Page 1

Three candidates vie for faculty rep

Roy

Bob Evans.

Carlyle.

Story and photos by Julie

who

Evans,

van Donkersgoed

Peter Findlay,

for the past

Three candidates have been nominated for position

the

Broadcasters honour Bob

on

of faculty representative

Conestoga College’s board of governors.

The candidates include Roy Evans and Peter Findlay,

all

feels

on other

service

his

management

with

which

matters

and tough

include

him

including layoffs, required

the

to

“I

discusses

am

improves

that

students

and

Findlay. Voting

open

is

engineering, product design and development

from 5:45 p.m.

necessity for the college to change and meet

and the history of furniture making in the woodworking program, has been at the col-

administration office in

am

very familiar with the board of

with

familiar

and and

responsibilities

goals

its

because he

Should students have

to

pay

if

committed

is

employed by the

they don’t use the

to

who

a.m. to

Room

2B10-6.

7:15 p.m. in

unable

are

voting

scheduled

the

college

the

1 1

Door 4, and 7:15 p.m. at the campus

vote on to cast can day their ballots on April 5 or 6 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 2B10-5 or from 5:45 p.m. to

Voters

with

balance

of

and

college’s board of

p.m. in the main foyer inside

1

running

is

time,

full

all

governors.

to representing the

in

interests

best

the

planning,” said Carlyle.

says he

community

teaching

strategic

librarians

product

materials,

He

12 years.

lege for

am

I

to

part time, sessional teachers, counsellors

Voting will occur on April 7 from teaches

the

for

together to achieve the college’s goals,” said

situations

to take a stand

Evans.

“I

quality

well as working

as

faculty,

and management groups and his participation in numerous organizations Carlyle also said he understands the

Findlay,

he

concerned that issues are dealt with in

way

a

on several issues. “I have the reputation for asking the tough questions in a non-threatening way,” said

governors’

and

college,

the faculty in a positive, progressive way.

running because of his background, which includes serving on the board of governors at Northern College, negotiating for both union

the internal and external needs of the college.

Men’s soccer team

sees himself as well positioned to represent

committee, which occurs in a union setting,

is

other

commitment

Evans said he

says he

involvement on

his

said

issues.

instructors at the

the college,

students.

committees, like the college council, shows his

running

is

committees, such as the faculty agreement

Carlyle, a sessional instructor in the business at

says he

years,

its

Findlay

because he would like to take a stand on tough

meets

program

13

Bob

Carlyle,

college.

studies

and

has taught accounting, finance

and business policy in the accounting program

Room

2B10-6.

facility?

advances to semi-finals

PAGE 9

Rec centre By

fee causing upset with parent students to gain access to various

Eileen Diniz

Kenneth E. Hunter

activities in the

For approximately 2 1/2 years a concerned father, who will not be

named of

to

attends

of each

currently

student’s his

tuition,

daughter

opportunities for

gain

was always

students

to

degree

the

at

pay

the

fee

at

The

of the students’ program of study.

some

$33 for full-time with one or more

basic fee

students

semesters

is

and

experience.

$16.50

for

all

is

It

providing

is

academic

students to

social and one way to

encourage a healthy atmosphere,

James

said

father

even

if

absolutely not happen.

so

many

would

There are

requests for activities at

the centre that

from 8 a.m.

until

for students to use the facility.

is

4

non-scheduled time

entry students.

“I’ve

by an amount greater than

college

equal to the rate of increase in the

including

Kevin the

Mullan,

minister

of

always

made

that

my

Consumer

Index

Price

that

(CPI),

since the last change in fees or

introduce

new

a

compulsory

of governors including president

must the

He

Tibbits.

said all these people were

the students years

was

initiated by ago and they would have to decide

Student this

wishes to

John W.

activities there.

said

states if the college

increase any of the compulsory

non-tuition related fee, the college

to

James

Fees

education, and the college’s board

one evening she may be turned down because of all the

p.m. there

fee allows the

MPPs,

facility

one semester or for a direct

The continual

his

daughter did decide to use the

But

with

talked

local

for Compulsory,

The protocol

Non-Tuition Related Incidental

said he

unable to help him because the fee

said.

The

college

cost varies according to the length

The

everybody

centre

centre.

the beginning of each year.

;

rec

business.

non-tuition related incidental fees

The Cambridge parent

vice-president

order to advance, he said.

The

should

the athletics.”

and think

You need to think whole community in

does not use the college’s rec

are required to

Baseball affects

can’t be

selfish

college

involve the academics as well as

administration

The

Page 4

They

to

James.

paying a

think part of their

I

at

about the

is

the facility,” said the father.

Commentary

and recreation, said people have think like a community.

experience

recreation fee, which

on my daughter’s registration form and (she) never uses

10

Ian James, manager of athletics

has

“I noticed the fee

students stripping.

student fee and

Recreation Centre.

for themselves.

removed because

PAGE

identity

priority,” said

“I respect that they are

Conestoga College, has wanted to have the mandatory athletics and part

X-rated hypnotist has

the

who

protect

daughter

his

number one

remove it. He was told

to

go

to the

Doon

and

they

Association

would have a protocol that he would be able to use to have the changes made.

The protocol has been delivered Cambridge man, but he has not been able to comment on it as of yet because he is away on

gain

acceptance

the

of

government

student

representatives.

The college agrees

that

it

will

not increase the subject fees in

regard until the cumulative

this

CPI increase since the last fee change exceeds one per cent. Where acceptance by student government representatives is required,

college administration

meet them to discuss the need change to the subject fees.

will

for

to the

See Rec centre

.

.

.

page 8


?

Page 2

— SPOKE, April

5,

1999

NEWS Students, Currie honoured at broadcasting banquet By Lindsay Gibson

so important to her. “1 love

The 24th annual Broadcasting Radio and Television Awards Dinner was held March 25 at the Transylvania Club in Kitchener.

Close

to

180 guests turned out to

honour the award winners and the 'former God’ of the program.

Bob

Currie.

Currie

officially

retired

broadcasting

the

as

Bob,” she

“He

said.

is

memorable

teacher

that

had an effect on

me and

he

a great person.”

most

the

is

Rob Currie, gave speech to honour his dad, jokingly saying that he wasn’t Currie’s son,

a

really

reaching retirement, and

now

he

could

really

start

working.

program’s

“There was no one better for the

technician in January of this year.

job of helping others,” he said,

Currie,

who

retired

one day short

of 30 years, has been an integral part of the

He was

one. for

this

program since day not only honoured

achievement, but for

influencing the lives of

all

those

he worked with.

Two

broadcasting

students,

Sarah Sherboume and Tammy Love, decided after last year’s banquet, to

make

a video in

“and

am

I

so very proud of you,

dad.”

Currie said he was pleased with the testimonial video and thanked

everyone in his speech. “I have a lot of memories, way better good qnes than bad ones,” he said. Currie

spending his retirement working with Rogers Cable,

honour of Currie’s retirement. The two women took more than

various other projects.

12 hours of testimonials from

honoured for

people around the world and edited

them down

to a

15-minute

masterpiece.

