Page 1

3 1st Year

MAY

Competition tests

1999

10,

skills of

ambulance attendants

Students take By Wayne

seriously

life

Collins

or cheer their teams on. for granted,

At the end of 20 minutes, each team had to give the judges a ver-

but Ontario’s paramedic students

bal report on what occurred in

Many treat

of us take

life

hfe saving and patient care as

their scenario, including signs

serious business in the real world

symptoms of

and in competition.

care they’d given.

While the Ontario Paramedic Student Patient Competition

and the

fastest

gram.

patient care scenarios, while then-

The second scenario, which began around 1:30 p.m., presented

five

were assessed and judged

by professional paramedics. Conestoga paramedic faculty members Bob Mahood and Wendy

related condition.

Spiegelberg created the competi-

assess the situation and report ver-

a person suffering from a diabetic-

Again, students were expected to

1994 because there was no any other large-scale

tition in

compewhich paramedic students

now

could participate. Students

bally

share information and

make

Conestoga College’s paramedic students Melissa Scheerer (left) and Adrienne Roberts placed third in the competition on April 27. (Photo by

beforehand, what either of two

fessional contacts.

scenarios

“We have provincial guidelines on how to do patient care for trau-

given a description of the situation

Spiegelberg,

30 seconds before entering the

right

ma

gym filled with patients.

chest

Speigelberg. “That’s

why we

all

Wayne

Collins)

med-

judges after 20 min-

utes.

One Conestoga team, made up of John Blythe and Steve Woods, fin-

The

first

would be and were

scenario, at 10:30 a.m.,

have that standardized method

presented students with one

now.”

ty,

This means that students have been taught standard guidelines and procedures to treat cases like

shot

accurate

gunshot wounds or diabetic condi-

them in the They were not told.

fatali-

plus a police officer with a gun-

wound to the chest and a pos-

“If they don’t seal that right up,

first and Melissa Scheerer and Adrienne Roberts of Conestoga placed third. Fanshawe

even with a hand

away

Speigelberg says she’s glad the

the patient is

whole event was a success, considering this was the paramedic

of breath.”

All five teams, from Conestoga,

La

Cite

(Ottawa),

Centennial

took second place.

minute of a

in the first

wound and

really short

says

initially,”

“then air escapes

Niagara,

program’s

last

year as a one-year

program. Beginning in September it

fast,

and competed simultaneously for two judges

appropriate solutions are crucial to

each. Local paramedics and teach-

students and teachers seldom get a

tions, as presented to

a life-saving team’s chances of

ers

competition.

success.

other students attended to help out

sible spinal injury.

Timing, quick,

assessment

and

Fanshawe

(Toronto)

(London)

volunteered to judge, while

will

By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

For most people, the word sum-

mer

mind images of

brings to

relaxation and long weekends.

But

this is

not the case for every-

will also continue to provide serv^

due

ices for students throughout the

grams during the summer.

summer months. “Students

will

served in the

to the increase of

tion,” says Spiegelberg,

chance to meet

summer

just

be like

able

throughout

the

summer

semester programs.

sellor with student services at the

college.

are the only noticeable alterations

to arrange for a pool of tutors to

in service delivery.

come

While the majority of those

“We’ll be open from 8:30 a.m. to

the college throughout the year

4 p.m. instead of 8:30 a.m.

enjoy a four-month break, there

p.m., so

are

some people who remain

it’s

to 4:30

only a small time

“We have been in

fortunate

enough

and help during the sum-

mer,” Robbins said.

She also said the housing

lists

are continually updated during the

at the

change,” she said. “The financial,

summer and

college to provide services to stu-

academic, personal and career-

drop in and access the service.

dents enrolled in

The summer

summer

is

courses.

an opportunity

for the staff of student services to

plan and prepare for the

fall.

Robbins said student services

counselling services will available

to

summer

months, especially for courses that run later than traditional, two-

attending classes and working at

circumstances

like this).”

