Page 1

3 1st Year

Sanctuary: a garbage By Jeanette Large

Everail

banner-sized

posters

announcing the closure of the Sanctuary

Conestoga

greeted

College students wanting to

sit

in

on March 11 and 12. problem? Excessive

the lounge

The garbage.

members

Executive

Doon

of

the

Student Association (DSA)

closed the lounge to send a

message continue

who

students

to

leave their mess

to

behind that they are frustrated with the on-going garbage

The

made

decision,

battle.

DSA

at a

executive meeting held on

March

Gerry

DSA

Cleaves,

vice-president of student affairs,

DSA

done up cveiyclTirrg-- from posters to getting up on stage and said

the

cans red and green so that they

“Unfortunately,

would be more

the students.”

at,” said

attractive to

look

“We’ve done

Cleaves

humanly possible

currently

Cleaves.

everything

has

addressing the students directly. “I’ve even painted the garbage

11

dump? it is

going to cost

DSA

the

said

up

is

hiring

considering

next to .walking behind people

someone

with a garbage can.”

however, the cost of the service will be paid for out of monies presently being used to provide

The problem wouldn’t be as bad if the garbage being left behind was just paper, said Cleaves, but

“People

it’s

spill

to clean

the lounge,

entertainment and nooners in the lounge.

not.

Other options which have been

food and it doesn’t into

considered to rectify the problem

on any given day and there are fruit flies,” he said. “It was getting to the point that there were ants.” In an attempt to fix the problem the DSA purchased tables and

include prohibiting food in the

You can go

get cleaned up.

the lounge

lounge.

This sign was what greeted students who wanted to use the Sanctuary on March 11

and

12.

(Pjioto

“But then

DSA)

by Jeanette Everail)

ple

who wanted to eat could sit at

them.

~

hoped

mess easier However, the

after themselves, said

new

the

,

clean

up.

someone

problem

has

said Cleaves,

the

the

to

persisted regardless of

all

to clean

up

who

to

naving

after

them,”

“If (the

supposed to be on the

is

want

be out there saying, “Sorry,

you

previous attempts to get people

up

becomes a policing

side of the students, I don’t to

to clean

it

said Cleaves.

issue,”

chairs for the Sanctuary so peo-

a last resort.

9, is

— No.

can’t eat in here.”

Bringing in a security officer to enforce the rule is more costly than hiring someone to clean up the mess, he said.

has been on

DSA executive for two years.

See iMunge

Page 11

Nicholas surprised by computer By Wayne

Nicholas said a

Collins

Friends and colleagues gathered in the staff lounge

see the look

face

Wednesday

when

to

when she saw her new many came just to

computer, but

administrator

Conestoga

and

on

is

Nicholas.

Her friend Judy

Myma hadn’t been

Gilmour,

told

suggeted the

who

Hart,

said

computer out munity

shmgged

had always wanted a

computer,”

idea of getting

a

comThe response

was overwhelming, she Hart, however, didn’t

want

to

be

She

said

many

Gregory,

counsellor,

college

a

read a story she’d

Myma.

referred

“The Wise One”

several times in her story recalling the phrase,

“Tmst me”,

as

one of

donation as well,” said Hart.

Nicholas’s favorite sayings.

She explained that Nicholas worked closely with Rodeway

she was, indeed, someone

housing

to

co-ordinating

before

Gregory said Nicholas proved

who

student

always seemed to have the right

becoming

problems.

solutions

to

daily

in the emotional

sheet

was

lifted off the

great

a

Nicholas sat

Nicholas for a long time.

others,

computer,

lady,”

at the

computer for

probably have to hire a to get

me

started

on

it,”

Nicholas will use the computer home to keep in touch with her

at

screamed as her hands flew

information on the Internet.

face in shock and surprise. “I

was not expecting

Nicholas

down

this at all,”

said as tears

her smiling face.

streamed

she

said, laughing.

which John Gilmour, of computer services, had set up earlier in a far comer of the room. Nicholas to her

said

a while, surrounded by everyone. “I’ll

as

Suites

“She’s

coach

Nicholas

gave us a

many

Gilmour.

moment, a bed-

jokingly

Suites

hugged

and

gathered around Nicholas to share

Gregory

“Rodeway

reading

which

prior to the presentation,

was so widely known by students the college.

while

tears

While more than a dozen people

she called The Oracle of

staff because of her position at

did

college counsellor Barbara

written about Nicholas’s career

people helped because Nicholas

and

like

off any credit for his as

efforts,

instramental

computer system,

Kraler.

Gregory stmggled through

a peer co-ordinator.

Carol

said.

singled out for her part in the

fund-raising.

John Gilmour starts up Myrna Nicholas’s new computer as (Photo by Wayne Colllns) friends and colleagues look on.

to the college

in January.

who was

in acquiring the

about the computer.

“Myma

overwhelming,” said

just

“It’s

being diagnosed with multiple Hart said

again.”

they had planned.

short-term disability leave after

sclerosis last year.

it

Wednesday expecting just to see her friends and had no idea what

longtime

employee,

to the college.

Nicholas said she showed up on

peer-services

a

came

she

proves

see her again.

Nicholas,

of things have

“The community and the family that’s been here for me, that’s always been here for me, this just

Myma Nicholas’s

on

lot

happened in her life, especially her Conestoga life, since 1972

friends

and

research

health

Hart said Nicholas will soon be

going

on

long-term

will she and missed by all.

be

disability

dearly


— SPOKE, March

Page 2

22, 1999

NEWS

Group celebrates women’s day By

The Women’s Resource Group gourmet dining, song and poetry

of

women’s

have been made.

Crete

who

has been getting a

The group made a profit of $400 from ticket sales, which donated, to the local were women’s shelter, Mary’s Place. Carol Gregory a counsellor with student services presented the

money

to

Madeleine Poynter,

member

a faculty

the

in

and

program

services

social

president of the Kitchener

the

She

CDs and has CBC, on

been

interviewed

Macaw

is

a high school teacher

and storywriter.

