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— No.

3 1st Year

Whafs Nummelin wins Inside teaching award By

Brian Smiley

Maureen of

Spring means renovation time around tiie campus

of

the

the winner

Hagar

on

international

assignments to the United States, continental Europe, Africa and the

thought, ‘Oh, what’s this about?’

UK.

She also has lectured

at Wilfrid

Laurier University in Waterloo, the University of

Guelph and

Queen’s University in Kingston. In 1990

Nummelin began teach-

ing a part-time course at the col-

He came over to let me know,” Nummelin said. “It took me about

lege.

a minute and a half to figure out

she said. “I like the culture in the

what had happened.” Nummelin, who taught

The environment is a litformal (than university).” After her first year at Conestoga, gave Nummelin an opportunity to teach more.

resources

man-

from eight nominees. The others were Greg Bums, Richard Farrar, John Finlay, Steve Kroisenbmrmer, Jeanette Linton,

McLaren

Sheila

and

Peter

Sheldon.

The committee which made the decision chose the winner based on input from her colleagues, managers, support staff and cur-

and former students

rent

at the

college.

Nummelin

11

first

“I

I really liked it,”

taught

at

tle less

She pursued

management

that chance, with

the support of her colleagues, and

moved up to teaching two

or three

classes a semester.

Peter Higgins, groundskeeper at Conestoga, hopes for rain gardens on campus grow. He adds some fertil(Photo by Michelle Lehmann) izer to help them along.

Admitting that she sfruggled her first few years, Nummelin left the college in 1993

to help the

during

and began to work as a consultant once again. However, working 80hour weeks and travelling four days out of five began to wear on

College pursues

her.

Conestoga in 1990. She had previously held senior

found that

college.

strategic

courses this year, was chosen

PAGE

nies she travelled

Conestoga College President John Tibbits informed Nummelin the last week of April that she had won. “I was sitting in my office and John came around the comer and

human

Just say no to the diet

like ICI and BF Goodrich Canada Inc. While working for these compa-

Distinguished Teaching Award.

I

PAGET

is

Aubrey

1999

the

May flowers

nationals

Nummelin

school of business

“I

was

really missing the teach-

FM

ing and students,” she said.

No magic

see

positions with Fortune 100 multi-

. . .

Page 2

By Brian

More cash

StarW^ps - the

of

should be seeing some serious

cash

come

their

way according

PAGE

Eves’s

12

by

Pase 4

update and

The expansion

is

the

tion,

of the

OAC

would

“ba^ boom While

.

.?

»

r

*

t

I

J t

:

(

I

i

I

;

I

1

it is

A

air

decision

June or

campus station could by spring of 2000. is

not expected until

be for the

stu-

we

actually like to have the

students (in communications) set

up

from

to teach other students

the college or any volunteers

how

to participate.”

July.

Broadcasting

“It will certainly

dents in communications, but

and journalism

He added that it would be a great for students who have never

thought about getting into com-

munications

expand

Waterloo and an engineering and

expected to help with alternate

selves with

neces-

science rehabilitation program at

programming.

exactly

College,

According

to

centre

a

for

Hamilton.

The

Dr.

Howard

MHz

Rundle, president of Fanshawe .

College, the

money

.

in

McMaster University

year of high

known

instructional

be on the

know

about volunteer positions.

career training and volunteers are

echo” children. not yet

the

cent of the content as part of their

school as well as the so-called

midst of tragedy

for

environmental and information technologies at the University of

sary because of expected enrol-

in

Centre

Communications Studies, says Spoke and posters around campus

way

ment increases caused by elimina-

Kindness

John, vice-president of

students will produce about 60 per

ary institutions $742 million more

facilities.

St.

1998, and if granted, a non-profit

Durham

Conestoga College’s president,

this year to

hearing in

Pat

Conestoga’s

they will use their share.

be divided

will

excellence in manufacturing at

outlines plans to give post-second-

COMMEMAPY

CRTC

FM radio

between colleges and universities, some have already planned how

money

University of Toronto, a centre for

positively

new

will be used to let everyone

the

announced a new centre for information technology at the

May 4 pre-election budget.

The budget, greeted

for a

a step clos-

Vancouver.

ter

Ontario Finance Minister Ernie

anticipation

hope

station, after a

In the budget the finance minis-

to

its

is

The college made a request to Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications and Commission (CRTC) in June of

how

Ontario’s colleges and universi-

Lake Erie and north about two

Gail

Conestoga College

Ontario’s colleges By Brad Dugard

radio licence hours, past Fergus.

for

er to

ties

18

is

a good

first

;step but is not enough.

see Cash

. .

Page 2

them-

express ideas.

Communication students be located

on the dial, from the Global

at 88.3

will transmit

TV

tower in

Paris. It

.

station, to

to

program

will reach about halfway to

Toronto and London, south over

will

influence the station’s content,

John

said.

soliciting

ideas

“We their

St.

will be openly

thoughts

and

on new programs and con-

cepts.”

see

CRTC

. .

.Page 2


— SPOKK, May

Pane 2

17,

1999

NEWS No magic

teaching

Cash

pill

says award winner

Continued from page one

Contifiuedjrom page one

distiguishes

other awards

She returned for good in 1995 and holds a cross appointment

management

as a professor in "Shidies

tot for

and program co-ordinaone of Ontario’s first

^intermediate level post-gradu-

programs

ate

sents a

is that

repre-

it

body of work,” she

consults and travels

Mimmu

renew her

to

business contacts. ‘

dents wrote letters to the

com-

mittee supporting her nomina-

1

have the

As

for teaching techniques,

and

connect

students

with

no

is

teaching techniques;

Kd

I

worth

tliL

nomiintioii itsUi

almost

much

as

to

winning,” she said. “1

is

as

know

about fi\e of tlu Light (nominees) and they are people 1

admire and tlsplU

really

I

what

I

1

was a

good

rences, such as writing a

do

1T> to

was not

I

very good think

what

cial

would ha\ c

said,

go

are right

quoting from the

we

were accepted

Indicator

that

we are doing some expansion now in Waterloo, but we feel we could expand much beyond that if we had the technology,

By Brian

a realny.

Area radio stations, government and politicians are among groups supporting Conestoga officials

I

you were

said

College’s application to the

seems

take yon

to

The request represents one of most important steps toward valuable, practical education and

.ill

on .hme ?2 somew^i^e" 'wtlF be .:md

s,iid.

eonvocatii>n

receive

.to',

the

the'

of her stadents and

friends,

CRTC

FM radio licence.

is

vital to

students

ifront

the quality of future

entering broadcasting,

said Wolfgang Von Raesfeld, vice-

colleagues.

president and general

manager of

Maureen Nummelin, winner of 1 999 Aubrey Hagar

marks from many of the people she works with. Nummelin, a strategic planning,

we need

and expand the Tibbits

to

added

upgrade

here

facility

Doon campus,)” he

(at the

said.

in

of support

of this enhance learning

the

“The

station

will

abilities

and

without question develop stronger

management

zation

“The committee had a very

dif-

Maureen Nummelin, school of business, was the 1999 winner the Aubrey Hagar Distinguished Teaching Award.

choosing a single win-

the cities of Cambridge, Guelph,

Kitchener,

and

Waterloo

the

he said.

interpersonal

he past three years for the award.

Tambeau, who shares an office with

Nummelin,

stream of students

secs

The business teacher said

couldn’t sec this per-

steady

“She’s like a magnet to people,”

back

he said.

the

who

One word

to sec her.

won-

Nummelin has been nominated I

we

think

I

are going to

benefit,” said Tibbits.

general manager of 105.3 Kool FM/Oldies 1090 AM, in her station’s letter.

“We

believe such a

new

service,

providing hands-on training and

trained radio professionals.”

Support has also been given by the

Doon

school’s

Association

Student

President

Kjristin

ing the need to provide training in

rience

advanced communication

ble to all other colleges in the

skills

Every student would benefit from a new station and the expeit

will offer

is

incompara-

while strengthening the range of

country, he said in the

options available to students.

ter.

FM CKWR in Waterloo, said

FM

“This

allow

Conestoga

move

to

DSA

station

let-

will

College

right

the

to

in a letter that the station will pro-

front of broadcasting programs

mote

everywhere.”

diversity in

programming

as

Broadcast/radio and television co-ordinator

College

has

an

the

and this facility will only enhance that reputation,” he said.

licence,

sector,

school’s

Mike Thumell

said

his students are so excited about

excellent reputation in the broad-

of gaining the

potential

they wish they could

programming tomorrow.

start

But without a is

CRTC

June or early

until

playing the waiting

everyone

like

decision

July, Thurnell

game

just

else. “I’ve got

my

and toes crossed, so we’ll see what happens.” fingers

to decide fate of

FM

Continued from page one But first and foremost it

it

Corso used was caring. “She was the best teacher

munications,” said

St.

John,

who

artists will

A

show

and

college because she cared,” he said.

25 years of service to the indus-

case local

communications

Corso was a student of Nummclin’s for two years. Like many of his classmates, he found out that “Mo” had won at a business banquet held on April

law,

the

ethics

college

lias

a

tops

it

is

all off.”

like

dynam-

professional, enthusiastic and

interested to describe

Nummelin.

1

had

30. “I

said.

wasn’t really surprised,” he

“She docs

a lot

of work

the class and outside, as well.”

in

be featured about 40

per cent of the time.

was recognized by the Canadian

Tambeau used words ic,

999 graduate Dave

Association of BroadcavSting for

“When one of your own

recognized

1

categories other than

pop, rock and dance. Canadian

at

tough time selecting a winner and he doesn’t underestimate their job but,

that

radio plans come from

will

be used to teach students com-

Nummclin’s colleague, Paul Tambeau, wasn’t surprised by the announcement.

how they

gy and the (information technolo-

Murphy.

college’s

excellent

come

der

the quality of opera-

into the skill shortages

Region of Wa.terloo says in its let ter that granting an FM licence to Conestoga lends itself to support-

of

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

candidates,” Tibbits wrote.

.son,”

and

that are apparent here in technolo-

made up of a partnership of

CRTC

McLaren

sit

“Just the demographics and the

experience for the students, will

industry well, said Linda Benoit,

Kroisenbrunner,

has been difficull to

the potential

for dramatic expansion in this area.

eight

and Peter Sheldon.