Tutors will continue to be availdefinitely

Robbins said vacation times and a minor change in operating hours

Lynn Robbins, a coun-

(in

“because

co-op pro-

always,” she said.

one, says

be a two-year program.

“Everyone enjoyed the competi-

Student services continue through

Page 2

steps taken, such as

ished

pro-

and medical conditions,” says

on

ication, to the

get a chance to apply their skills,

Question

scenario,

procedures of the paramedic pro-

The

provincial emergency care

Campus

first

Conestoga College responded to

longer

fW5E4

Following the

field.

teams which par-

tion in

hm In

structured

ticipated in the recent event at

efforts

UiidterwoiM learn

are

how paramedics

teams also answered a written quiz on related emergency care

losers.

fm

to

and

and the

should practice patient care in the

among

paramedic students, there were no

PAGE 3

the patients

The scenarios according

is

designed to determine the best, the brightest

awards

— No. 17

those

still

be

who need

them.”

Robbins expects” more students to access student services this year

students are free to

ing an appointment or

She encouraged anyone requirmore infor-

Lynn Robbins, a counsellor

mation to come to the student

with student services at the

services office in to call

748-5220

Room 2B02

ext. 360.

or

college. (Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)


Page 2

— SPOKE. May

1999

10,

NEWS Campus Question

Students agree with anti-tobacco campaign story and photos by Jeanette Everall

was made public in an announcement by Health Minister Elizabeth Witmer on April 23. In a random survey on April 28, Conestoga students were asked what they thought about the new

The Ontario government has a new target in its war against smoking.

The province its

recently unveiled

co campaign, which intends to

at

students

will be

Grades 6 to 12

in

across the province. This

is

was

skeptical

would

effective they

be.

may

“It

somewhat, but

help

warnings and education aren’t

working

he

now,”

right

“People know smoking them, but they

still

said.

bad for

is

smoke.”

Pedro Santos, a third-year graphic

it’s a good some time to

design student, said

see if

will take

it

actually reduces tobacco

it

a first-year registered practical

nursing student.

cation they have

on the

said Santos. “It

may be

Mark

one of

an excellent idea, but

know

would necessarwork,” said Lyndsay Strathem,

don’t

ily

aimed

how

about

among youths. “If someone wants to smoke they are going to do it regardless of how much edu-

I

ed into the public education sys-

a good idea, he

idea, but

youths.

“I think it’s

programs will be implement-

The programs

among

use

prehensive school-based preven-

tem.

initiative

was a positive move, but most were quick to question if the new programs would reduce tobacco

tar-

among youth. To reduce smoking among children and yoimg people, new comget tobacco use

tion

of the students sur-

strategy. All

veyed agreed the new

comprehensive new anti-tobac-

though he thinks the programs are

if

it

Gleba, a second-year gen-

several enhancements intended for

eral business student, said

Ontario’s Tobacco Strategy, which

too

many

he sees

kids smoking and even

use

long as

first-year

RPN.

a good

Mark

second-year

Gleba,

general business.

He

thing or a waste of money.” said kids

Lyndsay Strathem,

subject,”

leam by example and as people around them are

smoking, kids will continue to smoke.

Second-year broadcasting dent Johnny Staub said

stu-

a good

it’s

idea, but there is a larger issue to

J)e considered besides education. “I think it’s a good idea to implement programs into the classroom;

however, issue.

an environmental

it’s

Kids see

ing and

their parents

monkey

it’s

want

do,” said Staub. “If kids

new technology wing bai [%on Campus is to open thii

smok-

monkey

see,

to

smoke, they are going to find a

way

to

Johnny Staub,

do it.” Musseau, a second-year

Tammy

iislew teci j

younger age

i_

feet,

which

some work to washroom facilities

also included

Theaew two-slorey technology open

to

May

smoke at a good to educate

existing

and

10.