She formerly taught

some

in

said

of

Conestoga

at

women

the

in

and

trades

non-traditional

“They do these events

evening, the meal and the

the

entertainment.

The entertainment was funny The

it,”

women were

The Women’s Resource Group

for the

said Poynter. “Their

women’s college.

to help

time

the

The group has brought

speakers

guest

the

in

Sue

including

who spoke about date Dan Beckett whose topic

Gallagher

first

about

among

issues

rape and

the

about

awareness

raises

number of benefit concerts local women’s shelters.” is

able to relate to the

entertainment.

was sexism, lives and violence. The group also co-ordinates

Doon

Left to right:

Donna MaCaw,

is

Women’s Resource Group has

events with the

held this type of event. Poynter

Association for occasions, such as

Crete, guitar player

Eating Disorder Week.

at

Student

said a

number of people have

in

coma

By Janet Wakutz 5

is

poetry and story writer and Nonie at the Celebration of Women

and songwriter Waterloo campus.

(Photo by Eileen Diniz)

busitl

stud ent ‘***‘‘*Mir^ uueipn car

storm accident March

Student

Former

after winter

winter storm on

Women

they enjoyed

YWCA.

The duo. Women’s Voices,

A

how much

have said

charges are minimal and they do a

This

received a

students and the employees at the

academic upgrading programs. love of

“We

of positive feedback.

lot

but also meaningful, she said.

as well as a poet

YWCA

board of directors. Mary’s Place operated by the Kichener

of

lot

national attention this year.

Gregory.

Waterloo campus.

singer/songwriter

a

is

women attended Women Celebrating Women held at the college’s

an

it

ment.

has several

Seventy

make

annual event but no decisions

March 9 to mark International Women’s Day.

Tuesday,

suggested they should

provided the evening’s entertain-

of Conestoga College held an

evening

Macaw

Nonie Crete and Donna

Eileen Diniz

iji'iiM

III

V~

ifii:

cra^

being blamed for an accident that

has

construction-

a

left

By Janet Wakutz

engineering student in a coma.

John Pierre

Moons, of

(J.P.)

was a passenger

Forest, Ont.,

Lisa Scott-Mooncy, a

in a

car that skidded through an icy

College, has been killed in a car

London, Ont., intersection and hit broadside by another

accident near Guelph.

was

OPP

Guelph

vehicle.

that

separates

the

windows,” said Gord Lipke, ordinator

of the

County Road 86 north of Guelph. Road conditions were slippery at the time of the accident.

car co-

construction-

engineering program.

say the Feb. 12

accident occurred on Wellington

“His head was impacted by the post

1997

business graduate of Conestoga

John Pierre Moons

“Our

Moons was

investigation

revealed

conscious after the accident and

that her car crossed into

while being loaded into the ambu-

after

southbound lane and was

lance, Lipke said.

several days,” he said.

“When he

got to the hospital

they sedated him and

some time

he went into a coma for

by

Lipke said Moons’

Moons,

father,

John

reports his son has

been

conscious off and on and he has

Travel-Teach English

been able to speak but it is unlikely he will be able to return

University Hospital

5 days/40 hour (June 2-6 Guelph)

TESOL

teacher

course by correspondence)

certificate

(or

1

,000’s of jobs.

Available

NOW!

Toll Free:

1-800-270-2941

out of the

is

“(His recovery)

long

is

we’re

haul,

going to be a playing

He

Moons of much so.”

fun-loving,” said

dc.scribed

meticulous

loo his

son

dresser.

girllriends say

J.P.

has a

as

“All

a

his

million-

dollar wardrobe, he’s very neat for a boy,” he said.

accident,

to

work

full

time to

support his two children. in

June of this year.

“We’re

College.

“maybe

Scott

electronic

engineering technology student,

still

nesses,” said

The minor hockey player and avid golfer lives at Rodeway Suites while attending Conestoga is

Thomas

Lisa’s husband,

Mooney, who was an

it

day-by-day,” said his father.

“He

in the other

v^#e were hurt.

The couple was married

intensive care unit.

his son,

Free information pack,

London’s

in

is

egr” said Const Dale

Two occupants

has had to leave school since the

to school this semester.

Moons who

aaotfeeir

Gesff.

the

.struck

trying to find wit-

Mooney. “We know

there were two to three vehicles

following her and no one has

come forward.” Mooney and still

wife's

lane

family arc

his

trying to understand

car

left

the

and travelled

traffic.

He

why

into

oncoming

asks that anyone

may have witnessed

liis

northbound

who

the accident

contact the Guelph detachment

of the OPP.

Lisa Scott-Mooney with her their

June

1

998 wedding.

husband Thomas Scott Mooney

i

(Contributed phot<


STUDENT

SPOKE, March 22, 1999

LIFE

— Page 3

Broadcasting students lend a hand at Junos By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

broadcasting

said

student,

although enjoyable, volunteering

Five broadcasting students spent of

part

participating

scenes

March

their

break

the behind-the-

in

involved

action

in

producing the 1999 Juno Awards.

The

students were alerted to the

while

opportunity

volunteer

perusing the broadcasting bulletin

board located on the third as

seat

fillers

would the

for

production, which was broadcast

from Copps Coliseum on March the

7,

and

opportunity

resumes

seized

students

faxed

the their

production

the

to

a second-year

Fetch,

broadcasting

said

student,

she

was pleasantly surprised with the

change

in

her

volunteer

“I’m so glad be a seat

I

sent in

my resume

she said.

“I

don’t think any of us thought

we

filler,”

would actually get to help with the show because we thought those jobs would have already been First-year broadcasting student,

Erin-Lianne Cyopik, said working

Junos was one of the best

times of her

seemed

supervisors

CBC

“With the

strike they really

help,”

for

being on

staff

needed the extra

“The whole

she said.

experience was reaUy worthwhile

we

actually got to assist

with

professionals

major

a

production.”