The

because

testimonials

included

their

also

achievements

banquet. Sherboume,

at the

attend

she

in

is

who

banquet

the

Australia

furthering her education,

was

the

highlights and pictures of Currie,

big winner of the night, picking

and his family and messages from CTV News anchor Lloyd Robertson, CHYM FM’s Val Cole and country musician Jamie Warren. “Few people have touched

up four awards.

his

wife

students as

much

as

said broadcasting

Bob

Currie,”

co-ordinator

Mike Thumell.

Mary Garofalo, who a member of the class of but did not graduate,

is

was 1981,

now

working for FOX in New York. Garofalo flew back for the banquet because Currie is

The CJOY/Magic 106.1 Newsperson of the Year Award, award of the night, went Jeremy Gull, who was also the

the first to

at the Transylvania

K.A. Mackenzie Memorial Award and Brian Gillespie won the

were

students

couldn’t

Awards Dinner on March 24

master of ceremonies.

Kitchener.

in

CKCO Pat Fitzgerald Award.

Richard Bonn Rogers Cable Award, while

won

the

won

the

new

Broadcaster of the Year Award. Michelle Good won the Betty

Thompson Memorial

Bursary,

while Kris Ferguson

won

administrator

a

the

peer services

in

CHUM

Limited Award for Excellence in Radio

for to

Sherboume

also

won

Management.

won the Carl Pollock Memorial Award and Janice Saywell won the John

the

By Carly Benjamin

the

a

Telemedia Award for Broadcast

large

portion

tutoring. |

Henry

CJCS

Lori Illingworth

_

-

!

-

-

services administrator, the skills

learned

at

Larke Memorial Bursary.

excellent

preparation

CHYM morning co-host, George Michaels, was the guest

workforce.

Conestoga

have to co-ordinate and tutors and interview

“I

_

recruit

who are needing tutors,”

are

students

the

she said.

|

Creative Writing

CJCS

of her time overseeing the peer

spent

is

Award and

the

Production Award.

Sherboume and Love shared the

for

As

MacClennan, a graduate of social

services

Wilfrid

a

Laurier

Myma

University grad, replaces

x

:

ev

.

i

sb

i

;c

the student services counsellors

do

that.

may

refer or assess students,

then

I

said.

will

she

the

learned

skills

at

the

college were

more

practical

experience

MacClennan ,

remain

administrator

for

peer services

her

and hands-on

the

a

to

to their individual needs,” she

.

was

useful,

them

refer

counsellor in the office to tend

education facilities

found

Free Drink

:h

services

MacClennan does

not actually counsel the students;

but

said

?

peer

the

administrator,

“I

services administrator,

until

contract in

2000.

was

invaluable.

“The

and have

staff

students

Burger

me,” she

start

Thurs. April 8 1 1

:

30 am

Outside Main cafe

a

difficult

new

of

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

further

to

when

your Is

helps

work

so patient and

Prior to her job at the college,

DSA Award

drug therapy.

Kitchener,

Homes

Waterloo

for

Mental

Health.

Her

She If

is

on sick leave

that job

her

after

second-year

placement

for

social

which then led

to

a

responsibilities

college include

many

at

the

aspects but

to try a

Nicholas doesn’t return

end

services,

for Outstanding

diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

agency

co-op

I

Nicolas, a two-time winner of the

a year ago.

Regional

and

to be a part of that.”

MacClennan was employed at a community mental health in

to

expand and

Contribution to Student Life, was

contract position.

there early

would love

a lot

potential

develop it

understanding.”

completing

N

Melissa MacClennan.

position hut

environment

said,

program has

said. “It's

She obtained

„o°

she

welcomed

really

always

be

9 p.m.

at

Conestoga g

Rawnsely/Sony of Canada Award and the Betty Thompson

program and

Limited quantities

Theawards/^mierjWjll paired

on Rogers Cable Sunday, April 4

Sherboume

Christopher-Alien

year-two and Haderlein for year-three.

won

high,” he said,

Television

Carla Donnell for year-one, Gull for

Moretti

speaker and left students with a few words of wisdom. “Make the most of every job and do set your sights

Conestoga’s

Si

(Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

Programming.

The CHYM Radio Award Announcing was awarded

Mark

Club

is

C to C Productions and on

Many

Mary Garofalo, a broadcasting student from 1981 and now working for FOX in New York, poses with Bob Currie, retired broadcasting technician, at the 24th annual Broadcasting - Radio and Television

contract,

new

at the

MacClennan's the job would then be of

posted

internally

then

MacClennan said she would then have to reapply because the job would become a externally.

full-time position rather than a

contract one.


SPOKE, April

Program By

Eileen Diniz

women

offers

point they look at the

5,

1999

— Page 3

choices

outside

world, the trends and what’s hap-

“We women

strong independent

are

on

focusing

to

who

fit

happening and look for training opportunities in their interest path,

We

will

choose our place by becoming

aware of our options through education, persistence and faith in

she said.

“We do an communication

The above

the

mission

statement written by the

women of

is

Conestoga’s Focus for Change program.

awful

and

skills,”

Murphy

lot

and passive

also

listening

said.

The group often brings in guest The women in the group decide which speakers they would like to hear and each group’s speakers.

The course is being offered at the Cambridge campus and is contin-

choice

ually offered at Waterloo, except

based on their individual

during

said

the

summer..

on benefits who

for single mothers

have sole support of their children,

chn

take

instruction

in

women

strengths,

look

their

at

and natural

abilities

and

interests

from

they

that

research opportunities, including

and training paths

educational

may have been unaware

they said

different because

it’s

interests,

Murphy.

the

different

in the world.

happening

things

A

machinist spoke

Dianne Murphy, facilitator for the Focus for Change program, looks on as students Yvette Shingler and Cheryl King work on an assignment on the computer. (Photo by Eileen Diniz)

(left)

about non-traditional trades for

women.

English.

The

is

A trends analyst has talked about

a 12-week program

It is

of

including

skills

assertive, aggressive

behaviour

our true worth.”

'arid

try

they are into what’s

improve

children and ourselves.

"

pening in the work world. They

the quality of life for our

direction that will lead to (sic)

new

a

Dianne Murphy, group

of,

Marie Sutherland, a from The Cambridge Reporter and a Conestoga jour-

what jobs

nalism

also

reporter

graduate,

being a reporter,

of

spoke about and a member

John Ambulance spoke aid and CPR for

St.

about

first

students

to

become exist.

familiar with

Second, the tours

women their own

give the relate

leads

interests

Quite often the

to specific jobs.

tour

a chance

an

to

information

years that the Focus for Change program has been offered in Cambridge, said Murphy. She would like to see the program continue. She said these

women come

session and the opportunity to

for granted but leave as strong

shadow a job

women with goals. “Women are tough

work involvement and how to get where you want to go, said

“The machinist was really neat,” Murphy. “She brought in all her materials, and we had show and tell.” Each speaker gives a presentation on their own career paths including how they got there and what they do. The group often goes on tours, which have included a funeral home, a -factory, the hospital, the humane society and the police

want to go. Some actually do the job while shadowing and some assist. It depends on what the job is, said Murphy. One of Murphy’s students is shadowing at a bank and she most-

Murphy.

station.

ly watches but another student

itator for the

program.

program because I thought it would have extra information that I need to find a “I took the

job,” said Sheryl King. “I have

been using job postings and newspapers and I wasn’t sure

how

else

to find a job.”

