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— No. 16

3 1st Year

College honours outstanding

banquet

athletes at year-end By Charles Kuepfer

MVP for team,

Anthony

Stacie Arsenault and

Gignac were named female and athletes of the year at Conestoga College’s 31st annual athletic banquet.

while Ian

The banquet was held at the Sheraton Four Points Hotel in Kitchener on April 16 to honour

coaches award.

accomplishments of both varsity and intramural teams

were recognized as well as the

For the men’s hockey team,

^

MacDonald

received the

Besides honouring the college’s teams, intramural teams

varsity

college’s extramural success.

during the 98/99 schobl year at

Conestoga College. Over 100 athletes, coaches and referees were in attendance. Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation for Conestoga College, said the banquet was held

MVP award,

Gignac collected the

the

GotaGfCbi^niekie want to card? Von

Samuels

Shaun

receiving the coaches award.

male

"

the men’s indoor soccer

with

Marlene Ford, who is the program assistant for Conestoga College, said both and extramural intramural programs are important to her and athletic

Stacie Arsenault

Anthony Gignac

Female

Male athlete

athlete of the year. (Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

of the year.

the college.

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

was

“It

one

of

best

the

extramural seasons Conestoga has “It is

important to appreciate the

aMete,” said James, who extended thanks to all athletes, recreation staff and maintenance staff involved in the athletics program. effort of the student

who

Arsenault,

beat out four

nominees to win the female athlete of the year award, said it felt great to

win.

expect

didn’t

“I

Arsenault. “It

Year-end means

was

said

it,”

be

just nice to

CRUNCH TIMEn! PAGES

played

the

for

silver-medal winning women’s softball team. She set an OCAA record this

college’s

MVP,

while Keri Quipp received

athlete

Rebecca Miller was named

WAR

By

Eileen Diniz

MVP

medal in the national hockey championships and a bronze medal in the provincial hockey championships. He was named goalie of the tournament for both championships.

soccer team, with Daniela Siro

AH

silver

for the

women’s outdoor

For the women’s indoor soccer

MVP

named

Bob

Evans,

a

at

won

the

NATO

bombings-

Marshall received the coaches

women’s

honoured

softball

most

team

Arsenault

Stacie

as

PAGES

Page 4

;

^

TheGre^dlle

be? Not a

while

Marko

years

on

the

board

will

be

each other,” said Evans. “I hope will

at it

be the most boring three years

the

wrong

picture

me

(in

I’m not as good looking as Findley

on the board who doesn’t have that safety because they don’t

(whose picture appeared

belong to a union.

Evans joked.

will entail a

it

of additional work.

Evans said

all that

will

change

is

evening meetings a month and

possibly

some

will

make

additional

have

He

it

the workload heavier.

may be

said

it is

the truth

and

they won’t be called up for

it

behind closed doors.

“The admin rep and (rep),

at

his),

He went on

to say that

times, feel intimidated,

“I

thought

quite

often

it

they don’t have

have a certain amount of safety,”

classy of Spoke.”

are buried

nine,” said Evans.

are

back on page “I thought

it

page apology) was very

Full-time faculty, part-time fac-

said Evans.

laughed

12,

was nice because

when mistakes

(the front

He

he appre-

the incident. also staff

toes and nose to nose because they

said he will be dealing with

that,”

apology from Spoke in regards to

who

the people

and

in place

knew

ciated the front page, April

“They may

true winner,

sorry for

but they never

made they

Evans.

won because

Faculty can say anything they like as long as

of

felt

whereas faculty reps, typically over the years, have stood toes to

“So you know the socially,

commit-

Basically, he said,

tee work.

the extra work.”

each other and wink

having

tract unlike the administrative rep

“I hope it’s a quiet three years where Mr. Tibbits and I just

at

representative

me the best thing me was

ever happened to

about or jumping off the

lost,”

table,

“People said to that

not something one would be

uneventful.

exchange smiles across the

faculty

of the year.

official

faculty rep

also said he likes the idea of

a

was

intramural

the

as

Spoke). They

al

his three

as

he next three years.

He

McCartney

Katie

recognized

Mouradian was also named

volleyball,

in

slow-pitch and ball hockey.

because they have a union con-

walls about because lot

Jurisic

collected the coaches award.

being

Evans has taught accounting, finance and business policy in the accounting program for the past 13 years. He said he was glad to

won and hopes

The Enforcers were named the team of the year,

that the position

Evans also said

he will have a couple of addition-

wave

retires

Peter

will

it

Findlay.

hear he

CCMVmiENTARY

and

think

I

chance.”

thrilled

Carlyle

seven different leagues.

MVP,

The

a

400

which included

sports this year,

being awarded to each team.

with

hockey

took part in intramural

competing

is

Roy

Erin

both

approximately

said

athletes

The men’s outdoor soccer team honoured Paul Mouradian as

honoured,

on the college’s board of governors. Evans was competing against fellow professors

Haan was

and

won

tournament

extramural

valuable player and coaches award

election for the position of faculty

representative

an

fastball

tournament.

intramural

of committee work I’ve ever done.

professor

and

She

receiving the coaches award.

team, Stephanie .Den

an extramural

award.

of Conestoga’s varsity teams

But do Conestoga College, has

as

of the year, back-stopping the

Condors to a

ever had,” said Ford.

Conestoga hosted and

the coaches award.

Bob Evans elected new

^TOP ^THE

Serbians protest

24 in 12 games. Gignac was named male

hitting

were

nominated.”

Arsenault

year for most hits in a season,

about

winning

ulty,

sessional teachers, counsel-

issues that relate to the faculty

because he was the candidate

lors

and there are a number of major issues coming up over

whose

the college voted for the faculty

picture

was missing

April 5 issue of Spoke.

in the

and

librarians

employed by

representative on April 7.