“It

site for police

is

greatly aid in developing highly

prominence in communications has been recognized by several local radio stations and is predicted to serve the

nominees. The others were Greg Burns, Richard Farrar, Steve

the last couple of years and

and there

Canada’s Technology Triangle, an economic development organi-

The

be successful,” the notice read.

among such

training

career paths,” he said.

casting

randum to employees. “Maureen inspires her students

ner from

Tibbits said Conestoga has already

been designated as a

gy) area,

Conestoga

that

creation

“Conestoga

and labour relations teacher, was given high praise by Conestoga president John Tibbits in a memo-

ficult task

Another area on the wish list is and fire training centres.

police

tion

for future broadcasters.

receives high

Jeanette Linton, Sheila

the current graphics,

journalism and broadcasting programs.

tie that into

well as provide a training facility

Distinguished Teaching Award,

John

radio as well as doing

We

We could also upgrade machinery area even further. have a wonderful facility in

station’s letter

the

Finlay,

FM

more with

in the

98.5

Nummelin was among

the possi-

resources.

Scott Jensen, vice-president of

to

is

school could be get-

bility that the

economic development in the Golden Triangle would warrant growth (by the college.) Now, you

CHYM-FM/CKGL-AM

Gail

me 20

By Brian Smiley

resources

communications

said there

Station receives outside support

Hagar award winner praised

human

the

in

He

field.

it

plan to expand. In information

Guelph, but

release of the provin-

Key Performance

for an

family,

first

(KPI) survey results backs up

a coraniunity col-

teaching award in

feel

good

lege in Kitchener- Waterloo?’

.>,110

he

The recent

‘Do you see youraelf

m

don’t compare to tins one.

these.

lot ot

“If you’d have asked

years ago

the

opment

m Ikf life when tins

iiniL

o\ei.

“While you

a

Is

paper or a job well done on a certain consulting assignment. But. she sauf those awards

about

we

government documents.

think

f

there,”

of expansions and upgrade

list

also has plans for a major devel-

ting a

Tibbits outlined Conestoga’s wish

“There are a number of areas

don’t have any special

r\pe of work

that

think

graduate satisfaction.

lege’s proposals

up

so long. However, there

Life

I

employment and

would cost the province between $30 and $40 million.

doing the best job in

and

areas of graduate

John

president,

at

success,’

other Ontario colleges in the

all

projects, noting that if all the col-

more upbeat about

to institutions

showed

It

Conestoga College outperforming

funding

said.

don’t have any magic

teaching

During her career she has won other awards These awards were based on single occur-

capital

is

priority in expansion plans will

Nummelin s«d she his a tough lime being out of the classroom now that slies besn it

operation

government made was, ‘(The)

way.

things every single day.”

at

is

in

Conestoga are optimistic because one of the statements the

lu\e an\ magic bul-

“I don't

pills;

she was

to

preparing students for real world

After realizing she had be«ti noininated for the third \ear in

Nummelin had a chance

“We

.secret to

career.

a{!^raisc the situation

does nothing

announced funding.

her success.

lets;

for the prestigious atrar4

Tibbits,

her

all

some

in

of her leaching and coasulting

tow

This

Rundle

Conestoga’s

up-to-date with her curriculum

best of botli worlds,” she said

a

funds. only,”

tion.

However, there

honestlv let I like

1

(It)

which were cuts

past stu-

thing specific. She tries to keep

still

to address the full

Some of Nummelin ’s

Nuramelin. who has been nominated twice before for the Thi.

requirement.

and future budg-

restore previous cuts to colleges,

she said she doesn’t have any-

in

start

need

ets will

said,

resources miuiagcment.

award,

an adequate

is

it

or a “sustained pertbrmance.”

human

in

award from

this

optimism.

Tibbits’s

not enough in total but

“It is

expansions

will aid

music/interview

specialty

will be developed to talent.

try in 1997.

national bands,

About 25 per cent of airtime will be devoted to the spoken word, with a weekly news minimum of four per cent. “Block” programming will be used to

had

play various kinds of music in

bands in

bunches. At least 20 per cent will

tliat

show-

Regional and

who have never music played on the

their

radio, will get

some exposure.

“The concept is to seek out new forms of music. We will be adveron the

tising this

we

station so dial

this region undenstand

are

happy

to

do

” this


SPOKE, May

NEWS

1999

17,

— Page 3

Students designing the community By

Elizabeth Sackrider

application

the

use

to

Third-year computer program-

ming

students

analyst

sionals

strutted

aimual

the

at

demonstration day on

very simple and will walk

“It is

Also included in the group’s prowill be an application to

5.

Each presentation was the

gram

result

send reports directly to the

of a semester’s worth of work and

marshal via the Internet.

showed the community what the program graduates are capable of

Hughes.

all

Hughes and her partners were to Woodstock to install their program in early May. Winning the Canadian

applications were

travel to

designed to meet the needs of

local companies.

“This day shows the degree of professionalism of our class,” said

Arlene Hughes, a third-year com-

Arlene Hughes and Darren Tierney, winners of the ment program for the Woodstock fire department.

BFC

Industrial

Award

for their record

manage-

(Photo By Elizabeth Sacknder)

puter programming analyst stu-

Hughes Darren

and

her

Aaron

and

Tierney

Grigsby,

partners,

won the BFC

(construc-

Award for their record management program for the Woodstock fire company)

tion

Industrial

department.

“Amazing.

had a

really

good chance,”

said

Hughes. “I just wanted to have a

saw some of the

included

and a

big cry.”

Tierney said he thought the hon-

The

won

ed to something,” he

cash

award

(CIPS) Award was Alexandre Reis and Julius Avelar for their project

trio’s

employment

department.

way

a

“It’s

everything

look good on

my new

presentation,

(for us)

track

to

of a paper

instead

report,” said Lenjtaper, a fire pre-

vention officer for the Woodstock

which

over seven other groups, was

achieved through close co-operation

said.

$120

a

restunes,” said Grigsby.

our was a very rewarding experience.

Award

Industrial

certificate.

“It will

“Three years has finally amountI

Information Processing Society

created for use in the student

BFC

The

other projects and thought they

dent.

fire

save a lot of trees,” said

“It will

doing.

The computer

little

the user through,” he said.

project

May

easier

with

computer experience.

an array of profes-

their stuff for

be

to

those

for

with the Woodstock fire

“We

department.

paper

will

still

but this will

trail

keep a

make

it

and

co-operative

education centre at Conestoga College.

John

Scott,

head of the computer

programming analyst program, said judging the awards was difficult.

“This class has upheld the tradi-

easier.”

The biggest

was

priority

for

tion of exceptional work,” he said.

Walk Safe program

Students smile for the camera

take a break for

will

Security tightened at

summer semester

-

By Chadwick Severn

“A number of staff from Student work

Client Services Building

By Brian Smiley

about five years.%

The

move

and safety of students and staff at Conestoga College are the focus of a new

out to other buildings at Doon,’

closed-circuit television system

would be a good place to put cameras, but at a cost of around

security

being

implemented

campus.

at

Doon

A1 Hunter, supervisor of secu16 new cameras are being set up in locations around the campus’s A-wing.

rity services, said

“We’re trying to put the cameras in areas

of high

that are causing

The cameras

priority; areas

some concern

are set up with a

multiplexer unit, which allows security staff to monitor up to 16

The

safer, and m be safer, then certainly we’re going to try' to accomplish thal.” The other point of the system il

“Ultimately we'd like to

outside of the buildings

reality

is

for

il

it

$6,000 that will take a while to

become

ible,

a reality, hence the five-

In setting up a closed-circuit

system like

two

*

this

priorities.

One of

one there are Hunter said.

those is the student’s

“Their (students) perception is

he thing we can do their reality,”

“One of running ?

Hunter said should help cut

down on vandalism and other forms of crime. For the system to work the way it is intended it would have to accomplish two objectives. it’s

certainly going

to increase safety

on campus and

said.

“So any-

be a deterrent

that’s

going to

crime problems.”

to

some of

the

one time. It also equipped with two video

different locations at is

recording units.

The reason

for

two

VCRs

is

the

Doon

details.

He

would not be

fully

completed for

year,”

difficulties

summer

in the

it

with

is that

ed students and to

cars

their

staff

with escorts

the

in

evenings.

did not

unfortunate,” he said.

“It’s

got a late

“We

start.”

While full-time summer student hasn’t used Walk

Wendy Hoek

she

ers” near either the bookstore or

lem,” the nursing student said.

outside

room ID 17

at the

end of

“I think

it’s

“(People)

feels

still

it

a year-round prob-

stay

out later in the

the nursing wing.

summer.”

When asked how many people used the service weekly. Hunter said “dozens rather than hun-

hourly wage for each walker, plus

dreds.”

and

Doon

Walk Safe

during the sum-

will

be suspended

fall

the full-time programs

Web

site lists

and

journalism.

and winter terms only next

Part-time students take courses

throughout the year, and for

these

equipment, including rain gear radios.

new

The

DSA has

Some

they stand out more. Aside from

program is paid by the college, but Hunter

the jackets, the

does not rule out future summer service if the

demand

and maybe downgrade (during the summer months),” he said.

Hoek

said that

would be a good

idea.

Students are not the only users Safe.

Teachers

administrative staff also service,

it,

it saves one person, ” she said.

and

make use

especially

September, said Hunter.

it’s

worth

Correction It

was

incorrectly reported in

on page three of the 1999 issue, entitled at Graduates Journalism a story

es end around 10 p.m.

of Walk

is there.

something we could explore

“It’s

many class-

ordered

jackets for walkers so that

students take

place in the evenings.

of the

costs include the

“If

year.

classes

The program’s

for

Journalism will be switching to

allow security staff to watch up to 16 (Photo By Brian Smtiey) different cameras at once.

it

Nov. 25.

Safe before,

nursing, microcomputer adminis-

will

Walk

should run during the summer.

tration

multiplexer unit

confident

and 10:45 p.m. from Monday to Thursday could meet paid “walk-

Conestoga College

new

is

Safe will be ready to go by the

People leaving between .6:45 p.m.

Among

the

said.

September. Last year,

running during the summer, the

how

he

Hunter said he

start until

until the fall.

Al Hunter, supervisor of security services, explains

evening due to

few weeks,” said Allan Hunter, supervisor of security services. The Walk Safe program provid-

students at

Student

said the entire plan

the

fairly late in the

the workload at that time of the

many^tudents are here for only a

mer,

Association (DSA).

While work to install the cam-' eras has begun in the A-wing ensuring some of the 1 6 cameras will be operational during the summer, all of the cameras won’t be up and running until Hunter figures out the monetary

a

Since there are fewer full-time

so

one will record while the other may play back a previously taped sequence. Hunter said. The two monitors will be located in the security offices. The total cost of the equipment is around $9,000, Htmter said. However, the cost of this project was offset by a $3,525 donation

made by

to

smaller student population.

crime. Setting

“I’m hoping

safety.

taking a break

summer, due mainly

this

to act as a deterrent to

up the cameras in locations where they will be vis-

year plan, Htmter said.

Walk Safe will be

appear

will

in

May

10,

Banquet, that Rod Hilts graduated in 1993. The article should have said 1983. Spoke regrets the error.