The program

is

divided into

three directions, self development,

She said the

women

get to

From

strengths.

Murphy

know

themselves, their interests and their

said

that

tours

for

said

they

do

the

two reasons: Career

identification

is

the

first,

so the

for two weeks. Shadowing, which happens at the end of the program, places the

women at a specific job to watch how the job is done to determine if that is the direction they

shadowing is

at the

work

permitted to

This

is

the

YMCA and

first

is

she

goal, she said.

“The program is how overcome these obstacles and realistic goals,” said

King,

taking

a

course

for her.

Murphy. “It’s amazing to see the growth in these ladies when they realize they have

right

choices.”

may become

for,” said

The women come out of

how skills

“It just

my

the

may

take

obstacles other people

Doon

the

wasn’t

realistic for

two teenagers at home, but it an avenue down the is

these

women

find out they have choices

presentation they were presented

engineering technology program,

their

presented a research project to the

complimentary membership to the Canadian Welding Society. The research done by Hayhoe topics covered Hewitt and including welding using the submerged arc welding and gas metal arc welding processes, micro-hardness testing, microscopic examination, side bend and stress-relieving testing, research on the base metal itself. The metal used was uncommon, which made the welding and research difficult and many precautions had to be taken to ensure that test results would be

Toronto chapter of the Welding Society of Canada. They spoke to a group of 35 to 40 people on the research they had done regarding high

The low alloy steel. presentation on Tuesday, March 9, covered research that they have been working on since strength

the

beginning

of

winter

the

semester.

who

Those

representatives

industry

and

and

attended

were

from the welding other

universities,

colleges

including

students from Northern College welding engineering technology program and the University of Waterloo mechanical engineerAfter their ing department.

with

plaques commemorating achievement, as well as a

any choice except

settling for

for granted including transporta-

they had, said Murphy.

and the lack of a Grade 12 education, said Murphy.

it,”

p lease He Ip

she added.

This is the first time the welding engineering technology program has been implemented. It runs at the

Guelph campus.

to re-stocle

Rice, Pasta,

Salmon/Tuna, Cereals,

Canned Vegetables

(yellow beans,

left

to

right:

Student

Kroisenbrunner, and student technology program.

Kevin Bill

Hayhoe,

Hewitt,

all

faculty of the

John

welding

(Photo submitted)

and

mushrooms,

toiletries

your donations to Student Services Office off

or the

Fruits,

carrots, potatoes),

Soup, Crackers,

Drop

Canned

DSA Office

1

Thew

Tomato Sauce,

mixed vegetables,

From

e

CT

WHAT IS NEEDEDI Canned Juice, Peanut Butter,

accurate.

what

“Find your place, don’t be put in

U-C Y'

Y'C.

where

as before they felt they didn’t have

Welding students recognized Kevin Hayhoe and Bill Hewitt, welding Conestoga’s from

me

now, because of money and

The main thing

an they have

overcome

at

road,” she said.

the

to tell

tion, child care

at the job.

time in about

get said

campus but it wasn’t the right time

qualities

they don’t give themselves credit

employer what and how to

to

is

force,

she thought about the idea of characters.

They have wonderful

course knowing

to set

Murphy.

whose goal back into the work

in taking their skills

children.

facil-

They leave with confidence and a

three


Pago 4

— SPOKE, April

5,

1999

Campus Question

Tony Lee: does he

Sits

T e h temperature

exploit or entertain?

rising, the

is

snow the

Elizabeth Sackrider

X-rated hypnotist Tony Lee took his explicit act to Stages Nightclub to

entertain

with

Conestoga students

barage

a

of

sexually

its

Most

participants.

was

those

for entertainment.

who

and fooled around with a giant

materials

teddy bear.

said the

think

it is

a

form of entertainment. think

it

is

differs.

about a valid

Others

a grotesque display. Lee

argues that while under hypnosis

people do not do things they wouldn’t normally do. Others argue anything could be

Most

said

do anything while hypnotized they wouldn’t want to do.

Opinion on Lee’s show

the

participated wouldn’t

and while under hypnosis they kissed each other’s bare behinds

Some

of

students agreed the performance

provocative acts using hypnotized

his participants

either

show or who

were watching were asked whether they though Lee’s sho w exploited

people.

Lee hypnotized

who

Conestoga students participated in the

Maw,

Craig

a

third-year

management student, show was all fun and

games.

“Hypnotized people aren’t supposed to do anything they wouldn’t do in real

life,”

said

Maw. First-year broadcasting

Janice Saywell,

saw

Tony Lee gives ample

warning to those before the

show

begins.

means

“Everyone consents when they walk through the door,” said Scott.

Nick Rac, a

said he doesn’t care.

someone

Whenever crowd would shout “Conestoga”, Rac would jump

invented

historians.

“When you make the decision to go up there, you kind of accept what is going to happen,” said Rac.

won’t be

was

fun, I

would do

it

again,”

Photos by Jeanette Everall

free will.”

I

first-year

small

business

student,

Horace

like

someone who hit a game winning homerun or pitched a game. They want

perfect

leagues,

to

emulate

major

game

Some

in the

baseball has touched us

all.

is

teamwork.

is

The

about nine people (or 10

American League because

of the designated

working together runs

than

Nobody

hitter),

to score

their

opponents.

more important than

is

anyone

mother,

play regardless of skill level.

or

grandmother, brother or

sister,

game one way

way.

After baseball’s record setting

else.

Baseball

is

ball doesn’t

Anyone can The

easy.

have to be thrown

90 miles per hour, just a

at

soft toss

will do.

of or another.

all

more

those people should really think about it. Maybe your father or

grandfather

to

that person.

Baseball

some way or another,

And probably in a positive

Janice Saywell, first-year broadcasting student.

a ‘aec&Aly

shelter,

young,

recreational leagues, to the

baseball in

go,” said Dopp.

game

The

ah.

the

little

the

show was no worse than anything you would see on TV. “When a movie is X-rated and you don’t want to see it, then don’t First-year

the

even boyfriend or girlfriend or spouse has been involved with

nursing student, said Lee’s

development

game of

provided

about

and say they hate the baseball, maybe even sports in general, and they have never even thought about the game. But

McShane.

nursing student.

grandest

has

gs can’t and

debated

will read this

am doing, but, it is exciting to be in

Dopp, first-semester

IJVV...

leagues, in

a different state of mind,” said

Christa

[it!

From

first-year early

a

While

But certain

mind. “It

matter the size,

can provide us with an amazing

m

a

said Coleman.

Every

something.

with entertainment

onto his chair and flash his behind

Coleman, a first-year computer programming analysis

move means

1

to the entire audience.