— SPOKE, April 26, 1999

Page 2

NEWS Organizer says event a flop

Excessive water use costs college

2 students attend year-end concert 1

By Janet Wakutz Water usage 1

Everall

Business

After spending almost $2,000 to

Student

Association)

manager

put on a free concert, Conestoga’s

there’s

year-end party was a flop, says the

she said. “There’s so

event’s organizer.

“We

on

planned our big end-of-the-

Doon Student Association’s (DSA) entertainment manager. “We get a of people asking for not the

lot

same old try

it

We

thing.

and

much going

was hard

it

to find

Stokes said there were other reasons

over

why

financial

DSA

looking

other events going on in the office

(and)

have a

with guests the Pocket Dwellers.

comes

Both bands play a different style of music compared to the more mainstream groups, which Stokes said

was something new

for the

DSA.

members

with the bands,” said Stokes.

She said people being swamped with assigmnents and exams was partly to blame for the poor atten-

budget goes,

to the

of options

DSA

offer for the

known band, but

at the last

minute

big part in

we had (a band) name I’m sure it

said Stokes. “If

with a big

wouldn’t have mattered.”

She said

it

probably would have

a difference

if

the concert

attempting to fix the problem. are in the process of hiring a

who

be responsible for ensuring events

are

will all

promoted

properly, she said.

Stokes will be entertainment

manager again next year, but she said she won’t be making the same mistakes.

those nights wasn’t a possibility.

get earlier

the

CBSA

(Conestoga

“This

money

is

like a life lesson.

and

We’re

start allotting

more

for the year-end concert.”

wasn’t

able

to

students

possible that

is

it

came

without passes

in

after those students

were

by

let in

may have

security and they

left

taps running. “I

was unable

to determine

who

photo

labs.

I

not sure there was a problem,”

the

the

on the fourth and the labs in graphic still

alert

he

said

and there

of pooling resources By Janet Wakutz

the

finance for the college, said

he

security

Hunter

potential,

said.

faculty

in

the

program, said incident

it

member

a

graphic

at the

was not a

prints.

water and prints require washing as well. said he

had found a couple

of taps that wouldn’t shut off and talked

with

students

providing the opportunity

achieve

to

helping

their

students

them to meet those needs. “The synergy of pulling resoiurces together is realty what we want to celebrate. The spirit of what is done today is the

The processing of film requires 20 minutes of washing with cool

Sowa

is

students

design

time of the

real problem,

64

mind

recognize their needs and helping

His classes had just completed at least

special-needs

of

just over usage.

and making

of

thinks

when

enabling services, what comes to for

Sowa,

Allan Sparling and presented by Kurt Randall, who said, “I’ve

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of

believes

with

celebrates ‘synergy’

have addressed the situation and I have not heard anything further,”

Vince .

along

Awards banquet

areas that

processing two rolls of film each

going to learn to look at the bud-

is

addressed

notified

“Faculty

be a reaUy expensive show.” However, Stokes said, the DSA

were held on a Thursday or a Friday, but holding the event on “There

security

Milner

to

DSA

were

problem has been corrected.

promotions co-ordinator

on a Monday played a the low attendance,”

staff

water while on rounds.

was kind of a good thing that we didn’t get (the Watchmen) because it would have turned out

the small turnout.

made

better

“It

is

Dietz added

the water

she said.

and

have been no more problems,” said Hunter who asked his personnel to check for running

they decided not to accept any

They

know where

in journalism

“Guards are

put in an

Watchmen, a

“I don’t

am

design.

it

end of the year.”

Stokes said the

from a quarter-inch hose.

with students leaving taps running

security,

don’t

when

both of them and they said they didn’t leave the taps running.”

including water and salt for the

to

were causing concern, including

can’t

we

of an

they might be and at this point

the journalism labs

lot

much

water running

determine there was a problem

floor

far as our

to

gain entry to photo labs on weekends,” said Dietz. “I talked to

$55

always spend the time required to

dance, but the date the event was

it

$50

organize events,” said Stokes. “As

scheduled, played a bigger part in

“Having

was

At the time, A1 Hunter, head of

offers.

“Perhaps, people weren’t familiar

DSA

the

was due

increase

it

co-ordinator,

situation.

event in January, but there are

About 12 people, including the four students who came on the free bus from residence, attended the April 12 show which featured Ron Hawkins and the Rusty Nails

difficult to believe that

finds

asked to turn off taps and faculty

at the

flop.”

to

he

says

the cost of water used over the

and starts

from physical resources.

went, but I don’t think it all went from our area,” he said. Sharon Dietz, journalism

softener. Students

and lack of time to

plan events.

“The

left

students

Sowa now

March only two showed passes to security

“During

also

and preserve the environment,” said Milner whose figures indicate average

the concert didn’t go

including

well,

limitations

thought we’d

turned out to be a

it

week

this

physical

on and water was flowing freely. “Our concern is to control costs

week,”

this

of

said at the time he

believed water taps were being

the time to schedule the event.”

year concert and no one showed up,” said Patty Stokes, the

movie night

who

resources,

banquet tonight, there was the DSA awards banquet last week,

March was up by

,000 gallons, according to Barry

Milner,

By Jeanette

in

He

shutting off the taps.

posted the notices he had received

about

never had a better teacher or instructor.”

The support staff award went to Lynn Robbins and was presented by Steven Chmiel who called Robbins “extremely nice and caring.”

sentiment of an outstanding employee,” said Mullan.

The special needs awards were renamed last year and are now called the June Dahmer Memorial Special Needs Awards, in memory of June Dahmer who made contributions

needs

special

to

students at the Waterloo campus.