Another involved

second-year in

the

student

event,

Kerry

with the exposure to the Canadian

music industry

moment from

her responsibilities at the

(Photo By Julie van Donkersgoed)

Juno

the

that

Sabrina Pierson, second-year broadcast student, takes a to cozy up to comedian Mike Bullard.

Juno Awards

experience provided.

“A

lot

of people don’t get this

kind of opportunity,” she said.

was

also great because

we

“It

got to

paying the $200 everyone else did.”

this,” she

thoroughly experience.

said.

behind the scenes.”

teaxa -with the

won’t soon forget “I

Sabrina Pierson, a second-year

Tue^fdyCiy, AprCl/6,

Sandra Orton, a second-year broadcasting student,

life.

met a lot of new people, made some contacts and got to experience what really goes on

“I said.

grateful

the help.

attend this event free instead of

fiUed.”

at the

time on the students’ part, their

Cosgrove, said she was pleased

position.

to

Pierson went on to say that while

because

producer of the event.

Amanda

production.

the experience required a lot of

floor.

Originally thinking they

serve

show was not a one-day The students commitment. traveled to Hamilton on March 3 for a meeting, March 4 and 6 for a rehearsal, and the day of March 7 was spent doing a dry run of the for the

“I can’t wait to “I

thought

she

said

enjoyed

the

f do

it

1999

9:00 pm/

again,” she

we made a

great

Conestoga foUts and some Others thrown in.” ,

^ TLchety$5.00

AvMLahLe'Ot^^VSA

Office/

What's Happening With the DSA????

OBBQ P Barter and Garage Sale O Hoops for Heart 3 vs 3 Basketball Tournament

O Movie Day O Clown P Magician O Semi-Formai o Awards

Banquet

Co-ed


Oscars are sad Well,

the

Oscars

have

come

and

gone

once

montage of skin and sex appeal,

me

Don’t get I

wrong.

do appreciate the value of

wonder about

to the

I

event

glamorous, but

mass commercialism

with Christmas, this

associated

entertainment in our sqciety, but

you’re

a couple of pounds.

Akin

congratulate you.

agtiin.

If

I

reflection of values marketed for months prior

is

implications

Entire magazines are devoted to

such soirees have, not only on us,

the contenders and trashy tabloid

me.

you

but also on

news shows abound with

probably spent

youth that view

a good portion

friends

night

with

criticizing

a or

the clothing and mannerisms of those attending

praising

Hollywood’s biggest If

impressionable

homage

this

to all

things superficial.

of your Sunday

couple

the

do not highlight the comments of a ‘politically astute’ actor or presenter, but rather the

Gwyneth

Paltrow

was

wearing, or the fact that a certain

night.

you didn’t catch the splashy

actress

has

or

lost

gained

I

know

that this

must

in attendance.

view may not be

very popular, but society

the

that

our

get

its

I feel

really

We

be

magical

is

these

we

society the

What

need

attributes

to that

also need

deserving

nurses,

of

humanitarian

achievement and triumph.

am

not telling anyone to stop

watching the Oscars.

and

tune in again to next

I will likely

to

begin

by reconsidering the faces

truly

evening of unrealistic ideals and

days

is

must

the not-so-glamorous professions.

appreciation.

ignore

saying, however,

acknowledge, with some degree of passion, the achievements of Start

question the

to

am

I

we

that

message we are sending young people when we highlight an

I

evening

that this

a

year’s extraveganza.

and boys

constitute prestige.

priorities into perspective. I am aware supposed to

also aware

emulate

to

re-evaluate

‘insider

surrounding

wardrobes of those

We

dress

information’

am

I

little girls

unrealistic images.

As

like

many

trying

are

to its occurrence.

anythin g

the

that too

of

your

Remember the doctors, teachers, counsellors,

child-care

emergency personnel

providers,

and countless others who will never have an evening devoted to what they are wearing and how

much

they weigh.

State of lounge

shows disrespect of college students When I heard

cups stained a mud-puddle brown,

the Sanctuary

12 due to an

Sanctuary

garbage,

and

March is month for

about what kind of people

the

It

includes live coverage of aU

sessions

of

the

tournament,

Last year, the Kentucky Wilcats

made their third appearance in a row in the championship game,

through a deal

Madness in the form of

with the

the National

Collegiate

1991, was worth $1 billion and has since been replaced with a

enter as the tournament’s top seed,

Athletic

new $1,725

boasting

The

CBS NCAA.

deal,

Sports signed

(NCAA)

originally

signed in

billion

championships.

men’s basketball championships. The championships capture the attention of basketball enthusiasts

from around the world for the better part of the month. The tournament kicked-off on and runs until March 29. There are 64 teams competing for 1 1

championship

from

four regions of the United States: the east, west, midwest and south.

Each team must games to advance.

win

their

is

a big deal.

the

second

their

an

impressive

32-1

(won-lost) record. State,

Auburn

process to

choose the 64 teams which compete in the tournament has televised event.

From

NCAA true.

a fan’s

out

finals are a is

know how

to take

a majority of us live on

all,

for quite

some

if

we were

toddlers

running around in diapers be acceptable.

might

it

solution suggested

hiring

is

up the Sanctuary.

This fix will only take away

monies

from

activities

like

qualifiers

from each of the 64

final buzzer.

college

from a hectic schedule. But when the Sanctuary

basketball conferences,

finish

littered

once,

harbouring

to

compose

called the “bracket.”

what

is

will

be decided

But whether Duke can their year

having only

lost

we’ll have to wait and see.

fault.

their

brightly-coloured garbage cans

near

It is

up

every leave

to

some to

type

everyone

hard can

it

exit,

it

without

of

trash

to use them.

be to discard

your junk?

When you

are

at

home, you

don’t leave your apple cores on

is

with in old sandwich bags

substance

impossible

How

at the

to

DSA’s

DSA has done its job. Having placed recycle bins and

staff to clean

some games

selected

the

office.

the

complement the 30 automatic

are

disruption in

and mildew outside

flies

passing

Ibe Sanctuary is a refuge, a place to relax, and find distraction

teams

so far as to blame the

am sure they don’t like the fhiit

collector.

