Issuu on Google+

System upload

crashes

network By Elizabeth Sackrider One by one

computers

the

displayed error messages.

And

members of

one by one the

staff

Spoke began

to panic

as

the

pages of the week’s newspaper disappeared.

of

afternoon

early

the

In

Feb. 17, Conestoga experienced glitch server computer a

Spoke lab 4B15,

affecting the Room 2Aj22,

Jennifer Stager, a first-year student in the ocxiupational therapy assistant and physio-therapy assistant program, takes a dive at the polar plunge on Feb. 1 8. (Photo by Eileen Diniz)

Room 2A.10, aiad. the entire third-floor computer system.

Computer

services admitted the

problem was their fault. “We were uploading a new image for 2A19 and new software,” said

Wayne Hewitt,

of

the college’s computer services.

“We

just shut

server)

(the

it

down.” The problem took about 20 minutes to fix after computer

Chedc outMardi

was a

services realized there

tiavdfeatiins.

“It

to participate in the 18th annual

The

wouldn’t talk to anybody after

Polar Bear Plunge to help raise

water

that.”

approximately $1,500 for the

Becky

Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Student Association’s director

100 per

to

said Hewitt.

2A22,

lab

in

the

computers were crashing just as

According to Clayfield, the

11

about what was going on with their

Some

computers.

of the

students experienced problems

logging on or off their computer or the computer just shut

“They

I

(the

like little

students) looked

gophers popping their

heads up,” she -Li

-

Q)MMENTARY Page 4 Is crime

1

I

down.

“Everyone

said.

was asking everybody else what was going on.” Clayfield said the problem was frustrating. One minute she was working away and the next was “After the

fifth

time

I tried to

i I

on campus

log

in, I

was ready

to put

my fist

through the computer,” she

said.

assistant

The

students

who

for the Winterfest

asked

were

to

getting

’99 event

pants sliding

collect

a

minimum

J

See Network

.

.

.

Page 15

down a wet banana

This

the

fifth

year

Conestoga College students have donated to the Heart and

participate in the plunge.

Stroke

“I think it’s pretty cool

and

is

Foundation,

said

Conestoga has raised over

involved in school events,” said

during

It

Shantz

onlooker

Sarah

first-year

early

a

childhood

education student.

event

was

almost

cancelled this year because of the

low water levels

campus pond.

in

the

Instead

the

already

$12,000

the various campaigns.

The plunge started out as fun, then it became a fund-raising event for the Doon campus elevator and then it became a heart

and stroke

fund-raiser.

The plunge got even

when

jump

in fully dressed.

“The anchor said we’ll donate $10 if you jump in, so he did,” said Boertien.

Erin Marshall, a first-year law

who

student

security

participated in the plunge, said

she has never done

it

before but

was fun and she would

it

definitely

do

again.

it

“It is for the

Heart and Stroke

Foundation which

good cause,”

“My

a

is

really

Marshall.

said

grandpa died of heart

why

Mel McShane,

did

it.”

education

early

childhood

student,

was hoping

in the

I

first-year

a

to take part

plunge but forgot to bring

a change of clothes.

Boertien.

gets people

kind of neat.

to

disease and that’s

fun of soap and water.

pledge of $10 to take on Thursday, Feb. 18. Every year 20 to 30 students part

organizers decided to modify

worse?

The

sprinkler.

event ended with the partici-

Bryan Bambrick dared

student

and

signed up

j

[

Doon

the

life.

snow through a

program.

The

total chaos.

Boertien,

and physio-therapy

Jennifer Stager, a student in the

students in the lab were confused

said

course,

obstacle

of student

to survive a

proceeded to run over ice and

journalism

student Angela Clayfield.

had

occupational therapy assistant

“Everything was messed up,”

second-year

students

They had to jump into a small swimming pool filled with ice cold water and fetch a penny out Then they of the bottom.

and this something seemed pretty crazy to me,” said

said

is;^iaBa.v<s.AfHr»o.

needed to do

crazy

they were upstairs.

-

“I thought I

interviewing Conestoga College

him

patio.

“The server went

R»IGE8

if hold and main cafeteria by the

event

the

Twenty-two brave souls dared

Down

1

Eileen Diniz

outside the

cent usage,”

'•t-

By

complication.

PN3^9

iJCfTj''

Polar plunge freezing frenzy

a

CKCO

“I can’t

because

do I

it

which

McShane. “Now them back.” All

is

crappy

got pledges,” said I

participants

have to give received a

sweatshirt and had a chance to join one of the Sponsorship Clubs. Their rewards are based

crazier

on

anchor

money

the

amount

raised.

of

pledge


Page 2

— SPOKE, March

8,

1999

NEWS

Local transit By Jaime Clark Deregulation of Ontario’s bus

per

which may happen as

way

for

public

a

willing to pre-pay $164

semester

for

the

service,

which would have been provided by Toshmar, a private bus line. “Now that the politicians seem

early as next January, could clear

the

service

Cambridge

to

be involved, as well as the actu-

for making transportation Cambridge students travelling to

al

bus

Conestoga College much

“But,

linking Kitchener and

For

decades,

easier.

over

little.”

said

routes,

Waterloo Record

Kitchener-

a

like there is

said

that

it is

Fletcher.

we should

going to happen.

maybe we have

think

to

push

it

a

While the motivation to get a between the two cities

provincial Transportation Minister in

seems

don’t think

I

I

inter-city

it

support,”

assume

carriers

private

lines,

some

have been granted exclusive rights

Tony Clement

transit link

seems

article.

be

to

booming

the

Trentway- Wager currently holds

mega-stores and businesses in the

the licence for coach service along

Gateway and Sportsworld Park areas, the bus service would cut

the

Highway

8 corridor between

down on

Kitchener and Hamilton, with a

The

cost for

$22.47 for

10 bus

stop in Cambridge.

students

is

transportation costs and

Conestoga students coming from Cambridge. “It doesn’t bother me what is

time

tickets.

Jack Fletcher, director of student

for

bus

initiating the interest (in the

Jack Fletcher, director of student and recreation services, says the college needs to keep putting on the pressure to get a bus service from Cambridge to Conestoga College. (Photo by Jaime Clark)

(Conestoga

Doon,

service).

has been trying to get a bus

College)

Cambridge residents since a survey he had conducted revealed 72 per cent of Cambridge students would use a bus service on a daily basis. Fletcher took those results as a positive sign and arranged to meet with those

contribute to the welfare of this

impossible for Topping, a second-

whole

year accoimting student, to

and recreation services

at

service for

We’re a

and

too

business

area,” said Fletcher. “We’re

economy

just as important to the

box

as the

who

students

attended the Nov. 19

and said he has spent

service

it

and

hours

often

is

it

make

on time. be honest. I’m not

pleased with

wish

I

was

it

really

(Trentway-Wager).

it

a

more

little

said a transit link between

governors

“Right now,

it

takes almost two

between

with

until

March

1

1

to get their

m

following elections, includes four internal

members of which

three are faculty

and one

is

a

The remaining are members and

student.

external

of people from the

consist

community. Faculty elected to the board

will

and not a particular interest group they may represent

Members

no odt^

receive

begin Sept

1999 and

1,

expenses meunred

members '^are „

also

^

responsible to continiW until the

^

'

end of the term even

if

expecting to graduate within j

members must

resign

from the board if their employment at the college ceases during their term on the

1999-2000

the

^ j

I

budget

was

school

main

the

discussion at the

year,

topic

of

DSA

16

Feb.

for

meeting.

Jenn

Lists

of nominees are posted

members include enforcement

March 22 and April 7

of college by-laws and conflict

tion day. All college employees

of

and full-time and part-time

attendance

at

all

scheduled

board meetings and attendance at other

board events.

must

also

Members

respect

the

confidence of the board unless the information has been

public

at

made

an open meeting.

Members

bring a constituent

perspective to the deliberations

he

said

of

vice-president

operations,

i

went

over

is

elec-

stu-

budget

with

the

changes

upcoming school

on

money

the

he

said.

thinks

the

means

“Our

change

big fee

“(It)

and

April

16

the

council

last

year

it’s

up

reason

for to

was

revenue,”

was

the said

budgeted

$210,000 $230,000.

in

the bus service established.

