Page 1

Take your wm

stuff As NATO protests continue, a Serbian student teDs

her

story.

PAGE 3

By Janet Wakutz

When

leave

students

college, either for the

the

summer

or

good, A1 Hunter, head of

for

would

security,

like

them

to take

with them. He said there was a major problem with belongings left

their belongings

behind in student lockers

last

year.

At

least

300 locks were cut off it was a lot of work to

till

mm

lockers and try

and get items returned

to then-

owners.

would

“I

the

empty

assume they

when

locker

PAGE 6

said.

shouldn’t

students will

all

their lockers at

end of the term,” he

He added

Golf may not be as popular as we may think.

encourage

like to

students to

have the same

they return in the

fall.

Property left in lockers can only be returned if the items are properly identified. Hunter said some

people are not using the lockers assigned to them and that complicates

the process

of returning

belongings.

After every attempt has been to find the owners, Hunter

made

items are distributed.

said the

Books

Students of Conestoga College’s motorcycle driver training program have progressed from novices (Photo by Wayne Collins) to confident riders in a couple of weeks.

are offered to the

DSA,

equipment, calculators and any other items thought to be

drafting

useful are offered to

students

with special needs. Clothing in good repair to the Salvation

is

given

Army and

back-

packs are donated to a scout troop.

Pocket Dwellers play

Mecca.

PAGE 8

“We

try to

said Hunter,

Kids and guns don’t

mix

things,”

who added

his first

choice would be for belongings Every not to be left behind. attempt

Page 4

make use of

is

made

to get the items

back to the owners. LASA students were involved last year in making phone calls to students to try and return items. “If there is any other property around the campus (such as portable stereos or art equip-

ment), take

I

encourage students to with them,” said

them

Hunter,

who would

rather stu-

dents didn’t leave things at the college over the summer.

Dodging pylons was

all

part of the motorcycle training course offered at Conestoga. (Photo by

Wayne

Collins)


— SPOKE, May

Page 2

3,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Long-time Conestoga employee retires to pursue freelance computer projects By Carly Benjamin

McLaren

said she switched pro-

grams because

A

Conestoga College employee

evident

was becoming

it

traditional

secretarial

of 27 years will be retiring June 18 to pursue a number of personal

careers were disappearing, so she

projects.

istration

McLaren, co-ordinator

microcomputer adminprogram from scratch. “There was a need to train stu-

and founder of the microcomputer

dents in the area of office manage-

Sheila

started the

administration program, plans to

ment

freelance in the area of Microsoft

application skills,” she said.

access computer applications.

and

extensive

software

McLaren refected on her memory at the college and

The focus of the program McLaren developed provides a

fondest

valuable blend of technical, sys-

was

tems and human relation

necessary for the effectiveness of

“I received the most enjoyment from helping students to believe in

business and industrial operations.

themselves,” she said. “I watched

It

in

skills

prepares students for a career

microcomputer administration,

office administration, a provider

of software support,

as

or,

an

applications specialist.

The two-year, six-semester program includes a four-week work placement

at the end of the term, which provides the practical expe-

rience

complement

to

the

program.

formerly

1983,

the

administrations

McLaren program

the best experience.

them reach

office

program,

taught in the secretarial at the college.

the

potential

they

didn’t think they could achieve.”

In

Conestoga sent United Arab Emirates where she developed 1988,

McLaren

to

the

curriculum for a secretarial pro-

gram to be used in their colleges. “I was the only female on the .

team,” she said.

McLaren School

Before developing the microcomputer administration program in

working with the students

said

also received the first

of

Business Faculty Award, an award given by the faculty to the faculty.

She is also nominated for the Aubrey Hagar Award. The winner will be

announced

at the

end of

Sheila McLaren, co-ordinator and founder of the microcomputer administration proaram the end of this semester.

will

be

retiring at

April.

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

Local newspaper

makes blunder

with e-mail surtax ‘April-fool’ hoax By Wayne

Collins

implement a new e-mail

sur-

charge.

April

April

19 Fool’s

newspaper, the

federal

Canada

Post

proved to be day for a local which criticized government and for

a

plan

to

While some Ontario newspapers saw through the Internet’s April 19 hoax, the Cambridge Reporter

The hoax reported proposed

that,

under

legislation,

Canada Post

would be attempting

to bill e-mail

users for “alternate postage fees.”

The

phony

message 602P, which

e-mail

published an editorial condemning

referred to a fake Bill

the surcharge.

would permit the federal government to pin a five-cent surcharge on e-mail users, by billing Internet service providers. They, in turn,

would

bill their

The message

customers.

also stated that “the

Canada Post nearly $23,000,000 annually in lost revenue.”