Each top seed is vulneiabio to being ousted by an underdog, and

34

selection show,”

It isn’t

them.

a do-or-die

for

Sanctuary usage.

around

nooners.

as the

DSA

the

dream come

It is all

piggies” in

little

The

Maybe

situation for both teams.

Known

-

I

own and have

One

standpoint,

Each game

After

Some even go the

care of ourselves.

our

else is at fault.

school.

But then again toddlers have their mommies to clean up after

Coimecticut and

finish

should

Everyone

the other “dirty

time.

Duke Blue Devils

tournament’s top four seeds.

selection

become an annual

for

in three years.

title

This year, the

Michigan

Needless to say, the madness in

March Even

Utah 78-69

beating

agreement which extends through the 2002

Association

the

must

I

college level.

we

mess,”

the

Fingers point in all directions. Students blame each other.

I may be wrong, but this problem shouldn’t be occurring at

30,

make

past the closed Sanctuary.

Being in the age group of 18

madness.

March

Elizabeth Saekrider

stop

think

the

the

closed.

never

“I

attend school with.

concludes with March madness

is

students have said as they walked

it

made me

when

Students get angry

on-going

basketball season

hard to get comfortable in the

sludge.

problem with

NCAA

is

it

was closed on March 11 and

a

and

the sofa.

So why don’t you do treat your school like you would your home.

As you probably spend more time here,

it

is

foreign

mossy

own advantage

battered

coffee

clean and

SPOKE is mainly

I'unded

probably to your to

keep the college

tidy.

from September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

SPOKE

in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE

are not

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Juhc van Donkcrsgocd; News Editor: Janet Wakutz; Student Life Editor: Lindsay Gibson; is

Entertainment Editor: Elizabeth Sackrider; Sports Editor: Brian Smiley; Photo Editor: Charles Kuepfer; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Carly Benjamin; Circulation Manager: Eileen Diniz; Faculty Supervisor: Jim llagaity; Faculty Adviser: Sharon SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr, Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke(u)eonestogae.on.ea

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

logo.

out ol errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a. 111 Mond,iy. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or .

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect tile would be helpful. Submissions must no* contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied rejection

Ol

Dietz.

MS

Word

:

an illustration (such as a photograph).


! SPOKE, March

CAMPUS QUESTION

How do

you stay

Angela Clayfield, thirdsemester journalism student.

Tracey Dasilva, second-year marketing student.

By

the halls of Conestoga, a majority

Elizabeth Sackrider

of students said they Recently,

researchers

at

the

University of British Columbia

conducted a study that found almost one-third of adults are

at

heart disease,

risk for diabetes,

high blood pressure and premature death because they are overwei^L

Researchers

suggested

hazard and not just a

may seem

like

an older

person’s problem and a distant

occurrence for college students, but the infamous “freshman 15”

where

it

is

aU begins.

The weight gain starting college

even during

“I can’t cycle in the winter, but I try to ski

when I can,”

Clayfield,

a

said Angela

third-semester

journalism student.

said she could find a

exercise

associated with

can be stopped by

watching what you eat and by increasing or maintaining activity.

Out of eight students surveyed in

“I jog

is

way

to get

even when the

really,” said

Kendrick.

Tracey Dasilva, a second-year marketing student, takes refuge

at

the

gym during the winter months.

“I

go for half-hour walks,” said

Dasilva. “I go to a

Amanda

go

to the

the winter?

Jessica Swijters, second-year marketing student.

Brubacher, second-year marketing student.

Jeff

YMCA in Guelph,”

said Coutts.

Jessica Swijters, a second-year

sports during the winter. “I play ringette,” she said “It’s like girl

hockey with a

stick

and a

gym as

Coutts,

a

well.”

first-year

early childhood education student,

said she goes to the

Not

everyone

turns

the

to

indoors for physical fitness during the

winter,

Brubacher

Jeff

a

PEER TUTORS

second-year marketing student, enjoys outdoor sports.

undesirable.

around the community,

anywhere

“I

— Page 5

ring.”

early childhood education student,

some

Dave Becker, second-year marketing student.

1999

marketing student, plays indoor

the winter.

weather

fashion crime.

Obesity

to get regular activity

manage

Kristine Kendrick, a second-year

being

obese should be looked upon as a real health

still

in

fit

22,

gym as

well.

“I play

squash and

I

snowboard,”

CAN HELP!

said Brubacher.

Dave Becker,

a

second-year

marketing student, said he

is

more

of a summer kind of person. “I

don’t

do anything

in

the

wintertime,” said Becker. “In the

summer I skim-board.” Robert Murphy a woodworking student

CHECK INTO HIRING A TUTOR

first-year

also admits

to being inactive during the winter

COME TO STUDENT SERVICES (2B02)

months.

“There isn’t that much you can do during the winter,” said Murphy. “I try to walk instead of

Peer Services

taking the bus.”

Photos by Jeanette Everall

Y'C. Piec^se

(PL

Htlf to

Y'e-

re-s>too\z

The^

WHAT IS NEEDEDI Canned Juice, Peanut Butter,

USED CD

Rice, Pasta,

OUTLET

Tomato Sauce,

Salmon/Tuna,Cereals,

Canned Vegetables 415 Hespier Road,

(yellow beans,

mixed vegetables,

CAMBRIDGE

823- 534 !

mushrooms,

and

toiletries

your donations to student Services Office or the DSA Office off

Fruits,

carrots, potatoes).