Maryann and

for

is

DSA,

myself, or the

go

to

to city

council and present the petition,” Aaid FletcKer.

do the petition,

it

viable option for the

might be a

DSA

to take

on a similar task. “You have to do something to keep the pressure on,” said Fletcher.

the

wrong number of

students

in

past

We

believe

sec.

to

this

is

estimate.”

budgets.

more

of

an

accurate

down because

rates

and bar

wages, which did

not

included

staff

were reduced

were

beforehand,

exist

budgeted

bar

so

in,

staff

could be hired for licensed events.

The executive

DSA

the

also re-evaluated

manager

office

position and

decided to hire a

for

full-time promotions co-ordinator.

the

The

job

DSA is looking into receiving prof-

new

promotions

its

because

pubs,

orientation

from cash

and the budget

bars,

for orientation kits,

were

orientation didn’t

which

put

why

and

into

and

kits

said

be

year.

time

well,”

sell

will

upcoming

of

lot

longer be used.

we changed that is wc were working with

is

revenue

increased

the

to explain

candidates and posts results

community

changes

big

and

because

for the college

Other

The

of regents announces successful

that

going to try

is

“A money

Hussey.

9

within

said

and have more licensed events.

non-existent in the

student

Ballots are counted April

based

year,

spent

DSA

the

Hussey

behind

reason

the

a

$4,000

a

to

budget.

different areas during this school

diploma

arc eligible to vote.

for

budget

$ 1 ,000

proposed

from

went

year.

dents enrolled in a program of instniction leading to a

made

be

to

which

sales,

that

Hussey,

the

guidelines,

Topping

us,”

Another change included beer proposed

throughout the college.

interest/role

interested

wa-s

organizing a petition to try and get

Lisa Wilhelm

The

they are

that time.

By

executive, pointing out significant

board

meeting,

out '^pproved board businei^. ^^Stttdent

the

of

something out with

two-hour bus rides to school.

Nomination forms are available on bulletin boards

Re.sponsibilitics

deal,

we gave them a they would work if

bus pass system implemented.

board.

1999 and end Aug. 31,2000.

imagine

“I’d

current situation, which

elected will serve a one-year 1,

9

Student Association (DSA)

Fletcher said if Wasilka doesn’t

p.m.

successful. Topping hopes to see a

end Aug. 31, 2002. The student term, which will begin Sept.

of

at the Feb.

biggest budget change

than out-of-pocket and travel

Faculty

serve a three-year term, which

group

a

concerned citizens

Student fee revenue

responsibility is to the students

additional compensation

The board, wluch is appointed by the eouncil of regents

are

cities

represented

understanding,

the

however, that their primary

nominations

two

the

Maryaim Wasilka,

Fletcher said

who

“The idea

Currently,

good

improve bus links

If efforts to

deadline nears

Conestoga's board of governors

service if the bus service doesn’t

option for students travelling to

Kitchener,” he said.

of

taxi

from a friend on days when

hours to ride from Cambridge to

mcmbns

Topping suggested the college

Cambridge Transit has a deal with Cambridge City Cab to cover the bus routes after 6

Doon.

discourages people from coming to Conestoga.

Doon

the current service.”

be a cheaper and more convenient

he has an 8:30 a.m. class. Trentway buses run about every

Students and faculty mterest-

“I’m just not happy with

said.

on

letter outlining their preferences for pickup spots and times.

ed in becoming

he

happen.

rides

Melissa Dietrich

students and you have to be 17

Kitchener and Cambridge would

portation costs and has to rely

of

don’t

approximately $1,000 in trans-

showed up for the meeting on Nov. 19 and only 1 1 people filled out a

Board

(Cambridge)

work something out with a

frequent,” he said.

He

“They

recognize university and college

years old to get the student rate,”

to his class “I’ll

meeting, uses the Trentway- Wager,

Unfortunately, only three people

two

stores are.”

Trevor Topping, one of three

students to iron out the details.

have

possibility

Conestoga needed 54 students

who were industry,

a

link

the

they

Hussey

the kits will

no

not

membership expenses

conferences,

all

fees

were

and

budgeted

travel last

year.

Insurance

considered

24-hour

were budgeted

at

week

The to

the

least

a

was

job,

executive

create

and

a

decided

full-time

part-time

position position

from one full-time position so that

work this

past will be

that

year

done

been

hasn’t

and

years

in

in the future.

Other items on the agenda includ-

ed

the

elections

update

and new wooden storage that are being

fees

be

to

a

of

co-ordinator,

discussed.

done

Conference fees were increased

because

description

DSA office.

units

purchased for the


SPOKE, Feb.

NEWS

1,

1999

— Page 3

Consistency is the key

DSA

looks at hiring part-time promotions co-ordinator Hussey isn’t ruling out the possiof hiring a student for this

By Jaime Clark

bility

position, but she said she thinks a

The Doon Student Association (DSA) has created a new position on their executive and amalgamated the responsibilities of some of

non-student would be more approsince that person

priate

have to attend

Jeim Hussey, vice-president of operations, said the majority of

the jobs currently held

by students

would

activities

during the day and evening.

She said the

the existing jobs.

DSA

all

same

the

person,

said

Hussey.

“We want somebody who fits in said Hussey. “We want

here,”

(him/her) to be part of the team

and possibly breathe new hfe

into

us.”

DSA also wanted to

develop this position to create

some consistency

with

in the executive

office.

Hussey said the DSA is looking someone with new and alternative promotional and marketing ideas who can come up with more effective ways of advertising for for

on the executive, like the president and vice-president positions, will remain the same. The public relations manager position, currently held Jessica by

the student planner which the

Umblandt, will be turned into a

DSA

part-time position, which will be

of each school year.

process.

official

The plan is for the DSA to make some long-term contacts with

begin that process by next month

would be promotions co-

outside sources and to ensure that

offered

to

people

outside

Conestoga College. The job

title

of

The promotions co-ordinator would be responsible for overseeing the promotions assistants as well as recruiting advertisers for

distributes at the beginning

these contacts are always in touch

ordinator.

APiCS hoids

the executive.

The new

position

has to be

still

DSA

approved by the

and the board of directors before the executive can begin the hiring

Hussey said she hopes she can and have someone hired before May.

DSA

Jenn Hussey,

says the develop some

vice-president of operations,

creation of the promotions co-ordinator job

will

consistency

(Photo by Jaime Clark)

in

the executive office.

appreciation night

Students grab opportunity to network with industry By Jeanette

Everall

Obsolescence was the focus of the speech given to materials man-

agement students attending the American Production annual Inventory

(APICS)

Society Controlstudent appreciation

He kept the audience involved using examples and quotes.” The eveniijg was also an opportunity for students like Laurin who went to the event to network with some of the 45

professionals

who

“Students had the

Guest speaker Dick Verbeek CPIM, CIRM, of Performance Plus Consultants, told the 35

on a one-on-one

meeting, the infor-

faculty

member

encouraged to get involved with

APICS, which offers training to its members on the latest business management concepts and

were in attendance. “It’s

like the perfect interview.

better than a 10 or 15 minute

ing allows future employers to get a better idea of who you are

was

did his speech.

APICS

with

professionals,

to

is

a wine and

held at the

Dpon campus.

be an

It

will

materials

opportunity

for

management

students to

meet with and learn about summer employment opportuni-

professionals ties.

Ereutmund Csmatia^

make

As

said networking at the meet-

MEET THE TOP DOG.

for networking, Bernard said

she was happy with the ratio of students to professionals

interview,” said Laurin.

He

student

executive members,

the opportunity to increase contact

their jobs.

me

way he

by

be

to

materialssaid faculty member

contacts for class projects and to learn from professionals about

It’s

the

are

chapter meetings gives students

mation was not new, but he said at least Verbeek made it interesting. “I was impressed - he didn’t put to sleep,” said Laurin. “It

materials

program

association and attending parent

For Chris Laurin, a third-year student

the

in

promotion

cheese

March 25 from 5-7 p.m.