RETURNING STUDENTS

Internet users would, therefore,

pay a yearly average of $ 1 80 bill were passed.

The Toronto Star’s was also

98/99

the

editorial

department

AV TUTORS FOR THE NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR

if

misrep-

Richard Stepp, a Toronto lawyer fighting

to

at

216 Bay

stop

the

St.,

was

proposed

The

Supported by Poon ftudart Aiaodafan

editor.

April 23, the Reporter ran a

hoax fooled us.” While the hoax tested the local journalism community, some students at Conestoga College said

they

didn’t

exist

admitted Stepp

anymore than

their

surcharge editorial.

The Cambridge

Reporter,

how-

Two

second-year construction

knew

little

about

it

vaguely recalled hearing of the

In the April 23 story the Reporter quoted e-mail from a Rev. R.G.

Skelding, that chided the paper for swallowing the

“Had you bothered said Skelding,

found

Michael Debssou, a first-year electronics technology student, said he didn’t see the e-mail hoax

602P.”

considered little bit

the

Reporter’s

unprofessional.”

Second-year computer program-

Hammoud,

Carmen

said the story should first,

before

it

was reported.

He

to

check,”

“you would have

that there is

no such

bill as

said that bills brought to the

House of Commons have prefix “C” and senate bills

the are

prefixed with an “S”.

Toronto Sun columnist, Gary Dunford, said he wasn’t fooled by the

bogus e-mail message because

of the phony

bill,

the fake lawyer

and the misspelling of the word

“(They’ve) got a responsibility to

check before they write something,” said

phony “P”

bill.

because of their busy schedules.

Third-year

Star later

ing rumours,” said Travis.

time to read the news.

On

have been verified

message,

well read the

as

we’re going to be read-

aging

never existed. the

if

hoax but they didn’t have much

ing analyst(CPA) student

to

Enquirer

Clyde Warrington, the Reporter’s mansaid

is “a concept whose time has come.” This March 6 editorial

legislation.

J

quickly,”

useful

with an office

so

error “a

TALK TO YOUR FACULTY OR DROP IN TO STUDENT SER VICES!

I

and Andy O’Brien, said they’d

on

reported that the Star wrote the

According

Services M

prime reason Internet mail caught

but

IF INTERESTED

fJBPeer

engineering students, Kevin Ross

resented by the message, which idea of an e-mail surcharge

“We might

an April 20 editocondemning the surcharge and Canada Post. “It would be the last laugh, since Canada Post inefficiency was a

story with the headline, “Internet

proliferation of e-mail is costing

WE WILL BE LOOKING TO HIRE

ever, published

rial

Hammoud.

CPA

students, Travis

bureaucratic.

Meanwhile, journalists

not

said print

stories just for the sake of selling

Cornell

and Ryan Giles, didn’t read the fake Internet message but

papers.

also said the Reporter’s editorial

able

was “not very

like this,”

professional.

Hammoud should

“They should be held account-

when

they write something

he said.


SPOKE, May 3,

STUDENT

NATO bombs

1999

— Page 3

LIFE

refineries

hit oil

across Belgrade and Novi Sad By Wayne

about her relatives

Collins

A Conestoga College student was saddened to hear the April 17 news reports of NATO striking oil

“She

the

destruction of “this gorgeous city”

a tragedy.

Novi Sad roughly

eastern Europe,

sits in

of the

centre

the

in

province of Vojvodina. The city’s

importance to the paign

in

lies

NATO

cam-

portation routes.

Novi Sad is a junction of international highway and railroad trans-

Of

portation.

the eight roads that

pass through the

important

the

is

city,

the most

highway which Europe and

originates in northern

runs south by

way of Budapest,

passing through Belgrade and ter-

minating in Athens, Istanbul and

Near East. Novi Sad railroad junction also radiates in six directions, the most cities in the

important

originating

in

terminating

in

line

and

Istanbul

Budapest, Prague, Berlin,

Warsaw

Summer for

Davqor

destruction

in

at the April

17 anti-NATO protest

(Photo by

exams and award banquet programs is coming to a close, the Conestoga College print shop ready for the

Yugoslavia in 1991 and decided

is

summer

is

to leave.

“Nationalism began to escalate

beasts,”

bombing campaigns because of

Kosovo, with the Albanians.”

NATO.

Sajfert,

these routes.

more being bombed.

Sajfert says she believes

than just a city

“Novi Sad “It

is

is

a being,” she says.

has a soul, a heart and a mind.”

Sajfert says that,

as a child, she

never felt any prejudice, racism or hatred in Novi Sad.