Soup, Crackers,

Drop

Canned


Page 6

— SPOKE, March

22, 1999

STUDENT ''A

LIFE

described

'i

Student nurses take time for teaching break

By Lindsay Gibson By The

Conestoga

Association

(CBSA)

meeting March

1 1

Business

held an election at a

vote

to

Elizabeth Sackrider

Student

in

The sixth-semester nursing

new

a

students

president and vice- president for next year’s

took a break from their work placements to educate and to promote ideas about

executive.

healthy

Lisa Cashmore, a second-year marketing student,

was

the

lone candidate in the

She spoke before fellow business students told

them she

is

in

Hamburger and two other

looking forward to being

encourage people

me,” she said

to

Mandy Mahon and Becky

in her speech. “I

talk to

would

and 8 students at Canadian Martyrs mentary school in Kitchener.

like

second-year

accounting

and

student

second-year

Clement

Alan

Henhoeffer

The

won

the election

class

was divided

for an anti-smoking

and will be 1999-2000

CBSA vice-president for the

school year.

Next year’s vice-president of

CBSA

was acclaimed promotions director and Trevor Topping, a secondyear accounting student, was acclaimed student,

treasurer.

Current communications director, Laurie Campbell, says the executive for next year will be a good one.

and president Lisa

left,

The questions included information on

Cashmore, who were elected by business students on March

8. (Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

“I think they’re

executive

next

going to have an amazin g year they are all

hardworking, energetic students.”

There wiU be another vote March 18 to elect next year’s

The CBSA is to become next

communications

into two teams game, and each team

received points for the correct answer.

Katie Henhoeffer,

Teresa Bricker, a third-year marketing for next year

St.

St.

Clements.

marketing

student, Katie Henhoeffer.

the

ele-

Another group of students went to elementary school in

candidates ran for vice-president,

Dickinson

students, Hill spoke

about the dangers of smoking to Grade 7

come and

that.”

Two

to the kids about

learned,” said Julie

Hamburger.

Room 1D02 and

president of the executive. “I

we have

something

March 8

elementary school

to

March 10. was good to talk

“It

presidency race.

at the elections

living

students on

director.

the effects of nicotine,

at the CBSA meeting was upcoming biz bash at Sammy’s Garage April 13, where there will be free admission and all drinks will be $2. The Business Banquet will be held April 13

Also covered

“We even

the

also looking for candidates

at the

year’s computer liason.

sale

the diseases

caused by smoking and the chemicals found in cigarettes. incentive,”

provided

a

little

more

“We gave

said Hill.

out chocolate Easter eggs for the right answers.”

Waterloo Motor Inn. Tickets are on

Brent Oldham, sixth-semester student, wanted to make the event as fun as

now.

possible for the kids. Oldman took on the persona of Disco Dan, the taUc-show

Grad studies criminology

n Sherlock

man. Disco Dan created awareness of the importance of hand washing. Brenda Bannon, another graduating

is

nursing student, taught about the dangers

of drugs.

She said (the age of the children must be taken into account) in order to prepare

science

a game for the kids.

By Lindsay Gibson

“You have to remember the variety of you have to teach,” said Bannon. Being out of the medical work

levels L

Conestoga graduate Jeff Weyers’ interest in finding the answers to how police fin d

was created when he enrolled

serial killers

in

'

who

the law and security administration

to

“It

Weyers

told

LASA

project for the nursing course.

leaders for the event.

students about the

two

different types of profiling in a lecture he

says he learned a great deal. “I liked the

gave

program (LASA) but I was keen on psychology and furthering my

at the

college

March

Psychological

8.

and geographical profiling look a specific serial killer

Weyers

told

graphical

at

behavior

look

the

may

students

profiling,

where

education.”

LASA co-ordinator, Don

work.

about geo-

where investigators

at things like the point

of contact

site,

wanted Weyers

where the body was dropped, gather physical evidence and use linking techniques to suggest where the serial

killer

may

reside.

criminal to determine, for example, the type

of car (he person

may

drive.

While in his last semester at the college, Weyers began studying a Bachelor of Arts in

psychology

Willrid Laurier University, which he finished in 1997. From he at

WLU

went

to

England in

the (or

University

one year for

of Liveipool

in

his masters degree

science in investigative psychology.

Weyers enjoyed

his lime at

Conestoga and

to

success story.

“His field

and

is

is

current and important to us

very popular right

now,” said

Douglas.

Psychological

on the other hand looks at behaviors such as spatial, abnormal and profiling

Douglas, said he

speak to his

first- and second-year students because he was a

the crime scene and

Weyers, a graduate of the LASA program at Conestoga, came to speak to LASA students March 8 about psychological and geographical profiling, which he specialized in at the University of Liverpool in England. (Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

different type of

The event was

a certain crime.

as well as geography to define a base

Jeff

said.

Shane Grace, Moses Michaelis and Carrie-Lyn McAdams were the student

provide investigative agencies with

who committed

she

organized by the students as part of a final

specific information as to the type of indi-

vidual

.

was a completely

nursing,”

defined as an educated attempt

is

along with Bannon taught about the

dangers of drugs

program at Conestoga College in 1992. Weyers came to Conestoga with the dream of becoming a police officer. While here he became intrigued with profiling. The term profiling

placement environment was a good change of pace, said Leaime Cwilewicz,

Douglas,

who

introduced Weyers as “one

of his victims” said the

could learn a

lot

LASA

students

from him.

“I wanted the students to get an idea of the two techniques and learn about them.” Weyers, who lives in Stratford, is

considering going back to school for his

PhD.

“It felt

weird not going to school

September,” he

said.

in

“You become addicted

to it.”

He ly

has applied to the OPP and is currentundergoing the applicant screening

process.


Award-winning comedian By Jeanette

visits

Conestoga

Everaii

The Jamaican moved to Canada

Despite a late

start and a poor sound system, comedian

quality

wife

Cotter’s routine.

jokes

“He was

made

Cotter

Simon

B. Cotter visited the

lounge on March 9

for the

DSA

nooner.

lounge

become a comedian,

to

began

stardom

at

ascent

his

Yuk

Yuk’s.

He

to

has

since appeared three times on

for

Just

details

Laughs,

one of the

longest-running hit prime-time

on CBC. “You have to be invited

series

to go,”

Cotter said of the Montreal show.

very prestigious.

“It’s

It’s

like the

From

first

of a hotel while she is attending

Goldberg, Jonathan Jackson and

her class reunion.