— SPOKE, Mi^

4

17,

1999

Good deeds

from the ashes of evil

rise

Kindness found there

First,

was

despite

Yet,

Colorado high

ible unity

school

ties together.

shoot-

Then a socalled “copy ing.

an Alberta

in

high

Kosovo

bombings of

And

continue.

tornado

a

recently,

a

through

path

destructive

more

forged

place.

mitted by a teenager.

He

said that through

from

his son’s school

have made

divided by indifference and apa-

summons people

It

what

good and

is

to hold onto

value the

to

aftermath of this

the

in

tragedy

is

Lang has publicly

that

expressed forgiveness to the 14-

taking lives.

individual and collective lives.

his son.

For Dale Lang, the Anglican

whose son

minister in Taber, Alta.,

lov-

Perhaps the most incredible ele-

ment

thy.

more

that the school “is a

ing and positive place”.

The event

who murdered

that brought out the

was gunned down while walking

out the best in another.

er.

the hall of his high school last

minister “walking the walk” in the

We

see a

tal

then

up

designa-

this

meant

tion is to

ing.

inform the

deserve.

community Carly

Benjamin

discrimi-

nate

they

-

strike all races,

than one in 14 inmates has

a mental iUness.

do

disorders

not

More

mental

that

incomes and social

strata.

reveal the shocking one in four Canadians will suffer from a serious mental Statistics

findings:

being almost overwhelmed by people seeking to make donations.

students

The National Alliance for the Mentally 111 and Public Citizens’ Health Research Group reports 29 per cent of the nation’s jails routinely hold people with a mental illness without any criminal charges.

Severe mental illnesses are more than cancer, diabetes or

sion

in their lifetime

and 21 per cent of

hospital beds are filled

by

patients

“Severe mental illnesses are more

common

than

cancer, diabetes or heart

disease, but the nation

Statistics

in

treats

them

like

a

dirty

may have

a diagnosable mental

disorder and an estimated 7.7 to 12.8 million children suffer from

mental disorders, according to the Center for Mental Health Services,

which conducted a study

in 1993.

These youth are estimated

to

have severe emotional or behav-

1990 by the National

Institute

for Mental Health, indicated in the

U.S.about 9.1 million, or 5.1 per cent of the population, live with

Some

One in four women and one in 10 men can expect to develop depression during their lifetime. Eighty to 90 per cent of those

who

suffer

from depression can

lead

pony-tails.

am sitting on m>

poich enjoysavouring the

as the light breeze rustles

his

turquoi.se u> \ellow.

bo3^riend, John.

friend, beei.

i>.

sipping

my

spiked lemonade and Jeanette,

decide to

downing a |ump msule and i'

services covered.

blight sk>

Physical disorder coverage in the same health-care plans typically

With the porch mill bunung bnght I rejoin my friends Ail of a sudden 1 he.ir an usual buzzing Not thinking miu. h ol ii

with

70

per

cent

no

arbitrary

limits

its

focus on

mental health, will shine a light on mental disorders, and people can help those

who

suffer

these afflictions, realizing their fault at

begin to

and may

strike

anytime.

from

it is

not

anyone

“He’ll

Now to hit fairly

little

stand out right in the

middle and start belting out My Fair Lady," I said. The buzzing becomes louder and I look up. To my surpri.se, there is a huge June bug fluttering

SPOKE is mainly

take a look at w'hat

let’s

1

was preparing a glass wmdow'pane with a heavy oak branch. Not a 1

antenna and insect

moved from

the

it's

intuition,

glass

right

Jumping off the

make sure { hit it again

And

again.

OK

Llizabeth,

scream. “I just

agai

> ; itN

Jeanette

I deac

an«| Jof^

I ^ wanted to make' kire ”1

say while smiling with faction that

comes with

safi^

beatii^

the enemy.

As we rejoin our con\er»anun, hear another buzzing, tsofli' er.

An

entire

imarling

my

I

June bug a*my i I stream and

porch.

run inside.

Yeah, springtime, tihe time for June bugs. Try writing a roman poem about them

funded from September to

May by the Doon

Student Association, (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Brian Smiley;

News

Editor: Elizabeth Sackridcr;

and Activities Editor: Carly Benjamin; Student Life Editor: Wayne Collins; Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer; Production Manager: Janel Wakutz; Advertising Manager: Eileen Diniz; Circulation Manager: Chadwick Severn; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Frank and Christina Jonas; SPOKE’S address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Issues

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spokc@concstogac.on.ca

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection

or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect Submissions must not con-

MS Word file would be helpful.

tain

any libellous statements and

may be accompanied by

illustration (such as a photograph).

i

'

porch I run to escape tl» beetle's wTatb of fli^puig wings. Now jt was vdi between the lime bug and I Climbing back onto tto jporc find Hiy enemy has lande^on i cement. Taking one sbaqf-^wi swash the menace. Ar^ just

already!”

my

hope May, with

start to

dimmed

tell my fiKiKls about neighbour who likes to sing" while raking his lawn. I

to

care. I

1

I

to

sUirted

w indow.

towards' my face.

my hair and the twilight sky fades

as 100 per cent of costs!

tscanch. iuul

across.

switch on the outside light as the

from

largio~.Ac(se<

good idea to say the least. However, the June bug, with

My

much

It landed on the glass window of the aluminum door. With murder on my mind, J picked up a

about spring is ilic forsaken mother of all bugs. The June bug. The largest bug 1 have ever had the displeasure of stumbling

on co-payments and the type and amount of

as

nothing

than the

just started to do.

liom

covers

is

life

dreaded June bug. When I was little they use to tangle their copper-plated bodies in ray blonde

lyrics

spring, living one ol those nice

restrictions

my

in

windows and llasli from the chrome on cars. What nobody evci mentions

million experience bipolar disor-

more

head, ’fhere

Straight for the

poems

ly

my

porch railings and Indro wires. Golden ray.s of sun bounce off

I

the

ruin spring

more feared

ing a beer and

3.9 million have obsessive

will

ness of tragedy.

neiu"

and

compulsive disorder; two million have schizophrenia; 2.4 million have panic disorder and two

lit-

That concept seems unjust in a nation where we have the facilities to accommodate and properly deal with such individuals. Depression can appear at any age and is one of the most common and treatable illnesses.

children/adolescents

from a report released

health-care plans cover mental disorders with significant-

of Mental Health. Preliminary studies indicate that five

it

life.

Most

tle secret.”

in

from depresconsumes their

suffer

neither

I scream a.s the hovering mass of body, legs and wings swoop

all

bursting fiotn the tree branches. The birds twerp their little songs from die

ders.

with mental illness, the leading reason for hospital admissions, according to the National Institute

one

before

so

are

major depression.

heart disease, but the nation treats

them like a dirty little secret. Twenty per cent of families are affected by severe mental illness

receive treatment

benefit.

who

t)r

again,

goodness of ordinary people. Kindness pushes back the dark-

near the bulb.

you to believe. The luscious emerald buds

The schools should implement more awareness programs or campus help groups to accommodate the large number of

disorder in their lifetime.

common

some

materials.

Charity groups have reported

would

derive

and

These goods include

effort.

rhyming

Instead of shunning these innocent victims they should 'be treated with the dignity they

month

there will be

and other

ing $300,000 to help aid the clean-

nets

all

can only hope and pray that when our own lives are touched by

clothing, shoes, clean-up supplies

total-

the pretty son-

interfere with their daily function-

evil.

We

mourn with us and to help us get back on our feet again. Murders will happen. Mother Nature will always keep us wary, and wars may never cease, but

of three truckloads of goods

alive

health

out of the ashes of

some kind of tragedy,

June bugs

be effectively treated and nearly

who

has

Spring IS the best time to be

ioural problems that significantly

people

community

still

even the worst

people around to comfort us, to

four Canadians wiii suffer from iiiness

men-

is

And once

begun.

and generosity

that

World Vision has already organized the collection and shipment

Severe mental disorders more common than cancer May

named “Tornado

and

exist,

responded with open arms.

worst in one person also brought

time, changing their worlds forev-

gives us hope that good-

It

events can’t stop good from rising

the

him

place.

this,

a better

like

after a devastating tornado ripped

again,

com-

hear reports like

world seems

ness, kindness

has

call for

When we the

Oklahoma, the overwhelming task of cleaning up

Valley”

wake up

in

com-

in

teachers and school staff have told

somehow

events

year-old teenager

One in

Meanwhile

through the aptly

with those they bullied

things in life that safeguard our

Events like these interrupt the

students

only days before. Also students,

Oklahoma destroying homes and

routine of everyone involved for a

it,

most trying of circumstances,

friends

munities, both local and global,

NATO

the face of a hideous crime

often have the reverse effect of

serve as a

the

Atlantic, the

community

month, the traumatic event has helped to make the world a better

bringing people together.

Destructive

school.

Across

which draws communiThe very events that

threaten to destroy a

shooting

cat”

inevitable

the

despair there also rises an incred-

the

midst of tragedies

in

an


SPOKE, May

NEWS

Ginger Dargo, account-

Julie Karn,

ing graduate.

management

Andrew

second-year

CPA

Fritsch,

Ron

Peters,

John

third-year

woodworking.

graduate.

studies.

second-

Bald,

year computer program

1999

17,

— Page 5

Wendy

Spiegelberg,

paramedic

faculty,

analyst.

Students debate future campus renovations story and Photos By Janet Wakutz

Ginger Dorgo, an accounting graduate, said they

money should be

like to see

directed toward

“We

things which directly affect students.

Ontario colleges and universities will

“I think (the

money) should go towards

receive

$750 million from the provincial government to build and renovate facilities

teachers and improving labs,” she said.

to get ready for increased enrolment.

student, said she feels that should take pri-

According to an

article in the

Toronto Star

May 5, enrolment in post-secondary institutions is expected to increase after the elimi-

ities

and

already have good labs and the facil-

Fritsch, another

would

computers

Chris Taylor, a third-year woodworking student, said the existing facilities should

be

Kam, who just completed her second

woodworking centre, we have a needs to be repaired and that would benefit us more than having additions,” he said.

areas other than building and construction.

year of management studies, said she would

However, Taylor’s classmate, Ron Peters,

Julie

attention.

industry

way technology and

growing there

is

is

a need for

the

more

computers and lab time so to house that ings,” said Bald.

used offsetting teacher cutbacks and making smaller class sizes,” she said.

need

kind of equipment, you need bigger build-

lyst grad, agrees.

could be better

student,

improved.

Of 14* students randomly surveyed at the Doon campus of the college May 5, most said the money could be better spent in

it

CPA

said the physical facilities of the college

“I think with the

nation of Grade 13 in 2003.

“I think

students.

both in programs and Mcensing.

can’t even afford an education,” she said.

ana-

when Grade 13 is cut the college would need more space to house the extra said

John Bald, a second-year

CPA grad,

like to see the college invest in

“Some people

Mary Mansour, a computer program

into job creation

here are good,” she said.