She said being involved with the

basis,”

inventory in Ontario.

more

Students

network on a one-on-one basis,” she said, adding the good turnout is a result of a pro-active student chapter and increased support and interest from first-year students. One of this year’s events, plaimed

Jennifer Bernard.

Jennifer Bernard

obsolescence was the leading problem facing professionals in

materials-management

working

the

management

techniques,

opportunity to network

students attending the event that

at the

of

environment.

management

night on Feb. 10.

who was

outside

at

the

recent meeting held at the Knights

of Columbus

hall in Kitchener.

“Students had the opportunity to

More destinations. More buses.

More value. Low

student fares.

Climate controlled,

smoke

free coaches.

STUDENT RETURN FARES Kitchener

Student Athletic Committee play»*, eiyoy

soci^izing and

want

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Belleville

Departm^t with a

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Would you like

Are you a lead^, team

$10 $22 $52

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variety of functioas

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Price does not include

$101

GST.

other discounted destinations plus oneway student fares available.

|»r<^ram in 1999/2000?

activities?

pldc up an application at the RecreaticHi Center. Applications with a resume should be submitted liFy If so, please

March

19,

1999.

::iRAVELCUIS 170 University Ave. W.

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St.

W.

886-0400 741-2600

Any questions?

Call Marlene at 748-5220 ext. 452

Take

it

Easy. Take the Greyhound. www.greyhound.ca


Thefts at Conestoga sad reflection of society There

is

College have been broken into and

something wrong

with

when

society

to

from

steal

is

it

afford to replace.

the taking

Kitchener, a police officer

walks

a

by the

first thief

argue

that

in their car, but

I

lunch or a car

in thinking that

what

in

busy

a

parking

the

I

am

naive

leave in

I

because

it

is

missed out on learning right from wrong.

Stealing at Conestoga doesn’t stop at the parking

lot.

A journalism student had her camera stolen right out of the

find the fact that cars in the

parking lots here at Conestoga

now

skis

being

are

but

I

people

can’t the thieves themselves get

cars only to find their car has

been

jobs and live within their means? So, what is the problem?

When

Sometimes *I think people are just

to

possessions

stolen. is

ridiculous.

(5).

I’m

not

1 If

$62.2 million.

The resulting strain on government resources which,

of

and motivation, and I feel my program has

continue repaying their loans if tliey decTaic banlsruptcy.

prepared me to face the challenges of a rewarding career as a

every last cent

journalist.

from both

But, for

neglect

AIDS

support

Waterloo

you stop and wonder what our government is thinking when they

Region residents

make such a

could get the virus

is

that

unless

federal

reinstated

for

is

education

AIDS Committee

programs. The

of

funding

local

Kitchener,

Waterloo

and

Cambridge is appealing a decision by Health Canada to cut approximately $105,000 in annual funding as of March 1

Given

less than three

months

to

with the cut, the decision came as a total surprise to the deal

drastic decision that

going to affect such a worthy

cause.

AIDS

causes

other

have also been denied funding. Something like this really makes

more

group,

15

And

it

also

makes you

wonder where the money cut from AIDS education is going to go probably into areas that definitely don’t need

We

are

it.

curing this

research to find a cure,

We

money

is

give the victims

hope of survival, and then

pull the

hope eventually gives these

false

it

pesky

completely.

you.

So

here’s

my

suggestion

-

great,

^ut

and taken

if

it’s

right

going to be given

away

again, what’s

the point? It will unnecessarily upset a lot of people.

my

opinion. Health

down and their decision to make There are many other should

sit

Canada

reconsider

his

Let

name

is

name

me introduce

OSAP.

my

I

commend

who

understand

friend,

little

my reluctance to graduate - let me fill

I

you

in

on a not-so-fiinny story

spout

in the first place.

counter this by

I

everyone

may seem

that

a

little

education

permitted,

ability to live at

It is

money, many people are going to from the decision, a fatal one at that. suffer

student

is

$25,000.

According

number

ever-increasing

to

of

the article,

the

post-secondary

SPOKE

Ironically,

is

now

graduates

face

the threat of living in poverty to felt

would

way of life.

Maybe

that hard earned diploma degree will have to serve double duty as a testimony of ‘the

or

haves’ and the as

I

pay back

‘I

will have as

this

damn

soon

loan.’

mainly funded from September

Student Association (DSA).

SPOKE

difficult to survive in this

create a better

of

while

world, even with an education.

pay back what they

approximate debt for a

home

college or university.

far-fetched to you, don’t be so

Because

be

family background, finances, or

sure.

tuition, the

I feel

should

regardless of their

these cuts.

important that probably don’t need funds. If they do cut the

an

to

M out-of-town student,

this

things less

the

saying that

entitled

is

education.

attending

While

eyes and judgments

surrounding the wisdom of amassing such an incredible debt

Apparently

astronomical debt loads as a result of post-secondary education are going into hiding.

scared

roll their

forth

the

facing

have borrowed of government to

I

levels

of the standard of living I will face as a result.

read in the Record on Feb. 20. students

even

fully intend to repay

my education, I am

further

As

For those of you

I

Some may

far as to

learning without the help of

stop

with the false hope already. If the funding is going to be given, then

gone so

For those of you who have made through these hallowed halls of

people nothing to look forward to, causing them to give up

In

closer to

dreaded disease, a disease that has already claimed the lives of millions of people all over the world. But after money is put into withdrawn.

rug out from under them. The

buzzing

fly

little

can’t

I

While

my Chardonnay.

little critter.

you

About

education,

I’ve even

the

the benefits of a

all

the

around in

Cuts to AIDS funding incroasos risk

ultimately falls on to the taxpayer,

has led to the implementation of a policy that forces students to

wonderful

organizations in Ontario

just too

aspirations

-

organization.

is

Don’t get me wrong. I’m

I

-

AIDS

around you. bad that we are victims here because there is nothing we can do, unless we want It

students defaulting on loans is at an all-time high, translating into 23.5 per cent of students owing

to

full

veteran

in the people

graduation.

.

a

worst feeling in the

and seek’

looking forward

It

the

is

debt has

to ‘hide

P|eoS6'

1

It

world to be robbed of the tiniest possession because it robs you of something else - respect and trust

why

steal,

reason for such

behaviour.

grads resorting

p aI to

thieves

OSAP

0

legitimate

snowboard or even for that set of current CDs. If the victims of these heartless crimes, can work for the that $ 1 ,000

tfreir

me,

be the rush a thief gets while committing the crime. Whatever it is, 1 cannot come up with any

if thieves ever wonder hard someone had to work to

pay for

>

According

be

wonder

how

S 1

must

there

wander around trying remember where they parked

This, to

getting lazy and their greed takes over and they steal to fulfill their wants. Other times 1 think it must

such a

something wrong.

and snowboards

stolen,

in

people-oriented

atmosphere,

in

there.

Not only

watch for thieves

friendly,

Chicopee Ski Club

at

a police officer needs to be hired to

walks the “Chicopee beat” every Thursday through Sunday because of all the theft that has occurred

my

mine.

line these thieves

I

guess

car, will stay there

somewhere along

lot,

people

shouldn’t leave anything of value

fourth grader’s

Out

who

by.

Some

others.

Whether

Valuable or not, whatever was was not left in cars, free for

stolen

people feel the

need

newsroom. It’s an expensive piece of equipment that she cannot

people’s things stolen disgusting.

to May by the Doon The views and opinions expressed

in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE

are not

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Jaime Clark; News Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor: Sarah Thomson; Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthicr; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg; Features and Issues Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy SankarMulti-media Editor: Neven Mujczinovic; Production Manager: Jeanette Evcrall; Advertising Manager: Janet Wakutz Circulation Manager: Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. is

.

SPOKE’S

address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by

MS

an illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, March.

8,

1999

— Page 5

Streeter

vandalism out of control

Is

By Cariy Benjamin Vandalism

becoming

is

a

reoccurring problem at Conestoga College.

A

significant

number of posters

Doon

promoting

(DSA)

Association

elections

agreed there

for other students’ property.

were altered in an manner and negative messages were scrawled across

belongings.

pictures

“There

unflattering

more

them.