“I

t

hink a lot of

kids don’t realize the dangers of

45,000 square

for

it’s

them younger.

tnii

tobacco.

was

small

other

items.

A

lot

of kids aren’t get-

ting the right info.

good place

to

School

leam about

is

a

it.”

Second-year marketing student Nicole Jenkins said

it is

important

began on the building in August 1998. The delayed opening shouldn’t

for younger kids, especially kids

pushed back because ot bid

be a problem. Putt

understand the

weadm in the

the tedniology

Or%k)ally scheduled to open the second or third

week of

April, the comjiletion date

Putt,

ivinier, said

director

ot

was

Da\ id

physical

Constraction

have

mid-A]pnl.” he said so

"We

lost

a

when we had some

occti^ancy until the

fall

work was pushed back, which

in

turn delayed all other scheduled

work.

which was built opposite the machine wing on (he south side of the campus’s main building, is between 42,000 and 43,(K)0 square feet. The contract was buildial,

is

leam about

the

smoking. “They don’t risks,

they just see

the coolness of smoking.”

“The more education young peoon tobacco, they are going

ple get

moved fipom'one of the rooms at Doon to the new addition. There

robotics and automation student.

furniture

be one ’Class scheduled for

this term,4i0^handle the

overflow

said

He

Luke Simioni, a

said people

from

who

Luke

year

marketing

student.

make them aware,

illnesses

“It’ll

may

but

education students.

should be guest speakers to deter

prevent them from smoking.”

young people from smoking. An early education on the effects of smoking may be helpful for 'some people, said Tracey DaSilva. “It might work for some people,

However, Le^mne Reid, a

dards as the rest of the college’s facilities,

with one exception.

Because of a change in the Ontario Building

Code

the building

must have a thorough and

full

sprinkler system, Putt said.

but others lished

said

decisions

Editor: Brian Smiley;

and

News

Leanne

Reid, first-year nursing.

to

she

knew

the

they

already

effects of

Jordan first-

effects

of

know what

smoking Stewart

thinks kids already

gers of

up.

effects

year

smoke doesn’t

anything to do with adolescence.

“They are going really want to

By

education.”

try

things,” said DaSilva, a second-

the time kids are teenagers

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

said

he also

know

the danlight

“Most already know what

smoking before she made the necessarily have

the

are.”

smoking before they

decision to smoke. “Starting to

have already estab-

their

not

year registered nursing student,

it

will have,” said the third-

graphic-design to try

student. it

if

regardless

mainly lunded from September

to

they

of

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect tlie

views of

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

published and produced weekly by the Journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Elizabeth Sackridcr; Student Life Editor:

Wayne

Collins;

Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer; Production Manager: Janet Wakutz; Advertising Manager: Eileen Diniz; Circulation Manager: Chadwick Severn; Faculty Supervisors: Jerry Frank; Christina Jonas. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Issues

first-year

and automation.

first-year

are suffering

tobacco-related

Simioni,

robotics

During construction, everything, was built to the same stan-

(ff continuing

Spoke SPOKE

effects of

to see the effects of the long term,”

w<»k,

Last

will

date for the roof

The new

because

in grade school, to

was

'origimtQy set a date for

week or

full

said,

students won’t

semester begins.

resources.

“We

second-year

accounting.

accounting student, said because

Brian Smiley

building

Tammy Musseau,

kids are starting to

opening By

second-year

broadcasting.

Activities: Carly Benjamin;

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not be liable for

out of errors in advertising beyond the

any damages amount paid

arising for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection

or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

MS Word file would be helpfril.

tain

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, May

NEWS

— Page 3

1999

10,

Engineers shine at ceremony hsinniiot u wii

hr%n/^iii*ciH sit csiii r '!