Andrew

Jennifer Schortt, a first-semester nursing

ority over the building itself.

money go

reducing tuition and textbook costs.

“In the

lot

that

Wendy

Spiegelberg, paramedic

faculty,

said there needs to be funds allocated for

construction growth and that the funding

is

a good idea.

College^ assisting

enrolment

food bank

amounts to approximately

this

$40,000

in funding.

While the enrolment figures for

By Charles Kuepfer

Key surveys

Conestoga College has joined forces with the Waterloo Region

tration

Food Bank

ing

food

to help

bank’s

operate the

new Community

Food Enterprises program. The college has donated the use of

its

is

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

providing

from the food and beverage management program. The new program is designed to

training

offer willing participants support

and training

in the specialty

industry, said

food

Elba Martell, com-

munity development co-ordinator for

Elba Martell, community development co-ordinator for the Waterloo Region Food Bank, explains the ties that Conestoga College has forged with the food bank.

kitchen facilities at the

Waterloo campus and

the Waterloo

Region Food

Bank.

development programs, which the Food Bank began to implement in 1990. This

new program was

start-

ed to help low-income famihes in the region start their

own

busi-

nesses.

developed and tried by the

poverty (and) earn

move

out of

some money,”

partici-

They

are also trying to contact a

pating group.

business to help with packaging.

The food bank approached Beth Esemberg, co-ordinator of the food and beverage management

members of

program, with the idea. Martell said Esemberg has also

been very helpful.

al,”

said Martell, “

The food bank

And

propos-

she gave

chef

currently has one

from Kitchener and

at the college is training

the group

and they

area,

who

are

going through the program. They are considered the pilot project, said there are

two

interested in start-

community,

bringing

are living in poverty right

now.

Hopefully,

the

numbers

certainly

bode well

the use of the

Technology of Ontario placed Conestoga College ahead of

kitchen for now, but Martell said

every other community college

campus has halted will

back

be

again

in

September. “I think

energy to

in the province in the categories

of graduation placement and

it

this college.

will attract a higher

calibre of applicants. Hopefully,

we

will give a lot of

graduate satisfaction.

will attract the attention of the

an excellent college

He

we

also said the results

have,”

make a

good tool for the college to use to promote itself, pointing out the results are already posted on the Web site and on the college’s sign on Homer Watson Boulevard. “We are looking for ways to

this idea,” said Martell,

Intended to provide third-party

of the community food enterprises

ratings of colleges, the survey

apply the benefits of the survey

program.

Conestoga had a graduate placement rate of 94 per cent and a graduate satisfac-

results within

found

Another part

community program is mar-

to the

food enterprises research.

Martell

said they

that

tion rate of

The

76 per

cent.

provincial government’s

funding formula will take into consideration the survey results

research, and they are thinking of

when they

group has drawn up a business

approaching Conestoga College’s

Ontario’s colleges.

plan with help from a mentor from

Bbusiness program.

per cent of the budgets

“I see a lot

of opportunities for

their business partner, they plan

partnership between

helpful in providing a licensed

turning ground venison into veni-

and the food bank

kitchen where recipes

son pies and selling them.

market research.”

can be

will encourage

dents completed the surveys, but

students help with ongoing market

With help from on

it

people to apply to

University with the idea of having

the community.

She said the college has been

“Hopefully,

to the school befoie college stu-

said Sawicki.

who

use

most high school

said the survey results

would eventually have a positive effect on enrolment numbers.

Colleges of Applied Arts and

resources together to help people

tries to

college, said

registrar for the

lic affairs,

said Martell.

these

program

Fred Harris,

John Sawicki, manager of pub-

busy putting

still

the positive results to good use.

received from Conestoga College,

have approached Wilfrid Laurier

said the

marketers are

keters are not putting the statistics to use.

it

ket

She

upcom-

does

mar-

business community to see what

the help they have

all

The group is matched with a community business partner who has a wild game farm and sells the meat to various businesses. The

the resources that are already in a

the

results, this

that Conestoga’s

The survey results released last month by the Association of

appreciate

ing.

said Martell.

ftjr

semester. Conestoga’s

by the

mean

for the future of Conestoga.

they

group, consisting of five families

more groups

A

Construction at the Waterloo first

us a lot of input.”

but Martell

“People need to

numbers

fall

affected

not

students had their applications in

“She reviewed the

The program moves a step beyond the other community

have an impact on regis-

will not

next year will not be noticeably

Conestoga

in the area of

designating grants to

About two

may

be

aflEected

by

the

time in the school year

first

the KPI’s results for

2(XK)-2001. In Conestoga’s case

our current com-

munications,”

said

Sawicki.

‘Twenty-seven thousand cars per day see the sign out front (of the college) and we incur no cost for the advertising.”

As

for other areas that will

affected

by

be

the results, Sawicki

employees are on the right track, as shown by the survey’s results, said the college’s

clearly

but that everyone ted to trying to

is still commitdo things better.


.

— SPOKE, May

Page 6

17,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Communications students By Wayne

buiid better ciock

Collins

aged and

may

this

affect proper

data input.

Two of Conestoga

The telecom

College’s

telecommunications

third-year

have invented a new

students

security

guards into the

magnetic

Tom

and

proto-

waterproof

also

this

next millenium.

Fernandes

students’

is

and shockproof, has overcome flaw by using an infrared scanning technique. Electro-

gadget they hope will put the college’s

which

type,

transformers

the

in

Malnar have just completed the

handheld unit power up the wallmounted unit and send out a fre-

prototype for a futuristic version

quency-modulated

of the original Detex mechanical

which stores the data on a

Carlos

the

memory

actually going to do

“it’s like

said

control.”

watchman’s

which

clock,

guards have used for years.

“We were something

we found

Malnar, “but then

was looking

system

(to

replace

using a television remote

out

Both students said the only

for such a

obstacle they encountered during

Detex

the

the project

clock).”

The

students’ original idea, said

was

selecting an inad-

memory

equate

chip. After

150

scans the information had to be

Fernandes, was to produce a clock

downloaded

for police.

because the chip was

on bikes and

“If police were

tiny

chip.

“(Essentially),” said Fernandes,

different,”

security

code,

digital

computer,

a

to

full.

they pulled someone over, they

“(Hunter) wanted to leave it on from a Friday to a Sunday, which

could swipe a licence to get infor-

meant about 300 scans,”

mation,”

“We

Fernandes,

said

kind of catered

memory chip

to security

this

here.”

record the

is

the Detex clock’s

made from

recording

the type

by

key,

on

Each key embosses a num-

inside.

ber on the paper record and a tale detector

Carlos Fernandes

tell-

punches a hole in the

paper every time the clock is opened and closed. This detects or prevents any tampering.

telecom project while waiting for Al (Photo by Wayne Coiiins)

10-pound Detex clock with them

computer and get a printout of the

quite a bit

when

guards’ activities.

possibly, less reliable.

Bob Coons, the telecom program co-ordinator, said aside

own

they’re doing rounds,” said

Himter,

who had asked

the stu-

dents for a written proposal on the project.

Hunter said he

is

interested in

new system. He make the security jobs more efficient

exploring the

said the old

guards’

is

their third-year

somewhat imgainly.

it

will

because they

“(Guards) won’t be carrying a

to

doesn’t) have

(it

be downloaded for a month.”

Hunter said the new unit would

when when a round was started and when a parrecord information such as

expects

services,

and Tom Malnar work on

Hunter’s decision on a proposal they submitted last week.

A1 Himter, head of Conestoga’s security

(left)

direct

impression on the paper time dial

clock

now that can hold

in

5,000 scans, so

Essentially,

said

Malnar. “We’re going to put a

will, then,

download data

be able to

directly into

a

from the imminent approval of insurance companies, the bottom

and,

Fernandes and Malnar said their

similar

commercial equipment,” Coons said, adding that some of the commercial stuff out there is

ticular

to go,”

for the wall moimts.

that

finished product

Another drawback to other mod-

way cheaper than

the guards start work,

would cost $7 for the han&eld units, and $60

line is cost. “It’s

more expensive

els,

said Coons,

magnet-

is their

ized swiping systems, which use

Coons said dirty or dam-

door was

“This

is

a

checked.

last

much

preferred route

Hunter said. “I’m hoping works out.” Meanwhile, the students said it

they are busy whittling the hand-

held unit

down

to a cell

phone

unreliable data strips.

size while awaiting Hunter’s final

the strips could get

decision.

Graphics students snap up design and photo awards By Angela They

slave

The United Way of Cambridge and North Dumfries. The task was

Clayfield

away

all

first year,

drawing everything by hand.

It’s

the hardest part in reaching thengoal, but

when

they get recogni-

tion for their work,

worth

it

all

seems

Heather

Miehm and Mark

Pioch

both having finished their

first

year of graphic design and advertising,

have done very well as far

as competitions go.

Miehm was awarded $500

for

will receive her

on May 3 1 Pioch was awarded a free four-

He

contrast.

says this

is

shown

amalgamation of Galt, Preston and Hespeler into the city of

day

actually rushing.

Cambridge.

class trip during reading week.

to create a poster celebrating the

She will receive $300 of the

The United Way

$150 and $50

will get

go towards a Applied Arts magwill

subscription to azine.

.

is

Miehm’s second win,

won $50

for Skills Still,

trip to

Antwerp, Belgium, for

a photo he took in

New York

The photo of pedestrian

traffic

taken at Grand Central Station called Standstill

the

and won

as

for designing a pin

is

silver in

Agfa Young Creatives Contest

Canada

this February.

she says, this win

is

just as

prize

includes an

and his work Agfa’s

Web

will

site,

standing

on a

1999. In addition to the trip his

This she

designing a winning poster for

Miehm

because some people appear to be

prize.

it.

exciting.

prize at a banquet

Agfa scaimer

be displayed on

www.agfa.com.

The theme of Pioch ’s photo

still

when everyone

is

wants to do some backpacking while he has the chance. In addition to the experience and the free

Pioch’s photo beat 2,500 entries

from around the world and was judged by a panel of design and photography experts. Recipients will spend one day

trip,

Pioch says

an opportunity

although

it

it,

taking photographs

Canada

throughout

mer. However, the

Bel-

gium

in preparation

poster

for

designing

“that’s

a

me

maga-

the lifestyle

ceremony

does and what makes

happy,”

As

and

sum-

this

she

says.

is

the

as

far

future

an official awards

concerned,

neither student has

a

decided what they

public relations pro-

want because there

gram on

are

the

last

day.

This

is

his

learn.

first

says neither he nor

$500 winner Heather Miehm

his parents believed

(Photo by Angela Clayfield)

it

hard to describe,” he says

talking

how

about

makes him

feel.