Her Hungarian/Oerman

father

and Slovenian mother, however, foresaw the disintegration of

who

from Feb. 25 to March 15 this year, says no one there expected the

NATO

offensive then.

remedy

“The people’s

and optimistic,” she says. Sajfert describes Novi Sad as the Paris of the Balkans, with its enchanting architectural designs,

monuments and plush

cultural

is

an integral part of the

“They put

in 110

The

print shop,

Mail, cornier service to satellite

campuses, liquor and beer runs for the Waterloo campus dining room, audio visual

supplies,

services are also handled

shop

Alviano,

all

who

manager of the print

to

(he)

opens 100

another

detonate over Serbia,” she says.

“What can

I

think of him?”

Sajfert says she thinks

Sajfert says she

spoke with her

who remained in Novi

best friend,

Sad, on the third day of the bombing. “She said the university was closed that Wednesday, on the first day of the attack and she, like everybody else, just wants to get a break from this torture,” says Sajfert.

Sajfert

worries

his

bombs

made an

NATO has

absolute fiasco out of

Kosovo. “(They) are more naive than Serbs to have played into the

hands of the Kosovo Liberation

Army (KLA) Muslim terrorists.” Sajfert says she may return to Novi Sad someday because she loves the city and its historical charms. “It’s Europe,” she says,

can (you) not want

“How

live (there)?”

also

is

college’s

the

women’s

shop for 19 years and loves

you

the students that keep

are so grateful,” he

They

said.

The

shop sees a

print

students

who need

of

lot

projects print-

ed or bound, especially

this

at

Alviano said they bail a lot of jams and do not

ask for anything in return.

“We

staff.

soccer team, has worked in the

which does

referring

says,

“Everytime

mouth,

said.

“It’s

going.

college.

cartridge

he

it,

print

said.

beauties

shop

print

demic year in September.

per cent.”

Milosevic

Slobodan

world of darkness and

busiest time

is

the college prepares for the aca-

here are excellent,”

she

Meanwhile,

green parks and beach.

students out of

says supervisor Vince Alviano as

to stay

is

positive

by the three printers, one supervisor and one courier who comprise the

the busiest time of year,”

Novi Sad

revisited

time of year.

Alviano

lives in a

preserved over centuries by the Serb folks, now he in the hands of

in Croatia,” she says, “and then

supplies and paper for computer

months.

staff

President

Collins)

historical

the

“All

around 300,000 people, has been the target of much of NATO’s

the printing for all Conestoga

Just as the rush for printing final

“The

to the

despair.

and Moscow. This city, whose population

campuses,

“It’s

end

Wayne

Kitchener, calling for an

in

Yugoslavia.

Conestoga

By Lindsay Gibson

getting

speaks

Milicevic

strategic trans-

its

Sajfert

Her uncle, 40, was drafted three weeks ago and she hasn’t heard anything more about him. Sajfert describes the American-led campaign as a “mad bully on the loose” and says Yugoslavian

12 years old.

considers

Novi Sad,”

in

says.

suburbs of Novi Sad until she was

she

immobile, spending her

electricity

journalism student, lived in the

says

is

days and nights alone in a dark one-bedroom apartment, without

Belgrade and Novi Sad. Ana Sajfert, a 20-year-old

She

in

without medication.

and chemical plants in

refineries

who remain

Novi Sad, including her 70-yearold grandmother who suffers from is and disease Parkinson’s

he

are here for the students,”

said.

The

shop has a wall of

print

cards and letters thanking them for their help.

Alviano said some students have staff cookies and

even brought the

show

tarts to

their appreciation.

In mid-May, the print shop will

deliver

Conestoga College

all

acceptance office,

letters

which

to

will take

a three-quarter ton

riiiiLl' if

.

.

*Jtif

:

post

the

two

m

trips in

GMC van.

USED CD

Last year, $160,000 in postage alone, not including bulk mailing,

and $141,000

in stationary

were

used by the print shop. The college uses approximately

3B5

Foiry/ay

Road S

KITCHENER Canadian

lire

naza)

{km from Mksmk)

two tonnes of paper per week at the Doon campus and about seven million sheets of paper go through the machines in

the print

shop

GUELPH

each year.

Second-year electronics engineering students Joe Sosnoski (front) and Rob Brazeau get a final project together with help from shop the print ,_ u ... r r staff. .

,

while-you-wait jobs,

rush jobs, whatever

.

. , (Photo by Lindsay Gibson) .