Student

the

staff

the

at

a

Millen,

Tricia

first-year

“The walk-safe volunteers give

these acts of vandalism should be severely punished,” said Farood

Subhanally, a Conestoga student.

“Then students might think twice

have also been in contact with the

who

about committing such an act in

now

are

the future.”

conducting patrols in and around

Tricia Millen, a first-year student

in

But Hunter said they everywhere

be

can’t

at once.

many

more active role. “The security should be conducting more patrols,” she said. “We pay a large amount of fees at thi s college and I think that should

The majority of students polled random survey at Conestoga on Feb. 18 agreed more security cameras were needed and suggested security staff should perform more patrols around the school, rain or shine.

Nezezon,

a

electronic-

obvious lack of respect for others, that is the root

security

cameras “There

are

an

is

first

Joan

coimect with the content in the book

Magazine,

student

study

workshop on

skills

a

effective

textbook reading on Tuesday, Feb. 16,

3:30 p.m. in 2D13.

at

was SQ4R, a system of text-

book reading

that

Magazine suggest-

ed may save a student a

lot

of time

in

SQ4R,

wMe they are studying. The

steps

meaningful to them, she

The next step in surveying the book to see how the book is laid out.

Although the preface is often skipped, can be valuable to the student to see

it

how the author intends the book to be looking

After

book,

to the

at

the

skip

see if there

to

of

front

should

students

back

is

es saying

come

it is

into student servic-

taking them a long time

looking up the terminology in a dictionary, while not noticing there is

surveying the textbook, questioning,

glossary in the

reading,

said.

and

recording

reviewing

the

Surveying the textbook means look-

how

about.

then

tents to get learn,

a sense of what you will

said Magazine.

each

unit

inspiration

Go

through

gain

to

and to get a big picture of

the course, she suggested. It

also

helps

the

student

to

be surveyed. The student

it

should

author’s objectives

said to

to

and

up,

set

is

he/she

ch^ter summary

is

to

a

already,” she

should look through the chapter to see

ing at the

book to see what it’s all Look through the table of con-

book

Qiapters are the next area of the

book

material.

textbook

John Nezezon, a first-year electronics-engineering technician student.

Photos by Cariy Benjamin

and Conestoga

experience

tighter security.”

not a mystery book,

you

where

to the

want

don’t

to

back. to find out the

ending,” said Magazine.

SQ4R

in

is

the next

but

is

it

closely related to surveying.

As

the

student surveys he/she are already is

important,

and what

needs

he/she

to

leam. If the student’s text has questions to

read

the

see what the

of the chapter

Magazine.

focus the student

This

when

are,

helps he/she

reading through the chapter so

he/she can concentrate

on the

learn-

Steps

answer then they should be

three,

reading, reciting,

section

own

and

saying

it

read but will help to retain the infor-

Reciting

mation for a longer period of time.

mind by

is

what

stopping

in

Studying will be shorter, and you

is

should only have to read a chapter

and

once,” said Magazine.

this

tive

Reviewing

While the student he/she

,

out loud. is

doing

putting the information into

long-term

his/her

what

Recording

is

memory. important

is

the last step in effec-

textbook reading. Eighty per cent

of

detail

is

forgotten

within one day after a one-hour learning experience.

basis

When a student has finished reading

should not be done by highhghting

through a chapter he/she should scan

whole

by

the notes to get a bird’s-eye view of

highhghting enough key words that

the various ideas and their relation-

on

a

section-by-section

sentences

the student can

and recording are

the key words.

closely related. Instead, of reading a

a time, read each

saying

involves

your

five,

four

at

individually.

important

Questioning the material step

the iong run

whole chapter is

read first.

or effective textbook reading, include

reciting,

a

glossary of terms.

“Students

“A

asking what

used, said Magazine.

to read a chapter because they are

involved

get

would have

in

ing objectives.

flip

said.

is

the

The method she taught the two participants

become

will

time.

services counsellor, vriio conducted

Linda Nyitara, a third-year materials-management student

save time

skills

You should never have to read an entire chapter more than once, said

of the problem.”

a third-year

materials-management student, offered a unique suggestion. “LASA students should get involved and patrol the school, it would benefit both parties,” she said. “The LASA students would

-

they may already know so the content

textbook the

Farood Subhanally, a Conestoga College student.

agreed with the majority.

“More

Surveying the exam time study peri-

Anne Macrobbi,

engineering techni cian program,

needed,” he said.

us to a safe enviroiunent.”

entitle

first-year

the

in

suggested security to

existing

take a

in a

student

program,

getting the

This raises concerns for

John

computer-programmer

the

analyst

students.

od begins with the way you read your

third-year

management

materials student.

us our extra eyes and ears,” said

first-year

Anne Macrobbi, a

who commit

“I think the people

regional police,

By Sarah Thomson

Other students suggested putting the authorities.

the parking lots.

Study

security

analyst.

Security officials at Conestoga

Counsellor says

more

computer-programmer

Hunter.

technician.

first-year

electronic-

the guilty parties in the hands of

through Thursday.

electronic-engineering

a

the

in

would be beneficial. “Maybe Spoke will help by shining a spotlight on the issue,” he said.

security supervisor,

security

by stepping up patrols around the college and notifying the walk safe program, which runs Monday

Tony Laudano, a

Laudano,

suggested

also

college has tried to be observant

student.

could catch people in

officers

A1 Himter, said

were

if there

engineering technician program,

student

outrage.

a third-year

we

Tony

for student

sparked

has

respect for others’

Maybe

the act,” she said.

student

The lack of respect property

is little

security cameras around the

school

Security has reported a rash of car break-ins and vandalism to

management

a lack of respect

is

have been defaced. Candidates’

vehicles at the college.

Linda Nyitara, materials

Conestoga?

at

“It

takes

but

go back and study just

ships.

Students should check their

memory by covering up the notes and a

little

longer

to

trying to recall the

main

points.


SPOKE, March

•aue 6

8,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Japanese students experience Canadian iifestyie for two weeks By Neven Mujezinovic

college planning and international

in-class

education at Conestoga.

student client services building from

lessons

taught

group of 12 Japanese on the Nova Academy

educational institutions met at a

English teacher Chris Buuck.

program arrived at Conestoga . ollege on Feb. 13.

Canadian education fair in Osaka and have been working on bring-

4:30 p.m.,

!

he

first

students

Conestoga :

is

one of 20 colleges

universities worldwide,

lid

which

Representatives

over

ing

has a hosting agreement with the

since. “It’s

The

is

on

focus

will

learning English and experiencing

an overseas e.\

lifestyle

change during

and

cultural

their two- week

stay. is

one of Japan’s

foremost foreign language schools

some

with

220,000

students,

currently enrolled.

fhe

between

collaboration

Conestoga College and the Nova

Academy began

in

Larry Rechsteiner,

1996,

says

director

of

two

English

and

9 a.m. to 12 p.m., by Conestoga

The second

which

activities

forth.

We

visits

back

have finally put

it

This

is

the first in a series of

groups of Japanese students

come

who

to Conestoga.

have been

visit to the

activities include a shopping mall, a nature

walk, a visit to the Toyota plant

and

ice skating.

improvement of language

skills,

should be arriving in the summer. They will start in mid-July

insight into the

and go through

that

till

mid-September.

Nova Academy

program concept

The

first

the

is

third

component. Each student is hosted by a Canadian family, which should provide not only further

Another group of 12 is expected in March, while five groups

parts.

will

p.m. to

1

of related

covered during the day’s lessons.

Homestay

into place,” says Rechsteiner.

The

from

part,

consists

Some of these taken three years, with com-

plan to

Nova Academy

interested

munication and some

offered.

students

the

language students from Japan ever

academy where English language training

of

the

at

their

English

but also offer an

Canadian

lifestyle.

All these elements should ensure

the

overseas

enjoyable

consists

of three

experience

part

involves

Rechsteiner.

students

and in

have

an

John tells

enriching

Canada,

Daly, a representative of the University of Western Sydney, students about studying in Australia. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

says

Western offers

degree and good time *

By Neven Mujezinovic sky-rocket

Representatives

of University of ^’cstem

in

Olympic

the

upon

held a presentauon to

the

makkg

a

stu_|__ ...