Dahmer’s

.

husband

A1

and

daughter Sarah presented one of

and her mother Ann spoke about her daughter to the the awards

1999

ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS

audience.

“She was a very special person thought of all of you as her family,” Dahmer’s mother said.

Marian Mainland gets a hug from Myrna Nicholas as she receives her award.

who

(Photo by Janet Wakutz)

Jack Fletcher, director of student

emceed

services,

ceremony, held

WE NEED HELP THIS FALL WITH ORIENTATION AND REQUIRE A FEW STUDENTS TO ASSIST IN THIS AREA

THIS IS A PAID POSITION ($7/H0UR)

the

at the

award

college on

April 12.

award approached the podium and described why they nominated the individual and then presented the

his

appropriate award.

of services

for each

Certificates of appreciation

were

given to Mike Verway of technol-

Wright

for

his

approachable,

understanding way; Dick Parker

ORIENTATION WEEK WILL BE AUGUST 30th - SEPT 3/99

Dan Cann.

friend, fellow student

The nominator

ogy, nominated by student David

PLEASE SEE Melissa MacClennan in Student Services (2B02) ABOUT THE DETAILS PRIOR TO THE END OF THE SCHOOL TERM

The student award went to Lee Breen and was presented by his John

Gilmour

services

received

Cromby award

the

in recognition of

commitment for

needs

special

computer Glen

of

to the provision

students at

with

Conestoga

College.

Myrna

Nicholas,

administrator

who

peer is

on

tutor

sick

leave,

was presented with an

of social services, nominated by

award

to recognize her dedication

who said, “Dick Parker is a man who believes in empowerment;” Stuait Hood of

to the

Robert Gurney

academic success of

dents with special needs.

stu-

Marian

Mainland, co-ordinator of special

welding engineering, nominated by Rashed Yeghani; and Martin

needs, presented the award.

Haie of technology, nominated by Lee Breen who said Hare had

member

from special needs, ended the award ceremony by

always been sensitive to Breen’s needs which developed from a

of appreciation for their work in

back

accommodating

The

injury.

faculty

award was given

to

Judy

Hart,

a

support

staff

presenting proctors with a token

required special

students tests.

who


STUDENT

Cramming

SPOKE, April

LIFE

common

is

CBSA holds annual banquet

Conestoga students

for

and bash

By Lindsay Gibson

van Donkersgoed

Julie

I

Cojiestoga

ho

Bii-smess

Student As.soaation held

signing in to security after hours

work

to

annual awards banquet

in labs.

on April

Conestoga security guard Lori Rothwell said some students have

I i

at tlic

its

at

I

llh

6 p m.

WaU-ihio Inn

Matthew, co-ordinator of

Ian

The executive included Topping, Campbell,

communications

and security has had to kick them out because they don’t have proper night passes. But most are

prtjgiam, acted as the nuslor of

cciemonies

Mike Chau

back again

communications

6:30 a.m. the next

at

“The biggest one

is

who

said Rothwell,

two

the college for

at

which

graphics,”

has worked

Leslie Molina,

security

a third-year

on Saturday,

civil

17

April

engineering student, signs

with

in

(Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

.

years.

Traditionally the end of any

semester

is

students,

said

busy

a

time

for

Joan Magazine,

a busier time for the

“It is also

students are facing

may

some

because

counsellors

to the fact

when

not pass,

have been a

up

“It

because

stressful

is

everything comes

all at

once,” he

said.

According to Magazine

student services counsellor.

they

should

it

reality before,” she

about

setting

it is

all

and

priorities

“The end tends

sneak up on

to

you,” she said. “Students need to

and consider how

set priorities

Students are feeling the pressure

of paper,

exam and

dates, said Leslie

project due

Molina, a third-

year civil engineering student.

Magazine suggests students work on improving a C grade and spend less time on an courses.

all

existing

A grade.

to-ordinator.

Magazine

said

some

that

and then focus more attention on those ones.” For example, if students feel they don’t have enough time for grade

because

semester

they

can’t

handle the pressure, but that does not happen very often.

“Some students have to ask for some time off work to study and get things done,” said Magazine,

“which

good because school

is

should be

61

Awards

presented

LASA students educate means

by

survey

of

a

questionnaire to be included in a First-year

LASA

up Conestoga

students set

around

displays

College, Tuesday, April

13,

to

written

final

LASA

The

required

policing centres in the area.

legislation

information fair as part of their

The

discovered completing

incarceration centres they

one day be employed

As

of the

part

first-year students

to

visit

a

may

project,

the

were required

particular

to

Sarah

LASA

at.

jail

or

detention centre and conduct a

in

facts

were

process

the

“We

CBSA

J999-2000

school year which includes Lisa president;

Katie

vice

president:

Topping,

treasurer;

Henhoeffer,

Trevor

Christa Biltort, ccnmnutlications

The

programs

included

accounting, business inuthemat-

prgrammer/

comfiutei

general

analyst,

^mess,

managoraeni studies, marketing, materials

nianagcincnt,

microcomputer adniiniati ation and microcomputer soft-ware ftTiile

too numerous to

list,

the

awards presented ranged from laculty awards' to president,

co-ordinator;

Andreas

Teresa Bricker,

and computer

co-ordinator;

promotio-ns

Kyriacov,

liaison.

The aw^ds ceremeny was by a biz bash at Sammy’s G^agej a bar in downtown Kkchen^. Students and some facultv, followed

many

still

>emi-lormal

spotting

wear

ffteir

tiom

the

banquet, attended the event.

Admission was were drawn

free '

and prizes

throughout

die evening

hierarchy throughout.”

group toured

of

is

in

danger of

closing because the government

considering

“super

proposal

a

jail,”

is

a

for

a larger jail that all

the smaller jails

in the area.

