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3 1st Year

— No.

15

Whafs Baden ‘disaster’ no accident Inside

By Wayne

Collins

and

spontaneity

their

test

proficiency in making the right decisions under pressure.

Blood was spilled, limbs were lost and hearts stopped beating in the town of Baden on April 10, but it was no accident. It was all carefully planned by Conestoga College’s paramedic teachers

30

give

to

One

k:

accidents

teach students paramedic

students

skills.

His favorite part of the whole

saving skills before they graduate

program,

in June.

riding

has been ambulance crews around Waterloo Region because anything could happen and there’s no teacher like real hfe.

Baden

Event.

firefighters

fun day

victims out of wrecked cars and

using

fire

hoses to contain

Each scenario took about 45 minutes from the initial

incident to closure.

various from Paramedics services monitor and critique the students’ work and give them

handled

have

the

call

its

Wendy

who

Spiegelberg,

teaches

in

one-year

the

meaning

skills

Paramedic Five scenarios were enacted during Baden Day. students must assess a mock accident scene. The student posing as a victim may have a broken neck and crews co-ordinate efforts to remove her from the vehicle. (Photo by Wayne Collins)

and

they’ve learned.

would work

the

Students

team

a

as

interpret

apply

and

troubleshoot the situation.

he

Earlier

hopefully,

joked

had

that,

would not

students

forget their training in the realistic setting.

paramedic program,

said each

a

scenario

gets

student

better.

assess a situation,

to

some practical advice on how they could

for a

Bob Mahood, co-ordinator of the

to car wrecks for the staged acci-

to

make

end of the year,”

paramedic program, said the exercise was to teach smdents

Regional Ambulance and provides everything from fire trucks

30

scenarios)

at the

said Judges.

fires.

Baden fire department sponsors the event along with Kitchener

dents.

however,

with

“Still, (the

assisted througout the day, cutting

i

people or head

a chance to practise their hfe-

Day

PAGE 4

Judges, said

where

from car and farm were a great way to

injuries

Five “accident” scenarios were

principal’s attention.

Mark

suffered heart attacks

enacted in the 12th Annual Baden

Litde letter writer gets

student,

scenarios

the

Afterwards

with.

deal

to

he whole class discusses each

“When

performance.

Spiegelberg

the

said

Baden

Day’s five scenarios were kept secret

from the students

to ensure

are three people

there

involved and one

dead,” said

is

Mahood, “they should know not to perform CPR on the dead one.”

Recreation centre negotiates possible addition of bubble dome Talks with the investor, whose

By Brian Smiley

name James could The

Kenneth

Hunter

E.

recreation centre offers students

existing

of

use

facilities

throughout the year, but sometimes there isn’t enough space for all

Conestoga teaches good habits.

PAGE 6

the activities students

would

3

History lost

superior

on

spates

investor has

come up with

one proposal and James expects to hear back from the investor within the next couple of weeks. There are

some

however that work out before

particulars,

But Ian James, manager of letics and recreation, says

ath-

committing

that

importantly

to

most

to the project,

how

will

it

affect

“We

would

don’t want to have

any

The

investor

of

cost

staff.

tennis centre.

The dome would resemble the one at Pioneer Sports World on Highway 8 in Kitchener. “It’s a 50 per cent chance,” James

said. “It’s

something that

could realistically happen.”

most important students

to us is

One

option

when our

have

would

opportunity to use

the

during

would assume

anything

that

is

not

inflatable

“I

in

see

venture.

be

a

off hours.

college

and could be erected and taken down at any time. One option would be to take the bubble

down

in

that

as

a

reasonable

They could take

their

have the James

provide

would

Astroturf surface

As

so people

There would be no permanent

bubble (off the school’s property) w.e

summer

still

there,”

rooms

seating or change facility.

and

the

could enjoy the warmer weather.

The room

facility

for

in

for the

temporary

seating and the recreation centre

use of the dome,

James sees a couple alternatives. The first option would be a shared

the

would

would provide change rooms.

said.

it.”

would

membership and another would be student use

the

would be liable. The other he favours is for the investors to take more risk and run things with more liability. The dome itself would be

the

James estimated that cost to the neighbourhood of

investor about the possibility of

the

for

cost about $200,000.

$700,000.

of

James said he is not too this idea because the

option

explained. “We don’t want to raise student fees, and that is the overall tone of how things are going to be in discussions. What would be

over the

share the cost of running the facility.

structures, like the Astroturf

be

dome

He the

permanent and concrete. James said this would

paying

where both the

private investor and the college

keen on

impact on student fees,” James

west

see

cost program,

college invest in the project by

preliminary talks with a private

courts

million.

to

like

permanent, such as the bubble and

students at the college.

soon.

erecting a sports

Page

The

James wants

Conestoga College has begun

CQMMENTAm

cost at around $1

are in the prehminary stages.

like to see offered.

may change

not disclose,

from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. James estimated the approximate

See Bubble dome

.

.

.Page 2


— SPOKE, April

Page 2

1999

19,

NEWS

DSA By

presents annual awards

van Donkersgoed

Julie

not been any corporate sponsors that

The Doon Student Association Annual Awards Banquet was held April 6 at the Golf Steak House.