“It’s

the

award

the biggest

thing ever.”

Both students are planning to the most of their prizes.

make

Miehm

says she will probably

invest the

money she

while Pioch his trip

is

hoping to extend

and stay

more than four

receives,

in

days.

would

like to

lot

of

they need to

Miehm

says

she would like to

work

for a firm in

New York. Pioch

at first. “It’s

a

still

skills

major win and he

(Photo by Angela ciayfieid)

name on

will be used across

There will also be

entries from around the world to take silver prize in

out

Unfortunately for Miehm, her pin doesn’t have her

zine Ad! diet.

Mark Pioch’s photograph Standstill beat 2,500 the Agfa Young Creatives Contest 1 999.

name

before the public.

booklet insert for is

this is also

to get his

work

says

he

for a design

firm in Toronto, but his current goal

is

says

it’s

to finish his first year.

Miehm in is

He

the hardest one.

says everything handed

done by hand

but the hard work

in the first year

is

worth

it

in the

end.

“I’m very proud to be in

it

Europe for

(graphic design and advertising),”

He

Miehm

says he

says.


.

STUDENT

new

Students offered By Wayne

SPOKE, May

LIFE

— Page 7

1999

17,

career connection

Collins

ly located across the street, in the

Market Square building’s baseStudents searching for jobs or

ment.

summer employment should know

“We

Kitchener- Waterloo Career

that

(KWCC)

Connections

opened

May

officially

be ridiculous,” she

doors in Kitchener on

its

The new employment 165 King St.

office,

E, has

been operating since the middle of March, but Lil Premsukh Singh

was

said the grand opening ly at

p.m.

1

May

Under

actual-

7.

who

equipped with the

Human

Resources

eral is

is

the

Centre

Summer

Students and

grams,

mer

new home of

the

for

listings and many areas, from unskilled labour to profes-

ment

funded jointly by the fedIt

sional fields, are included.

the result of a partnership initia-

by Human Resources Canada, the Lutherwood Community Development Association, tive

Conestoga College and Waterloo

Region

district

began in early

1998,” said Singh.

workers on hand to conduct various workshops on ing, plus

K-W

Career Connections, May

resume

writ-

job searching and

inter-

Photocopying and will also be

viewing

skills.

faxing

services

offered to students.

“We

7.

(photo by Anna sajfert)

no age

limit,” said

Singh, “as long as you’re a student

computers have been

Jason Hankins, co-ordinator of

technology

for

Lutherwood’s

Community

Opportunities

Development

said

the

up with

set

Internet access to job banks

and

grams on the new computers, including one that’s tailored for resume writing.

“Some of

general Microsoft Office programs.

“We have

going back to school.” information

(CODA),

Association

serve youth, from ages lb-

24, but there’s

have eight support

will

opening of

the latest software that

anyone in industry is using,” Hankins said. “These are state-of-

said,

it’s

defi-

Centre for Students was previous-

buildings.

happy

in

By Angela Clayfield

about to retire as a

worker at the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation

officer

at

recreation centre, employees

.

,

unappre-

is

Rodeway three

years ago as an assistant manager,

location before

the retirees that leave us,” Perkins

plans

“(The college) will never

Nelson Harrison, maintenance worker

Harrison said he started working for the college as part of the clean-

at Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, paints the outside of the building as part of his

spring painting project on

Wednesday

witnessed the construction of the

work with and a nice experience,”

recreation centre in January 1980.

he

Now, almost 20 years

moment around

he

is

said.

“There’s never a dull

what makes

goes so

65th birthday in November.

the job so interesting.”

fast

and

The time

here.

preparing for retirement on his

to

(Photo by Andrea Jesson)

that’s

Perkins said Harrison

is

As

to

stay

here

for

quite

some

time.

a role

jan Zylstra

deal

my

their

According to Zylstra, managing because

it

Suites is a great job

He

always changes.

does an excellent job and even

the regular school year and he

from snow removal

tries to

young

to

Harrison said. ‘This job

is

entire soccer field.

retire,

the recreation centre

almost

for

family to me.”

he

Over the years, he

said,

he has

seen a lot of changes on campus

and has made a

lot

of

Mends

as

well as enemies, but he will miss the job “It’s

He

to.

and the people.

a good job, nice people to

said while

is

preparing

summer camps and programs is

always busy and

is

currently

spring painting the outside of the

My job

is

whatever needs to be

done,” he said. “If anybody asks

me

to

lem.”

“He

do a

job, there’s

no prob-

plans after retiring

It)ut

will

be missed in

much

return.

one of

older than

"^e

26-year-old says he under-

stands

what students go through.

Being close in age also helps when

own memories

Zylstra says there

minor damage year

because

room

rates

He

relies

on

of staying in

his

resi-

to the

was only rooms diis

when the students left for the

summer, consisting mostly of wear and tear and a few broken lampshades. Overall, he says, the students are

nice to have around. Zylstra says the hotel

ready

planning events.

According to Perkins, Harrison

summer. is

them, he says. ,

miss his job. will also

he’s not too

doesn’t put on a

phoney front”

many

in the

the fun parts of his job because

son I’ve known in a long time,”

Harrison said he doeS not have

building.

a hotel

Being around students

“He’s the most trustworthy perPerkins said.

be around students during

gets to run

the process.

still

good

are cheaper than the guest’s.

ation centre consists of an)dhing

because his age forces him

he

living

are

getting a

this location for

Rodeway

in

but

dents

'

him and he

money

is

for

says the 10 stu-

Jq|j

gets to

save the college

first

The meal

there

life.”

far as maintaining the

Rodeway’s

which includes offering a

hotel,

the fun part of the

grounds, Perkins said Harrison

to cutting the

the

guests

Harrison’s job around the recre-

leaving

May 6 was

Being around students jg

to

night being fully operational as a

strictly

‘Tm

the rest of

now

knows how

run a building.

he

says

MsjxHn^yat

model around the recreation centre and he has never in his life seen a man work as hard as Harrison works.

really

continental breakfast.

However, he said his years on campus have not yet caught up to only

of Guelph.

ing in hotels for three years

going to be with

December 1972 and

later,

coming back

Kitchener as general manager.

He

replace a person like Nelson.”

at the University

merce degree. He has been work-

the college they fail to recognize

too

Kitchener

Jan Zylstra, the

new general manager at Rodeway Zylstra started at

at

“People are so tied up in their

“I’m

Verhulst at 744-8151.

and says he

own problems and changes around

is

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday; its doors remain open until 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. Anyone needing more information can contact Singh or Kathryn

management and graduated with

then transferred to a different

ing crew in

K-W Career Connections is open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday,

honours and a bachelor of com-

is

work

ciative.

said.

help

a mce place

too, according to

the

one job, but

times the workplace

we

is,

to visit and a nice 'place to live

Waterloo region

According to Doug Perkins, ath-

at

fine

people get jobs,” said Singh.

Zylstra studied hotel and food

Centre.

all their lives

initiatives.

dence

maintenance

equipment

sidy programs

snow to Nelson

thing from shovelling

letic

on wage suband government

receive information

Rodeway manager

After 27 years of doing every-

is

Hankins

change from the past.” Singh said the Human Resources

By Andrea Jesson

Harrison

stuff,”

school or at home, but

the-art machines.”

Hankins pointed out several pro-

this

“they’re already using in

nitely a big

Maintenance man goes unnoticed

painting

job postings, employers will also

“The bottom

“Discussions between the organ-

KWCC

Besides being offered free onhne

Cutting the ribbon - (From left) Wayne Wettlaufer, MPP for Kitchener, Dieter Kays, CEO of Lutherwood, Doris McGillvary, Ministry of Education and Training, Sharri Joiner, manager of adjustment services at Human Resources Canada and Karen Redman, MP for Kitchener, mark the grand

school board.

izations actually

offices.

Hankins said the KWCC’s job board displays the latest employ-

Jobs pro-

and provincial governments.

total

of 10 people from the various for-

resource centre’s co-ordinator.

KWCC,

computer

latest

technology and staffed by a

new

the

is

new arrangement,

this

employment agencies are combined under one roof, several

students in here since last week,”

Singh,

said.

ment.

“We’ve already had about 500 said

used to

it

According to Singh, students would get confused as to which office they should go to get help in finding jobs or summer employ-

7.

located at

Summer

(ran) the Ontario

Jobs program there and

the

fcff

season

busiest

they’re off to a

smooth-running

“The toes,”

staff

he

now

is

what he presets to be :

And

first

was

says.

^ yet,

gooiHt*^ really

'

on

their


— SPOKE, May

Pago 8

17,

1999

STUDENT

Fewer students

LIFE

summer

in

Spring spruce up

resuits in shorter library hours By Adam Wilson When May comes

enough students ing open later. to

Conestoga

summer semester begins, the halls become empty and the students become scarce. This is why the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) shortens College, and the

it

much

to

isn’t

May staff

until

do

in the

like there

LRC

from

August, Douglas said

keeps busy by getting ready

for the fall semester

are

more

when

there

students.

Douglas, the centre’s co-ordi-

Jill

nator, said the

taken into

number of students consideration when

May

hours are set for

the

to

August.

“We talk

to faculty that

dents during the figure

to

have

summer and

talk to faculty that

try to figure

out from there what

hours

will suit their

Centre talk to the faculty of sum-

for all of

Ontario colleges,” said Douglas.

Also during the summer hours,

Jill

which

Douglas

LRC co-ordinator

days they have later classes or

when

“They do bulk orders

the learning resource centres in

LRC

needs.”

students and find out

the

process them.”

Staff at the Learning Resource

mer

with

placed

“They catalogue them and we

out from there what

Douglas.

are

Centennial College.

have students during the

summer and

hours will suit their needs,” said

Staff

and students can recommend books to the LRC and if there is a great enough demand, and the budget allows it, the book will be ordered and on the shelf Douglas said most of the books orders

“We

are ordered to support

student and faculty needs.

Bibliocentre in Toronto located at

stu-

try

said Douglas.

The books

may seem

hours for the summer.

itc

is

Although

to warrant stay-

staff take

time to catalogue

and process all of the books and magazines that had been donated during the course of the year and have them ready for the fall.

Doon Campus.

ing at

{Photo by Andrea JessoR}

-

they are done classes and

base their hours around what the

“We’re

students’ schedules look like.

During will be

May and

June the

open from 8 a.m.

LRC

until

4

p.m. on Monday, Thursday and

and

Friday

5

p.m.

July to Sept. 3, the

LRC

8

a.m.

to

Tuesday and Wednesday.

From

change its hours and be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday. The LRC will not be open on weekends or nights during the summer because there aren’t

will

doing

more

of

the

International student population

behind-the-scenes jobs,” she said.