,

I

By Lindsay Gibson

li

/

'.l.z

The 1999 Civil Engineering Awards Banquet was held at the Golf Steak House in Kitchener April 29, where a number of stu-

|||||||i|i|||j||g||« Four Conestoga College graduwere

Hilts said

oured by

ates of journalism-print

honoured

the

Tony

Reinhart, for

dents took

was

at

and

it

their

me," he

Kitchener-

tlie

Each

Andrew Jankowski

to

be done and

to

know we

dents are required to complete a

Bob

group project of their choice over

award went to Sean Laaber, Beard

the course of the school year.

as

Tiotter

his

i

It is

and Mike Galley for

their design

a project completely organized

of a national class

swimming

for 12 years, work-

and structured by the students

facility in

way from

at

he

Uiink.s that

who

themselves

city reporter to

through a series

of bis

original class of 32,

'-ibb

n

for

Waterloo boy, Keith Hemy, and

dC

confession

Reinhaft

Then

category.

Ipurnalist Sif

t^

Year

is

the

chc^en

:wfeie^:!

kludcd a

This y<

:

becoming

He

in

editor

moved

then

three groups are recognized -for

1

waste-water treatment facility for

8 months

the

later.

to the Mitchell

i

‘I give a lot

Hilts.

‘They told us how

it

said

it

a significant

as

highest academic

There was a

with the

students

first-year

achievement.

The Sze-Stratka Award given to student who overcame an

the

emotionally difficult time and maintained high academic stan-

went

dards

to

died

brother

whose

Barten,

cancer

of

in

December 1998. Barten picked up his

second award of the night, the

John

Centennial Concrete Award, tied

Fraser and Gail Cryer fought for

with Leduc, for attaining the high-

tie for first as

top honours and finished only

.5

of a per cent apart. The runner-up

est

results

water supply

the

in

course.

award was Jared Puppe.

Beard won the award for achiev-

problem

that is presently occur-

According to course co-ordinator

ing the highest standard in both

was

ring at the existing treatment facil-

Gerry Nakluski, these decisions

highways

are never easy.

special recognition

Sylvia Kulak and Douglas.

infiltration/inflow

Nakluski told the crowd of

for this

I

and

II

courses, while

went

to both

flexibility is

about 60 people. The three said they were happy to receive the

“Through a combination of hard work, long hours and excellent

“Don't narrow yourself to one

award and were glad the waiting

attendance records, these three are

was

being recognized amongst their

The highest academic achievement in the second-year structural design courses was a tie and went

peers,” Nakluski told the crowd.

to Barten

Hilts said

two

weU

extraneous

ity,

Reinhart said it must be hard to be objective when judging somefliing as personifl as v

into

to

the rurmer-up.

.said

of credit to the

;azettea

Tlie father of

town of Elmira, taking

account the expected population

growth as prepared us,"

editor

j

The 1998-1999 Best Third Year Project Award went to Nathan McLaughlin, Brad Metzger and Tim Weber. The trio designed a

Clinton. Ont.,

Advocate.

“|>rofe^

"^Londd^ the managing

each year, the top

their achievements.

for a paper

win; in

ihiist

''

And

active

one of the biggest reasons i‘ succeeded was my milingness to go anywhere;’ be said. After graduating. Hilts worked

top honours, while Douglas was

award went to Paul Douglas, Sheldon Mustard and Steven Pletz for designing a combined banquet hall, fitness centre and hotel complex on a 5.4-hectare site. The first award of the night went

teachers.

in

downtown- Kitchener.

designs and developments to their

graduated

‘1 think

lb be entered in the cate^ty r«l

JottS%

still

1

jOiui^isni.

lus killer,

Stanley Rice,

midi a r^^jfter

are

six

aine-ye«r-nid

1

and Ramzie Albasel for highest academic achievement in year two

Waterloo and the revi-

talization of

The Best Land Development

,

to sec-

and runner-up respectively. For highest academic achievements in year three. Beard won

their

provide

of presentations

1995. .said

Project Presentation

The

he has lieen

Hilts said

The Best

The second award went

ond-year students Anita Leduc

did weU,” said McLaughlin.

and former jounialisra teachei

ing his

Imother

good the third-year stu-

year,

Nathan

to right)

left

(Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

Del Bell Award for

inlluences.