Steve

defy logic in

exciting.

is

Any move, no

small village in

excitement.

show was all in good fun. “I was thinking what the hell

Baseball

Doubieday invented the sport in a New York called CnniwtltAnm TUnf

the

Dopp,

160th

its

programming analyst student, mooned the entire crowd, but he

childhood education student, said

Christa

Baseball will celebrate

little

stage) willingly,” said Saywell. “It it’s

hitting streak,

year in existence. In 1839, Abner

in the

It

many

so

Joe DiMaggio’s 56-

like

computer

first-year

front of his schoolmates but didn’t

X-rated. People go up there (on

with

us

the “real world”.

is

show

the first

to put into their subconscious.

not exploitation,

season

student, took off his clothing in

and people are completely open to any suggestions Lee might decide

Mel McShane, a

game

student,

in

is

Some,

wins.

and variables to analyze.

statistics

and

,

The team th<

analytical.

is

provides

is It’s

;.

who might object

Baseball

middle-aged and old, regardless of gender, with pleasure and

September and she said the participants know what is going to go on when they go to the show. “I think you get warned it is

possible while in a hypnotic state

Scott, said

grass

more runs

scores

is

mon

get

tries to

runs than the other.

and

melting

By

pitches the ball, the batter hits

and one team

Baseball

shared. Fathers and

is

sons, mothers and daughters or

any variation of people have had a

season last year (you know, 70 homeruns by Mark 125 wins by the New York Yankees), baseball once aj

proved in

why it’s

the greatest

g.

North America. These

some of the r< game is an Baseball

is

a

reminder.

It

is

In

always

little

picnics,

leagues,

we’ve

and tossed a Baseball

all

and

parks

put on a glove

ball around. is

nature.

Unless

distorted and played on Astroturf and inside domes, it’s green grass,

Steve Coleman, first-year computer programming

early

analyst student.

student.

Mel

McShane, childhood

brown

dirt

and fresh

first-year

education

Nic

Roc,

first-year

computer

Baseball

is

simple.

The

pitcher

SPOKE

SPOKE

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Janet Wakutz; Student Life Editor: Lindsay Gibson; Entertainment Editor: Elizabeth Sackrider; Sports Editor: Brian Smiley; Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Carly Benjamin; Circulation Manager: Eileen Diniz; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca is

came and

went, as did

gh

picking up again).

be

pastime

in

the

Hockey

it

will

national

Canada and soccer

seems to be gaining popularity. But to paraphrase James Earl Jones's character Terrance Matin,

movie A FMd of Dreams, “Throughout history (he meant American, 1 say North American) in the

there

has

always

been

one

constant: baseball.”

programming analyst student.

Keeping Conestoga College connected Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed;

air.

Playing on a perfect, diamond shaped field is nature at its best.

a

Cricket excitement

provides memories of playing with friends, families and rivals.

is

mainly funded from September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

Word

file

would be

helpful.

contain any libellous statements and

Submissions must not

may be accompanied by

an illustration (such as a photograph).


h

STUDENT

Few students show By Wayne

talk,

Conestoga students were offered a chance on Thursday afternoon to travel and work abroad but just a handful showed interest.

Only 10 hands were raised when Student Work Abroad

(SWAP) representatives, Bethan McVeigh and Scott Bokor, asked how many had actually come to Sanctuary

the

for

“We

usually

response

get

Each

countries

had 100 students from here

inter-

SWAP

around

the

Australia,

world,

France,

Germany, New Zealand and the United States. Full time and part time stu-

ested last year.”

This small group, however,

dents and even “non-students,”

SWAP

between 18 and 25 years old, can also sign up for the registration

listened

attentively

to

captain

McVeigh’s

30-minute

stressed that previous

countries

program.

is

take care of them-

She strongly suggested,

selves.

reconsider

parents,

travelling

alone to a foreign country.

SWAP

going

Julie

van Donkersgoed

meet Conestoga College’s materials

management

students

jumped

the chance to turn a

at

wine and

The

event, held

March 25

arc

staff,

some

are here to support us

a n d s n me ar c jus t n s vo i k i ng.” Jennifer

Bernard,

advisor for the in

“Some

APICS

visas, students don’t

two years

in

money

have to stay

own jobs in their chosen SWAP’s hosting

centres,

according to McVeigh,

the

are

reason

real

students

program over others. “Whatever you need, they get for you, she said. “You have choose

a

this

over

friend

there

one country.

“You’re

what

and

on

happens

times as they want, or

working with people and becoming one of them.” Only four students approached McVeigh and Bokor for more

they want, up to three years.

She also cautioned students about

picking

places

Germany and France. “You must speak more

difficult

"

%!

SWAP’s

to

get

in

cent. ly

announced

success

to is

McVeigh,

around 95 per

SWAP also publishes a year-

magazine for anyone needing

information about the program.

that

The Computer Helpline

:

"

According

lan-

Germany. also

“You’re

entation.

the

guage,” she said, adding that jobs are

said.

information, following the pres-

like

a

gives

students an excellent opportunity. h

tourist,

many

McVeigh

third-year

a

student, said the evening

I

a

however,”

day-to-day basis.”

Enn Conway,

not

enter and exit a country

,v

-

while seeing places like

Europe.

They can

countries but

..

:

Available from: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Vi"

& 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Monday to Friday

students the chance in recognize

chapter, agreed that the evening

chance for students to make

because travellers can earn pocket with the

that,

as

faculty

student

the

pick another destination whenever

looking for full-time or part-time

cheese e ening into a networking session with future employers.

us,” she said.

around

in each destination. Participants

:

“These people are coming to

students

said.

She pointed out

McVeigh

asV'Ava

many

provides job and travel resources

find their

program and that many SWAP now work there. “(They) had a great time last year,” said McVeigh. She said the program is a good way to travel and meet people

the

participate in the

McVeigh

world,”

the full

arranges the trip and

Disneyland had recently joined

a worldwide organi-

now

Canadians

living with then-

still

— Page 5

1999

meeting

“We’re not just a bunch of

because participants are expected

know how to

is

zation and students from

one of the

experience

travel

assists

approximately young 2,400 people to work and travel in including

“We

colleges,”

year

better

said Bokor.

the

has locations on

SWAP

program’s definite requirements

that people

than at

a

at the universities

McVeigh

arrived from a Waterloo office,

SWAP

SWAP

before you even go.”

to $400.

to

or near campuses across Canada.

annual

the

$250

CUTS/Voyages Campus. Although McVeigh and Bokor they said

seminar.

which Bokor said runs from

fee,

5,

2P

interest in Sanctuary’s

which covered everything from program costs to work visas and eligibility requirements. SWAP is a program of the Canadian Federation of Students, which works through Travel

Collins

SPOKE, April

LIFE

"V

.2,0 1:

Available to

.

the Blue Cafeteria at the college

is

was organized by

student

new contacts at

who have a specific computer related question that

Educational

a professional

can be answered by phone or e-mail

chapters

of

Society

the

the

Resource and (AP1CS)

for

Management

Purchasing Management Association of Canada (JPMAC). Students were encouraged to

the

to

professionals and

make

contacts.