The

full-time staff of 13 people

busy processing and cataloguing books over the summer. The LRC also takes time to order all of the new books they will need is

for the fall semester during the

on the

By John Oberholtzer

tionships with various schools in

Japan,

The number of

international

summer months.

students

“We’re hoping to receive the material and have it ready for the

College has increased in the last three

shelves by the end of the summer,”

director

Conestoga

attending

years,

of

according to the International

the

Larry Rechsteiner says the col-

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

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$8.00/hr. plus gratuities

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info pack, Toll free:

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Fax: (519) 884-9071

including

Japan College of Foreign Languages in the

Tokyo.

about 250,000 part-time students

study

“Students do the their training (at

we

Nova Academy of Japan. The Academy, through which

leg

first

of

home) and then

anticipate they’ll be able to go

various languages at approximately 200 schools throughout Japan, regularly sends

groups of 12 students to the

directly into post-secondary pro-

campus

grams here,” he

language instruction.

says.

Doon

two weeks of English

for

more aggressive recruiting policy and he expects more than 100 foreign

important to

students will be enrolled at the

coimections with agencies and

and Japan are the two countries

beginning of the upcoming

schools, but also to attend educa-

with the most students in the

lege has adopted a

semester,

compared

to

fall

49 in

have

Rechsteiner other

om

key selected

representatives in different coun-

said

also

it

is

make regular trips to countries not only to make

tion fairs.

He

September 1998.

“We now

Must be able to work a variety of hours Send resume to: Joanne Gagne 1 39 Father David Bauer

Conestoga College

rise at

Education Office.

(or

Robert Santos, a maintenance worker for the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, cuts the grass outside the build-

example of Japan, where every fall the Canadian Embassy co-ordinates an event where representatives from unisites the

Five such groups are slated to

come The

summer. Rechsteiner said he is proud of the goodwill

shown by at

provide information about their

25

respective institutions.

try.

the world.

One of the major

lenges he faces

is

chal-

getting the

appropriate information to credible agencies.

guage schools and high schools from all over Canada come to

“It’s sort

of waving the corpo-

rate flag to say that

Conestoga

College exists,” he says.

Rechsteiner

said

he

three Chinese students

an orientation meeting on

find a school in another part of

colleges, English lan-

versities,

Kitchener this summer.

particularly

and they are begiiming to refer students to us,” he says. Rechsteiner uses Japan as an example of a country where most students use an agency in order to tries

to

People’s Republic of China

He asked

also

who

arrived

to stand

up and

the three,

two months ago,

introduce themselves to the other

who had just

entered the coun-

“One of them

said,

‘I

know

quite a bit about the buses and the

college (and) is

May

3.

way

I

In addition to the agencies, the

pleased with the association the

“That

college has also developed rela-

college has developed with the

day.”

can,”’

I

will help

you any-

Rechsteiner says.

set the tone for the entire

Got the munchies?

A

promotional jeep for

Humpty Dumpty

circles the

Doon Campus on May 7. (Photo by John Oberhottzer)


.

STUDENT

Law

clerks prepare

SPOKE, May

LIFE

— Page 9

1999

17,

i

for final verdict I

By John Oberholtzer

"Some of the

students arc tak-

ing this coutse along with the

When

comes

it

to mastering

the intnciiues ol legal system,

education

tlie

Cdiidciian

some continuing hope the

students

three

companion courses door to

their fool in the (rf work,”

Boidh

to get

this kind

says.

Litigation, corporate

'

law and

I

phrase “I fouglU the law and

tlic

law won” doesn't apply to them Students

enrolled

classes ofl'ered I

Law

night

in

by tlie

Institute

of

Clerks of Ontario (ILCO)

are currently winding

down

their

studies widi final exams.

A Waterloo lawyer who teaches for

law

clerks

law arc the other

estate

on

in conjunction with 19

nity

commu-

throughout

colleges

the

i

I

tlicsc clas.scs difl'er

from other continuing education programs oifered at Conestoga College-

of the

“All

these tcchnJcid-orientcd courses

and they’re marked

are not necessarily for the gener-

Toronto, so the

it

Monica Himmelman of Alumni Services Conestoga College’s alumni magazine.

currently producing the next issue of Connections,

is

(Photo by Janet wakutz)

Conestoga’s alumni officer keeps graduates connected

Institute

courses arc 100 per cent finals

puMic.

'

The courses run Irom ' Septesmber to May.

province.

Thursday nights explains that

al

l

courses otfered by the institute

Boich says

Enhancing Education estates

real

ceiurally in

takes awhile for

students to find out their

“Thty’rc courses that Ibcos on the practicalities ic

of dpii^ specif-

types of law office vw>rk ” says

Jeff Boich.

.“It’s

importai^ that

Enhancing

By JanetWakutz

Skills

According

to

The

Criude for 1LC(J SluJciils, the

the students learn the ptoper

institute’s

to

way out forms and have good

the education and skills of law

background knowledge so

clerks already in the profession

fill

legal

(they) understand

what

(they’re)

doing.”

mandate

is

to

enhance

and c.xpand the knowledge of

Being laid off from her social

'

!

I

experienced legal secretaries.

The

on what happens if someone doesn’t have a will and the admiiiistration of the estate after someone dies. The majority of the students are working in law firms already and they’re taking these classes to upgrade or develop new skills estates course focuses

within their jobs, says Boich.

But there

are

some people who ^

are looking to switch careers.

It

also pro\ides the basic aca-

demic foundation needed for people with legal experience planning careers as law clerks.

ILCO students

awards after

certificateis

the

to

successful

completion of the program and provides a job hotline accessible '

by phone or the Internet. There is, however, no legal certification for law clefks in

>

employee

profile

limmelman but she

is

and a grad

other alumni.”

profile.

Himmelman, who

is

go to one big confer-

“I get to

ence a year and network with

Along with Connections, alumresume serv-

the past

president and founder of the alum-

ni services offers a

excited and

ni association, said this issue is

ice,

months

bigger than the previous because

centre,

discount rates at the recreation

pleased with her

first six

as

alumni services

resource centre and access to a

officer.

computer with a laser printer for

The social services graduate’s main responsibility is editing Conestoga’s biannual alumni mag-

updating resumes and Internet

college’s

tlie

|

wills,

issue that

scr\ices job with the region of

Waterloo was difficult for Monica

\

upcoming

will include a faculty or

story for the

l-,s>eniial

“I

The Jime

of 30,000.

issue

whale

Connections”

and a

learning

services also offers to

'

frame diplomas. Orders are now being taken in the office and staff will frame diplomas at convoca-

They

tion.

fin.

also sponsor a profes-

sional photographer for graduates

Jennifer Ertel

the

all

semesters within

features a cover photo of sparkling

water, a graduate in a canoe

engage

the

access for job searches.

Alumni

out and try to

azine, Connections, with a circula-

tion

my antenna

keep

try to

access to

the canoeist on

is

Ertel

cover.

last

is

Himmelman is who

convocation.

at

Monica Himmelman

year’s

currently looking for students

'

Ontario at the present time.

Alumnus of Distinction, an award

Alumni Services Officer

honours the accomplishments

that

Stairway to work

1991 graduate of recreation

Himmelman

World

trips for

of the increase in grapevine activ-

both chal-

ity,

a section devoted to updates on

lenged individuals and able-bod-

graduates.

ied participants.

She said she gets inspiration from other alumni magazines.

featured in the cover

is

By Andrea Jesson

around, but

it’s

mostly kids you

and try

keep

my

engage

to

use

in

antenna out semesters

all

within Connections,” she said.

out,” she said.

Defenceman

training

camps

will

tre until

and administrating contracts for outside sports programs that come

Summer

Centre will see the

legs of

to the recreation centre throughout

offering

of the

the summer.

adventure and sport camps from

O’Brien said most of the time

quiet

sport

little

stars

According the

to

Paula Feddema,

administrative

services co-

ordinator, the recreation centre

preparing for a

is

summer filled with

and fim camps for youth.

sports “It’s

a different kind of busy

administrator

for the recreation centre, said the

Youth Hockey League

is

already

under way. The leagues play on Fridays and Saturdays

all

summer

5 year olds. According to O’Brien, June is for

when

eight to

1

is

activity really starts to pick

up around the recreation

Turcotte

centre.

Hockey school games

from July 12-23 for ages nine

to

“There’s always a lot of people

be held

The

will also

be the third summer

the Kitchener Rangers

hockey

future

Stars

of

prospects

ages

seven to 14.

The

Tomorrow hockey and the youth football camp for high school kids are two of the most popular camps, said Stars of

school

Sports and Adventures

recreation

centre

usual three

its

is

also

summer

The

of age.

costs of

summer day camps

range from $135 to $170 and will kids

opportunity

the

to

explore nature and outdoor cooking as well as participate in basketball,

volleyball

tennis,

swimming

until

and

September.

Adult Rollerblading Although the recreation centre will be swamped with kids enrolled in hockey schools and camps it is not limited to the community’s children.

There are many adult rollerblad-

O’Brien.

Each game or event

is

also popu-

with the public.

“All the

at the recreation cen-

June 27.

to 13 years

give

16.

lar

also

July 5 to Aug. 27 for children five

Other upcoming events include

Tomorrow Hockey school will be offering two, one-week camps for

Youth Hockey Jackie O’Brien,

'

It

during the summer,” she said.

and

is

Stars of Tomorrow

future.

(Photo by Chadwick Severn)

can

she

Connections.

spent setting up for facility events

prosperous

tech building,

said she keeps her

around Conestoga’s Doon campus these days, but it won’t be long until the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation It

Jason Bolender, bottom, and Randy Privatt use foam and caulk to fill breaks in the new brick wall on the

asked

at college

see,” she said.

be

mation

“I try to

camp

Children to may

is

eye on Spoke for interesting infor-

Adventures,

Integrated

which provide

She

interested

to contact her.

leadership, Ertel operates

Access

Anyone

cation.

of graduates.

A

can volunteer to help with convo-

games

are usually a sell-

ing

and

powerskating

clinics

otfered as well as wilderness and

canoe

trips in

June and August.

-


Page 10

— SPOKE, May

17,

1999

ISSUES & ACTIVITIES

Women’s resource group By Carly Benjamin

member

Carol

Poynter said.

the past have included

Barb Kraler, Joan Magazine and Jeanette Walker, all

She said she considers herself a feminist and Joined the group

Dan Beckett whose

of whom are student services

staff,

about four years ago to fight for

co-

equality of women. “The main focus of the group is to raise awareness of women’s issues and rights,” she said. Meetings are open to everyone

in social services,

Gregory,

The women's resource group will be in

I

meeting

DMA

May

19 at 9 a.m.

to discuss the

coming

Sharon

Dietz,

year’s strategies for the advance-

ordinator and

ment of women. The agenda will include introductions as well as background and the history of the group.

health

Issues that will also be discussed

include finances, vision, planning

and structures for 1999/2000.