Cone Ron Kelly, pre.sident of KO^ Jocal company

Olympic image. “Lock yotffi' rent to for a

tarnished

hs

',Univemty of

Chang

ifUWS). explained i:vemty

is

advised,'

made

'

UWS

said

year”;

IliiSil'

intematiotsal

.student enrolment is b^eea 10 of threeg-and 12 per '^tThis, she sai4 .Ntpea^vC ,boo^ die iihage and

that the uni-

'up "

entitle:

'

provides iydiffet^ti

A

group of

in

front of the student services building.

1

2 Japanese students from the Nova

Academy program poses

with Larry Rechsteiner

(Photo ^ by Neven Mujezinovic)^

®

Uwe Li||e, a Nepean, started <mt

UWS

has

^general

recently

agreement

i-Ontario colleges,

DSA

Elections '99 Unofficial Results

^oppot international

signed

^Chaag. “Wei

with

^".|Enrichin|'.‘’

^lactsets

Steve Coiman, Vice President of Student Affairs Eiect Jennifer Harron, Vice President of

Education Eiect

John '

the

odter^

and

'complete your

cvnicgc;

local

uuiversuies ua$y map

|ed.frii

pm^^iisNdi

Sdl

^diploma^and

[e|

the third year of that area of Lilje.

Tt

“EaCh^^

quali^is measured-

for academic

About 30 students attended the

]enn Hussey, Vice President of Operations Eiect

% w

Idacasrpl

transfer.”

Elect

said

ktibi^it is quite

The

study (at UWS),*’ said

Menage, President

C

general frainewoik'\)(i1hin

takes the uncertainty out of the

Ellen

with

lay

Isy

and

session

asked

the

research,

oh die

of and

basis

perfbrraance

contributions to peer-reviewed

representatives questions. Thition

refereed literature,” said Daly.

ranges from $9,500 to $12,000 a

In

Kelly

is

year.

said

many

students will need approximately $20,000 for one year of study. There are various housing

more

arrangements,

a

said

Ester

Chang, a representative from Hawkesbury. Students can live on their own or rent bungalowtype

houses

and

share

accommodation costs. Nepean delegate, Peter Topper reminded prospective students tlie

in

2000 Olympics will be held Sydney and housiitg

arrangements .should be made

areas,

he sai4

ahead”

“streets

established

UWS

of

Australian r, -

universities.

Kelly emphasized drat

new and

institution.

UWS

is

vigorously growing:

“Degrees

to the market,”

stu%

:

the:

he

am

tailored

said. “It’s

not a

imivereity.”

\

>;

The studenh from Conestoga

who

UWS

are cunently studying are

all

,

at,,

enjoying their stay

“down under,” said Kelly. Ttk a great way to have a

year-

long vacation and get a degree on the side.” said Topper.


SPOKE, March

8,

— Page 7

1999

Education is freedom says 1995 graduate By Janet Wakutz

“I

know Val

where

When the

light at the

is

ever get a glimpse of it, gfaduates

may be what

view of

able to give a

end looks

that

like.

and

because I’ve been through that I’ll know how to encourage her and give her tips like getting the support of a good friend,” she

end of the growing dim, and students are wondering if they’ll

tunnel

will reach a point

she’ll question herself

said. .

Volhner said money was

tight

Karen Vollmer, says “Education is freedom, it changes you as a

while she was a student and trips to McDonald’s with three children resulted in them choosing

person.”

between

Social services graduate,

The 1991 graduate says she had worked in manufacturing but

“My

fries

or a drink.

greatest

moment

after

When

graduating was (the children) turning their faces up and asking ‘what can we get?’ and being able

ready

to say ‘anything

started dreading going to work.

her youngest child was for school she started looking for a new career. The day Vollnier

started

was

College her day

Conestoga

at

same

the

youngest

started

kindergarten.

“One of my biggest worries about going to school was the kids,” she says, but looking back she says she spent more time with them while she was in school than while working. Vollmer recently asked her children, now age 19, 17 and almost 15, what they remember from when she was in college. “They remember celebrating my accomplishments with me,” she says. She remembers their school journals containing records of her academic accomplishments.

Her oldest child, Val, had said she would go to Conestoga too and is

now

in her

second semester of

Before starting classes, Vollmer all the study groups offered by student services because she knew she needed every edge. says she attended

“I think the biggest things that

me

through were time management, support of family, got

and teachers, positive

friends

thinking and believing in myself,”

she said.

Volhner says her husband was very supportive, helping with household tasks and being more involved with their children. “It strengthened our marriage,” she said, adding her going back to school “helped our family mesh and empowered the kids to be

more independent.” Vollmer remembers encouraging her youngest son to

own peanut

make

Vollmer

is

instilled the

proud

to

have

importance of educa-

tion in her daughter.

Will her

own

experience as a

help Vollmer empathize with her children as they face school challenges? student

and

when

his

his

butter sandwiches,

becoming

I’d get there.”

Volmer says she was hired by Region of Waterloo Social Services before graduating from the social services program and worked as a caseworker for six

Barb

a college counsellor offers advice on and effective scheduling.

Kraler,

prioritizing

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

years.

standing on a stool at the counter,

nursing.

college

you want’.”

Vollmer says the whole picture of going to school and having a family can be overwhelming but she recommends breaking it down into manageable segments. “If I told you I could run to Montreal,” she said, “you’d probably not believe me. But, if I ran from one hydro pole to another, it might take a while, but

frustrated

bread would rip. About two months into the school year, Volhner says, she can still remember him announcing he was the best peanut butter sandwich-maker. the

Currently, Vollmer is an employment co-ordinator running workshops for people who participate in the Ontario Works Program. A provincial program aimed at making people more

addresses such areas as resume writing, cover letters and interview skills.

employable,

.

.

management

time

it

The program helps participants motivated and become and abilities. motivate people and

identifies their skills

“I love to help them believe in themselves,” said Vollmer. ‘Tart of what helps

me do my job is knowing I was

at

once myself and knowing I had people supporting and motivating me.” She said going through the that

Talking about

point

challenges she did in order to

graduate from social services helped her to be stronger and to grow as a person. “To be humble,” she said. As for advice to students who now wear the shoes she wore as a student, “Ride your fear and embrace the challenge. Fear is energy if it’s challenged in the right direction,” she said.

By Jacqueline Smith Regardless of gender, race, creed, or national origin

have exactly the same number of hours in a week. times

when some people have

all

people

Yet. there are

to rush to finish a project or find

tune for an activity another person could have easily done in the

same amount of lime. Barb

""*’*”*'1

(.'ollegc counsellor, said

Conestoga

Kraler, a

better able

deal witli things

tf>

when

people arc

they are written

down on

upTiH ‘Joiif head. wfiat-\v<r

ht?'’ided

recommend

is to

write out a schedule of things you need to do,”

- She .said people benefit from .schedules because they are freed from constant decisions, which makes reaching their goals more

She said students who believe they cannot should think of

stick to a schedule

personal schedule as an expansion of their

tlieir

school timetable. She suggested setting realistic goals, allowing flexibility in a .schedule, setting clear starting

and stopping times,

as well as planning for the unplanned.

Kraler said the next thing to do

is

to prioritize

Alan Lakcin, author ofTake Control of Your Time and Life, suggests,

“A’s

In

"Simpfy label each task A, B or C.” on your list are those things that are most important,” he book,

hfei

L^ein

says the

B taslss are

He says C’s priorities are

fhan the A’s.

important, but less so

often easy jobs and

do not

require immediate attention.

KraW

said the

most common problems students complain

about are not having enough time to balance a number of things, procrastimtion, and the feeling of not having enough time to

themselves because, unlike work, students have school work to

do when they get home

Dave

Ellis in

.

Becoming a Master Student

time you are ten^ted to

say,

‘I

suggests,

“The next

just don’t have time,’ pause for a

minute. Question the truth of this statement. Could you find four

more hours

this

According to

week

Ellis,

for studying?”

time

doesn’t bother time at

is elusive

all.