The idea which was proposed

in

Pooley,

first-year

postponed to the year 2000.

learned

tihe

for the

“And

September 1999 has now been

a

who

visited the

how much

keep an inmate

day, even

said.

according

Guelph Correction Centre. to

pre.sented.

executive.

students from biismoss programs

presented award.s of appreciation

this project,

student

Chau

from the

also got a taste of the levels of

would replace

interesting

designed to give

is

funding,

jaU system.

LASA students an in-depth look at

project

consider

to

award of

also received an

appreciation

executive

and

liaison.

Pooley also said the centre her

were

students

and how the different levels of govermnent affect the Other

public administration course.

the

entire experience.

inform students about different students participated in this

on

report

computer

fair

employees earn,” she

we

.lohnson,

at Oie college.

Hong Chau, CBSA

By Carly Benjamin

to

Hicks,

co-ordinator;

Cashtnore,

were

program-specific awards.

first priority.”

through information

weie

aviaids

presented.

ics,

students drop out at the end of the

planning ahead.

certain projects will affect then-

said.

The

CMISA

said 3.51 attended the event, at

morning.

security

fin the evening.

Ryan

co-ordinator;

promotions

Carapholl.

Laurtc

treasurer;

the sm^ill business development

LiitJiic

Terc.sa

Bricker, vice president; Trevor

to pull “all-nighters”

been trying

executive

current

the

of the association.

There has been an 85 per cent increase in the number of students to

— Page 3

26, 1999

were accepted, smaller jails Guelph would close. Rhys Hayes and Darryl If

it

like it

costs

in prison per

what kind of salaries jail

Porterfield, both first-year

who

students

LASA

fair,

LASA

participated in the

said they have been

accepted as auxiliary officers for the Ontario Provincial Police.

Although the opportunity did not arise

the

from the project they did on

OPP

for the

students agreed that

would

their

it

LASA

fair,

was a

the

position

offer experience for

program and

later

their

USED CD

career.

In the initial training, auxiliary officers are required to

complete

an extensive orientation program

385 Fairway Rood S

41 5 Hespler Rood,

KITCHENER

CAMBRIDGE

((gniKWOtt lira

of approximately 60 hours. Auxiliary

OPP

members

assist regular

and duties may include community pohcing initiatives and projects, search and rescue situations, crime and disaster scenes, large officers

crowd control and

too)

893-2464 402 King

first-year

auxiliary officer for the

LASA student, has been

OPP.

accepted as an

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

and

traffic

traffic accidents.

622-7774

Street M.

WATERIOO {Agog from Itoxl/s}

gatherings or parades for

Rhys Hayes, a

{AonssirmMcOornlds}

884-7376

Q49

com


— SPOKE. April

Page 4

26,

19<»«>

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College conneeted SPOKE

is

mainly funded from September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor; Julie van Donkersgoed; News Editor: Janet Wakutz; Student Life Editor; Lindsay Gibson; Entertainment Editor: Elizabeth Sackrider; Sports Editor: Brian Smiley; is

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager; Carly Benjamin; Circulation Manager: Eileen Diniz; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon SPOKE’S address is 299 Boon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

or

MS Word file would be helpful.

Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

tain

Dietz.

illustration (such as a photograph).

Gretzky’s retirement spurs student debate By Elizabeth Sackrider The greatest hockey player Canada has ever produced is hanging up his skates after a 20-year career.

Wayne

Gretzky, the legendary

number

has announced his and the news has caused mixed reactions across the 99,

retirement

country.

Some

of Conestoga’s hockey

interviewed in a random survey thought Gretzky should be fans

able to retire if he wants, despite

being

an international super and hockey legend. Others thought he should hang in there and play for one more

Tannis Fenton, journalism.

year.

that

athlete

Tony

Wagner,

a

first-year

mechanical engineering student, said he thought Gretzky should do as he likes.

“He shouldn’t

let

the

affect his decisions,” said

Derrick

Wall,

woodworking

a

media

Wagner.

first-year

agreed

student,

with Wagner’s sentiment. “After 20 years he deserves some family time. He is a family

man now,”

said Wall.

Mike Tutka,

ing student,

also said

he thought Gretzky should spend more time with his family. “He’s too old for the game,” said Tutka.

accounting

agreed

student,

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Part 2:

Coping with Stress

In part

1,

we

Stress

lives,

and

physically, emotionally

“He should

style,” said Peterson. retire

when he is

stiU in the public

it

Shauna Peterson, accounting.

engi-

really

should

accounting student, Cindy Dean.

he wants to retire, he should. If he wants to take time off, he should go nuts and do what he wants,” said Dean. “If

woodworking student Gretzky

said

should stay in the game. in him,” said Faulhafer. “Besides

his

knew about have

wife doesn’t want him to

and he

till

is terrible to

> :

James Gallay, said he was sorry that such a great hockey player is finally going to be leaving the game.

next

Second-year accounting student,

“It’s

him go,” said good he goes out

sad to see

should play another season.

Gallay. “It

is

“He should play one more year “He would make the perfect

now

with Toronto,” said Wright.

with people.”

second-line centre.”

journalism student, agreed with

he

civil

Dwayne

doesn’t

retirement will is

that

Tannis

engineering

Fenton,

a

first-year

“It is sad to see a great Canadian hockey player go,” said Fenton. “He has been amazing, even though he has been in the States, he has been a great role model for many young athletes.”

Gretzky’s

retire for a

stiU favourable

-

last.

going to

is

Gallay.

Hofstetter, said

think

while he

year

then play for the Maple Leafs,” said Hofstetter.

