

where the audience

different

makes

show through sugevery Thursday

Theatresports, in 1981. Theatre

the

gestions,

on

evening.

Theatre

for about seven or eight years now, he said. They always have new people

On The Edge perform

own brand of improv at the Waterloo Community Arts their

formerly

Centre,

joining and cast

Old

the

No

Little

I

experience

Theatre (9 Princess St., across from the Princess

h0 *e „f„ H group every Sunday night at 7:30 until the end of June, and possibly indefinitely. Five dollars

for

what

t™ out

to

them

pay for three

to

admissions and get three

is

“The reason r people r

necessary. If

as well as shows around southwestern Ontario, keep the troupe running.

Cover charges have to take care of rent and advertising expenses.

“We’re breaking even, which the main thing. And we’re doing a lot of off-site shows as well, private bookings,” said Roehl, a software developer at the University of Waterloo. As for shows at Conestoga College, none have been done is

but “there are plans afoot,” he said. Theatre on the Edge can tailor

see

live

theatre .at

to

Jon’t

by

see

have a fourth

and who are

houses to busking, or street performing.

Those

we

wall.” Roehl,

creative director

Most

Whether the troupe is on a quickly sinking surface or searching alien cornfields, they turn the average night of watching TV at home, inside out. Troupe members take turns acting as host, and are responsible for coming up with a few ideas

show when

for the

it

is their

Without warning, the host stops the action in the middle of a skit and asks for suggestions. Everything from a type of food to a genre of film is shouted out by the crowd and thrown into the mix. Cast members do an amazing job of juggling their characters and recreating turn.

scenes. “It

a

crowd

fails

when you have

that you’re trying to

avoid a topic with, they always suggest things related to that topic,” said

Bemie Roehl,

cre-

of the troupe. you want to be careful

ative director if

interested in perform-

ing with Theatre on the Edge, this is the place to start.

“People come to those and

how

do basic improv and eventually we put them on stage,” Roehl said of the approximately 25 members. learn

He

said performers are con-

stantly like

to

moving away

to places

Toronto and Vancouver, but new ones come

as people leave in.

Though the number of actors growing by leaps and

isn’t

bounds, Roehl said

it

is

on a

steady increase.

comedy

troupes

gig

is

too small.

charity events will

be done for a letter of commendation. The fee for other gigs depends on where it will be done and how soon. To contact them call 519-7475049, or send e-mail to broehl@ece.uwaterloo.ca.

What makes

Theatre on the

Edge so entertaining

is its

link

with the audience and the unpredictable content that comes from their involvement. Television cannot compete with such amazing, hilarious improv, and Roehl said this is why audiences enjoy their work.

“The reason people come

Normally performing or host-

never

“So

you are

in

through their players.

No

free.

interested

booking the troupe can also be connected to murder mystery groups, singers, magicians and sketch

Montreal native was in the audience for the June 10 show, and said the crowd of roughly 30 people was a decent ing, the

see our show,

to

who normally

don’t go to see live theatre at all,

and

who

television,

is

are frustrated by

we

that

don’t have

The audience is show. .That’s some-

a fourth wall.

turnout for the middle of the

part of the

summer. Regular

thing people never get from tel-

performances

in

Child.

evision or film.”

.

lonely,

How’d

missing what

one

stood

I

looking for that just

Why am

get so bad?

it

am

to the

we

angry?

I

And why am I

never really had.” every-

clapping and whistling until Marshall reappeared with her band members and perup,

formed a new song on keyboard. Following that, Marshall performed her hit song, Let It Rain, off her

first

album.

She started the song by saying “sing it for me,” and the audience did.

During the song, a fan approached the front of the stage and danced in front of Marshall. Marshall

Twelve of the 13 tracks on Tuesday’s Child were co-written by

reached out and shook the fan’s

the singer.

hand.

Believe in You, a hit single, was powerful.

the first stops on her 15 -city, cross-

After a small introduction most fans recognized the song and start-

to

from children’s picnics and campus coffee

Bemie

and powerful. She added a lot of extra “yeahs” and moans into her songs that gave them more of a blues feeling. She performed almost all of her songs off her new album Tuesday’s clear

Centre in the Square was one of

Canada concert tour

to

promote

Tuesday’s Child.

Book Review

is in

to

television, is that

first

whatever mind. They have done everything content

come

all,

show

the

I

there?

isn’t

I’m talking

When the concert was over,

album, titled Amanda Marshall, does not do enough justice to her voice. Hearing her live showed how talented she really is. Her voice was

yet,

0 ur show, who normally don’t go

be frustrated

an unpredictable show. And frequent fun cards are given to first-time visitors, which allows

members come

from workshops that are held every Sunday at the K-W Little Theatre at 4 p.m.

Button Factory, (located at 25 Regina St. S.) weekly at 8 p.m.

The Kitchener-Waterloo

Edge has been around

the

K-W,

like

it’s

What am

air.

blues songs.

Her

I

you’re sitting right here. Why talking,

how the Kitchener crowd was doing

Me? had

“Why am

great lyrics:

“It’s

Nick Oddson (left) and Chris Edwards, players for Theatre on the Edge, perform at the Waterloo Community Arts Centre June 1 (Photo by Brian Gall)

and clap. Don’t You Love

to whistle

Why

in the

Crosbie autobiography

open and By Wayne

brutally frank

Collins

occasion in federal politics. Far from being the slow-witted

Macleans columnist Alan Fotheringham once described John Crosbie as a consummate actor who dressed as

was

if the

Salvation

Army

his tailor.

“He goes around dressed like an unmade bed and talking like an outof-work butcher,” said Fotheringham. “All the time his mind is doing nip-ups, curve balls, fandangos and madrigals.” In his autobiography No Holds Barred,

My Life in Politics, Crosbie

quotes Fotheringham on page 166 with an earthy openness seldom

seen from any form of political

John’s, Nfld.

Like Crosbie himself, the book speaks to the reader as a 400-page conversation, or litany. At times brutally honest,

when

relating

infamous quotes to the media may have been political suicide at times, but he still maintains his humour was always the ace up his political sleeve. “I tried to continue to use

as a

it is

some

of the shady dealings of Newfoundland’s former Premier Joseph R. Smallwood. Crosbie is as blunt in his opinion of Smallwood as he was in active politics. This same wit and quick tongue, of course, proved to be Crosbie ’s Achilles heel on more than one

weapon

against

humour

my opponents,”

he said. Crosbie covers the high points in

from working with Joe Clark and Brian Mulroney, to the low points such as being a minister in Smallwood’s cabinet. his career,

This former national bestseller,

life

Canada. Of course, this was Crosbie ’s trademark throughout his 28-year political career that began in 1965 when he ran for council in in

St.

“Newfie” his peers often perceived, Crosbie concedes some of his most

when

it

was published

must read

in 1997, is a

anyone interested in a completely frank look behind the closed doors of ministerial offices. Hugh Segal of The Financial Post said

it

for

“may

set the standard for

compelling and important biography” but more importantly it frank,

is

funny,

entertaining

and

like

Crosbie himself, refreshingly and tantalizingly politically incorrect.

At $20

book is a bible for and history buffs^ad millions of Canadian voters want to know how honest/huffln this

fact-seekers

our politicians really are. Five out of five rating.

Digital Edition - June 21, 1999