Time

and

is

easy to ignore. “That

is perfectly

content to remain

hidden until you are nearly out of it. And when your are out of it,

you are out of it. “Time management givi^ you a chance to spend your most observing how valuable resource in the way you choose. Stm you use time,” he said, Kraler said other people’s demands can also conflict with a student’s priorities. She encourages students to get Others, whether it’s their families or their roommates, involved with their .schedule. She said putting up a copy of the schedule where

%

it informs others about when you arc not available. your partner or roommate can see that you are busy

others can sec

“This

w^,

tonight,” she said.

She also suggested making compromises and

know what you need

to achieve.

Most

letting

everyone

importantly, Kraler sai4

the student needs to stick with the schedule he or she

Social services grad, Karen Vollmer, says organization

developed while

in

college.

She

utilizes

these

skills in

and time management were

her work.

skills

she

(Photo by Janet wakutz)

because

it is tite

only

way to be taken

seriously.

made


Pago 8

— SPOKE, March

8,

1999

FEATURES AND ISSUES Caution

No one immune

need^

to sexiial assaiui^ says fecturer

By Judy Sankar

the proper authorities.

“Even "Sexual assault sexual

is

any form of

activity

forced

upon

person

without

their

another

last

come

consent” said social worker Sue

if calling

the polite is

No

to die c®titee for care,” she

one

immiHie to sexu»l

is

Cjallagher during a lecture in the

assault,

Sanctiiary, Feb. 16.

that 11 to 12 per cent

The

W6inen'’s Resoiuce

brought at

of victims

In a question and answer

Sexual

Centre,

Gallagher, stating

said

are male.

who works

in Gallagher,

the Waterloo Region

Assault Treatment

Group

tibat

thing on your mind, you can

followed

that

the

j^od

lecsture,

to

Gallagher told the audience that

lecture about assault in general,

upon arriving at an emergency room, a victim of assault is

sexual

safety

and

date

drugging.

immediately taken to the centre

Gallagher told the 25

and usually treated within 30 to

wiio attended that in Waterloo

40 minutes. This

Region

last year,

hours of waiting that usually

cases

the

46 per cent of

treatment

centre

accompany a

handled involved people between

Evidence

the ages of 16^ and 24,Glallaghert also said

for

&e number

some time

of assailants arc known to the

67 per cent

Sue

a

worker at the Waterloo Region Sexual Assault Treatment Centre at St. Mary’s Hospital, lectured in the Sanctuary Feb. 16, (photo by Judy Sankar) Gallagher,

social

Week, are times when people should be extra cautious. Appearing

Rohypnol, a drug that

Vacations, like Reading

prevalent

recently.

as strong as valium, c

many drugs

is

u.sed hy

said Gallagher.

One

10 times

ts

one of

assailants,

explanation

the attention of assailants, said

for the use of the drug, also called

Gallagher

rooty, is that

hu

become

if ftie

is

to decide, tips

assaulted including travelling in

groups, not acceptmg drinks from

more

Date rape drugging

months so

for reducing the chance of being

.

assailant.

m a foreign city draws

,

Gallagher suggested several c

of assaults occur within the home of either the victim or the

vulnerable

six

to*

the hospital.

gathered and held

wants to press charges, there

M

victim. Furthermore,

trip to

is

victim isn’t sure whether he/she

of attacks hy strangers are low fact, just over 80 pea^cent

and,

up

eliminates the

it

pcrson\ .system

goes through a w'ithin 12

hours

which makes it difficult to detect. One drug that is often overlooked or imdcresti mated is Gallagher

alcohol.

the

told

audience to be weary of

who

is

making the drinks and how much alcohol Is in each dnnk The Sexual Assault Treatment

Centre, which operates from

strangers,

St.

dearly your

stating

Mary's Hospital and Cambridge

level

Memorial Hospital, treats both victims and family or friends of

and always letting some* one know where you are. “Everyone has used bad judgment Sexual assault should not be a consequence of bad

victims. Ciiiliagher ,stTe.s.sed that

going to

the centre doesn’t nuxin tj^t the \

must report the

iLlun

assault to

comfort

of

with

the

situation

jud&meiit.’ said Gallagher

Precaution, testing will reduce risk of sexually transmitted disease By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

That special someone you met

Sexually

transmitted

diseases

behaviour, said Cheryl Opolko,

(STDs) are not a new phenomenon, but still present

the public health nurse for the

March break may have shared more than a ‘good time’

potentially fatal consequences to

with you.

during the

their victims.

lack of accountability in general

While STDs can be contracted at any time, periods of uninhibited behaviour can increase the risk for

resulted in a sexual encounter, the

those

consequences remain the same.

participate

Whether

alcohol, drug use or a

who

do

not

in

risky

generally

sexual

AIDS and STD program at the Waterloo Region Community Health Department. Opolko went on to say that the key to preventing the further

STDs

spread of

is

being tested.

“Often people do not even

know

they are spreading an STD,” she

“People need to

said.

know

i/fimnunifUtfi’

I

^

Opolko said there are three main reasons people are tested. These reasons include symptoms, partner

unprotected screening. that

surrounding

disclosure

and

sex

It is

general

important to note

symptoms do not need

be

to

present to be tested, as

many STDs

do not have symptoms. While contracting

specific

consequence,

welcome

is

is

an

could save

testing

A

provide some relief in most cases,

second

not to have sex for 14

and medical attention can

however.

weeks. This waiting period should

Anon5mious

testing

provide adequate time to be tested

medication for

STDs

and receive the results for AIDS and syphiiis. Impaired judgments and poor

at

and

Waterloo

the

free

available

is

Region

decision-making will not provide

Community Health Department. For more information, or to book an appointment, call

protection against STDs.

(519) 883-2251.

IS

Proper

ISISISISISMSMSISISMSISISMSISISMSIUIMSISISMSISIIIBI

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

STD,

physical

obviously not a

prospect, another aspect

Final

Exams

I Whether

to panic or to prepare.

1 enlightened or

Whether

to sulk or to study.

Whether

is

into

1

in

to

become

remain in the dark, hoping for the best. How you use your time up to you and will determine your level of success or failure. to

1 and energy To go the exam period with your eyes wide open, you need I how many exams you have and which

know:

to

subjects;

when, where and for how long they are scheduled; what material will be covered with emphasis on which

what format

areas;

I

of

regardless

option

it

that

they have to be tested and when.”

Cast your ballot

add them your partner’s life. routine,

the

exam

will have (multiple choice, essay,

short answer); •

percentage of your 1 About whatweeks before exams For each course, 1 exam on a

mark the exam covers. mark the times and locations of each list what you need to study and the sources

final

three

start,

calendar.

you

will use (textbook, class notes, lab assignments). Estimate the

amount of

1 study time you need and indicate study periods on the calendar. By planning you know you have time for each subject. 1 ahead, Use sources of help available you: old exams, classmates, study groups, I class review time, notes or highlighted sections, summaries and chapter will

to consider is the partner

individual

who engaged

of the

in sexual

while on vacation, said

activity

Opolko. In

a

world,

the

partner of the deviation from a

monogamous Unfortunately this reality.

votes for vice-preeident of education. The winner, announced Feb. 19, waa fir$t*yaar general arts and sciences student^ Jflhrtifer Harron. (photo uyusawiihoim)

option,

:

relationship. is

often not the

If ‘fessing up’ is not the desired

Opolko has provided

a

Firstly,

use condoms.

If

condoms

questions.

Avoid •

1 1• • I 1 1

Ask your

common

text

faculty for help

and information about the exam.

mistakes:

ovcrsludyiirg for the first

energy for

llic

working hard

exam and running

for Ihc course(s)

you like^and neglecting

not starling early enough, leaving too

little

time during

others;

exam

week. 11

you would

Final •

out of time and

others;

like assistance in

preparing for final exams,

the Student Services oil ice, or attend

i

couple of options to choose from. are not a part of the regular sexual

to

text

i perfect

‘wanderer’ would inform his/her

Mike Harris, chief returning officer for the DSA el^ons, looks on as 86<k»iid>ysar general business student, Jen McDonald

will

all

come

one of our “Preparing

Tlmrsday, April 8,

to

Room 2D02 1:30. Room 2D02

,1:J0 - 4:30,

12:.30

-

1 In]

1 I 1 I i I 1 I I 1 1 i 1 1 i

for

Exams" workshops:

lucsday, April 6,

1

isiSjaiaisiiiaiaiaisiaaMaisisiajajgMaaagjgoigjgicuptpijgi

1 i i

1


SPOKE, March

8,

— Page 9

1999

Servants of the Gods throw beads and other assorted goods to the eager crowd.