,

Best third-year project award winners (from McLaughlin, Brad Metzger and Tim Weber.

home

of the night, each taking

said.

three awards.

Tribune before joining

te

Christine

co-ordinator

seiwKih

student

of die Year and also •'

.

top honours for

Beard and second-year student Jeff Barten were the big winners

Record, was named

won

home

achievements in the program.

Third-year

Conestoga 16 years brought back fond

full-time

a

the

indusny and he

appreciated receiving the award.

Western Ontario

at the

nice to be hon-

it's

tfie

the

way

showing

to success,

he

over.

was a

“It

lot of

work and

it

feels

and Albasel.

wtare inclined to seek a different

award winning would certainly help "I’m pretty happy doing what T’m doing. I'm not itching to move on bciauso of tlie aw trd

position,

who

Runhiiir

Records

iwiid

won foi

the

.tuduii

Journalist of the Yeai' while at

Conestoga College, said awards are not the only mea.sure of suc-

"Not winning die .iwaid would not have made me feel any less confulent about the cess

story,"

he said

Reinhart

uxlvised

joumaJism of goiul

lot

writing to help their

own wntmg

mature and grow. “Write because yon believe in the story, not to win awards.” Hilts,

for Excellence

in

liditmg

was Diana 1 ovdess, the community news reporter at the Stiatfurd Beacon Herald,

College graduation set for June

on vacation, was unable to be reached for However, John comment. Kastner. managing editor of the Beacon Herald, said be nominated Loveless because of her expertise in copy-editing and

By

Ixivelcss. currently

proofing

Ho

said Loveless

is

ihe

best he's ever seen.

She knows her f P ((’anidian Press) styL book olT bv heait ‘

students to read a

Rod

Wire Award

a 1993 giaduate,

was awarded the Quick Wire Award for Excellence in Editing for his work as assistant manag-

\

won

19‘Jfi

giaduaic,

Boh

Klager,

honourable mention in the

category of writing excellence for his

work

Klagar

is

a

in Oxford County. staff writer for foe

Woodstock Se^ittel-Review where he has worked since December 1997. "It was nice to be nominated,'’ he

said.

early Benjamin

The graduation ceremony

is

constantly reviewed but this year

Three graduation ceremonies be held at Conestoga College this year due to the large number of programs and graduates. Two will take place on June 22, one at 4 p.m. and the other at 7:30 p.m., and the third wiU be held the

no major changes were made because last year’s event was considered a great success, said John Sawicki, manager of public

following evening at 7 p.m.

often

will

All will be held in the recreation

gymnasium. Each ceremony will have a guest speaker and a presentation of certificates and diplomas to the grads. The first ceremony on June 22 will feature Linda Haseufratz, chief operating officer of Linamar

centre

while

Corp.,

executive

Robert

Irwin,

of

Human

director

affairs.

“We’re extremely proud of our graduation

had

universities

We’ve from other

ceremonies. visitors

and colleges praise

said the success

to the volunteers to

due

is

who

in part

are willing

give of their time and help

everyone

bring

to

and show the community what can be accomplished

“We

like to

at

Conestoga.

make

sure there

mixed with informality,” he said. At the ceremonies, Sawicki said, be the punctuality should student’s first priority.

He

said students should be aware

packages that

were distributed must be and returned

He

in

filled

recommended

graduates

45 minutes scheduled ceremony

Sawicki said the ceremony

is

one

prior to their

name

of the most important events at the

to allow for distribution of

college because

cards and line-up procedures.

is

out

a timely fashion.

arrive approximately

organize and conduct.

it

is

the right combination of formality

that the convocation

our convocation ceremonies.”