Group

members

Madeleine

Poynter,

meet May 19

to

and

journalism

Kim safety

Radigan, a officer

at

Conestoga. Poynter also

sits

on the national

YWCA

board of directors for -the

and

is

the local president for the

YWCA board of directors.

the

nterested

in

like

vided a small resource section of

was

literature in the library.

sexism, lives and violence.

Other topics guest speakers have lectured on include date rape

As

body about women’s

the resource group

rights,

responsible

is

and an emergency telephone

located in the deserted area in the

D

is

past attendance but they are cer-

wing, both for the safety of women

an important vehicle that draw’s

tainly invited to join us,” she said.

at the college.

faculty

attention

women’s

issues,”

Poynter said guest speakers in

For instance, the celebration of

The resource group has

also pro-

sold

out and raised $400 from ticket

which was donated

sales,

women’s

Place, a local

And 70

for increased lighting in the parking

include

to

events to

Women’s Day on March 9 was

well as informing Conestoga’s

student

The group also hosted commemorate women.

and

date rape drugs.

lots

remember any men

“I can’t

“The women’s resource group

awareness,

raising

in

including men.

men, topic

Mary’s

to

shelter.

female faculty members

from Conestoga attended

Women

Women, an evening

Celebrating

featuring a gourmet dinner, women’s poetry and song at the college’s Waterloo

campus.

College student with special needs adjusts to life with counseilor’s help By Linda Wright

oncoming van sneezed, ran a stop

Chris Ghigeanu was enjoying a

native

ger side of the

physical condition.

car.

new country, a new home and a new wife when it was all taken

were paralyzed

in

from him

changing his

dramatically. His

in a blink

of an eye.The

Prior to the accident Ghigeanu, a

sign and collided with the passen-

Ghigeanu’s legs and right hand

life

the accident,

of Romania, was in top

He

of his limbs after five months, he

second-year business management

wife

student at Conestoga College had

Linamar where he worked as a machine operator.

physical state, so

Was

Years of physiotherapy

been in Canada for six months when, in 1993, he was only

involved in a serious accident that

changed

On his

his life forever.

Dec.

5,

friend’s

while a passenger in car,

a driver in an

“I

left

him and he

lost his

job

at

in top condition

wanted

to

walk so badly

enjoyed

judo and auto mechanics. Although he regained limited use

skiing,

still

had a hard time accepting

his

damaged

his

it

of mind.

state

after

After going through covmselling

the accident,” says Ghigeanu, with

and four years of physiotherapy, where he worked with his own personal trainer, he can now walk

a look of pain and sadness in his eyes.

without a cane.

As

physical

his

improved,

and he

health,

did

so

felt

abilities

mental

his

(Photo by Linda Wright)

Bookstore offers variety of products

well enough to

enrol at Conestoga.

Marion

Roland Spieser, computer instructor, consults Sylvia Herron, clerk, to see if his course books are in.

bookstore

who

Mainland,

is

for college

students

By Linda Wright

it’s

Ghigeanus’ special needs counsellor,

has helped h im to adjust to

college

life.

“I

had a

lot

of trouble

adjusting to the level of perform-

ance necessary for school because

of the weakness caused by

my

accident,” he says.

Mainland has helped by teach-

him how

ing

with school

to deal

barriers, giving

him audiotapes of

the material covered in his cours-

and extra time to write exams. The only difficulty he has physi-

es

cally

at

the

college

the

getting

is

around. “To get from the

D wing to

A wing seems a long way,” says

Ghigeanu, sighing. “But college.” stairs

Choosing

I

to

love the

take the

and not the elevator

way of being just another

is

his

student.

Five years later “I just

want

to

be a regular guy,”

To look at him, you wouldn’t think he was different from anyone else. says Ghigeanu.

It’s

been five years since the acci-

dent and he

now

is

able to achieve

simple goals like cutting the grass. In the future, like to

have his

Ghigeanu would

own

business and

You might think Conestoga’s

sellers

sell fairly

well along

with a variety of other items such playing cards, maps,

as

chocolate bars and hospital pants

calculators, stamps, birthday cards

bookstore,

top the best sellers’

and Kitchener Transit bus

list.

which cost $7 for five. Computer software can be pur-

just books.

example. Simply Accounting

A popular winter item is (fuzzy) shirts.

They come

Sherpa in sand,

khaki and hunter green and

sell

chased

for is

academic pricing. For

at

sells

$62 although the regular price

$130. Student identification

is

required to purchase the software

program

for $57.99 plus tax.

and there

Conestoga jackets, which come in dark green and navy blue, sell

per student.

summer, shorts sell for $21.99, good quality T-shirts cost between $14.99 and $17.99 and crested

dents start college and buy items

for $79.99 plus tax. For the

hats

’sell

for $12.99. All items are

Parents

is

For security purposes, students are required to check their knap-

they shop.

summer

the

in

College rings make a great graduation

uing

are set

students,

says

Sylvia Herron, bookstore clerk.

The bookstore has books for

posted

rags,

As

in

full-time for

avail-

courses.

The

each course, are -

August.

well,

books

for continuing

entrance while

at the front

months are predominately contineducation

emblem such

as knapsacks.

sacks

Customers

in before the stu-

with the Conestoga

and

sizes.

a limit of one

come

available in a variety of colours

crib”,

gift,

Herrons says. Booths

up throughout graduation

ceremonies and

sell

a

little bit

The bookstore

return

regular

he does data entry.

Waterloo and Guelph campuses,

To other people in this situation Ghigeanu says, “Don’t give up,

offered from the continuing edu-

June, July and August are

cation catalogue, are also sold.

to

at

“Chocolate bars are big

Doon,

sellers,”

says Herron, laughing. After that

policy

books to be returned within two weeks accompanied by a receipt. A book on requires

education

courses

of

everything, says Herron.

gloves and tools, and sometimes

to

tickets

The bookstore, located in the main building through door No. 1, sells a little bit of everything. Not

booklists,

and keep on fighting. Try not focus on your weaknesses.”

mouse

pads, disk holders, day plaimers,

able

where his job title is “tool which means handing out

Chapstick.

but

at

he works on weekends

Linamar

books

that

would be one of the biggest

be as physical as he can. For now, at

gum and

Magazines

sale can’t be returned.

Hours of operation throughout Thursday,

8:30

Monday

a.m.

to

4:30 p.m. and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to

4 p.m.


SPOKE, May

ISSUES & ACTIVITIES

1999

17,

— Page 11

Day-care centre urges early registration By Lesley Turnbull

kindergarten

ior

Though August seems

far away,

parents wanting to register their

one

children,

adult to

12

children

and one adult

senior kindergarten

15

to

school-age children.

children at the Conestoga College

“As the children get older the

Doon Child Care Centre should do

group size gets larger and the

so as soon as possible, say centre

number of staff you need

workers.

es,” said Roberts.

Spaces

up

fill

fast

and those who

The

end of

leave registration until the

summer but been

and get

try

we can

it

organ-

and

we can

so

camp-like

$800, toddlers, $695, preschool-

includes field trips to the

and

$560,

ers,

junior/senior

$410.

children,

School-age children are $110 for

morning or lunch and afternoon fees are $140. During the summer, kindergarten and school-age children participate in a summer program with a the

their families time to socialize

Maria Roberts, team leader of the Doon day-care centre, encourages those who want to register fall semester, to do it now. (Photo by Lesley Turnbuii)

usually starts at 5:30 p.m. and runs

their children for the

for an hour

atmosphere

that

Doon

pond as well as other places. The centre provides indoor and outdoor activities. Group and individual activities are available for the children.

The

manipulative and discovery toys; science and nature;

working and cooking;

is

open

If you are interested in child care

to the

community.

for the fall or require further infor-

“A good portion of the people we serve are here at the col-

mation, call Maria Roberts at 748-

that

5220,

books, puppetry and computers;

lege and they are either the facul-

centre.

and support for developing friendships and successful peer relation-

ty’s, staff’s

program includes:

ships.

The

matic and block play; sensory.

literary

Social Services and entire

experiences through storytelling,

experiences and aetivities in dra-

child-care

wood-

art,

Roberts

Group centre

is

of

Ministry

licensed by the

Community

and

three

'

through

one adult

are

ratios

infants,

217, or drop into the

ext.

Fee assistance

or student’s children,”

said.

to

me

teims,

take care of their physical bodi

by

I.;

Health

exercising regularly, eat-

in the eye of

healthy person as one

but what happens

the beholder loses perspec-

May 2

Robbins, a counsellor in student

toned, well-built

body has lead

to

a rapid increase in dieting. Recent

Canadian studies show

at

given time 70 per cent of

women

and 35 per cent of some form of diet.

healthy

men

are

on

(Photo by Michelle Lehmann)

“Eating disorders are more

Robbins.

intended to challenge

and focus on becoming healthy and content. the thin ideal

shouldn’t be just a specific said Robbins. it

hope to lead

Marg

said

lives/’

stem from a lack of self-confi-

ing a lack of self-worth or helplessness.

mation on eating disorders, outside referrals for support agencies

diets

and eating disorders.

While

public

increasing, there

awareness is still

is

a lot to be

break.”

act, said

way we

Robbins.

coalition is

made up of pro-

former and current

Information Centre in Toronto

They believe

the real danger with

dieting

although no diet has

is that

ever lead to an eating disorder,

users of eating disorder services

almost

and members of the community

begins with a

are concerned with the prob-

lems linked to eating disorders and body images.

is

alarmed by the concept of dieting.

She

every

eating

disorder

diet.

said the coalition tries to

inform people of the problems by advocating healthy living and

Robbins said education

know

I

offers assistance, guidance

Cha make it a

to

and

support to any student througout

They operate with

highly trained counsellors

who

said.

provide up-to-date information,

long

help

centres

and

individual

counselling.

peo-

Tupling said students need to consider every aspect of their

overooked method to ensure

and look at themselves as a whole being in order to stay fit

things,” said Tupling.

is

out there.

lets

It is

body maintenance back

time to

into per-

spective.

Student services

“Students

to

who to

mental wellness,

experience

examine

their

simplest,

yet

is to talk

She said no matter what

often

about

is

on

your mind, you’ll find opening

help

emotional being, social being,

up

anyway

physiological being and spiritu-

Remember that family members

being because each factor

and friends are always willing

let

people

to

al

here

need

“The

in

tries

they can. are

lives

stress,

with such problems

express themselves, ask questions

and talk about their problems openly and personally,” said Robbins.

remember

break,”

“Sometimes

planned to celebrate Mental Health Week, student services

they are not alone and

put the ideas about weight and

“We

a

Although the Doon Student had nothing

Association

the year.

fit.