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mechanical

Second-year accounting student,

Steve Wright, concurred Gretzky

“He

Greg Bishop, a first-year computer programming analyst

this

waited

it

to the great one.

season.”

student,

Tutka,

most hockey patrons say goodbye

Overall,

agree

he should stay another Bishop. “Nobody

Second-year

“He has a couple of good years

Gretzky

ice.

said

Gretzky has worked hard to get where he is, said second-year

Dave Faulhafer

agreed

“I think

year,”

Mike

engineering.

should stay on the

eye.”

A goal is not to eliminate stress but to learn how to manage

even use

civil

CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES!

discussed that stress

our everyday

Hofstetter,

student,

retire.

leave.”

Shauna Peterson, a second-year

Gretzky should

“I think he should retire with

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Photos by Jeanette Everall


SPOKE, April 26, 1999

SPORTS

From Brantford Wayne

citizens

Gretzky surprised,

Gretzky didn’t burst onto the scene and tear up

and amazed most

hockey

Brantford minor hockey in

who

people

Brian

the

game

Smiley

of

while Gretzky announced that he’s at peace

and ready

to riiove

how many of us were ready

on,

to

go of arguably die greatest hockey player to ever have played

playmg novice, one single, solitary goal. Mind you he was a six-year-old playing in a league where everyone else was 10, but

in his

every

a sub-par performance.

still

the sport?

Gretzky became a star. Most people know about his scoring

am not.

for one,

Gretzky will always be a part of

me, as long as

we

that link,

I live. I like to

think

have a special

will always

shared with about 80,000

who were bom

other people,

or

hometown, Brantford. When you meet a person, invariably they ask where you’re live in our

from and I always answer without hesitation,

“I’m from Brantford, the

Wayne Gretzky was

place where

bom.” While most of these people don’t

know

geographical

the

location of our city, they’ve heard of

same

children.

Wa5me

did whatever his

coaches asked of him, which

is

Since that time Brantford has

me a chance to place our name in the

feats (378 goals in one year, etc.), however many people may be shocked and amazed to know Brantford didn’t want him. Some players’ parents on Wayne’s team downright despised, even hated, this youngster. They yeUed obscenities at Gretzky and threatened him for taking the spotlight and playing time away from their own

that question gives

of

Gretzky.

Answering

after his first year that

know Wayne

because

sentence, and

we’ve done something

seems

it

together.

By the time I was bom, in

renamed a recreation complex and road in his name. But even feose

honours

distinguished

were

Gretzky had already made his

debated in Brantford. In the early 1980s

mark on

suggested the Brant and District

our

,‘Ms’ sport

However,

from

p^^j^ stories, i^^ve

1975,

talking

city.

with

reading newspaper

come

to realize there

were some people in our city that didn’t like him. Those Br^tford

be debated, until

to

Civic

Centre

it

was

be renamed in

Gretzky’s name, but that idea was

down. Instead a recreation was renamed tlie Wayne

shot

has

centre

Gretzky Sports Centre.

more

is

man

been

own City, the place he put on map?

of 2,857

his point total

around

anyone

more

one-third

is

than

else.

Gretzky

this

is

A legend,

a hero. according to Oxford,

a famous or remarkable person. Gretzky achieved a lot outside of

is

the game. Every year

from 1981

Jealousy.

to 1992 he ran a Gretzky Celebrity

Wayne Gretzky could donate

Tennis tournament

every penny he has ever earned to

still

(later

changed

softbaU) in Brantford. This

tournament raised more than $1.2

argue that he hasn’t done

this

milEon for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. That is a remarkable effort by any person. Gretzky is a legend.

man and why we honour him in his own

Canada has few icons, which Oxford says is an image or statue.

anything for the

city.

ITus

is

the

argument many people have made as

to

some people would

Brantford and

what every player should do, but doesn’t, and for this he was ‘forced’ to leave the city at age 14 and play Junior B in Toronto.

Brantford and most of them

Brantford

was

It

Why

year,

let

I,

had

that

scored

first

of 1,963

And

city

subjected to this type of freatment

Gretzky

assist total

one of the main roads in the

Wayne Gretzky Parkway, even

phenomenon he

is today.

His

than anyone has in total points.

finally approved.

In that

But

hockey.

Iris

1990s when one city

In the

councillor suggested renaming

season playing orgaiuzed hockey. He wasn’t always the first

ever saw him

play

should be embarrassed

and ashamed.

dazzled

was

to Nagano, Gretzky

why

to

they

dislike

personable shouldn’t

hometown. Because he hasn’t done anything for Hogwash.

money

name

Gretzky’s biggest

When hockey anywhere,

us.

alone

is

the

after

I

is mentioned would wager a lot of

doesn’t take people long,

it

striking

up a conversation, comes to mind.

any industry or person wishing to

before Gretzky

relocate to Brantford.

The image I wiU always remember of Gretzky occinred during the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan. Canada weis tied at one with the Czech RepubEc and the game was moving into a sudden-death shootout. The winner would advance to the gold

I

will

point

selling

to

remember Gretzky

for

what he is and not what my fellow Brantfordians wanted him to be. He was arguably, (in my mind he the greatest hockey player, model and citizen our city has ever produced and probably ever is),

role

win, in

my lifetime.

The Oxford

definition of hero is

who

a person

admired for nobiEty, courage and outstmiding achievement Having watched him play as I grew up, I know what an outstanding career he has had. In 198.5/86 he set the record for points m one season with 215. In his career he amassed records for the most NID:.. goals, with 894, is

Gretzky

is

an icon.

and

thinking,

“This

remember

I

the ultimate

is

ending to the greatest hockey career. Gretzky will come off the bench as the last shooter, the shootout wiE be

great

Canada’s

and game. The greatest goal scorer and player the game had ever produced was left to hang his head on the bench in disbeEef when he wasn’t chosen

Canada

shooters

five

the

lost

to represent his greatest time of

country in

its

need (outside of

war).