The dinner was followed with an

The

recreation centre is in negotiations to erect a bubble dome to the west of the athletic facility. (Photo by Brian Smiley)

awards ceremony

awards

and

presented

dome

College negotiating for bubbie

which several

at

members

community,

college

were

certificates

to

of

departments and associations and

Continued from page

The

1 ...

college.

The

astroturf

inside

complex would be the

different

corporate partners.

James says he recognizes

Beth Lee of the

the

the potential for the athletic pro-

received

from

gram at the school. And James said it would also benefit the college.

Memorial Award.

the former Canadian

turf at

approached the

investors

National Exhibition stadium.

This

It

a very inexpensive

is

would be a grass with longer hairs and more padding. The dome could have four courts,

start

with four different activities going

$5 million, he

on

at the

same time.

If they

the horseshoe pits

add

athletic

removed

for us,” to

six separate courts.

Indoor

tennis,

hockey, lacrosse and volleyball and

many

other

could be

activities

played on the surface.

“As long

the college

to

said.

another

Conestoga College.

Lee was chosen

“We just have

to see

it

work, so

in Kitchener.

The

facility, to

centre, over the tennis courts,

Would you use

said.

the

dome would be up and running within three months of the codstruction start

built to the

and volleyball, among many other

the

west of the recreation

C/O

it

NO,

would use the

I

I

said -the

were

Distinction

its

the

donation of

prizes throughout the year to the

Murphy

college.

SPOKE newsroom

said there have

Rebecca Slaughter, Patty Stokes and Jessica Umlandt.

DSA

the

received

student

life at

Conestoga College

for

their

DSA executive.

The executive members Kristin

was always willing to lend a hand. The Award of Excellence was

Gerry Cleaves, Tara Llanes, Patty

presented to Steve Coleman.

Bambrick,

It

the highest award presented by the DSA in recognition and appreciation of outstanding is

Murphy

and involvement said

Chad

would not use the

every

By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

A vice-president t>f the norm I

Student Association said

week !

Spoke

that

is

for

lust

only gooti starting

campfires.

fSMSMSisMajsiaMsisMaiasjiMsiaiuaisigigiaaagjgMpina

1

1 1

and Stress Management 1

:

What

is

Stress?

become part of our everyday vocabulary. Why write a column on stress when everyone deals with it daily? Since stress

i

Stress has

is

misunderstood and mismanaged, let’s start with understanding. Stress denotes the changes that we undergo as we experience and

1

1 1 1 i IhJ

It has physical and emotional effects on us and can create positive or negative feelings. As a positive influence, stress creates anticipation and excitement and can compel us to action (remember that clutch single that won

the T-ball

game

for

your team?). As a negative influence, stress can anger and rejection, with health problems such

result in discomfort,

as headaches, upset stomach and insomnia.

Although almost everyone responds to some situations with a high level of stress (death of a loved one, birth ol a child, beginning or ending a relationship), individuals respond differently to most situa-

These become stressors for an individual only if they arc construed as threatening or dangerous. Mo.st of us cringe at the thought tions.

of having

to parachute

from an airplane; some find it a challenge. Most of us avoid contact with snakes. Others keep them as pets. Most of us experience anxiety at the thought of presenting in front of a class, and wliile some will do anything to avoid it, a few get totally turned on.

The goal even use

is it

not to eliminate stress but to learn to help us.

how

(o m.'inage

Cleaves,

vice-pre.sident

adjust to our continually changing environment.

i 1 1 i 1 1 i

Gerry

R

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Part

Hussey,

Bryan

Allison,

Ellen

Menage and

Jessica Umlandt.

in

assisted with

and

event

DSA

awareness week held by the

and also served on the board of directors.

recipients of the

Directors’

were

Board of

Award of Recognition

recognized

for

their

their

member of the DSA board of directors.

The

recipients

were;

Chad

Bryan Bambrick, Saul Bower, Teresa Bricker, Laurie Campbell, Gerry Cleaves, Steve Coleman, Jennifer Harron, Jen Allison,

Golf

Steak

I

facility.

Brian Smiley

Stress

Jenn

Coleman received

award because he

virtually

Stokes,

Murphy,

Steve Coleman received the

DSA

award of excellence at annual DSA awards banquet on April 6 at the Golf Steak Hduse in Kitchener.

the

(Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

hlousc

it

tli.ll

good

As Cleaves was opening

th<

Ihe only

it

and

1 1 i

i 1 1

i 1 I

I 1 1

1 1 1

i

Next week: Coping with Stress

I

R

affairs,

made

j

the

fJSA

the

of

outgoing student

comment

Annual

at

AwiU-ds

Biuiquct held April 6 at the

event, he

showed

pictures oi

an overhead projector of tht DSA members. Among Uie photos showr was one of a bonfire. Cleave* asked if anyone from Spokt

was

in

attendance,

notiemg a Spoke Cleaves

present,

staffer

comm

aftm

wa*

is

was met wuh

'Ibe comjiKni

spouidic

the

Simke

tlung

for is staruiig campfires

^

I 1 1

are:

year and that each of the recipients

SPOKE ‘burned’ by Cleaves

spoke @conestogac.on.ca

1

successful

member of

facihty.

or email your opinion to:

in

to

and the

Kitchener.