Parenting magazine,

my

drama would not five up to the book were unfounded. The movie, rated PG 13, seemed to confirm

when most

comics

get

don’t

opportunity to do

pictured

Due

it

my mind

as

had

while reading the book.

to time restraints,

was

way

anyone

at all.

slightly offensive, but in

that didn’t directly,”

seem he

to offend

said.

tear jerker

Strong supporting performances Treat Williams, Whoopi

Merriman

add

older brother, right to the last

Academy Awards.

hand

a

children.

Ryan

when he admits he let go of

“It

the

This mother came away with a renewed appreciation for her four

believability of this movie.

sibling’s

job.

mother’s deepest fears.

movie never releases its hold on the audience who feels the guilt experienced by the scene

it

Cotter’s

he thought Cotter was a comedian doing his

Olympics of what we do.” He said he was lucky to be invited three times, especially

catch said

I

predict

receive

1

the

this

to

movie

attention

of

the

will

the

2345

Whoopi Goldberg and Michelle

Pfeifer (Beth)

(Internet Photo)

just before

he disappeared nine years earher. Pfeifer co-produced this heart- wrenching film that takes the audience into the Cappadora

the

everything

the

The

his

fears that

to

first-year

also in the

every

last

15 minutes few seconds the audience is a weeping mass of sniffles, tears and soggy tissues. Having read the book of the same name by Jacqueline Mitchard, an author and contributing editor of the

'

of

portrayal

realistic

by

it

from you. through to the

of the book were omitted.

mood, emotion and vividness of Mitchard’s words came to life in a powerful performance by Michelle Pfeifer, who plays a mother whose son disappears in the crowded lobby

wrung

mde,” said

little

fun of didn’t say anything

performance,

But,

is

a

Rob Murphy, a woodworking student,

(Photo by Jeanette Everaii)

Deep End of the Ocean a every last emotion

were

back.”

North

continues to squeeze and torture

students

Sharma, a first-year general arts and science student. “I was shocked the guys being

estate

until

is

Kiran

eight-city national tour fea-

The film Deep End of the Ocean

in his

niche

^

show

After the

The

reaches out, grabs your heart and

shows

It

his

asked what they thought about Cotter and his jokes.

heads in laughter. As the 1998 Canadian Comic of the Year, Cotter will be taking part in the Craven A Just for Laughs Canadian Comedy Tour commencing March 17.

By Janet Wakutz

that

relationships.

the back of the Sanctuary, Cotter had the majority of the students throwing back their

After leaving a career in real

age of

daughter. His wife and new baby made up a considerable portion of

Conestoga College students at the March 9 nooner with jokes about relationships, marriage and sex. With only a few side jokes to centre-out two, not-so-interested students in

America’s top comedians.

who

native, at the

hves in Toronto with his and their 18 -month-old

three,

Simon B. Cotter managed to make the best of a bad situation. The award-winning comic entertained a large crowd of

tures an all-star lineup of

— Page 7

SPOKE, March 22, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT

family’s torment.

many

Deep End of

Ocean

the

is

a

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Problem Gambling

Casinos, video lottery terminals, Proline, lottery tickets.

The opportunities feels like a

it

bling

gamble are everywhere, and

a problem

when

how you

how gambling

often do

lost the

many

the behaviour begins to

your family, personal or school

Gamblers Anonymous has a determine

for

is

you go back

list

life.

of twenty questions

to

affecting you. For example,

what you win money that

to try to recuperate

day before? Have you claimed

to

Do you ever hide betting slips or lottery from your family? After winning, do you have a

strong urge to return and

win more?

These are just some indications that gambling

is

a problem

your life. If you are worried that your level of gambling no longer fun and you need help to stop, you can talk to counsellor about special community programs for people

in

a

Tuesdsy, March 23

STAGES

really lost?

tickets

is

BADIU-

harmless means of entertainment. But gam-

becomes

interfere with

to

SHOW WAS

HYPNOSIS 5 H OW

$4 Doon

Oampus

non-studonts Tickets available at the

with gambling problems as well as self-help groups available in our area. Like other addictions,

can destroy your on.

life.

Sadly, that’s

problem gambling

one thing you can bet

Studonts

Warning: Not suitable for easily offended people. Stong language & hard core humour throughout.

DSA

Office.


SPOKE, March

FEATURES AND ISSUES

22, 1999

— Page 8

Health centre offers natural alternatives By Cariy Benjamin The youth of today seem to be way to

massage therapy, meditation and

forced

relaxation

place.

fitness

heal themselves without polluting

reflexology,

their bodies with pills.

therapy,

numerous

show

researchers,

scientists,

doctors,

As

counseling, nutritional counseling,

searehing for an alternative

Statistics

addiction

therapies,

training,

panic heating,

reiki,

therapeutic

regression

and

touch,

Optimal

a Christian, she learned the

spirits that

she believes surround

us on earth.

and

guiding me,

at

Harrington, Ont.

The

Stratford

Optimal Health

258 Ontario St., is a centre which utilizes forms of complimentary healing and allows disbelievers to educate

her other healing centre in

house

a

come

offers

teach

is

Centre,

retreat

healing

workshops and angel readings.

that

It

have learned to

to

professionals

new methods of

“Many young

has been open for nearly four

adults

with

come

into

need

for

mental and

individuals heal through education

use of

to

physical,

light,

sound, and energy

balancing, high touch acupressure.

and

complementary

after her

own

therapies,

aware of the powerful benefits of alternative

therapies

by

is

individuals in the healing arts are

and

a

offered on a continual basis, free

reliever,

says

of charge,

at

both centres.

healing to

emotional imbalances through the

staff address health issues

make people

the curious public.

something different,” she said. “They want to become more aware of what’s out there and how it can

The

the

and

lectures

often

Karaz said she felt guided to open these centres because she felt a need to provide an environment that would be dedicated to helping

related

Ongoing

Meditation healing

stress

med-

at

also

each of the centres to

the

of natural healing.

offered

are

at this free session.

trust

years.

themselves through various forms

accepted

that.”