His Efe had come fuU circle. Gretzky was no longer needed (Eke his days in Brantford) and

my

It was then that I end was near and that not the image I want to have of

heart sank.

realized the is

him

in

my

mindi However,

I

can

only think of what might have been, had he been chosen as one

of “our” shooters? Would

won

we have

medal? Would Canadian hockey be better and not gold

the

ailing as

is?

it

These debates can only be raised because Gretzky is the world’s greatest player

and has such an

impact on his sport

medal game, the loser the bronze. Both teams were selecting their shooters

— Page 5

tied,

and Gretzky

wiU have

the last chance to

the game.

He’U do

win

Everything worked out in the

was forced to leave maybe if he had remained he wouldn’t have become what he has. It is possible end. Gretzky

Brantford and

that

he may not even have been

at

those Olympics games.

What I know proud that

I

for sure

is

that

I’m

wasn’t one of those

parents or spectators, players or

coaches, at Brantford’s arenas

who were

inconsiderate and rude

young boy who just wanted to play a game he loved. I was on his side and I’U always to a

hold a special place in

my

heart

for the greatest person, gentleman

and hockey player Brantford wiU

it.”

That never happened. Gretzky wasn’t selected to be one of

ever produce.

Gretzky cards worth double overnight, collector says By Wayne

New York on April

Collins

16, despite the

pleas of family, fans and

Students

who

collect

hockey

cards should be aware that, with

Wayne

Gretzky’s

Gretzky

cards

retirement,

and

feUow

career of what many, including

week,” says Clark, who’s hanging on to a couple of

memorabiEa have just doubled, or

Lemieux, consider the greatest hockey player to ever lace up a

Gretzky,

announced his news conference in

38,

retirement at a

and 61

goes

worth

for old

Edmonton

Oiler, St.

assists, despite suffering

a

Rangers cards with Gretzky’s face

Gretzky cards wiU become even more

on them,

valuable.

someone wants them bad enough,

by,

CoUectors should scout around

“In

I

my

opinion,” says Clark, “if

can ask any price

I

want.”

same reason.

Number world

known around

99,

the

“The Great One”, re-wrote the NHL’s record books

last

week, can be

sold for at least

$800

this

week.”

as

in a 20-year career that

one

“Cards that were worth

$400

on Sunday against

last assist

He

and 1,963

retires

with 894 goals

assists for a total

of

says he’d afready sold five

a.m.

at the market by 10 on Saturday morning and

expects to get a lot of offers for his

Tim Clark, who sells hockey memorabiEa at the Flea Market on Hespeler Road in Cambridge, says

remaining cards.

he considers Gretzky the No.

1

“Hockey different,”

is

to

a

retirement, however, he expects

IF INTERESTED

TALK TO YOUR FACULTY OR DROP IN TO STUDENT SER VICES!

more on his card stocks. “They will go to the highest

to bid

bidder,” says Clark.

To put old hockey memorabiEa

Gretzky cards and souvenirs, has

prices in perspective, Clark says.

collection

98/99

Crease to determine an item’s market value. After Gretzky’s buyers wUl be more than wilEng

his

AS TUTORS FOR THE NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR

called

of

years,

RETURNING STUDENTS

says, usually

publication

“Nobody

wiU replace him.” Clark, who’s been collecting hockey cards for more than 20 says

Most vendors, he refer

going to be very

says Clark.

WILL BE LOOKING TO HIRE

Gretzky cards

2,857 regular season points.

player of aU time.

WE

hockey card salesman

ended with

the Penguins.

Gretzky

Tim Clark,

Louis

Blues, Los Angeles Kings and

injury.

National Hockey League and the

these three other players, win sell for about $35 now but the pric^ wlli go op. (Photo by Wayne Collins)

Gretzky’s rookie cards for the

time

is

New York Rangers as their leading

neck

patjticular set, yvith

this

As

Orr’s rookie card

pair of skates. Gretzky leaves the

scorer this season with nine goals

Tim Clark holds up a Wayne Gretzky card. He says this

approximately $2,700 but points out that this card is from 1967.

“Cards that were worth $400 last week, can be sold for at least $8(X)

Pittsburgh Penguins star Mario

tripled, in value.

Bobby

more season. The announcement ends the

players to play one

other

even

already doubled in value since last Friday’s announcement.

^sl^ices I

I

Supported by PocnSfcidtrtAttocliiow


Page 6

— SPOKE, April

26, 1999

SPORTS Condor teams capture four medals

Award Winners Athletic

Athletic

manager

predicts

gold for future varsity teams By Brian Smiley Conestoga

College’s

varsity

teams all had successful 1998/1999 campaigns, according to Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation. But next year he may be blinded by the shininess of gold medals he thinks those teams are capable of sports

winning. “It’s been a very good year, as opposed to other years I’ve been here,” James said. “Next year is looking very promising. We’re looking to strike for at least two

golds.”

Coach

Geoff Johnstone presents Paul Mouradian with one of the two MVP awards he won for indoor and outdoor men’s soccer (Photo by Charlos Kuepter)

Condor teams struck for four medals this year, none of them coveted golds, but an excellent showing nonetheless.

The biggest highlight of the year was the men’s hockey team. After

team accomplished something no other Conestoga hockey team has done before: skate away from the National Championships with the silver medal.