He

opportunity

together at one time in one place

the only

Resources Development Canada, will speak at the

June

the

ceremony,

second event. At

23

Harold

vice-president of is

convocation

scheduled

CBC

to

Redekopp, television,

be the guest

Classifieds Travel-Teach English

speaker.

The convocation ceremonies also

feature

will

four college-wide

5 days/40 hr. (June 2-6 Guelph)

awards: the Mastercraft award, the

James W. Church achievement award, the Govemor-General’s academic medal and the Aubrey Hagar distinguished teaching In

Tony Reinhart, a Conestoga graduate, sits with his Lost Boys series that won him Journalist of ftte Year Award. {Photo

fcy

yncteay Git»on)

addition,

the

alumni office

one alumni of distincaward at each of the

1

teacher

ceremonies.

cert,

Presentations,

Spreadsheets, Tables, Graphs, etc.

CD ROM

Backup &

course

,000s of jobs

NOW!

Free info pack

will present

tion

process essays, PowerPoint

More. TESOL

available

award.

Will

Free 270-2941 888 Toll

1-

-

729-0899 after 6pm & weekends, leave

message


'

,

— SPOKE, May

Page 4

10,

1999

NEWS & REVIEW New call centre certificate program

Program can help students expand By Charles Kuepfer

the

Do you like talking on the phone? If you do, then Conestoga 11 -week

College’s

Call Centre

Professional Certificate program

may

be for you.

The

employment

the

in

centre industry, which

according

regarded

is

brochure

a

to

promoting the course.

A good job market is just one of “Once an individual centre,

in

a

does open doors

individual

is in

who

open doors

employment,

find

becoming a

with

call centre,

does

it

the

in

students

“frontline person”

with several

college

and development

department at Conestoga

program

was

Linda

Each intake of the program can

age mix within the program and

company,”

said

It

Elizabeth Sackrider

band to bring an

takes a special

make

audience together, to

glow and

spirits

maximum

Weber

said

of 14 students.

there

with excitement.

That

April 25 at

of

who performed on the Guvemment in

Any band

Toronto.

power

the

is

Underworld,

that

can bring

Torontonians together has to be

damn “I

good.

was

jiving to the rhythms.

be for everybody.

reaction of the audience,”

said

John Craig, an Underworld fan from Waterloo. “The show was

and these guys had the power to turn it off and on.” The band commands their fans like

a

spell,

convincing them

like puppeteers,

to

really surprised as to the

But a career

and

tech-

“(It

nice

a

is

a

is)

nology; computer training; team

said Weber.

customer service; communication; interpersonal

from Aug. 3

and marketing; and management.

The

all

fast-paced

runs

to Oct. 15.

fee

includes

not

environment,”

program

next

The

relations; sales

time/stress

very

demanding

and

may

in the field

which

$326,

is

required materials.

Student gu By

Orientation as

the end

of the evening aU hands were up and everyone was jumping like

their

their faces flash

and there were 30 jobs available for the eight

tuations.

concert-goers found themselves

Review

placements

graduating students.

environment

super-

positions.

April 16, the second intake

students learning how to improve one-on-one communication si-

Underworld excites audience By

emphasized

is

support,

management

of students finished their work

course curriculum, with

the

On

and a

training

senior level

visory and

concepts;

Weber, a training consultant in

the

weeks of

centre

introduced last September

have a

in

as

Topics of study include: call College.

and has had an average of 10 students for each intake.

it

marketing and help desks as well

female.

in

training consultant in the training

looking for some employees.

first

she said the

far

Communication

opening here. She named Bell and Canada Trust as two companies who will be

Career possibilities which are by the course include order entry, customer service, aided

three-week work placement.

Linda Weber

centres

have

classes have been predominately

eight

company”

said job prospects in the

region are good, call

women

and

The course content includes

within a company.

Weber

men

enrolled.