C/O

awards

recognize their contributions to

on

successful completion of term as a

award because of

Jen

Scheerer,

based

volunteer assistance throughout the

Conestoga College and for

Molson received

Melissa

completion of term as a

The Excellence in Customer Service Award was presented to Molson Breweries. Murphy, president of the

Murphy,

Kristin

Samual,

of

corporate partners.

said

Menage,

Awards

contributions to student life at

Brian Smiley:

YES,

Teresa

departments and associations and

Kristin

activities.

off at the

members of Walk Safe team, campus

were:

Jim Bruin, Sherri Bulmer, Laurie Campbell, Laura Doucette, Mike Harris and Alycia Punnett.

Murphy

Harnum, Sean Hunter, Jenn Hussey, Carrie Lantz, Scott Lichty, Tara Llanes, Jenn Melnyk, Ellen

The nine executive members of

recipients

Bricker,

The

significant.

DSA,

this facility for

Please check one of the following and drop

were

Recipients included

would provide students with the opportunity

The

the

members of college community whose

been

date.

be

and Lee

contributions to college life has

a small charge during off hours (7 a.m.-4 p.m.) or on a membership basis, provided athletic fees did not increase.

(4B15)

family

the

presented to several

to play various sports such as indoor soccer, tennis, ball hockey, flag football, lacrosse

in

has

life

been outstanding.

leadership

had a

Certificates of appreciation

an agreement

college

college hfe.

recently

Distinction

to

contributions to college

The classmate had

volunteered to help her.

Conestoga College is currently in negotiations with a private investor about the possibility of building a sports dome, like the one at Pioneer Sports

World

for her assistance

of

members of the community whose

in a fellow classmate’s assignment.

death

the

that if

and and

enriching the lives of students at

could be made, the

you could basically do anything you’d do in a gymnasium,” James said. there,

warmth

a

responsiveness in caring for

beneficial to the college.”

now

member of community who has

demonstrated

said.

James

He added

area and you’re able to put balls in

spend

Allan

most time consuming part of the whole deal is the administrative work, James

you have the big open

as

way

college’s

a tremendous opportunity

Right

ball

and

have the vision

it’s

soccer,

the

to

Logan The award is

the

Seven Awards were presented

program

presented annually to a

program, without having to

fresh

“It’s

north of the

dome could have

tennis courts, the

facilities

ECE

to

such an extent in previous years.

the

campus

have assisted the college

laugliter.

room

of

throughout

about

100

people.

During received

the

a

awards,

Spoke

certificate

appreciation from the

DSA

of in

"recogiuuon of contributions to stiidem

life

at

Conestoga


SPOKE, April

19,

1999

— Page 3

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

Keeping Conestoga College connected

newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not in this

DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising endorsed by the

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed;

News

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the

Editor: Janet Wakutz; Stndent Life Editor: Lindsay Gibson;

space. Unsolicited submissions

Entertainment Editor: Elizabeth Sackrider; Sports Editor: Brian Smiley; Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Carly Benjamin; Circulation Manager: Eileen Diniz; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz.

SPOKE’S

or

damp

NATO’s

If

on

caves.

The

we bomb

womb

without

Yugoslavia proves

impunity, while taking

noth-

else

shows humans, earth’s

illustration

Who would lose in a third world war if our Mayan

self-

is

from memory

This superior species appears, at share one genetic

trait:

most

least, to

a paranoia chromo-

afraid of

whom

here,

Albanians or Serbians? Doesn’t anybody, including Slobodan Milosevic, fear the consequences of the

NATO

strike?

to finally

How many

wars does

it

take

‘dumb’, than knowing

their paradise with

We

kin

we

desecrate

our malice.

for gods, justice, love, fear, hate,

greed, passion, prejudice, pride and pain.

Animals

kill

We make tyrants

loss

would be

sur-

diary, so far,

comedy of bad judgement and

We

are a species

while our

reckless

own

whose lessons elude us

history sparks our pride and

prejudice.

We invent airplanes and use them as warWe give ultimatums, but never back

planes.

down; we only beg tolerance when

in

minority.

We make history, instead of learn-

ing from

it

and,

we

never say ‘uncle’ at any

cost.

This last sorry century of the miUenium two world

wars,

warmongers and

and follow them like trained pupGod’s green earth into a

if

nothing else.

Our Hiroshimas and

Vietnams will pop up in our

history

Uke

acne on dance night or doomsday “Lest forget”

That’s

but

for food.

leaders of

a

Who

mankind’s

should, at least be noted for our

calm us down?

Perhaps, the four-legged animals are better off

memory

decisions.

loss.

one another enough to inflict enslaveif not extinction, on their enemies.

is

civilization?

prised, considering

races, in their superior ignorance,

Who

(such as a photograph).

immortality for

species were lost like Atlantis or the fabled

ment,

some.

its

the

superior

fear

Submissions must not con-

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

granted.

it

proclaimed

Human

nurturing

its

that

species, suffer

by

earth is our disposable

diaper and, in our worst tantrums,

and scar

ing

to the editor

is

Superior species suffers from strike

MS Word file would be helpful.

tain

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca address

must be sent

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

we

it totally.

why

legionaires

still sell

we buy them thinking war is

poppies,

stiU not as

crappy as submission.