Qualified

The Harrington Centre

1

tremendous

Donations

Karaz..

demonstrations to

at 7 p.m., a

is

powerful

year ago, after achieving success

from the being within.

class

was

and

concluded that true healing comes

On Wednesday centre.

meditating and could hear them

have

healing free of charge but dona-

Stratford

eight years ago,” she said. “I

chance

of natural

tions are accepted.

heard the angels nearly

Health Centre approximately one

believers

clinics give people a

itation

pastern and western philosophers spiritual

The

to explore the concepts

“I first

started the

seek out such a

importance of angels and the

angel presentations.

Donna Karaz

her to

centre

a

them positively.” Weekly healing clinics

affect

offered

Monday

are

at 7 p.m. at the

Stratford Optimal Health Centre.

health challenges

4 the/ support, the/fi^Le4^d4h(p,

the/ U4^fctrgetcible/ vne4norie&, (X4^x^the/ U4xfbrget(il^

yioC ^ee^n/ e^vuyu^gh/ yety iX: hcyy^ it (M/.

The

Stratford Optimal Health Centre and Healing Resources is located on Ontario Street. (Photo By Carly Benjamin)

Mymo/ he/ (4vtoueh/l IMiBfWCU/ HMi mmm mam mm mm •

••

mm • mm

mm

a

Ereytmund

mJ

aa aMB a a asataaMM a aaMi a a^M a a

The Sanctuary’s

MEET THE TOP DOG.

Crisis the past the DSA has put up posters asking the students to put their garbage in the cans provided. The DSA has also purchased additional garbage cans and painted them so that they stood out. This still did not get the attention of some students. In

More destinations. More buses. More value. Low student fares. Climate controlled,

smoke

free coaches.

STUDENT RETURN FARES Kitchener

As you may be aware the DSA recently closed the lounge down for 2 days due to the continued problem. We hope that students who have not been respecting their lounge will now, to ensure that the lounge stays open.

Guelph Belleville

$10 $22 $52

Ottawa

$91

Toronto

Price

to:

London

$18 Peterborough $46 Windsor $52 Sudbury $101

does not include GST.

other discounted destinations plus oneway student fares available.

Thank you to those students who have effort to

put

their

garbage away and

made an

trying to

keep

your lounge clean. To the others all we ask is for you to take the time to clean up after yourselves.. -

IIIRAVELCUIS 1

70 University Ave. W.

Gmjtmmd 15 Charles

St.

W.

886-0400 741-2600 Thank you

for keeping

your lounge clean!

Take

it

Easy. Take the Greyhound. www.greyhound.ca


SPOKE, March 22,

FEATURES & ISSUES

Future uncertain for By Wayne

Collins

that

Door

55 Dickson

at

has students and staff

concerned

about

the

school’s

future.

move would

adversely

affect

them.

“A

of students there only

lot

have four or five credits and might not be able to graduate,” says Klodt.

Students to

who

Open Door

attend

complete their high school

may have

credits are. worried they to finish elsewhere.

FOR SALE

She says students also worry that one of the region’s high schools might be chosen as a new address for

Open Door.

Keith Halley, a teacher at Open Door, says the school’s lease

lot of students -might not be able to get there,” she says, “but,

expires in September 1999 and

also, many adults say they will be uncomfortable going to a high

one seems

know

to

mean moving Open Door’s

or

school’s

no

if the sale will

He

riot.

says

have

students

formed a group

to

profile

raise

within

who make

“higher-ups”

8,

the final

representatives

community are

invited

to

Open Door’s

Farrugia,

1982, says the

and interested

and

students

Gill

the

be holding an open

house on April

school.”

counsellor

decision. will

“A

the

Cambridge community and promote its value to the

“We

since

opened in prospect of moving

“We may have to leave, the new owner

hopefully,

make

more

the lease

but

attractive,”

says Farrugia.

Both Farrugia and Halley say positive economic

the decision-makers.

“Besides

speculate on

program,”

Waterloo Region district school board superintendent John Hume

knows even

less

about the

matter. “I don’t

or

know

who owns

said,

what’s going on,

Hume

the building,”

suggesting the Golden Kiwi

Pub, which leases part of the building,

may buy

contribution

Ed

whether the school was moving or not, indicating he might be the last to know.

or lease

it.

The

school’s

Downtown

to

extensive

its

Halley

co-op

says,

presence)

“(the

adds

to

business here.”

Many pursue

Open fiirther

Door studies

students

co-op

as

students at schools like Conestoga College’s, says Halley.

Adults over age 21, who’ve been of school for at

out

least

one year, can attend Open

Door.

A

full

range of credits

is

covering regular high school curriculum up to the Grade offered,

pub’s owner, however, has not

12 level, in the free program,

confirmed

which operates from Monday

One

this statement.

Open

Door

student,

Veronica Klodt, said the

move

is

more than just rumom-. Klodt, who is

studying accounting at

Open

Door, indicates the matter has

been

openly

discussed

wayne

will

students and teachers.

to

(Photo by

since the “for sale” sign went up a

Cambridge must be considered by

Laryea refused

beenforSeSS

year ago.

Meanwhile, the “higher-ups” seem to know as little as the vice-principal

school for adults on Dickson Street, Cambridge, has have formed a group to deal with a possible move.

has concerned staff and students

Open Door’s

Open Door’s

Open Door secondary year. Students there

it

attend,” Halley says.

says he

Open Door school

staff and students. Klodt says students believe a

Open

secondary school St.

— Page 9

among

There’s a “for sale” sign on

Cambridge’s

1999

to

Friday.

According

to

one Main Street

business owner.

Open Door has

not been singled out for sale.

“That

whole block

is

being

sold,” the source says.

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Page 10

— SPOKE, Mar.

22, 1999

SPORTS

two Condors named OCCA all-stars By Charles Kuepfer

“It

was

Cd (OG

The Ontano A.ssociatii>o

Lights,

Athletic

led

its

for a.

year-end project.