However, so

a

The is

both

“Once an

She said the program helps to expand the horizons of those

the enrolment incentives.

call

development

Doon Campus

of Conestoga College.

call

as Canada’s fastest growing industry,

at the

the possibility of the

program equips

full-time

students with the necessary skills for

and

training

department

their horizons

move

beats.

drum and bass most unwilling of

to the

Even

the

beans to the techno

The

tionally polite;

riffs.

were aU excep-

spectators

could be called

it

a peaceful and soul-fiUing show. Instead of the usual muddle of

people gasping for

air in the front

viewers were scattered

section,

around the venue with enough space to dance.

Arms were

in the air

and bodies

hustled side to side as the music filled the

warehouse.

^

The music was peaceful and romantic yet full of vigor. The tunes invaded your mind, hurling

out the negative and welcoming the positive.

Singing about the beauty of skyscrapers,

lead

Karl

singer

Hyde bounced around the stage, urging the crowd to catch a groove. Every once in awhile he

would face the back or the

MacClenr^^^H

fy/1elissa

side of

the stage to get everyone involved.

The concert followed the release of their new album Beaucoup

(Photo by

Macdennan i

Fish, the band’s third full-length

CD. Agnew, who works at a record store on University Avenue in Waterloo, said sales are good ‘The album

definitely

is

picking up,” she said.

been getting a Their to

the

worth

“We have

was released

Infants,

in

1996.

Fish

contains

the

popular club track King of Snake that

was released about a month

ago.

(Conadiun

Plu/a)

fire

[

» #

J

^ 5^^

officially

been

college), or

a

2li

session the

be required to hour training

week

prior to oru n

tation, in order

Ideally, says

assistants will

'

^

^

Mac0eunani: die

work

eight-hour

Monday

Thursday and will be paid an hourly wage of $7. students will

sttategi-

lege,

such as the Blue Room,

North America.

in the larger cities,

compared

to

is still

its

noth-

European

M-7376

(AiuvyfiuiiVltoiM^sJ

Underworld is an extension of multi-media design group

the

Tomato

that

and Nike.

does ads for

MTV

.services

program,

knows how

says

she

program works bgtte^r

program run by

ovefsOe

services

Macdennan,

Anyone an

interested in

orientation

working assistant

Student Services office, prior to leaving school

this semester.

Assistants will be contacted

ipating

summer

to confirm

they have been chosen and that

they are

still

in

September.

interested in partic-

the

.

...

studea^

we hii^

should contact MacClenoan at

be asking prospective

certain questions to determine

tl^

students helping students

as

5

Jt,**

connection. This way,

during the

assistaiits

:

“One good reason why peer

and confusing Orientation Week can be for new students. She says she will hectic

Registrar’s

thi

office.

(2B02)

in

and not

through student services than a'

MacClennan, who is a graduate of the college’s social

music genre

!

classrooms and the

how would yon

if they are lost

She sa\ s she thinks the oritn

the

helping newcomers find locker

it

sure when* they’re going

tation

to

The

handle

locations,

electronic/trance

counterpart.

8

will also

Registrar’s office,

ing

Buip

They

way

the

a stident

rniike

comtorlahJc (aiming to the

been making tremendous head-

the techno scene here

8,

would you

|

for

for the posi-

t^uesnons Loutd incllude,

tions.

How

together since the 1990s and has

While growing

[fieftwaa)

su liability

’A

1

I

ot incoming students. I

cally placed throughmit the col-

The band has

LiLi i 1 i

MicLCssful orientation

ihi.

days, if possible from

Beaucoup

USED CD

ieel

are

for successful candfil^:^.

CD, Second Toughest

last

with

attend'

of demand.”

lot

their

assistants

j

Jodi

for the much-anticipated album.

I

needed lo give directum, hand out materials and geQeraily help tation

Wayi^ ^iins)

says ftMir orien-

program

this

1

Digital Edition - May 10, 1999  
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