Agnes Toth, a third-year dent and president of the dent chapter of

APICS,

stu-

stu-

said the

a

employers,” she said.

All Students

& Employees of Conestoga College

level.

"This

is

a

Call

great opportu-

Doon Campus,

mty

(519) 748-5220 Extension 444

Or

students to net-

Enter e-mail address "COMPUTERCOACH"

work,"

“To hear

said.

YOUR ROAD MAP ON THE COMPUTER HIGHWAY

m o professionals f

r

in

the

field (left) and Bill Dechert meet March 25 wine and cheese social.

evening provides students from

shows students

Rolf Bodendorfer

the program’s three years with the

the

at the

opportunity to network.

of

realities

their careers

(Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

PEER APPRECIATION WEEK APRIL

^

FREE

5

-9 th

ALL TUTORS, LAB MONITORS, HOSTS, MENTORS & COACHES DESERVE A THANK-YOU FOR A JOB WELL

Popcorn Candy FIosSa ** "Tatoo" Arils*

W

a

DONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

TUTORS HELPED MANY STUDENTS THIS YEAR IN THEIR STUDIES IN HEALTH SCIENCES, COMMUNITY SERVICES, TECHNOLOGY AND BUSINESS

PLESE JOIN US ON APRIL 7TH FOR THE ANNUAL PEER APPRECIATION RECEPTION TO THANK AND GIVE RECOGNITION TO THE HARD WORK OUR STUDENTS HAVE DONE IN PEER SERVICES

ANYONE INTERESTED IN BECOMING A PEER TUTOR FOR SEPTEMBER PLEASE CONTACT PEER SERVICES IN THE STUDENTS SERVICES OFFFICE 2B02 BEFORE LEAVING SCHOOL THIS SEMESTER

Barney the Magician Clown creating Caricatures '

In

O*

Ik Sflwtou) Tim»Am6 -

.

*o

Peer Services Supported by Doon Student Association


— SPOKE, April

Page 6

5,

1999

Breakfast honours Conestoga co-op nominees By Wayne Three

Collins

campus, joked about being the oldest of the trio at 33. Wood, who

Conestoga

College

once did contract work for the Ontario Ministry of Natural

co-op students, nominated for a

Canadian

Association

for

Resources, said he’d never had a

Co-operative Education award,

full-time job in his

were honored during an employee breakfast in the Waterloo campus dining room on March 26. The event, a joint promotion of Waterloo Region’s three universities and Conestoga College,

John

president,

in

co-op program’s overall success.

program

He

Ontario.

ranks

Ellen

program

advisory

for

committees

the

program’s success. Tibbits also

acknowledged the support from employers and praised the efforts of companies like Automatic

The employee’s

Toronto,

Seated back Mary Wright.

left

to right,

Jim

one

Stobbe,

employers

11

said

company, GFI Control Systems in Kitchener, has 'been a proud supporter of the coop program for six years now. his

GFI’s past co-op students, said Stobbe, have shown high energy

the co-op setting, he said,

enthusiasm, talent and

creativity.

Students gain self-confidence in

a

and get show what they can

a chance to

jealous of his father’s success.

Academy

doesn’t want to be anything like his father and shuns the

Award winner Robert De Niro

spotlight,

{Cape Fear)

boring, neurotic and complaining

as

Paul Vitti and

When Harry Met Sally) as Ben Sobol in a new Warner Brothers Comedy directed by Harold Ramis {Groundhog Day). The movie is about a psyBilly Crystal

(

whose

patient is an inseboss trying to get in touch with how he is feeling. De Niro plays New York’s most powerful gangster who has grown

chiatrist

cure

up

mob

surrounded

He

lifestyle.

is

by

mob

the

well prepared for

future responsibilities

his

espe-

cially since his father died a

few

years before.

Suddenly when Mendetta, the head boss, is gunned down, it becomes time for Vitti (De Niro) to run

for the leader of all the

crime families in New York, but he starts having problems sleeping, breathing

and getting erect for He is preoccupied and distant with his wife and son and even his loyal followers are beginning to worry about his his mistress.

behaviour. Crystal

New

plays a divorced

enduring a

but

Jelly

(Lisa

Kudrow of the Fox TV series He is a nice guy who is

Friends).

also

dealing

problems. is

a

more

with

His father (Bill Macy) successful,

therapist then Sobol.

also

book

has out

Sobol’s

parental

show-off His father

a

best

and

every

friends

selling one!

believes

he

of is

nervous

is

co-op education are mutual.

Tank, a food and beverage coop student, talked about her co-op experiences in Alberta, Quebec,

Columbia

British

and

Newfoundland. She said her Alberta work term

was

the opportunity of a lifetime

and she can now deal with any problems that arise in her field.

McFarland,

a

third-year

woodworking technology

stu-

De

Niro and surprisingly

Viterelli.

said

the

benefits

of

“Although we learn a employers,”

lot from McFarland,

said

“(my) employers learned a lot from me, too.” McFarland said he did three work terms and the whole program was an incredible experience.

industry

relationship

An

and

colleges

with

universities

Wood, a

third-year mechanical

is good for business. Although a University of Guelph student won the CAFCE Award, Linda Hart, a co-op

Blahitka,

advisor,

was

said

held

three

the

to

breakfast

honour

the

and

to

nominees

promote national co-op week, which ran from March 22-28. “They weren’t just nominated as best co-op students,” said Hart.

engineering technology, robotics

“The winner was named the top

and automation student at the Doon

student in Canada.”

Meanwhile

Vitti’s

however he plays a and weary character

of

Analyze This ends

will

is

surprise

most viewers.

De

Niro is enjoyable, funny and worth the $8. He has fun mocking the gangster part he has played so

him. He confides to Jelly that he needs a “head doctor” and Jelly, of course,

a long time and he makes the most

of

shows him Sobol’s

hyper

kill

card.

he cure his panic attacks before the impending crime-family meeting in a few weeks. Sobol doesn’t want any part of treating Vitti. He just wants to live a quiet life and get married, although Vitti fascinates him and is his biggest challenge as a patient.

Vitti

him.

Vitti’s

breaks

dull but this is his best role in

it!

Kudrow

plays

yuppie

her

part,

typical

which

is

insists

Sobol

neurosis

down

is

is

that

Sobol

excited

mob

rivals include

archenemy Primo Sindonc (Chazz Palminteri, A Bronx Tale). The film delivers some sharp comedic performances from

a

using a mobster voice that scares Sobol.