“We do

said Alviano.

is

({Between Harvey's

&

Burger Kira)

needed,”

884-7376

{Across

from Watty's)

823-5341


From Columbine to Canada, kids with guns pose threat Columbine school

high

I’ve

begun

to

gunmen

for hunting with a firearm to 12

really that different

In September 1998, Queen’s Park passed

terrorized stu-

dents.

who were

stu-

suicide after opening fire assailants

on

students.

were described as members

of the “Trenchcoat Mafia” by other students said

gunmen wore long black

the

trenchcoats.

minimum age

lowered the

from

15.

currently

toll

stands at

15

including the two gunmen.

How can one possibly fathom the loss, the shock and the horror of such a tragic event? was

I wonder if training 12-year-olds to use a gun a good idea? Have you ever seen a teenager fly into a rage? Have you ever heard them shout

threats in the heat of their anger?

Of course

The death

I

that

course and sure, they are supposed to have a supervisor with them.

report-

ed to have committed

As

C-68

Sure, they are supposed to take a training

The gunmen were

who

f'Y'SS-

wonder though, if Canada is from the United States.

Bill

The

Pearl,

Ark.

kittle “ion, Co.

was the scene of a grotesque tragedy on April 20 when two Colo.,

dents

Joo€Sboro,

71

role in this kind of rampage.

Littleton,

in

7J\

Spoke lab calmly

sitting in the

laying out a page of the newspaper, high school students were terrorized and killed

they don’t

mean

their threats.

But people do things in anger they would never do in a rational mind. Sometimes teenagers lose If that child

it.

knows how

has access to one,

I

hope

to use a

my

gun and

children and

yours are nowhere nearby. I

the

pray none of us every truly knows

how

community around Columbine high

school in Littleton feels today.

12-year-olds to use a

Is training

gun a good idea?

and parents were robbed of their children. I look at the faces of my own children, shudder to think what the future might

As I

hold.

At least, I tell myself, we live in Canada where guns are not a common possession like cell

As

phones.

a parent,

my

urge

to

is

my

keep

children in the safety of my gaze. I want to protect them and I would certainly, without

a second thought, give

How

then will

I

ever

my

fife for

them go

let

them. off to

college or university?

Imagine the fear parents of surviving

Columbine students

will experience every time their children leave their homes in the morning.

How many times will they

wonder if then-

children will return?

Not only have

the

gunmen robbed

at least

15 students of their lives, they have robbed

many more people of

their security

and

their trust.

Reports say at least 18 people were taken from the Colorado school to hospital with gunshot wounds. One young woman suffered nine gunshots to her chest.

What could disaster?

I

possibly

cause

such

a

wonder what events preceded

such a hellish deed.

How

does a high school student become

either so enraged or so

decides to

kill

desperate that he

others and/or himself?

Gun laws are tougher on this side of the border and access to guns obviously plays a

SPOKE is mainly funded

Keeping Conestoga College connected SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Janet Wakutz; Student Life Editor: Lindsay Gibson;

Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed;

Entertainment Editor: Elizabeth Sackrider; Sports Editor: Brian Smiley; Photo Editor: Charles Kucpfer; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Carly Benjamin; Circulation Manager: Eileen Diniz; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon

SPOKE’s

address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

May by the Doon

DSA

logo.

SPOKE shall

not be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection

or

Dietz.

from September to

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

and should be

clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

MS Word file would be helpful.

Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).

tain


SPOKE, May

CAMPUS QUESTION

Dechert,

Bill

third-year

mat-

management.

erials

Julia Maier, first-year graphic

Dan

design and advertising.

faculty.

Fisher,

broadcasting

Pam

Hopwood,

first-year

journalism.

Suzanna

3,

1999

Chow,

— Page 5

first-year

journalism.

Students respond to Columbine massacre

Violence must be addressed, say majority Story and photos

Dan

by Julie van Donkersgoed

Fisher,

Petch ’s

Schoolyard into

homes

reached

violence

across the world as the

terrified faces

witnesses

of the victims and

of the

Columbine

massacre

at

school

in

high

were splashed across newscasts and newspapers around the world. Wide-eyed Colo.,

Littleton,

expressed horror at the

teens

events they encountered while law

enforcement

numbly

officials

reported the unthinkable to

a.

world demanding to know more. Students polled in a

vey

random

sur-

Conestoga on April 22

at

agreed schoolyard violence

problem

that

before

occurs again.

it

Amanda

Petch,

broadcasting incident

must be

is

a

dealt with

sentiment,

saying

says

the

stomach when

kids developing a cache of arms to

do things

like that here.”

management

als

student, says he

feels the shooting is terribly sad.

for the

families and go through this for such a long time,” he said. Kathy Novak, a second-year “I

feel

friends that will

business

management

student,

calls the incident horrible

reminder

of

how

and a

society

human

respect for

is

wrong.

other kids

who

get

to

are

mean

to them.”