Women’s softball also took home one of the four medals, a silver,

at

the Ontario Colleges

OCAA

playoffs

as

mild upset, the Condors captured the bronze medal. But the most prominent event was yet to come. In the Canadian Colleges Athletic Association hockey championships held at the college, Conestoga upset the No. 1 nationally ranked Cambrian Golden Shield, for a thrilling

the talent

and

potential for success all season,

but they couldn’t string together afi/larlene

Ford

Conestoga’s

athletic

program assistant, presents Stephanie Den Haan with the MVP award for women's indoor soccer.

1\

was a

rebuilding they were

it

“I’m expecting they’ll challenge for the gold

medal

OF Management

Leading The

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ADVANCE YOUR CAREER

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be considered among the elite of Canadian coUege hockey. They used that potential and talent in the finals and proved to be an outstanding to

CIM program

in

the Conestoga College

Continuing Education Catalogue or

indoor are

in

and

definite

processes,

but

able to provide

still

some immense optimism for the upcoming year. The women’s outdoor team won the regional championship and

made the

it

to the quarter-finals of

OCAA

championships before

bowing out for the year. James said he is looking forward to big things from this team next year and doesn’t expect them to fall off their usual winning pace from previous years. After switching to the cozy confines of the gymnasium, the women’s indoor team seemed

when

cruising

they

won

the regional provincial qualifying

championships.” Ian James,

manager of and recreation

tournament for the OCAA championships. However, they lost steam in the OCAA championships and exited early from those championships, failing to reach the playoff round.

going to be a toss-up next James said. “We’re going to be as strong as this year but, “It’s

also

won

hardware, capturing a

bronze medal at the OCAA championships. Winning bronze was a huge boost to the men’s soccer program at the college, considering the team has kept the basement of the league warm in previous years. “It’s

we need

of success and

all

the players

accomplished one important achievement this season.

On

top of the fabulous results

“They had a

athletes

season and we’re tremendously excited about the 1999/2000

fashion.

season.”

very recruiting

a

few

-great

new

James said

themselves represented the college in remarkable

the

James

After

key players.”

the varsity teams had,

a tremendous turnaround,” said.

three

Each team had some smell

“The second half of the year is what I’d like to remember,” James said. Most people will agree, as the varsity hockey

Ford would like

to

“Conestoga was represented well by their varsity athletes,” he said.

see basketball included

Assistant manager says intramurals a success By Brian Smiley

Ford attempted to put together a basketball session, but the interest

and that includes intramurals, which saw participation remain steady, according to Marlene Ford, assistant manager of athletics and season

athletic

it was dropped. She said she will try again next year and hopefully tliere will be more interest.

wasn’t there so

Contact: Mr. Jay Moszynski

@

Doon Campus 1-519-748-5220 ext 492

room

1

B49

The

centre

recreation

five

ran

intramurals

different

“It

contact

hockey,

of

MANAGEMENT

National Office

athletics

e-mail; office@cim.ca Internet: http://www.cim.ca

manager of and recreation

Ford said she was happy with all

the

seasons, but

would

add

like

another intramural the schedule next year.

to

was disappointing

no

to

1-800-387-5774

ran.”

assistant

ball hockey.

CANADIAN INSTITUTE

disappointing that Marlene Ford,

two

sessions of co-ed volleyball and

or

was

no basketball

including co-ed slo-pitch, touch football,

“It

basketball ran,” she said.

that

crowned Foo Bar as its champion. Contact hockey had no winner because of scheduling conflicts, and in the first session of volleyball, which Ford says is the best intramural. These captured the championship.

Guys

second session Civil 2 took home the volleyball

In the

recreation.

in

women’s

squad.

April ends Conestoga College’s

Learn about the

The

to be

at the Ontario

athletics

soccer program,” he said.

Canadian Institute

1

IN

together next year.

year,”

The Condors were an up-and-

enough wins

it all

because they weren’t supposed to compete with the elite of the league. Even though there’s nowhere to go but up, James said next year looks to be better. “It’s very promising for next year. I’m expecting they’ll challenge for the gold medal at the Ontario championships,” he said. The men’s outdoor soccer team

this year,

effort

finish to their season.

down team and had

put

“We’re excited about what’s going to happen with the men’s

was rebuilding fantastic

the end of the season and slipped

the

may

outdoor teams

the Condors put things together at

the fourth, and final, seed. In a

and had a decent indoor season to complement their outdoor team. James said they have a lot of individual talent and to gel

Association playoff tournament at Durham College in October. Considering the team Athletic

having a mediocre regular season,

into

players this year, the team started

No.

1

and the B. Clams won the ball hockey championship. Overall, Ford said the intramurals cdhtinue to have a good participation rate, but things are getting tougher because students continue to take on more title

responsibilities.

now

co-ed slo-pitch, which ran during the first semester, the Amateurs took the title. Touch

they

football, also in the first session.

(participate),” she said.

In

“Right

students

part-time job or they just

need a

commute and

can’t

do

it


SPOKE, April 26, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT Fixing

— Page 7

Conestoga

Whatever you do

Go

don’t pass up By

Eileen Diniz

and gets even deeper into trouble

of Kitchener Glass Ltd, prepares to take a lenigth of glass from his truck to fix door. (Photo by Wayne CoHins)

while attending a rave at an under-

Go, the new entertaining black

comedy/drama director

by

Swingers

Doug Liman,

stars

Katie

Holmes {Disturbing Behaviour), Sarah Polley {The Sweet Hereafter),

Jay

Mohr

Cigarettes),

Scott

Wolf (TV’s

{200

The

Go

second

trouble with the

and

bar.

Olyplant {Scream

2).

is

into

split

situations

is

three

that

same

the

different

begin

all

at

The film about a bunch of time.

basically

messed up kids having difficulties with judgement, morality and dmgs.