Canada’s history will

be seen as a Judas’

diplomatic world, for

pies, as they turn

last kiss to the

personal outhouse?

monumental puckering up for British and American seats of government. How many Canadians would actually cancel next weekend’s barbecue to teach

We’ve claimed this ‘heavenly body’ as a human domain and spilled our blood and venom upon its face, since we huddled in

its

Milosevic a lesson?

ers believe the tooth fairy is

Few wiU, despite American, Canadian and Yugoslavian warheads tugging at our

roving reporter in the

electronic heartstrings.

Incredibly,

help us

these

now CNN’s

NATO strike and God

if they’re right.

God

pity us if she’s

right.

Now,

dogs of war expect blind obedience from us

the very yoUc and eggshell of this

again.

superior species

Their propaganda machines have already wiped the lines between good and evil out

of people

who

sits

squarely in the hands

can’t even control their sex

drives.

of existence in the Balkans. Serbian protest-

God

help us

all.

1999

ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS

WE NEED HELP THIS FALL WITH ORIENTATION AND REQUIRE A FEW STUDENTS TO ASSIST IN THIS AREA

THIS IS A PAID POSITION ($7/HOUR)

WE

WILL BE LOOKING TO HIRE

RETURNING STUDENTS A5 TUTORS FOR THE NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR 98/99

PLEASE SEE Melissa MacClennan in Student Services (2B02) ABOUT THE DETAILS PRIOR TO THE END OF THE SCHOOL TERM

IF INTERESTED

TALK TO YOUR FACULTY OR DROP IN TO STUDENT SER VICES!

iSHPeer ORIENTATION WEEK WILL BE AUGUST 30th - SEPT 3/99

Services I

SuppofWdlyOoonSuilMAnoclilon


.

4—

Page

SPOKE, April

19,

1999

NEWS

Young student concerned about environment

Campus

prompts

litter

letter

from worried six-year-old By Janet Wakutz

Sara

student,

to Ontario

Rickert, a Grade was out walking one day during her spring break when she

“I would like people to use the buckets and keep the place clean because (the college) is an idyllic

Colleges by Christopher Moore, a

noticed garbage on the 'college

place,” he said. “It’s only going to

grounds.

stay this

M &

The book

S Guide

examines features of published by McLellan and Stewart, reads. “If there were a “handsome campus” that

Ontario

colleges

award, Conestoga would be the hot contender.” but a six-year-old girl

doesn’t agree.

J.

1

She

concern

expressed

about

this

to

her her

grandmother Sharon Rickert who asked her what she felt should be done.

way if we preserve it.” McGregor said he showed Sara’s

letter to

physical resources,

garbage

Sara suggested she could clean

Barry Milner, manager of

when

is left

the

melts.

to college property

letter to the principal.

properties.

He

wrote:

“I

am

always

interested

hearing from people like you they can help

said the

behind every spring

snow

up the garbage herself but she realized this wouldn’t fix the problem so she decided to write a Grant McGregor, the college principal, wrote back to Sara to thank her for the letter.

who

“It

dropped and can blow on from adjacent

was

individual

quite

nice

notice of the conditions left behind by the winter,” Millner said.

resources

staff

are

involved in spring clean-up and

Milner

he

said

thinks

for

an

of that age to take

when

collect garbage

a

telephone interview Sara

said she hopes the students will

clean up the mess. “1

a

wrote the

letter to the principal

six-year-old being concerned has

because the garbage

something

for the birds that live in the for-

“My

real

to say for

our future.

concern

is

the

(fast

Although for

letter writing

Sara,

may be

was two years old and

her grandmother

McGregor Sara

J.

Rickert,

Grade

1

and

said as soon as Sara was old enough to push a doll carriage, she would fill it with garbage bags to

“Sometimes

I

Environmentally yours

it was 'a cute was important to

take Sara’s letter seriously.

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Aiy 'TKc.

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USED CD 385 Fairway Road

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OUTLET 415Hespler Road,

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do

up

the

“Birds need

food and a clean place to hve.”

if

HP

tries to

pick

garbage,” she said.

said

felt it

bad

her share.

or suggestions.”

story

is

said she has been concerned about the environment since she

me

am enclosing a Conestoga College pen so that you can write to me if you have any other observations

saw

She

the college,” she said.

new

I

Sara said.

est,”

in

improve the condition of Conestoga College. I

they went

for walks.

In

Physical

food) garbage people leave around

Millner said during the winter litter is

visitor


At Springfest ’99

Dancers swing By

Elizabeth Sackrider

The sky

is

are

hiding.

It is

out

of

spring once again.

In honour of the

Doon

and

blissfully blue

coming

legs

atmosphere of the Sanctuary was and too crowded to have a large

season,

Student Association held

Springfest activities

week of April

during the

5-9.

the challenge to learn to

swing

dance in the Sanctuary during the event on April 5. Sheila Block, a first-year journalism student, grabbed a

to

have a

live band,”

to

come over and check

it

out,”

she said. “I have always wanted to learn how to swing.” Instructor

Tom

Reinhart guided

Block and the other Reinhart

participants.

been

teaching

way

is

dancing a mile apart,” he provides

the

opportunity for people

The

illusions

“He

said.

perfect

who want

ing

was in town on complete with free popcorn and candy floss. Students lined up in the lounge to get their lips around some of the stuff,”

to

was

March, Reinhart teaches lessons Club Abstract in Kitchener.

at

MacKenzie.