The movie

is

more than

just a

scene, but this time Crystal plays Vito Carleone and De Niro is

the slow, useless Fredo.

paid to their personalities as to the

few more jokes such as one involving one of Sigmund Freud’s theories. Sobol explains the Oedipus complex where some sons want to kill thenfathers and marry their mother and Vitti asks “have you ever seen my mother?” Vitti is bothered

funny lines. Analyze This ends in an odd but

It

also includes a

throughout the film by Freud’s

Basketball

Challeng

so bad that he

bosses with confidence

is

Don

crying

and authority. His

Sobol

good therapist and makes him believe it by repeating it

dimension that makes it easy to care about them and what’s going to happen. As much attention is

but

inner child so he can confront his

Vitti also insists that

surface

that

during sentimental TV commercials. Sobol has to unravel Vitti’s past and help him connect with his

his

is

moments where

notion of an Oedipus complex.

classic

then decides to go to Sobol

Vitti

and demands

rival

he

of

The Godfather. Analyze This has a nice re-creation of one Godfather scene, the failed murder

often. Crystal has

or they will try to

after years

The movie makes fun of many mobster movies including the

an odd but good way which

loyal, patient

being in the business.

in

about

neurosis

most people. funny and charming,

getting boring to Veterelli is

getting even worse and decides he can’t let the other families know

scared to death.

MacNamara

full

insurance reports and eventually accepts Ben’s business card.

treat

fiancee Laura

list

Sobol’s life seems normal until he rear ends a car that appears to have an extra passenger in the trunk. The car is driven by Vitti’s bodyguard Jelly (Joseph Viterilli). Sobol insists they call the police

York psychiatrist with a young listens in on his sessions. Sobol is about to marry his high-strung

dent,

their resumes.

patients.

son, played by Kyle Sahiby,

who

do while gaining experience they can put on

Crystal,

He

stars

she feels great

comedy Analyze This a must see

Hilarious Eileen Diniz

of

attending,

adding the college’s real goal No. 1 ranking worldwide.

This

Collins)

said

about the whole program.

through co-op programs, said

levels,

Analyze

Wayne

(Photo by

and Manulife Financial. “They must think we’re doing something right,” said Tibbits,

By

was

held March 26 at the Waterloo campus, for co-op employLynn Tank, Jack Kok, Greg McFarland, Jim Stobbe, Roger Wood and

recognition breakfast

ers.

Tooling Systems (ATS), Michelin

is

manager at Knoll American Corp. in

North

credited the college’s

faculty, support staff and

human

Blahitka,

resources

in

first

Steele,

businesses and for the area.

Tibbits said the college’s co-

op

Andy

a positive thing for

certainly

Dr.

Tibbits, congratulated the

like

manager of Valley City Dundas, said the program was

factory

co-op week, paid tribute to Roger Wood, Greg McFarland and Lynn Tank. Conestoga’s

future

to hold his

“test drive” his abilities.

Employers

of national

part

as

means

employers won’t have

hand or

His co-op

life.

experience, he said,

Wed. April 7 The Sanctuary

contain

comedy. The characters a

certain

human

good way which will surprise most viewers. It is rated AA and is currently

playing at Cambridge Centre Cinema, Silver City and King’s College in Kitchener and 3 Star

Cinema

in Guelph.

1

2 3 4 5


ISi SB

in

Maurier

Supporting 215 cultural organizations

m

Canada during the 1998-99 season


Page 8

— SPOKE, April

5,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

ECE man

graduate

with a mission

By Janet Wakutz

seven years,” said Neves.

childhood

Early graduate,

father

children’s

book

of

education

The details have not been worked out yet but Neves will use

two

his vacation time for the trip

and

Rob

author,

Conestoga College the

left to right) Alicia Lorenz and Cameron Krasovcec received a lesson in geography on March 27 at Elmira Childcare Centre as teacher, Rob Neves, shows the route he hopes to take (Photo by Janet Wakutz) in September.

from 1992 works

Elmira Childcare Centre school-age

with

Students (from

in

make

to

starting

is

children,

and

contacts.

Neves’ wife Colleen and two

Neves is on a mission. Neves who graduated at

a

is

chil-

dren will travel with him.

my children

want

“I

to see being

of service as normal in their he

lives,”

said.

providing them with a structured

His 25-year-old nephew, Frank

environment of creativity and fun.

Dias, plays guitar and will provide

Neves has developed workshops with storytelling and has worked

music ministry on the mission. sure about isn’t Neves

with Catholic school boards.

workshop

six-hour

at

is

He

8.

could

is

to offer the

work-

shop free of charge to churches on a three-week tour starting

the

second week in September.

He

hopes to work his way out to

workshop is

at

offer

an

evening

to parents called,

your Dad, which

is

God

a light look

parenting, taking God’s lead

and remembering the parent

is

a

child of God.

of the workshop over the past

may

the group

is

out.

great if he

or

RV or

stay with families

along the way. accept whatever

“I’ll

God

and hope

gives

offered

is

me my

daily

bread,” he said. said he believes for every

need someone has, there are lacking else

you because someone

it is

greedy with their

is

if

gifts,”

he

Put simply, Neves

explained.

what

an

is

equal gift in the world. “So,

said,

“I’ve been doing bits and pieces

would be

it

make use of a van

Neves

Charlottetown, P.E.I. and back. will

said

but

trip

work

confident things will

God’s Love

Know

His mission

He

accommodations for the

youths in grades 7 and

Getting to

aimed

His

entitled,

we should take account of we have and give the

surplus. “I use

home

my

but

gifts at

I still feel

work and

at

fortunate,”

he

said.

Neves said he has felt a strong do make this journey. “I am a professional story teller and I’m

call to

“I’m looking

blessed,” he said.

way

for a great

to share

some of

the joy I’ve experienced with

God.” addition

In

two

having

to

books published, the

children’s

resident

has

self-published

three

other

children’s books.

His publishing

Listowel

company Rob Neves Press

will

a greeting card line

this

start

summer.

Rob reached robneves

Neves

can

through

email

be at

@ hotmail.com.

Rec Centre Cont d from page The Ontario Ministry of Education and Training has

just

Modifications

released the results of two province-wide surveys of the of Applied Arts

1

25 Ontario Colleges

and Technology. Conestoga College posted outstanding

results in five

key areas:

maybe made throu|l|

the

use

Graduate Placement

in

Graduate

in

Student Satisfaction

of

the

the

revised

existing rules.

Approval in

this

to

protocol

of

protocol will he sought from the

Satisfaction

college's

board

of

governors.

The new filed

protocol will be

with the ministry

of

in

Quality of Services

education.

in

Quality of Facilities/Resources

Kristin Murphy, DSA president said the protocol

be changed. by the province and every college in Ontario goes by it. In order to change it we would have to go through both the province and all Ontario will not

The College Board of Governors congratulates the the

Management Team and

Conestoga College #1

in

Faculty,

Support

Staff,

the best college students in the province for

Ontario.

THANK" youf

Program Advisory Committees,

making

Conestoga College

m

It is

set

colleges.

“There is a possibility it can be changed, but it would take an act of God,” said Murphy.


SPOKE, April

SPORTS

1999

5,

— Page 9

Men’s varsity soccer team advances to semifinals The

By Charles Kuepfer

first-half

Condors men’s varsity indoor soccer team has advanced

The

March

overpower the younger Southwest team.

half

up a 4-0 lead

that

much

for

too

the

Southwest to overcome. Zlatko

Lakoseljac,

Samuels,

Hermes

Shaun Alvarez

and Paul McQuade scored for Miguel Knox

Ognjen

Caprara big

the Condors, while

and

Southwest stormed back and

Panic

replied

Lou

come up with

to

save

of

off

a

shot

a

by

Matthew Martindale. The Condors struck again, taking a 2-0 led after Shaun Samuels powered his way in front of the net and hammered a shot

well,”

refused to be beaten for a third

Condor goal

to give

them a

goalkeeper

them come

played very

we

sat

back and

Johnstone said he was pleased with the play of his defenders,

time.