By Rob Himburg

as the years went by.

consisted

New Orleans has been the major You have to see it to believe it. Words just cannot justify the

closing off the French Quarter,

site of Mardi Gras in North America since 1827. If came to North America when some students who had traveled to Paris brought back the customs of the festivities over in Europe. The students donned strange costumes and danced their way through the

Bourbon

streets.

sights

and

sounds

of

North

America’s greatest social gathering

known

as

Mardi Gras.

New Orleans Louisiana plays host to the celebration every year, Street

in

particular,

upon thousands of tourists, partygoers and thrill-seekers from across the continent. This year’s event drew

The idea

for this

originated

Rome several

as

second

in

a

celebration

feast

put

New

Orleans has been

festival,

the

on

themselves

up

to

and Venus as they considered all pleasures allowable. The trend slowly spread over Europe

float

moved

through the streets to the hilarious roars of the crowd.

As

the years progressed, so did

alcohol smell that engulfed the

bags of the

Quarter.

goods and tossed them into the eager, outstretched arms of the

munber of parades and the number of people who attended

crowd.

the event. Mardi Gras 1999 played

largest

host to 49 parades.

covered parades

also

guests.

The route of the parade, the of the entire festival, was with

making a

the

city

wailed as

sirens

lined the

street,

from one

solid line

side to the other, officially closing

the

For only $100 US, a

forcing street.

Following the lines of foot patrol

can go up on a for

down and

street

those in attendance off the

officers,

rows of mounted

policy;

followed.

an hour and

Street sweepers

toss beads.

who

attempted

clean up the mess

to

left

by

seen on a Bourbon Street

the tourists followed the police.

balcony with an entourage of

Undaunted, some people tried to

also

1827-1833,

At midnight,

garbage.

the floats, while

was

nimimum purchase. police officers

Sandra Bullock (Speed)

People. Actor James Belushi

There were also limited places to to the bathroom, and to get into a bar to use one, a cover charge had to be paid plus a one drink

go

of abandoned beads, broken toys and strands

endary disco phenoms The Village

From

the

riders tore through

balcony

had evolved to the point that an annual Mardi Gras ball was held. A main attraction of Mardi Gras is the parades. The first parade was staged for 1839. That parade

to

also gave a

floats as the

the

these

It

from the

toys flew

tourist

since 1827.

and cut over and up

breath of fresh air from the stale

the

a guest appearance, as did leg-

North America

being

medallions, stuffed animals and

as

Gras

in

floats

great success in the eyes of the

organizers

from the Sun was on another. Harry Coimick Jr. also made

dress

Bacchus

consecutive

French Stewart from Third Rock

Romans would

masks,

150

next destination.

it

the major site of Mardi

During

themselves as specters and give

float,

pulled by transport trucks. Beads,

was on one of

days was followed by

the fast of 40 days of Lent. this

lasted

one

featured celebrities and special

century

that

only

was a

Some of

to thousands

over two million people.

of

crudely constructed, yet

uniformed

The also

get back onto

security.

final day,

known

Mardi Gras Day,

As

the parade ended, those

as Fat Tuesday, played

were

still

Rex

way

to

host to the Zulu and

parades.

The Rex, featured an amazing

one

sober enough

made their

French

Quarter,

the

Bourbon

who

Street in particular, for

of carousing and

final night

If

a.m. and then again early in the

morning, closing the until next year,

hits

was anything bad Mardi Gras, Bourbon may have been it. It’s the

when

the

like a tidal

celebrating.

Bourbon and the

process was again repeated at 2

street

down

the festival

town

again

wave.

there

about Street

high point of the party, but

it

is

ATTENTION STUDENTS THEY’RE GOING BACK!!!

so crowded there that one literally

has

to

use

elbows to

his/her

make any headway through crowd. And if movement

the is

possible, keep an eye in the sky as

Tins IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO PURCHASE YOUR WINTER SEMESTER TEXTBOOKS AT THE BOON BOOKSTORE.

tons of beads are tossed off the

balconies that line the

street.

For

only $100 US, a tourist can go up

on a balcony

for

an hour and toss

beads.

Drinks

are

also

THE BOOKSTORE IS PREPARING FOR YEAR-END INVENTORY, AND IS CURRENTLY IN THE PROCESS OF RETURNING SURPLUS STOCK.

expensive,

Hurricanes, a tropical kind of drink with a mixture of various alcohols, ran a pretty the beer

By

of

many

colourful floats featured during the

Rex parade. (Photo by

Rob Himburg)

a glass.

was jam packed making it almost impossible to move. If you wanted to get somewhere, the best bet was to take a side street with

Bandwagon was one

at $1

the late hours of Fat Tuesday,

Bourbon

His Majesty’s

was cheap Street

people,

NOTE:

penny while

THE BOON BOOKSTORE WILL BE CLOSED TUESDAY, MARCH 30/99 AT 12:30 P.M., AND ALL DAY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31/99 FOR INVENTORY


Pago 10

— SPOKE, March

8,

1909

FEATURES AND ISSUES

Straggler forgets

where he last hunq his hat

Internet porn at college

not popular, says security By Wayne

'Bl#

Collins

does give students credit for being their

Gaming ^By Wayne Collins

He

offers “Craft” as his last

name,

\\

spells

it,

but refuses to

ty morning in \ repeat it. ^alks^along \ ‘t|t will do,” says

Craft.

remember or where he was

he

lives,

^^heiKwns to ^proceed along around and ou a cop or

n^

on a few computer icons, but the college’s security supervisor says

the

is

Internet

to

as easy as clicking

not a major problem.

anyone with an account number and a password can print any form of smut they encounter in the world of cybersex.

While A1 Hunter won’t

pom

system,”

“students

Essentially,

disqualify sn’t

in this case.

“I think the reality of it is when you look at the tens of thousands of hours of use the students access

access

pornography

it’s

says he doesn’t

own watchdogs

totally

as a problem, he

Hunter,

says

tend

He

was bringing up

was

“It

not,

regard.”

explaining not unusual for

security to get a complaint from one student about the conduct of

another student, certain

if

he/she finds

materials

offensive.

my

opinion,

says

Hunter

in

the

more

females,

resembled

closely

with

material,

clad

scantily

a

fashion

page.

Hunter says there has

Still,

been

small

a

been

percentage

of

where students have

incidents

ano|nt|<iipppWsinto.

material another

female found offensive. pornographic,”

it’s

who

female student

a

themselves pretty well in that

Hunter says

a

just

it’s

a recent complaint

recalls

against

police

to

wait for a

Royal H^tel without

Sometimes, he says, matter of taste.

caught

with

authentic

pornography.

sai

Since September 1998, security

lurwed'the

previous:

has had to deal with less than a

half-dozen liber

e

man with a

however.

cases,

Occasionally, a guard will open up

was found dead

vacated

a

and

locker

find

several printouts that students left

College’s social

more ari|^

behind or forgot about.

Dick socid

..

One problem with Hunter,

needed to prevent

of knowing where

|#at ^^not a

“But

^

|®ons.'QR:t^|

yspict^o.^ v^“!’ve"^ a

the

wl: rough

%

ni^t:^^^affected

ttie

the .

“Why

all

tbes^ qnestic

on until he hears e jingling sound of loose ange. For. S4.25, the price of a of cigarettes, he is ,e shuflles

1

Under the open-access must

materials.

lab policy, says Himter, users

billion

remove any offensive material from the terminal and leave the

3^am

ifer

Ontario to hire

lab.

more nurses and provide more home care; ^

“Security

mention has been made in budget about additional funding for swial programs to combat homelessness in the Waterloo Re^on.

called at that

circumstances.”