Craig

Maw,

materials

a

difficulty

third-year

management

says he feels kids

and demands on time.

likely to withstand the pressures

full-time student bring.

dealing

student,

are

having

with

their

A healthy relationship is and changes

that being a

A local Individual, Couple and Family

Therapist, Barbara Pressman, developed a ciples for a healthy relationship.

list of primary prinHere are a few paraphrased

ideas: •

Respect for the other person

— no put downs, no

insults,

appreciation of different needs and beliefs and recognition of the possible need for separate as well as together time. •

Safety

is

of utmost importance

cal violence. If there is

even

fear, there

— no emotional

already

or physi-

is hurt.

• Caring behaviour and emotional support such as listenin g without judging or blaming and encouraging each other’s interests. • Inclusive decision-making regardless of earnings, compromising differences avoiding a win/lose result. • ings, to

sought), • •

Open communication including the capacity to share feelbe listened to attentively without giving advice (unless and willingness to be assertive about expressing needs. Communication includes affection and sexual expression. These need to fit the needs of each couple and be mutu-

ally satisfying.

The counsellor relationship issues.

at

your campus

is

gives ideas

It

on how

revenge on people

life

“The media

declining,” she said.

Being a student and in a committed relationship can bring enjoyment and pleasure and also feel conflictual in terms of responsibilities

is

“Kids are so demoralized and their

is

available to assist

“We have

you with

“What pushes people I

I

heard about

it,”

they take out half their school.”

nalism student, says

Julia Maier, a first-year graphic

says she feels the incident

is

a

that

my

she said.

to

to

felt sick to

almost

be on the lookout for these problem kids before said.

design and advertising student,

Bill Dechert, a third-year materi-

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: RELATIONSHIPS

more

people to do such things.

with things in a rational way,” he

right to carry concealed

are they thinking?”

tragedy and wonders what drives like this

extreme?

to

where they are fighting for the weapons, but banning cell phones because kids might sell drugs,” she said.

know what kids

are thinking, but obviously they

portrayal

“This tragedy happened in a state

“I don’t

don’t have the capacity to deal

than anything, but that Colorado

blame.

anger and confusion.

that

law

“What

of the

changing.

was more frightening

is partially to

member

American society is partly to blame for such acts of violence. “How do young people amass these things? You can’t do that in Canada,” he said. “You don’t have

a second-year

student,

a

broadcasting faculty, agreed with

Pam Hopwood,

first-year jourit

is

sad to see

students acting in such a manner. I

was

in high school I

never thought of anything like

a first-year jour-

nalism student, describes the incident as disgusting. “I

Suzanna Chow, a

“When

she said. “Obviously things have changed, for the worse.” that,”

wonder how people can do

this to other

human

beings

if

they

are really people,” she said.

“I

was their attitude afterwards. It was an act of hate, but

think

it

they took joy in

it.”


y

— SPOKE, May

Page 6

1999

3,

SPORTS Boom, echo or bust?

may

golf

By Brian Smiley

RCGA

from

Statistics

report are indication

many

not be as popular as 1996 showed several starWhile golf continues

tion in

D

of the

Doon

Club,

next

Valley Golf

door

to

Conestoga College, the parking spots are scarce and golfers are abundant. Everything seems to be in order. However, is it? Golf is supposedly in a boom not seen since the 1960s when Arnold Palmer’s “Army” was facing Jack Nicklaus,

“Golden Bear”,

the

week

every

Professional

the

in

Golf Association’s selected tour stop. However, results from a survey commissioned by the Royal Canadian Golf Association and the views of some in the industry differ widely.

“When

they believe they can tap into what

among

ity

the industry

Moss

347,000 new golfers

1997,

loss of

which

left,

to

results in a net

problem Moss sees

the season begins the cours-

es are

swamped with people who endured

Moss

cold

long,

a

the

first

and head

grew up, golf was an old man’s sport,” says Jeremy Moss, a professional at the Doon Valley Golf Club. “Now everyit.

the thing to do.”

It’s

then

In

1997,

(at the beginning),”

this will

players

demographic

Women’s golfers took

game.

up the

he

the population

this

395.000

left,

results in

48.000

which

a net loss

of

be the year that

“It will

nis,”

report

said over the

past five

the club have increased substan-

Valley Golf

he

never slow

down like ten-

said. “It can’t.”