Mel McShane a

artist

Ruth

first-year early

know how he

feel

it

like

“You could

nice weather.

MacKenzie. She said she thought her portrait didn’t really look

better

Thomas

Muller,

Sanctuary on

she

was happy

everyone

Hoops

who

than

went in

Sheila Block swings during free swing lessons.

the

past,” said Punnett.

Gerry Cleaves and hungry students

floss in the

(Photo by Jeanette Everall)

Everall

situation for

for Heart fund-raiser to

money for the Heart and Stroke Foundation on April 7.

raise

The 24 students who took

pumped

treated to a post-game party complete with pizza and prizes.

took part in the

part

in the 3 -on- 3 basketball tourna-

ment

raised a total of $523.56 in pledges.

For their efforts players were

of

Kristin

with

partner

Greg

Hartman

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

Murphy flipped hamburgers for the

line

(Photo by Jeanetter Everall)

.

Event raises over $500

Students get

was a win-win

said Alycia

Springfest

year

this

a third-year business administration studies student, devours candy

*

It

think

“I

April 6.

By Jeanette

outside and eat

sit

The 450 hamburgers and cans of pop were gone a half-hour earUer than expected due to the

The classes will continue every Wednesday night.

but

than

Punnett, organizer of Springfest.

childhood education student, had character drawn by

her,

free for

summer

like

without freezing,”

her

like

“I

did that (the

spring.

Jack’s in Waterloo on April 7.

Reinhart said he thought the

with his

on April 7. The sun was out and the temperatures were high, making

Also on hand for the carnival character

me

second-year account-

The hamburgers were

business

Wednesday night from October

tricks.

the taking at the barbecue

Thomas

said

third-year

and card

really fooled

trick).”

fluffy pink stuff.

a

and

student Trina Leonard.

don’t

6

good

Magician

the

tricks,” said

carnival

Muller,

to get their pic-

white rabbit entertained the crowd with his rubber band

to dance together.”

April

idea.

his

administration studies student.

teaching at Whiskey

Barney

required.

“Most people go to the bars and hope to meet people while

“Swing

thought

tures done,” she said.

meet people because a

to

swing lessons as part of Latin dancing for 15 years. Every

He began

she

was a good

might be more apt

“It’s

has

he

Reinhart said swing provides a

first

partner from the audience. “I had

said

artist

“People that might not otherwise get involved (in student activities)

said.

partner

With a step to the right and a sway to the left, four couples took

McShane having an

really get the feel of swing,

you need the

with the picture.

number of swingers. “To

their partners

With a total of $146, Hisham Abdul Ghafoor raised the most pledge money, almost tripling Daniel Spoelstra,

who had

watch for raising over $125. took part in the

teammates, said the team wanted to pick a name that would

tournament said they came out to

represent what the tournament

worried the tournament, held at

have fun and good cause.

was

the recreation centre,

Players

“We a

Stroke Foundation.

automation

Ghafoor also won a Nike sports

money

for a

the

appropriate,” said first-year

speaking

all

about.

Players for the Pulse worked

felt

and baseball caps from the Heart and bottles

raise

to

name

themselves the Pulse.

Spoelstra and Ghafoor both

won Nike water

who

One team even chose

the

second-highest amount with $53.

for heart, stroke fund-raiser

name was Luke Simioni,

robotics

student.

on

behalf

hard to against

and

Simioni,

of

his

make Team

to the final

it

members went on

tournament

in

to

a

Team

win the double

elimination final.

The lack of initial

Association

would be

unsuccessful, however, organizer

Alycia Punnett said she was with the number of

happy

3.

Captain Shiv Raj and his 3

game

Doon (DSA)

3-on-3 tournament had the

Student

interest in the

students

“We

who

turned out.

how many

weren’t sure

teams

to

event

had

expect because this

never

been

before,” said Punnett.

done


Page 6

— SPOKE, April

19,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Conestoga College teaches good By Wayne

'hog’ habits 62nd day they can walk

Collins

into the

Ministry of Transportation office

and present

The Motorcycle Driver Training at Conestoga College’s Doon campus began its 23rd year on March 26 with its usual turnout

M2

of enthusiastic students.

students with a success rate of

to October, with about

senior

said

trained rider

instructors are

Nancy

(they)

know

a

more

likely

to

is

course, consisting of intense

Motorcycle-training students line up lessons.

has five instructors per course,

whom

Among

those

chief

are

Fred Burchill, Mike

and Nancy

Knighton

from

Burchill.

crisis

In

recent

who

Burchill,

to begin safety riding

lot 2,

(Photo by

Wayne

Collins)

two

has

give

insurance

to register, but

Knighton says

be

off

can

resurgence

in

population

and

the

educational tax deduction.

them properly than

in the

past.