“I just have to

problem.

that help

what we

stay mentally

to get help,” said

wonderful support system.”

times.

at

avoid stress in order to

tries to

take

sionals seriously, said Robbins.

be,

stressful

Cheng Cha, a micro computer

community and what to do if you or someone you know has a

ple

The National Eating Disorder

become

in the

done. People must take the warn-

how we should

fessionals,

college-aged

women are the most susceptible to

said

Tupling. “Student services are a

administration student, said she

Student services provides infor-

important that students

“It’s

Every student can agree that tests, assigments and classes

maga-

zines and television.

in

weight or appetite,sleep disturbances or oversleeping, or feel-

know where

your mental health.

fashion

changes

uncontrollably,

health sciences department.

shaped by the media through advertisements,

ings of health experts and profes-

should look like and the

who

Mental Health

School, in general, can affect

bigger

“It’s

time to correct the perception

The

7, was

said.

Signs of a problem are crying

dealing with body preoccupation

should be an aware-

ness day to change lifestyles.”

should

“These problems

dence and self-esteem.”

Robbins is

seri-

ous than just having food issues,” said

Day.

of

Lynn Robbins, a counsellor in student services, posts a flyer promoting the annual meeting for the Waterloo Region Eating Disorder Coalition which supports International No Diet Day.

any

Challenging Ideals May 6 was International No Diet

It’s

yourself op by the boot strings,”

Taping

Tupling, a nursing teacher in the

trend to maintain a slender,

than that,

-

attitudes if they

Coalition.

day,”

life

“People must establish healthy

and a member of the Waterloo Region Eating Disorder

and sadness.

kind of sad where you can’t pul

meet -^0 demands of

Week in Canada.

services

suggests' students look for

comfortable with themsehes,

with other people.

become more important than healthy, said Lynn

“It

She

signs' of stress

“Students must beware of the

’^amd is able to socialize properly

staying

enou^

feels

'^can

Today, being slim and athletic

The day

who

and getting

sleep, said Tupling.

Waterloo

r

of beauty?

The

To

mental wellness.

mentally healthy people must

Region describes a mentally

has

liCwl I

lealthy at Doori

By Michelle Lehmann

tive

may be available from „

fee assistance

I I I Vr I I

4taital

-

available

the regional government.

^,ing healthy

the beholder

may be

OSAP for students. As well,

for those living in Waterloo Region,

to

one adult to five

preschoolers, one adult to 10 jun-

health

when

and a half to two

hours.

day puts focus on

is

Each family

centre hours.

brings a dish to the picnic, which

No-diet

They say beauty

the date has not yet

The event gives children

set.

after

meet as many people’s needs as possible,” said Maria Roberts, team leader for the centre. Monthly fees are due on the first of each month. Cost for infants is

kindergarten

it’s

annual potluck picnic later in the

getting a spot for their child.

“We need to

**

centre will be having

August might have a hard time

ized as early as

decreas-

contributes to

good

to others

health,” said

to help.

Studies have proven that phys-

Tupling

Tbpling.

ical

weOness

“It’s like the

is directly

linked

a

little

said.

very therapeutic.

old Beatles song,”

“You get by with

help from your friends.”


Page 12

— SPOKE, May

1999

17,

ENTERTAINMENT

hype send Menace to the dark side?

Will two days summer movie In

Analysis

time, the

season

kicks

with

off

constantly

down rumours

shot

by posting a small

the

of infor-

tidbit

release of one

mation here and there regarding the

the most hyped movies

away, just enough to

of

rumour.

movie. Not enough to give anything

of

time.

all

And

no,

in

16 years that George Lucas will

new

send a totally

Star

Wars epic

the

Last November, Star Wars fans

not Austin Powers 2:

it’s

The Spy Who Shagged Me. Wednesday marks the first time

stop

up early

lined

buy a

morning

in the

to

Meet Joe Black,

ticket for

Just so they could see the two-

minute

The Phantom

for

trailer

to the big screen. If only I could

Menace. These crazed fans paid

remember

full

name of it.

the

..

.

movie price

at

8:30 a.m.

I

just

The

don’t see any point in paying

Phantom Menace will blast way into theatres May 19 to droves of hungry fans who’ve

$9.50 to see a preview for a movie.

Episode

Star Wars:

-

1

its

waited patiently for that song

Wars or not. Almost everyone knows there is a new Star Wars movie coming out. Star

again.

Surely, everyone has seen at least

For the words, “A long time ago,

one television commercial, music

to

heartbeats

their

start

away” to rollup For George Lucas to

in a galaxy far, far

the screen.

once

make

video,

movie

Menace.

complete with yet another Star

We’ve

their

Wars movie. But with all the hype and publicity going into the movie, will it hurt its box office potential?

Since

the

production

initial

two years ago, the coverage of The Phantom Menace started

Web

began. Internet to Star

devoted

sites

Wars began running wild

with rumours about casting, story filming

lines,

everything

locations

and

involved

with

else

movie production. The official Star Wars Web

before.

Is that

not enough?

seen hype

all

Anyone remember

last

Is

the

Dark Side?

I

hope

in

enjoying

the

best

movie I had ever seen. Maybe I was too young to remember, but I don’t think the hype was as over the top and in your face as it is

today.

Bass and William Broyles

Jr.

The film takes place during the last two weeks of 1999. The beautiful Gin is a young insurance convinces her nasty

conflict

and

an

any

all

right

all

real

the

in

da,

to

have his

own

agen-

along with Conrad Greene

boss Hector Cruz (Will Patton) she can catch Mac, a rich thief, in the act

by playing

Gin’s plan

is

to reel

Mac

a robbery opportunity

in

will

have

to

with

he can’t

the Bedford Palace.

two of them

The

overcome

the extensive security system and steal

a

It

deserves

remembered by future

be

just

we

like

New Hope.

thing that will keep

into this

one

there’s it

afloat. It will

draw people to the theatres, more than once in some cases. The people will wait for their

even

ticket,

The people will buy the action figures. The people will spend their money to get a piece of The Phantom Menace, no matter how big or if

it

is

hours.

small. Because the Force will make them do it. The Force is with all of us, and that is what will keep the movie from falling under the wheels of the _ advertising bandwagon.

Movie review

good,

Life

not exceptional By

Eileen Diniz

Murphy,

Martin

&T

Lawrence,

Ned

Williams

the

Beatty, Clarence third

and Obha new come-

Bubatunde

a possible bigger score than the

Bedford Palace.

tionship than a possible love affair

The film was written by Robert Ramsey and Matthew Stone and

The

film progresses a httle from

making the viewer wonder whose side Gin is really on.

here,

an

is

OK

film but all

the

good action takes place in the last 30 minutes. The story line is easy ing.

The most this

characters

captivating thing

movie are

is

that

both

two lead

extremely

However, Connery and

and the lack of chemistry between the actors makes it even worse.

The good thing is the film does take some unusual turns and occasionally a tiny spark is shown between the two leads. Overall, Entrapment isn’t worth the $10 to see it on the big screen; wait until it comes out on video. The film is currently playing at Cambridge Cinema and Fairway Cinema in Kitchener.

star in the

dy, Life.

was directed by Ted Demme. The film starts out in 1932 in a Harlem nightclub with an unlikely encounter between bank teller Claude Banks (Martin) and Rayford Gibson (Murphy) over outstanding debts.

$40-million

ancient

Chinese mask.

The film also features Ving Rhames and Maury Chaykin. Rhames stars as Thibadeaux, one

(Internet photo)

play baseball, have talent shows

and even enjoy a barbecue, while thinking of a

The

way

humourous

film takes on a

look at

the

all

to escape.

hardship, kindness,

fife,

cruelty and forgiveness. It’s

with Murphy’s and

filled

They are both in trouble with Spanky (Rick James), the club owner. He agrees to give them another chance by offering them the opportunity to pick up some moonshine in Mississippi. The two men get into some more trouble on the way to Mississippi

Lawrence’s comedic genius, as

who cheats

Lawrence’s

with a

man

(Williams)

Eventually,

Claude,

some

emotional

one

with

a

is

bit

an of

racism.

The majority of and Murphy’s

it

deals

with

how

they both pretend to continue to

arrests

their

hate are

wrongfully

convicted and sentenced to

fife in

film progresses from this

point through the next

60

each other throughout the

movie. This movie and, with

a Mississippi penitentiary.

in jail,

emotions and issues.

real

This odd and strange film

Ray

The two men

While

These two

substance.

who have been

cheat ends up

framed.

The

as

actors finally receive a role with

bond deepens as they spend time together. The funny thing is

the

dead and the sheriff

and

well

love-hate relationship and

Ray out of his money.

his rival.

resist:

of all three movies, just so he could experience everything I had 10 years before. This movie

between Gin and Mac. It seems more Uke a father/daughter rela-

(Chaykin). Their agenda involves

Jones don’t even do a convincing

master

the Special Edition re-releases

Eddie

Another problem with this film is the 40-year age difference

attractive.

30 minutes.

seems to be just a httle too old for making it unbehevable, and Jones doesn’t do much except follow Connery around and

look nice.

about

that

my

release,

the thief role,

who seems

to follow but isn’t exactly interest-

the good

action takes place last

up with

generations

hit

of Mac’s former partners in crime

lacks any real conflict and is

film but lacks

fining

remember A

a

my

brother two years ago to see

and a good memory for

Movie Review

Entrapment

Entrapment

remember

I

wagon. This movie deserves to be

I

with

Jedi

hype going

the

all

movie’s

job with their characters. Connery

The new action/adventure film Entrapment stars Sean Connery (The Avengers) as Robert “Mac” MacDougal and Catherine Zeta Jones (The Mask of Zorro) as Gin Baker. The movie was directed by Jon Amiel and written by Ronald

who

the

for it.

Eileen Diniz

agent

of

dad and being blown away by it. I remember wanting to be Han Solo and carrying his action figure around with me everywhere. little

Wait for Entrapment on video By

Return

With

1983 going to see

in

deserves good things.

line

three or four hours to see

theatre,

is sitting in

remember

to

it

when Return I

a

remember

I

buried under the advertising band-

to

may just happen. Sixteen years ago

tion. All I

kids and adults alike.

don’t

not, but

of the Jedi came out,

don’t remember being bombarded with endless ads and promo-

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to see anything bad happen to this movie and I love Star Wars just as much as the next person. I just don’t want to see it

overexposure going to

make The Phantom Menace go

remember waiting site

movies

kill

summer’s Godzilla? A critical and commercial flop which received tonnes of hype just because it was made by the same guys who made Independence Day.

(Internet photo)

or segment on

newscast about The Phantom

a

lives

again

trailer

years.

Ray and Claude

it,

formances

is

about friendship

pairs

by

some

great per-

Murphy

and

Lawrence, whose characters are likeable and touching.


Digital Edition - May 15, 1999