McQuade, Samuels

out

singling

their

Marko

defensive play and were able to

and

most of the play for the rest of the game. Panic got Southwest on the board, one-timing a pass from Shawn Boterman past Caprara. They continued to pressure the Condors, and Knox scored moments later off a pass from David Bucharski, cutting the

hold off Southwest to win the

contributors in the victory.

game.

It

Condor coach Geoff Johnstone said he knew his team wanted to win the game. “They want this now,” said desire

win

to

who

for

finished sixth in

during

division

their

regular

season play. Southwest bettered the Condors

by finishing third. Condors finished their

The

regular season play with a record

playoff

the

key

as

Juricic

was somewhat of an upset

the Condors,

Johnstone, referring to his team’s

of 7-9-0

championship.

He

let

at us.”

in

lead in half.

“The

Johnstone.

said

second half

Carprara

we

half

first

some good chances,

Despite

The Condors tightened up

half.

Southwest came out fired up

This brought the 30 or so fans to

past Luffman.

for Southwest.

“The

comeback bid

their

the first-half scoring, banging in a

the second-half, controlling

forced Condor goalkeeper

obviously cheering on the

Southwest team in

Condor

comfortable lead at the

Andrew

goalkeeper

life,

when he beat Luffman with a hard blast. Then McQuade completed

shot just inside the left post past

Luffman.

be

there.

a three-goal lead

fourth

They won the game on strength of some solid first to

it

Lakoseljac opened the scoring

Southwest

proved

Alvarez made

shortly into the half, blasting a

Conestoga College recreation centre.

play, building

But they didn’t stop

knocking

off Southwest Under- 18

on

size to

by a score 25 at the

to the semifinals, after

of 4-2

was dominated by

who used their

the Condors

team struggled after the midway point of the game.

while

(won-lost-tied)

Southwest

said his

boasted

a

9-5-2 record.

.

Attention ?

ftig-coac

:

d

:•

of the Alumni concluded the

when

scoring

first-half

she

Graduating Students

scored at around the 32-minute Conestoga College offers these Post-Graduate Programs. Attend an

mark.

A

wide-open

first half resulted

in neither team having a clearcut advantage going into the sec-

ond

ft

half. •

1

-

-

for:

Human Resources Management (Co-op) University Of Guelph

March 23,

7:00

-

University Of Waterloo

March 25, 10:00

-

Conestoga College

March

-

8:00 pm, McKinnon Building 11 :00

Rm 236

am, Davis Room

;

i

:

:

Information Session

:

;

30,

7:00

Room 2A56

8:00 pm,

scrappy ra the second half with both teams being awarded free

mes. Yeowell put the Alumni up 5-4

ft:

kicks se veral

i

10-minute mark of the second half when she took a nice pass from a teammate and put at the

Conestoga's Ang Papazotos goes

on Alumni goaltender, Amanda Kesselring. Kesselring made the stop with just over a couple minutes left in the game. The Alumni held on for a 6-5 victory in the championship game on March 23 at the recreation centre. (Photo by Brian Smiley)

the

past the

ball

Sasha Gruetzmacher evened the

game up again about a later when she blasted a

minute

Then

patting the ball in the baclt of the

penalty with just under five min-

net Conestoga took

utes to play in the

centre, to capture their secondstraight

the

Conestoga 6-5

It

at the recreation

title.

was

a

game

of teeter-totter,

was ahead and would tie it up and then roles would be reversed. The Condors seemed to trapped by the strategy of Alumni, which was to slow as one team

the

off the post.

other

the

the rebound

get the

game down and open up floor.

And

paid

way

The see-saw battle continued two minutes later when Marguilda Aguilar carried the

world

can beat them when they

slow down,” Condors’ coach their extra

**

e e

on the Condors’ goal and

weaved around a couple of defenders

before

slipping

under

Conestoga

Stephanie

Den Haan.

it

goalie

mark At the 22-minute Melanson was in on another goal

On

play Yeowell scored the decisive

Conestoga

coach

seven minutes

better position ball past the It

and blasted the

Condors’ goalie.

took Conestoga only two

9:00 pm,

Room 2A56

-

1 1

:00,

am

(Optional

Coop)

Room

Davis

over the

25-

referee’s

Den Haan a

penalty after one of his players

was fouled penalty half.

severely,

call, earlier in

was grossly

“It

decide the

game

with no

the second unfair to

like that,”

he

While both teams got away game, the talking

call

Johnstone was

about was an obvious

who

College COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

was a physical game and he go ” said Ford. The game was wide open and

in the

Ford said. “We love

when we

term

The

1960’s to describe people who, while

having average or above average

abilities,

exhibited difficulty

learning in one of the basic academic areas such as reading,

Since that time, considerable research

has helped us to identify and classify what a learning disability is, how to diagnose this problem, and how who have a learning disability.

Research has taught us that

to help individuals

:

• Learning disabilities affect about

show

2-5% of students. marked differ

a

ence in what they are capable of learning and

achievement

their

could have gone either way, but

Conestoga in the final. “It felt good to have some com-

to the

increasingly aware of the individual needs of students.

term was coined

in certain areas.

Learning disabled students do well in college

and university programs given the right kind of

Ford was happy to meet and beat

beat Conestoga

Learning Disabilities

“Learning Disability” in the past few years as educators become

“It

petition,”

[j

There has been considerable attention paid

• Learning disabled students

physical game.

continued to go

support. •

There are

tests

and procedures

that

can help

identify the exact nature of the disability.

to

There are strategies

While everyone has

can.”

mate, Sirio found the twine and

game was the conclusion of women’s play for the indoor

put Conestoga up by a goal.

soccer season.

After a nice pass from a team-

the Conestoga College Information Centre for more

writing, or mathematics.

said.

minute time length and the goals in.

call

information and to reserve your seat. 519-748-5220, ext. 656.

Johnstone

was upset with the

let it

cal glitch the half lasted about

Olson

March 22, 10:00

236

Alumni.

sixth goal for the

Olson once again tied the score and the half should

put to the middle

was

-

Rm

12 noon, Davis Room

game.

Alumni power-

the ensuing

allowed both teams to play a

have ended that way. However, because of a techni-

Please

Den Haan was assessed a two-minute

from her goalie and scored to put the Condors up 3-2. With just under a minute left in

ms

outhustled her opponent into a

8:00

9:00 pm, 236 McKinnon Building

NEW for September 1999, SYSTEMS ANALYST

both sides, Condors’ goalie

with quite a bit throughout the

first half,

r

University Of Waterloo

the controversy began.

oversight by the referee,

The Alumni, with

-

Environmental Engineering Applications

After several flagrant fouls by

decision to give

2-1.

ball in

strategy

in the

Ang Papazotos took and scored to make

the

off.