Neufield said the reason

one area the

is that

women’s participation rates were up only 0.3 per cent from 1996 to 1997.

the course and

the

Oakville, said the sport

is

shots are the

Fame

of

Hall

curator

Stone

agrees somewhat.

eventually see interest

“I can

trying

Gerry Smith putts on the 11th green of the Delhi Golf Club on April 25. Senior golfers account for the highest participation among all demographics, a report released by rate the Royal Canadian Golf Association states.

angles.

“The golf industry is really trying for the women’s market,” he said.

He

no two

same.

Museum, Library and Archives at Glen Abbey in

years the rounds of golf played at

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

said those attempts are main-

dying

down and people becoming

inundated with

it,

but

I

think

it’s

going to be okay for a while yet.”

Only fits

ti

me

will tell

where golf

in the sports spectrum.

and he believes the reason

for that increase

ness

is

it.

two sports are totally different. When you play tennis you’re on the same court for a long period of time, but in golf you walk around

new

tially

untapped

areas.

golf

enjoys

Doon

sional at the

Hall of Fame,

RCGA’s 1996

Moss

from

still

Club, doesn’t see that happening.

Paul Stone, curator at the Golf

golfers.

but

to the point

Jim Neufield, another profes-

said.

industry needs to improve on. In the association’s survey

In contrast,

sport for everyone,

bottomed out

it

where only a small percentage of

“People were more eager

new

’90s, to

1970s and ’80s.

the

in

coming

This year he sees a

golf will begin to attract and keep

347,000 new

game of golf in the

Tennis seemed to be the up-and-

difference.

Maybe

people in the sports

world have compared the

tennis

es to get a round in.

year

players and

all

said.

S

their golf gear

to the overflowing cours-

many reasons.

and

in line

happening.

is

ome

sign of spring

comes they unpack

come

balanced out.

Canadian winter indoors.

When

is

“The prices of equipment have It had to come down to where everyone could afford it,”

is

when have

the needs of

fit

he said that

48,000 golfers.

Part of the

said the prices in clubs

accessories needed to

took up the game. In contrast,

395,000

want. Another area trying to conquer

is

equipment.

alarming.

tistics are

In

women golfers

popular-

its

males, the overall sta-

But then they drop the game, for

I

one’s doing

to marginally increase

where

ly in the clothing industry,

tling results.

riving into the parking lot

believe

golf’s unique-

is

compared with

all

other

sports.

“You’re not playing against any-

one except yourself,” he

said,

Hockey League

National

playoff

team

referring to the fact that every time

players take to the course, they’re trying to improve their score

gear up for run at the Stanley Cup

from

their previous round.

The survey done by

the associa-

Classifieds Travel-Teach English

With mem-

(or

cert,

course

by corresondence).

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The

conference

match

.ups

Jersey! 1)

doing

and

so.

still

fresh in

The western conference is prob-

our

minds,

ably stronger than the east, but

come

playoffs

playoff time anything can

happen.

taken

Here’s a look at

centre stage

how

things

could take place:

world

semifinal

would then be against

against

total

and Philadelphia

would win their respective series and meet in the Conference final, with New Jersey coming out on top.

Eastern Conference

Western Conference

The number one seed

Look

east,

gious trophy.

should emerge from the east as

Canadian the

teams

combatants,

Colorado!

for Dallas and Colorado win their respective series and meet in the western final, with Colorado emerging as the win-

Look

to

Stanley

Stanley Cup, the National Hockey League's most presti-

Three

and

against Detroit(3).

ner.

of 16 teams have earned

the right to battle for the coveted

among

.pi

then pit Dallasf 1) against S

Louis(5)

Boston(6). Jersey

tlieim

Buffalo(7)

Philadelphia(5)

New

HH An

New

of professional hockey.

A

TEOSL teacher

win

again, but will have a tough time

in the

(June 2-6 Guelph)

Cup victories and boast a

that could realistically

retirement

have hr.

team

Gretzky’s

the

5 days/40

Stanley

of

ories

are

with

the

New

Jersey

in

the

Devils,

champions and represent the east in the

Cup

final.

Buffalo,

Look

for

New

Boston and win their first

Edmonton, Ottawa and Toronto trying to bring the Cup back

Jersey,

across the border.

round series against Pittsburgh. Ottawa. Carolina and Toronto

The Detroit Red Wings are coming off two-consecutive

Philadelphia to

respectively.

tor

Avalanche and

the

their talent-laden

win the west. With newly acquired Thereon Fleur and superstars like Joe Sakic, Peter Forsberg and Patrick Roy. Colorado will be tough to beat. Dallas, Colorado, Detroit and roster to

St.