Knighton,

who

course

the

graduated from

15

feel

and,

ride

is

of riding safely instead of just

Knighton.

are

Burchill says “word of mouth” where graduates tell friends, co-

a big plus to the program.

people

they’ve learned the previous day

how to

years

ago.

Burchill says, the “cruiser”

Fridays and riding lessons go

management

safety orientated program,” says

people

an

.

a motorcycle to

starting

general

willing today to learn

this

as

market has gotten very big with

“They learn good habits in a very

more

written

times run from 7-10 p.m. on

a

says,

seen

has

motorcycles.

workers, neighbours or cousins,

on

students learn everything

from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. “They practise everything

he

years,

motorcycling

a fairly fun course,” says

says

here are complete novices,” says

Gibson,

Don’s wife. “It’s

discounts

As “The vast majority who come

from the program. instructors

Conestoga College’s parking

in

graduated

also

the

them

The program, which runs every weekend throughout the summer, except one in August, costs $300

classroom and practical training,

some of

and

course

take

coverage.

survive on the streets.”

The

insurance

says

companies also prefer chents who

instructor

“and

22 months

license for

Knighton

30 students

very dedicated to the program,”

Gibson,

can only use

before they must write the exam.

per training session.

“Our group of 17

M2

the

March

them

Conestoga

the

certificate, students

started in

1976, runs every year from

of five years to write

Without

94

a

M class hcense.

their

The program,

by Don Gibson

started

have

of 18 months and a

the “exit exam”, which gives

The program’s group of 17 over 600 instructors trained per cent last year.

With the

license.

students

license,

minimum maximum

paperwork and

their

M2

receive an

course

high

at

speeds.

The course parking

is

lots

offered in the

two

of

the

front

in

woodworking skills building, in which the program’s theory lessons are taught. Classroom

then,

stuff,” says

we add some new Knighton.

Graduates of the course receive a

spend

at

appreciate the feeling

speeding.

“They

want

just

to get

on and

the fresh air against their

faces

on a nice sunny day,” says

Burchill.

from the college and least 60 days with an Ml

certificate

licensing classification.

who

On

the

Anyone wishing to inquire about program can contact the

the

college’s public affairs office at

extension 336.

Reception honours Conestoga peer helpers Julie

van Donkersgoed

Jack

Fletcher,

recreation and

A

welcomed guests and outlined

honour peer helpers at Conestoga was held April 7 in the Blue Cafeteria at the reception

director

to

of

student services, the

program for the evening. Kevin Mullan, vice-president of the finance, acknowledged

college.

appreciation

college’s

of

the

service saying that peer helpers

longtime

who

is

on

students requiring assistance and

hosts and coaches from the Doon,

about the importance of peer

for students in general.

Guelph and Waterloo campuses. Lynn Gresham, learning advisor of special needs, gave an update on the writing centre, which opened earlier this year. She also

“Peer helpers build on unique

by being able

Elaine

to

coach

said,

Brunk

and

Jeanette

Walker, support staff for student services, read selected letters

students, faculty

from

and administra-

tion.

Brunk summed up of faculty

Way For Over 50 Years

and

Conestoga employee,

short-term disabUity leave, spoke

someone,” he

Leading The

were

presented to peer tutors, monitors,

life skill

GRAND VALLEY BRANCH

administrator

(peer helpers) do.”

Certificates of appreciation

make the college a better place for

differences and are developing a

\ Canadian Institute OF Management IC4

way you

letters:

the sentiment

“Sometimes

faculty can’t help students in the

thanked the individuals involved in creating

and maintaining the

writing centre.

services

and how she misses the

famiUar faces

“These

at the college.

I’ve

faces.

missed

you

missed

have something

these faces,” she said.

guys

“I

fierce.”

The audience responded to her comments with a standing

“The writing centre has been and will continue to be a very collaborative effort,” she

ovation.

said.

filhng in for Nicholas, thanked

Myma Nicholas,

a peer services

Melissa MacClennan, services

administrator,

a

peer

who

is

everyone for attending.

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN

MANAGEMENT

Learn about the

CIM program

in

the Conestoga College

Continuing Education Catalogue or

Contact; Mr. Jay Moszynski in

room 1B49

@ Doon Campus

1-519-748-5220 ext 492 or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE

of

MANAGEMENT

National Office

1-800-387-5774 e-mail; office(gcim.ca

Bongani Dube, third-year materials-management student, received a Peer Host award Internet; http;/Awww.cim.ca

appreciation reception held April 7.

at the peer-

(Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)


STUDENT

SPOKE, April

LIFE

19,

— Page 7

1999

Volunteer needed

I

Habitat for Humanity

seeks coiiege help By Lindsay Gibson

m

buili

from the

Representatives

!

Wateiloo branch of Habitat for I

Humanity

I

visited construction

engineering

'

!

!

students

at

The first build will be on Dolph Street in Cainbndge, Apnl 19-24. Westvale Drive

opportunities

The foundation

throughout the

summer.

'

Humanity needs volunteers

Conestoga College April 6 to inform them of volunteer

i

Habitat for Humanity

!

non-profit,

a

is

Christian-based

Region

the W:«teiIi.o

sunmier, and Habitat for

this

!