Two

Board of Directors

to

W

^themselves/’

years

to enjoy

that

the

done”

without ,;|>roi^mg Conestoga

above th| oth^ colleges. Conesfca College

obtain and captain Jasorr:] team

were able

that coaches

said. “It

many

|weli, yei'was|“taste’fuMy

Conesto,

named

James

time in

^

assistant

(p^oto by Charles Kuepfer)

first

anquet lepre^nted the college

season’s league

Second-year broadcasting student Emanuel Zalevich gets some footage Zalevich, who says he enjoys the program, is making a music video.

the

James 4 also noted

Annual Bwikey on March 4,

Camera, Action

great ”

was

I

all-sta^.

Tlie banquet was'

Sheridan Four

P<

Kitchener on

OCAA playoff I

.

In attendance weif;

I

and

coaches

Cambrian,

presu

Conestc^ Humber

I

[

Wednesday, March 24 4:30 p.m.

The Other Room

and Seneca colleges. These four colleges qualified for the OC.fVA tonmaanent

by

m

the

I

finishing fourth or better

OCCA standings.

Ro^

OCAA,

and and Oiarlie Jack Hutchimton, two .former Conestoga teachers who are in the college’s sports hall of fame as bmlifers, v^ere also in atten-

g

dance. ;

J.unes said, that Rolph and manager of athletics heavily were and recieation at Conestoga Hutchinson banquet. in\ olved in getnng the recreation College, said thecentre at college. wa^ a success Urn Janie.s.

Agenda

Itenns

will

Include: dental plan,

budget approval election

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And

that

hcnta;^c

GMi Engineering & Management Institute was originally founded and run by General Motors Corporation, the largest means our quality standards, state-of-the-art technology and record of graduating corporate leaders are second to none.

Kettering University, formerly

company

GMI


SPOKE, March

SPORTS

— Page fl

22, 1999

Condors edged by Europe 3-2 By Brian Smiley The

Europa

game after March 11. defeated

Stars

team 3-2 on March

11

at

lost

total

game

calm

in

nine players missing due to injury.

Johnstone.

to

game

effort.

Condors’ played

some

good

their

Condors only

time.

the

fact

two

carried

the

and

scored

who

Johnstone said er

said.

him

Earlier in the season, the

same

“It

Conestoga

was

terrible

in

the

are

in

to

a

if the

it

in

team missed the

it

will

it

be

Johnstone

be a

to

work

to

left

do before the

better

to get

good

facts,

to

hands,”

said.

down

bit stronger

chance

to

and have a win,

when

but

the

they get

to business, they get

down

to business.”

Let’s

hope both teams know who and have his type

Bill Gates is

of business sense. If they do, both

of Conestoga’s

varsity

indoor

Johnstone said not to count the

soccer teams should have a good

men

chance

out of the hunt.

penalties,”

Johnstone

^

at gold.

the

to

fact

DSA closes messy

said,

that

a

game moves

Ricky

George

pro^amming

overtime play.

tli^y

soccer

of both Condors’ varsity teams said he believes that this

is

D’lilello,

both

and Jay computer

analyst students,

detotared to the cafeteria

when

were unable to use the

’T don’t think the DSA closing the lounge for two days can fix ,

tte.

problem,” said D’Mello.

lounge

“People are going to continue to leave their garbage."

George

said

ma\be

getting

other students to police the peo-

ple

who

would

leave a mess bdhJnd

help.

As for not being allowed in tlie lounge, he said, It’s prettj boring without it.” '

the

Wed. Get the

“You can sometimes mistake guys’ attitude, but

Continuedfrom Page 1

While the competition will be stiff in both the men’s and women’s divisions, the coach

doesn’t

my

to

The women’s team may seem

on to penalty kicks if neither team can score in regulation and tied

wouldn’t both-

would be kind of nice

happen

on the Thunder

referring

preparation,” he said.

the

championships

hold both trophies in

“The games next week (March 18 weekend) could come down

Zlatko for

in the playoffs, but if

players and Johnstone said the

indoor

unturned.

playoffs.

referee ejected three

Athletic

(OCAA)

team goes on their quest for gold and he isn’t leaving any stone

carried

into the playoffs.

“The refereeing was atrocious,”

refereeing

stiU

nip-and-tuck race to gain entry

displeased by the refereeing.

he

they

Bell

Condors,

more

was

win gold in the same year. “I want to be the first coach

Johnstone says he knows there’s

opponents the majority of the

Lakosecjak

most important positions on any good indoor team, was a factor, Johnstone

match

Dwayne

subs.

Missing two centres, one of the

but

may have been

refereeing

control of the game, overmatching

soccer,” Johnstone said, alluding to

best chance for both teams

women’s

Bay.

bad, but throughout most of the

“They

preparing

and

March 18 weekend

said

Condor coach Geoff Johnstone wasn’t disappointed by his team’s

The

soccer

are

Colleges

Association

to step

melee,

the

Condors men’s

the

Ontario

the referee

control of the

and Johnstone was forced

the

recreation centre, but with eight or

The for

In that second

Conestoga’s men’s varsity soccer

game on

his team’s

April Tth

then get the vox All proceeds go to the Heart and

Hepatitis B Vaccine

Stroke Foundation

Clinic Tues. 1

The Other For

0

pre-register

am

-

Room

more

PEERS PLEASE

March 23

pm

2 -The Sanctuary

information

piease

and

to

go to the DSA Office

GUESTS! US ON

WEDNESDAY APRIL 7, 1999 FROM ^:30 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. IN “THE BLUE ROOM CAFETERIA" REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE PRESENTATIONS AT 5:00 P.M. PLEASE PLAN TO ATTEND AND HELP US CELEBRATE WITH

OUR PEER TUTORS. MONITORS. HOSTS & COACHES FOR A JOB WELL DONE! R.S.'S^P.

JE.ANETTE

WALKER

EXT. 337 BY MARCH

Hepatitis B virus can KILL you

26. 1999.


Page 12

— SPOKE, March

22, 1999

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