Cup

Final

Colorado

Louis will survive

tire

first

round, beating Edmonton, San

As

predicted,

New

Jersey and

Colorado meet in the Cup final and look for it to be a long, hardfought series. But the New Jersey Devils and their impres-

28 wins on the road during emerge as this year’s Stanley Cup chamsive

the regular season should

pions.


SPOKE, May

ENTERTAINMENT

Juried art exhibit not over the the

, I

co-president of the society of v, y:

Despite being the oldest show:

t

the region, the annual juried

in

exhibition of artists

a

but

i

stale.

was host

It

concepts

was anything

IS

fc

'

to

T':v

r

.

5

vivid

painting styles and

in

in

iris’

:.

:

prrCi iUo

ly

10

Sherry Rice for her work" Dried

images.

evaporates

red-orange,

dark

purple

and

blue-green, the painting sizzles to

“This painting was very loose

;

|

paint

creating a speckled look.

and relaxed,” said Rice. “It came through in one sitting.” Rice began painting seriously in 1995 and painted Dried Flowers under a time constraint.

life

with bolts of vibrant yellow

and reds across the canvas. “I

was

visual

and

desktop

publishing teacher. “I was not

expecting anything.”

/ery t nncuisi: .incnns-e

1..V

I

Kitchcncr-Waterloo Art Gallery,

have

the event

1

honoured

their talent

paintings

six aitists for

on April 22. Over 100 were submitted

let of

a

'

5ev5;/:

vveee

t

fee

yy

Gerrie Bea Joyce

HcesH .eoeoev; one of fbwer armtgoe tet need

a :

salting process to create the pat-

by a panel of judges.

critiqued

“The jury

&;:rcesc

/!

\7i:

vvhS:2

xy

the

;a;

prefer to capture

I

aoeiiod

a;

v

Eileen Diniz

won

The

simple

Lightening in a

the best

images

work

went into the painting. “It took so long because

painting entitled Lightening in a

many layers and I

Red Bag. Using a secondary

30 or so paintings

colour

combination

triad

of

of

Red Bag disguises

the over two years of

of show using mixed media to create an expressionist-abstract

Barrymore saves Never Been Kissed By

feeling

rather than realism,” said Rice.

teat -5.tt

He;'

dried

“I

I

professionally

Mount

New

stays in tune with art styles

going

to

galleries

An

honourable mention weni,

Goldberg for her mixed media Le Terrace. Awards of merit went to Jean Newberry for her

that

it

is

so

work on one time”

usually at

watercolour Woodland Trail and

Tusch Other for her mixed media Against the Window Pane. Best of show was also presented to Vicki Brophy for the pastel Looks Promising. Julie

said Joyce.

Easy Rider

she forgoes her nerdy friends stars as Josie

when her editor tells her she has to

Geller (a.k.a. Josie Grossie) in the

new comedy Never Been Kissed. The film was written by first-timers Abby Kohn and Marc

hang out with the cool kids is where the stories are. The story progresses a little from here, but it continues to be

Silverstein and was directed by Raja Gosnell {Home Alone 3).

boring.

The film also stars -Molly Shannon as Anita, David Arquette

hip, carefree brother.

as

Rob

Sam

Michael Vartan as Coulson, John C. Reilly as Geller,

Gus, Leelee Sobieski as Aldys and Garry Marshall as Rigfort. It

starts

copy

talented

out with

Josie,

editor, getting

dream job, which

is

to

work

reporter for the Chicago

Times. The problem

is

a

her as a

Sun-

her wacky

editor Rigfort

wants an undercover series on high school life and he assigns Josie because she looks

young. So

go back

now at age 25

she must

to high school to figure

because that

totally

David Arquette

little

stars as Josie ’s

He

gives an

okay performance, but nothing

He

spectacular.

has returned to

high school because he thinks will

him

help

fix

also

shows Josie “how

to

it

once

his

promising baseball career.

He

be cool”

when he immediately becomes popular during lunch.

Molly Shannon is a great and comedian, showing it off well in Never Been Kissed. She stars as Anita, the Chicago Sun-Times office tramp and actress

Josie ’s sympathetic co-worker.

out her story as well as to relive

her terrible high school years.

and a

unrealistic

The film was

full

of journalis-

inaccuracies including surveil-

tic

lance vans that watched undercover reporters in the high school through micro cameras built into

jewellery.

Never Been Kissed is unreal and so sloppy that it was lucky to have landed Barrymore, Shannon

and Arquette. pathetic

Drew Barrymore makes her debut as a film

producer.