The

second

be

will

on

Waterloo,

in

will be laid June 7-12 and June 14-19 and the build wilt be July 12-17 and

|

From five

July 19-2^.

left front: Andrea Jones, Shannon Gibson. Rear left: Carol Bos, Jen Lyne and Sara Hague. All students worked together on a project that examined osteoarthritis. (Photo by cariy Benjamin)

I

organization

aflbrdable housing to families

The third house will be on Sydney Street in Kitchener. Tlie-

Jiving under the poverty line.

foundation

that

offers

,

!

be

will

!

laid

j

I

“We

,

arc a hand up, not a

June 14-19 and

j

hand ouL"

Ruth Black,

.said

volunteer co-ordinator for the

j'

be Aug. 23-28 and Aug. 30 to Sept, 4.

I

j

.

organization.

Habitat for Humanity takes

,

Habitat for Humanity I

built

ha.s

experienced and inexperienced

70.000 homes in over 50

volunteers on a half-day basis

countries I

worldwide since

was founded

it

in 1976.

Pathology and psychology studied

die build will

j '

for

however long they wish

help

I

I

300 homes have been built and in Waterloo Region alone, 26 homes have In Canada,

been built or renovated since the orgainzation began here 10

'

I

years ago.

The objective of Habitat for Humanity is to eliminate

volunteers

stay

indepth Students were

four

for

coasecutiyc days.

!

various

homes, but communities

a.s

well, said Black.

Conestoga College students have volunteered on Habitat for

Humanity

sites

in

the past,

said

construction engineering

into

.split

gy

two crews with the first crew working from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the .second crew working ftom 5- 30 p m. to daik Volunteers

foundaUons,

for

relationships

between

the

students

Habitat for Humanity houses

)

Goid

The indepth

college,

said,

opportunity

Habitat

tor

who

own

Humanity homes

have no down payment, except for the 500 hours sweat equity and an interest free mortgage for

20 to 25 years. These

houses usually cost $50,000 to $80,000 to build.

There ate three houses being

a

projects

“It

is

,

|

a good

students

for

industry.

in

to

!

the

|

looks goinl on a

It

i

j

'

^

j '

designs,

said I

Anyone

interested can con-

Black

Humanity at

in

at

Habitat

i

for

Waterloo Region

i

747-0664. '

All volunteers are required to register

and

fill

out waiver

forms,

Work boots are mandatory and hard bats and gloves are supplied.

we

have on these

Jones

“The

agreed.

the faculty with the nursing health

to

be

The

20 per cent of

not

sciences

program, said the objective of the biofair is to

the student’s final grade.

explore the concepts learned in

Andrea Jones, Sara Hague, Carol Bos, Jen Lyne and Shannon Gibson, fourth-semester

pathology and psychology

nursing

worked

students put a lot of effort and

together on a project that explored

imagination into this assignment.”

students,

participates

improve

their health. “It benefits

fair

provides students with insight on these diseases,” she said. “They

may

who

learn something that could

everyone involved.”

nursing

to

form of arthritis which the joints degenerate.

osteoarthritis, a

constmeUon

engmeenng hopes to become more involved with the Habitat for Humanity program by doing

tact

that

class discussion topics.”

allows everyone to

3.

Parsons said students do very well in this project. “The nursing

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH 5 days/40 hours (June 2-6 Guelph)

TESOL teacher certificate course (or by correspondence) 1

,000’s of jobs.

Available

NOW!

'

the future,

in

class

more

with

and

had

pathology

biofair consists of

of

resume.”

hours in “sweat equity.” families

to

us

information than the

be aware of these problems and this fair provides them with the knowledge to fight them” Gerry Parsons, a member of

students are required to take.

construction engineering at the

Scott.

The

nursing

displayed projects

physiology

electrical,

l.ipke. co-oidinator

who .300

8.

inform students about diseases and their complications. related

plumbing, landscaping and in building garden sheds.

architectural

minimum of

Conestoga April

j

are built strictly by volunteers and the families themselves mu.sl put in a

to

j

footings,

carpentry, painting,

college and the organization,” said Scott.

fair at

Fourth-semester

j

needed

arc

network with people

“W'e are trying to build better

and how

j

is

|

teacher Peter Scott,

made aware of

ailments

prevent them at the annual biolo-

*

The workday

j

poverty hou.smg around the world by not only building

provides

i

recommend

but

out,

By Cariy Benjamin

to

j

I

about health

Biofalr

in

“This project helped us to expand our knowledge of pathology,” Hague said. “It

“They seem

to be inventors at

heart and this fair

is

successful

every year due to their hard work.”

Parsons

said

the

biofair

Free information pack, Call toll free:

1-800-270-2941


!

— SPOKE, April

Page 8

19, 1999

Cabana Boys

clip

Condors, win championship

By Charles Kuepfer

expired, they were off again for

same infraction. With time running out, Alvarez brought the Condors within a goal after scoring on a nice individual the

The Condors indoor soccer playoff run came to an end on April 8, when they were beaten 3-1 by the Cabana Boys in the championship men’s division

effort.

But Alegro restored the Cabana

1

Boys’ two-goal lead to put the

final.

game away.

The low-scoring match was a

Johnstone said he knew

of defences. Both teams

battle

number of chances

limited the

they allowed their opponent and the

Cabana Boys emerged

that

technical

game

Hermes

while

marker.