Go

starts

(Polley),

out with

Ronna Martin

a sarcastic

SoCal gro-

cery store clerk, trying to

some

make

extra cash to pay the rent

before she

is

evicted.

She has

Simon Baines’, (Desmond Askew) shift, which includes a bit of drug dealing on the side. Simon has decided to take some taken

You

learn

fits

detective

super

desperate

Krakowski

Zack

Montgomery this

charade

and his

wife

(Jane

from

TV’s

Ally

open

to

The end of Go involves the young actors colliding in an

way at an underground Los Angeles nightclub. outrageous

The

good is

as

thing

about

this

that the characters

their

situations

both interesting and fun.

as

are It

is

and leaves the viewer amazed by the characters’ pathetic sense of what is right and what is

RETURNING STUDENTS

Go

opened in theatres April 9 and is rated AA for coarse language and some strong

subject

matter.

currently playing

Centre

collateral.

Ronna continues

(Fichter)

that they are very

wrong.

(Olyplant) and uses her reluctant

and

to

the film

sexual adventures with strangers.

also fill in for Simon in a drug run after two actors, Adam (Wolf) and Zack (Mohr),

approach her requesting some ecstasy. She goes to Simon’s main drug source Todd Gaines

how

McBeal). This married couple also makes it obvious to Adam and

original

to

Burke

friendly

for cash she eventually decides

(Holmes) as

a mih ate?

together.

well

best friend Claire

t

These two also have quite a funny and strange dinner with

weekend. so

what they are up

begin to understand

movie

is

owner of a topless

(Wolf and Mohr) turn up again.

time off to go to Las Vegas for the

Ronna

in

Later in the movie the two actors

takes place a couple

days before Christmas holidays. It

situation

Simon and his friend Marcus (Tayp Diggs) to Las Vegas. They get extremely drunk, lose their money and get into some more crazy follows

{Armageddon)

The movie .

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Party of Five), William Fichter

Timothy

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Page 8

— SPOKE, April 26, 1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Anti-NATO protests continue By Wayne

Collins

As NATO’s

offensive against

Yugoslavia reached

on April

watch Serbian

its

26th night

17, protestors

gathered

demanding an end bombing. Black robed priests

to the

television.

everybody

can

“NATO

watch

television.”

He

said

it

not hard to

is

tell

who’s been lying, since the outset of the whole campaign. Milicevic

from Kitchener’s Serbian Orthodox Church, Holy Trinity, began the Saturday rally at 8 p.m. with a prayer in the Serbian language,

Holy Trinity with three fingers

of their hands.

NATO needs to

said that

world

support

offensive

for

against

and

people

lie to

its

the

their

get

unjust

Serbian

president,

Slobodan Milosevic.

while forming the church’s sign of the

Kitchener

“None,” he answered himself, adding that meanwhile,

again in front of Kitchener’s city hall,

in

Milicevic blamed the United States, saying the

Americans have

a strategic interest in bombing

Several speakers then took to

Yugoslavia.

podium, condemning the NATO bombings as a waste of Canadian taxpayers’ money. They

alternatives

to

capitalism

anywhere

chanted anti-war slogans to the

globe,” Milicevic said.

the

“They

want

no

their

social

version of

on

the

crowd of more than 300 people from various local commimity groups,

including

Greeks,

Romanians, Czechs, Canadians and British. Adults and children alike Serbians,

“Serbians

in

Serbia don’t

need propaganda.”

cheered reports of NATO failures,

Most

of the protesters at Kitchener’s City Hall

symbolize victims of the

NATO bombing

in

on

April

17 wore targets over

Yugoslavia,

their clothing to

(Photos by

Wayne

Collins)

Davaor Milicevic

such as downed bombers near Belgrade, while lighting candles

and singing Serbian songs. Most of those present, including several Conestoga College and University of Waterloo students, waved either Canadian or Serbian flags and wore black and white targets pinned to their bodies, symbolizing the victims of NATO

bombs in Yugoslavia. One speaker, Milicevic,

shouting

Davaor into

the

microphone from the stage in English, asked the crowd,

“Who

needs propaganda?”

He answered

his question with

NATO

needed propaganda more than Serbia because they were the ones bombing Yugoslavia. “Serbians in Serbia don’t need

with

bombs, and go to sleep

read

news in Serbian for those who had no Internet access. Several times the crowd cheered to hear bews of downed NATO pilots. It was also reported that 70,000 people had gathered in Macedonia

NATO’s plans

to protest

When crowd

to land

there.

the speeches ended, the

City Hall to march

left

along King Street, singing and chanting phrases such as “Stop the

bombing.”

Both the

OPP

their

with

traffic

bombs.” Milicevic also asked

One woman went up and the

and Waterloo were present to maintain order and provide

propaganda,” he said. “Serbians (children)

took the podium.

ground troops

a lengthy speech, saying

eat

The crowd cheered loudly, waving flags throughout the evening as several more speakers

regional

King

how many

people in the world can actually

police

control

The

Street.

along

crowd

dispersed and the protest ended

without any incidents.

Priests from Kitchener’s Serbian Hall

on

April

1

7 with a prayer

in

Orthodox Church, Holy

Trinity,

began the

Serbian.

(Photo by

^TOI THE

\Y/A

Momir Jakovijevic (left) and Nebojsa Miric attended the anti-NATO rally at Kitchener’s City Hall on April 17. Miric is making the Serbian Orthodox Church’s sign of the Holy Trinity. (Photo by

Wayne

Collins)

M ciofrianclinq

f an

at Kil',.liont!r

etid to ttu;

protest at Kitchener City

'b

NATO

on Apnl *7 on YuqOblavia

City Hall strike

Wayne

Coiiins)


Digital Edition - April 26, 1999