Josie,

dork,

is

an

(Internet photo)

adorable

so desperate to

in she

borrows her brother’s car for the first day of school, but she still

manages

to look like a fool in her

white jeans and gigantic scarf of feathers.

especially

suddenly

becomes popular after the hottest guy in school talks to her for absolutely no reason.

rejected fit

is

Josie

It

when

Josie ’s romantic lead,

is

also her English teacher, attracted to

ing she to

is

becomes her even before know-

25.

It

has the potential

be a scandal as well as a good

court case.

Overall this film has

The cool kids laugh and make

who

moments

including

funny

its

Josie’s

fun of her, but Aldys, the leader of

flashback of her pimples and

the smart kids,

braces during high school. If you are looking for something

becomes her friend

immediately.

She hangs out with Aldys and her friends because that is where she has been accepted and where

Students

in Conestoga College’s Motorcycle Driver training program continue on the Doon campus parking lot beside the woodworking building. In a few weeks they have progressed from novices to confident riders. (Photo by Wayne conns)

practising

smart, deep or realistic, however, this

wrong

film

is

choice.

definitely

the

——

,

by and

attending workshops.

she feels comfortable. Eventually,

Drew Barrymore

Allison

Brunswick.

to Esther

;

I

1999 Page 7

hill

was at

University in

She

thrilled,” said Joyce, a

art

Joyce trained

3,

**


6

— SPOKE, May3, 1999

Page 8

Pocket Dwellers bring back the music By Jeanette

Everall

you missed the Pocket Dwellers at the year-end concert you might be able to catch them on Much Music later If

month, when they release

this

from

group

it’s

think

that’s

not

important thing to get out, just

giving us a

Watching

their first

Toronto

not funk,

really

I

a

title.”

this

band play on

obvious they are

The

it’s

music.

it’s

concentrate more on the music than just

video.

with

recently

received a grant to produce a single and a

all

people

12

stage,

it

is

about the music. Even

attendance

in

at

Conestoga’s year-end concert, the seven-

member band played

video and plan to release them both later

house.

month, says the band’s lead vocalist

this

not hip hop,

“It’s

jazz,

was a

as if there

full

Their energy on and off stage

is

Nigel Williams (NI. Gel). They also have

addictive; their funky jazz undertones and

plans to head to the United States to play

pizzazz makes

summer.

this

“We

still.

can't ignore them,” says Williams,

referring

United

the music

to

want

us, I

Making

that will

to see the

it

we

as

Williams says

as I hate to admit

However, there this

it,”

is

band, which DJ’s, M.C.’s

is

it

in the

as

much

one inevitable thing for

it’s difficult

what kind of music they

“Even

if

is

the music.”

Playing good music this group, but

such a

“When we

title,

title

that

the bottom line for

is

wasn’t always easy, says

first

a challenge to

he

they’ll

it

got together,

make

“After

says.

weekly,

to

“There would be no one

it

Williams.

to describe

play.

they do give us a

don’t

ing right before the show,

come up with a new one,” says band member Marco Raposo (Red). have

You

we could be arguwe always feel

whatever could happen,

says Passley.

and funk musicians,

about bringing the

it’s

“Bring performance back.

The only problem is, the made up of jazz players,

collage of sounds

that they not only

is

have to have a huge budget to put on a good show with energy in it,” says Williams. “Every time we’re on stage,

band. They will have to accept being

pigeon-holed.

sit

watching

live music.

in the States is the key, says the

it be known, if you make you can make it anywhere,

band perform,

clear,

music back and making people enjoy the

whole world.”

Passley (O-Dogg).

“Let

becomes

each other.

are

always be a part of

group’s tenor saxophone player, Dennis

States

hard for any listener to

it

also

play for the audience, but they play for

industry in the

“As much

States.

Canadian and

this

What

it

we

fit

was

started

playing

was about a month, two

months and we were clicking.” of what sound

would fit

it

and work,”

this

mesh

us.”

of styles creates, the Pocket Dwellers

The fact there may never be a title to fit band is something the band members have come to take pride in. “One thing I’ve realized, just being in

will probably get their

band, everyone

is

about blurring the

Gel Williams of the Pocket Dwellers performs present at Mecca on April 1 .

lines

for

a handful

of students

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

and genres of music,” says Passley.

Vocalist NI. Gel Williams has the the top of his head or freestyle.

all

do. NI.

this

wish to rock

the continents because they love what they

this

ability to

rhyme

off

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

“Music is life and life is music for everyone in the band,” says the band’s guitar player Christian McKibbon.

McKibbon has played guitar with the likes of Pat LaBarbara and Kirk Macdonald.

Tenor saxophone player Dennis Passley has worked

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

Guitarist Christian

with notable

composer Don Thompson.

Digital Edition - May 03, 1999  
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