Despite the loss, Condor coach

The Condor’s Derhan Sherfali attempts to knock a Cabana Boy’s lost to the Cabana Boys 3-1 in the championship final.

player off the

ball.

The Condors

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

his family,

“He

“I’ve got

net.

The game started with a quick chance by the Cabana Boys right opening

shot

Their

kick.

blasted

just

our weaker shoot-

The Condors definitely missed Shaun Samuels, a defender who was absent because of a death in

Geoff Johnstone was postive.

no complaints,” said Johnstone. “We got beat by a team that plays nice soccer. We lost a close game to a good team.” Johnstone noted, however, that his team should have gotten more shots on the Cabana Boys’

fell to

ers,” said Johnstone.

Alvarez scored the lone Condor

first

was a very

chances

scored for the

Jr.

Cabana Boys,

the

it

“Unfortunately, our (scoring)

Derek Castro and

Incitti,

Carlos Alegro

off

was

with few scoring opportunities.

as

champions.

Andy

it

going to be a tough game, noting

he

said.

said Johnstone

of the Condor

only

net.

The Cabana Boys were the first to get on the scoreboard with Incitti

chipping the ball between

Condor goalkeeper

the legs of

Lou Capara. They continued to move the baU well with some crisp passing and Castro almost made it 2-0, banging a shot off the crossbar.

The Condors were

wide

limited to

a

handful

of

shots

in

Then

the

Cabana Boys nearly

the first half and never seriously

scored what could have been

Cabana Boys’ goal-

the final nail in the Condors’

threatened

keeper

Manny Rego. 1-0

Trailing the

second

heading

half,

when

coffin,

into

Condors

the

were looking to tie the game. But the Cabana Boys struck for their second goal of the game, with Castro knocking in a shot from in close.

Jeff

Castro

put

back

terrorizes the

field,”

underlining the

impact of his absence from the

game.

The game was

the

last

a shot off the post on a two-on-

the

one.

successful season next year.

The game tijmed rough, with the

team should have another pleased

“(I’m)

Condors Derhan Sherfali and the Cabana Boys’ Alegro taking

commitment

coincidental roughing penalties.

thing

Seconds

back next year.”

after

penalties

their

of

the season and Johnstone said

said

of

with the

the

guys,”

“The great most of them are

Johnstone. is

that

Experience The Matrix for yourself By

Eileen Diniz

Neo

“There are two

realities:

consists of the life

day and one

One

is

we

that lies

one

that

something hidden and unknown. He believes the only person

behind

the

a dream. The other

it.

Warner

action

futuristic

Brothers

the ‘real world’ searching for the

The

thriller

(Bound). is

a complex story;

takes place in the future but in the present.

is

it

told

The movie plays

with the idea that everything one

is

in

m

(Fishbume), the leader of a group

by brothers Andy and Larry Wachowski (Bound). The film stars Keanu Reeves (The Devil’s Advocate), Laurence Fishbume (Hoodlum), Carrie-Anne Moss (Sabotage), Hugo Weaving (The Interview) and Joe Pantoliano The Matrix

give hi

move

and every physical

a total fabrication created

by an electronic universe. Reeves plays Thomas Anderson, who works at a major software company. He is suspicious of life in general and alienates himself from the world. At night Anderson becomes Neo the computer hacker.

in

who can

one person

spectacular special effects and

one

computer animation.

stunt specialists in

The wire stunt work was done by Yuen

in this film

Wo

Ping,

of

the

top

Hong Kong Kung Fu and

The Matrix holds together well

and the fascinating

Experience The Matrix.

help them

with their mission.

Neo

Eventually

is

contacted

by Trinity (Moss), a beautiful

who

stranger

him

invites

into another world

Morpheous. At

last

Neo

experi-

v'e.

ences the matrix for himself.

The film progresses a

from there and Neo must choose whose side he’s on. He can either work little

want to catch Trinity and Morpheous or join forces with the two outcasts. realizes

shortly

rfter

he has plunged into an incred-

ible

whirlwind of an adventure

he

is

1999 world

Please H-elp to re-stocfe Them. WHAT IS NEEDED! Canned Juice, Peanut Butter,

that

living in.

This fast-paced film

is

Rice, Pasta,

highly

guns.

It

also

and shooting

includes

some

Tomato Sauce,

Salmon/Tuna,Cereals,

entertaining and involves lots of action, martial arts

Canned Vegetables

off

Canned

(yellow beans,

and

(internet photo)

mushrooms,

toiletries

your donations to

it

futuristic action thriller.

or the

DSA

Fruits,

carrots, potatoes).

Student Services Office Neo (Keanu Reeves) and agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) have Warner Brothers

,

this

that

that questions the

ve

who

with the black suited agents

Neo

&>

where he meets

Drop

Matrix.

balance of interesting

and out of

Soup, Crackers,

The

its

story of another reality.

wire stunt work.

mixed vegetables,

out, wire-stunt style, in

with

relationships

Morpheous

is

,

The

is

Matrix was written and directed

item

who can

answer

of people that

new

believes

seeking the truth about

live every

Matrix.”

The

is

matrix,

the

Office


Digital Edition - April 19, 1999