“There’s no

we

Alumni

lead of

the

one

only

with

substitution, the

its first

game at the 17-minute mark when Danny Sirio blasted a shot

it

March 30,

-

:00

Conestoga

Atanuii

minutes

defeated

Conestoga College

8:00 1 1

comer

season concluded on March 23 the

March 25,

net.

to get even. Karen Melanson created a turnover and stole the ball from an Alumni defender and made no mistake in

as

March 23,

University Of Waterloo

Conestoga

goalie;

of the Alumni

The women’s indoor soccer

University Of Guelph

in

rocket into the top-right

By Brian Smiley

Career Development Practitioner

come

This

that

can be used

to help

over

a learning disability. different leaning styles,

learning disabilities are

marked areas of difficulty.


i

Page 10

— SPOKE, April

5,

1999

ENTERTAINMENT

X-rated hypnotist has students in a trance By Jeanette Standing

Everall over five feet

do the

participants take part will-

ingly,

they also chose to allow

and a black T-shirt with ‘security’ written on the back, Tony Lee may not look like the

themselves to be hypnotized. “The hypnotist doesn’t hypnotize the person, the person hypnotize themselves. I just put

average hypnotist.

something

But despite appearances, he had Conestoga College students tak-

they decide whether or not they

at just

tall

in jeans

their ing off their clothes, swearing at

and

colleagues

performing

provocative sexual acts as part of his X-rated show on March 23.

About people, mostly 80 Conestoga College students, showed up at Stages Night Club to see Lee’s show, which is

want

to

do

From the

in

their

mind and

performing in a pornographic movie and demonstrating how to do the ‘wild thing’ with a stuffed teddy bear.

As for where Lee draws the line, he said everybody has a different line and what’s good for some people wouldn’t be good for others.

“We

it.”

audience,

it

looked like

Lee’s subjects were willing to do everything he suggested, including imagining themselves

generally stay

away from

doing crazy stuff to females. But for the guys, they’ll moon an audience when they’re not hypnotized.”

O

recognized as the only uncensored adult show of its kind.

Steve Coleman, a first-year computer-programming-analyst removes his pants while hypnotized at the Tony Lee show on March 23 at Stages in Kitchener. student,

(Photo by Jeanette Everall)

And

according

material he

to

Lee,

comes up with

the

for his

show see,

is what the students want to and so far, he hasn’t had any

WE

complaints in the 13 years he’s been doing it.

“We’ve

tyingfat 99 Monday,

I

April

CjcLrcuges Sale/

10:30 cww,

y,

5 vip f

TTve/ Scwvctiicwy

had any bad Lee in an interview after the show. “Even with the kind of show we do, people are warned before, during and after. Anyone who has any negative criticism knows what kind of a show we have.” As for the participants, no one seemed to mind one bit. “It was all for fun,” said Steve Coleman, who removed his never

criticism,”

Tuesday, April 6

down

Free' CcwCccctiwey yvv Tlve/ScwuztcLuury /

%

rprwogp porwLal/ 9 pvw, Golf St&aJh H ovi&e/

Wednesday, April 7 3a^hefiycdl/ CKaXLegpe/( V 6n/ live/ S(MVc£iAXwy

v

I

shouted

“It’s

TALK TO YOUR FACULTY OR DROP IN TO STUDENT SERVICES!

Peer Services Supported byDooo Student Assotiafan

Basketball

Challeng

was

all

in

fun.

not like he picked people

out of the audience and forced

3 orv 3 Totvrvu^vvie^vt 3:30 pvw, 1Z evyrevvtXxyyv C e^vtre/

IF INTERESTED

‘Conestoga’,

said his participation

good

98/99

was

buttocks every time an audience

member

AS TUTORS FOR THE

NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR

it.”

Coleman, who is a first-year computer-programming-analyst student, said his friends keep telling him what he did while on stage, however, he remembers giving Lee his clothes. “It just all made sense to do it,” said Coleman. “He wanted my pants, so I gave them to him.” Nick Roc, who exposed his

them

to

come up on

stage,” said

Roc, a first-year computerprogramming-analyst student. “You went up on your own free

Wed. April 7 The Sanctuary

will.”

And

Thursday, April

to his

seen the show before, so

prepared for

RETURNING STUDENTS

said

boxer shorts under Lee’s direction. “I have

clothes

WILL BE LOOKING TO HIRE

according to Lee, not only

8C|)

pre^Bar'B -Qute/ y 11:30 cww, OuJ^^e/ M(vXa^ c^vfe/

Friday, April

Great

Bags T-Shirts

9

Movie/ of tHe/We&h 12:30 pvw, Tlve/Scuvctuctry

stuff

Student Food Share Program

Printer

Sweatshirts

Monday,

April 5

0:30 am - 1 :30 The Sanctuary 1

pm


ENTERTAINMENT

SPOKE, April

5,

1999

— Page 11

Psychic hints at future By Elizabeth Sackrider College

most

students

commonly

ask

Dan

psychic

Valkos questions concerning love lives

and career paths.

The psychic appeared in the Sanctuary on March 24 to hint and suggest the future of Conestoga students.

can read people in essence by

“I

looking at them, tuning into the

sound of

their voice or just being

close to them,” said Valkos.

Psychic Dan Valkos visited Conestoga to tell fortunes in the Sanctuary on March 24. (Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

First-year broadcasting student,

Mandie Young, rushed Valkos to get a

to

see

of what her

tidbit

future holds. “It

like

is

horoscope. but a “It

Most of

little bit

is

reading it

your

isn’t true,

might be,” she

said.

mainly for entertainment,

though.”

Emilie Friedrich, came to watch Valkos out of curiosity, but cautions anyone

who might

at the

answers to

Valkos

large quartz crystal.

reading in 1971.

my

crystal as an energy

He “I

did his

was

thought

somebody’s

garbage,” said Valkos.

head

with,”

said

Valkos.

But

First-year

nursing

student,

with

teachers

was the

of

assistance

of

psychic

UTLET

for the top

Canadian radio psychic in 1998. When people ask questions,

and

bunch

a

the

studies in Ontario.

Valkos

focal point, something to get into

four years Valkos has

teaching

He was nominated

professional

first

originally a skeptic it

UFO

became

involved in research in 1969.

last

development and reincarnation workshop at Conestoga College and also does hypnosis work for

didn’t occur

he

until

Young’s questions about careers and her life while rubbing his “I use

been

really

“Never put your future in the hands of a psychic,” she said. to

further.

For the

believe in psychic predictions.

Becoming a psychic

Valkos hinted

abilities

he can tune

in,

to

some degree of accuracy

as

to

said,

what the answers

to the questions

are going to be.

“You have

Valkos developed his

total

complete control

own destiny,” he said. “I like a road map and tell

over your

can act

you what might happen if you walk down path A or path B.” According to Valkos, the psychic

SWING DANCE

circles

call-in

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Page 12

— SPOKE, April

5,

1999

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