A

:

loss

second offence carries a

in

vacated lockers.

(Photo by

Wayne

Collins)

total

of privileges in the use of the

open-access Security guards at the college occasionally find things such as

porn printouts

:

may be

he says, “depending on the

point,”

No

the

hand scoops up the money and he offers a name *to go with the photograph

fair

does deal with pornography and inappropriate policy

with $1 billion a year over

"five

His

remind

like to

college’s

for health care over the next five jyears,

suddenly willing to laise his pictures.

$1K5

says.

students that the

federal levc^^ tlie^ budget promised'” tlic

>|imviHces ai>|extra

4sks, his tone sounding :«inoyed.

head and pose for

1 ft

V,..

he

Hunter would also use

came from.

it

from the school’s

it

Internet labs,”

man’s death

no way

know, in some cases, they

have pulled

if'^i <^tft;mittd,” he?4}^d no new %easmes have been and asks wh> anyone taken to prevent another tragedy.

grunts,

He

Ontario’s

•vemment appears

||

I

says

this,

that security has

is

for

labs

the

remainder of the academic year.

“The student

is

also

sent to

administration for discipline, as outlined in the student handbook,”

Classifieds University &College

Whitewater Weekend June 11-13, 1999 Whitewater Rafting On the Mighty Ottawa River Only $150!!! + GST now to reserve or

says Hunter.

The new happening spot in Cambridge; The Fiddlers Green Irish Pub is

Cal!

outstanding, energetic,

earn commission! Wilderness Tours

and personable bartenders, waitstaff and

1-800-267-9166

bus persons. Please call Robyn for an

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appointment.

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TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

Great potential for advancement. Wage depending on

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person with resume to:

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Fiddlers Green Irish

Pub 12 1/2 Water

St.

Cambridge

info,

suspended

Easier tax filing and faster refunds for students

at

not

is

been

who’s

Conestoga for

this,

to date.

One

been

has

student

discontinued, he says, for abusing

computer system, but

the college’s

your

pornography was not involved.

and available seven days a week.

It’s free, at

fingertips,

In the case of the female student

who viewed

fashion page.

the

Hunter says the person would just receive a reminder that others find

Check your personalized income package for a

certain things offensive.

TELEFILE

“It’s

everything else, you

like

know,” says Hunter. “You almost

invitation.

have to govern person

For more information, our Web site at:

perhaps, by the

it,

who would be more

easily

offended in the room.”

visit

Meanwhile, Cathy Potvin,

who

has been the learning resources

information

centre’s

services

co-ordinator for three years, says

www.rc.gc.ca/telefile/

she’s never seen

anyone abusing

the system in the

LCR, and with

good reason.

pack,

“It’s

Toll Free:

1-800-270-2941

of anyone

aware

NOW! Free

this offence, a

Hunter says he

principal.

tax Full-time head cook needed immediately.

suspended for

student can appeal to the college

looking for

Become a Campus Rep and

emaii:

If

Job Posting The Irish Pub That Rocks

Revenue Canada

Revenu Canada

V

Ji.i

so

open

and

visible

here,” says Potvin, “you’d notice right away.”


SPOKE, March

SPORTS

8,

1999

— Page 11

Ford develops indoor soccer scholarship hm "

By Lindsay Gibson

l

tournament Athletic

college’s

own

The

scholarships

hammered

have out

definitely consider

who show

not

but

yet

of the been

By

the

who

plays on the

Alumni

indoor soccer team, said the scholarships will be her contribution to the college.

after she graduated, she

“Indoor soccer

growing,” said

is

enrolled in the general arts and

Ford, “and people don’t realize Tt

science

is

program,

but

did

not

a varsity sport.”

will

From the cheap seats

team players and are

doing well academically. But they won’t necessarily honour the best players on the team, said

about time for the Jays

It’s

Ford.

Ford realized the possibility of scholarships when she introduced men’s teams to the annual Alumni indoor soccer the

program assistant Marlene Ford soccer scholarships.

Athletic

is

^

-

excited about indoor,

'

(Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

7.

thou]^*

After prizes were bought and

end of the 2000 indoor soccer sea-

and to give

money

son. Ford started the alumni soc-

to look forward to year after year.

was enough to begin a scholarship

cer tournament five years ago to

fund that will be awarded

get

at the

some of

the old players back

to win, but if I

it's

tournament

The tournament is Ford’s “baby” and has been a great success. The

'

much money.

that

I

seems to be a

You can look at other .sports and their players who have had it

topic.

There

'

games

think I wuld faaadle not winning.

hot

,

to

still

I

athletes a

had a chance

play in one-fifth of ray team’s

wintear, ba.sc-

ball

fees paid, the surplus of

Ford,

graduated

leadership

tournament Feb. 6 and

Conestoga

1993.

The year

criteria for candidates

left

from the recreation leadership program in

indoor

for

she

after

four scholarships (of approxmate-

six-month

ever since.

Ford never really

Marlene Ford, is currently working to establish

a

of 1995, Ford was working full time at the college and has been

she

it,”

got

fall

it’s

said.

assistant,

ly $250 each) soccer players.

and people love

it

she

year because

first

position with the college.

it.

a lot of leg work, but

worth

complete her

on her

time because she enjoys

“It’s

program

athletic

not part of Ford’s

job, but something she does

scholarships/bursaries

have become scarce at Conestoga College and for indoor soccer players, scholarships of any kind were non-existent until recently.

The

is

was

worse.

T^e M^el

irom

Naticaial

Texas, we’ll

all-time

llij.s

gii\

i

Dionne, the

Hockey League’s

third ;

I

Billiards

him

CiUl

anyone?

who

arrives

m

the Maj{)r Leagues should be

awardbi the chance to play on a team with a chance of winning a Wotld Seucs ring

To

ilo

some Mniplc math,

tliere

arc 10

U-dm> in Major I.eagiie "fiwsebaS; each havtpga toistet'tsf'

25 players. Fhai would tell you 749 players other fiian Roger wiih ilie -..ime aspiratioii

there are

You

scorer,

who

complain? Not the way Roger has He never berated hi.s team’s

management ,irid demanded a He woikcd with the team

trade.

he bad 'The love of the game is gone and Roger has just buried himself. Although he publicly withdrew his trade demand, he fell

disfavour with his teammates and a trade was inevitable.

inU)

He finally

also cannot forget about the

got

hi.s

wi.sh

and got

plethora of minoi league teams

traded to a contending leant in

and plaveiN who .lUo ha\e

York Yankees, but who the Bronx Bombers won't live up to their name this year and get bombed? Who else

dream whcn*die> is.

you’re

not

New

the

thi«.

sign their fust

profe.ssional contiiict. Fact oi

matter

I

played 18 seasons without wm-'^niug a St^ey Cup. Did he ever

Kogcr. Ilo seems to think every baseball player

leading

is

llie

alone

to say

j

is to

We’ll

^so say Roger

i.s

say foe Toronto Blue Jays**

may have

earning

benefited ffom the tra^ and could make a run at foe World Series? It’s the sports world, where upsets are immi-

about $8 piiilioii a year to pilch in about 32 of his team’s 162

games Appiircnilw $250,000 for is not enough to

eadh appearance

nent.

m^e him forget about winning a

ready because

championship. Don’t get me wrong, the point of the game is

going to be eating

So Roger, if

get that foot

you don’t win

the World Series this year, you’re it.

science student takes a shot on the pool table in on from the left is Vicky Woods, a first-year general Laurie Pinhero also in her first year of general business and Tanya Melo,

and science.

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

,

Gstnes Simon B Cotter

March 15

-

18

"He's Funny"

^oosba/l

"And He's Bock!"

Tournament

And He has a

Big

Head

Hockey Toirniamcnt

Tues.

Week

March 9

11:30

am

The Sanctuary

Pool

Tournament

up at the DSA Office Sign


Page 12

— SPOKE, March

8,

1999

Condors rebound to

Seneca

tie

By Charles Kuepfer

Conestoga’s hockey team survived a deathblow

hands of

at the

Seneca Sting, tying the game

the

with 16 seconds

their playoff

the third

left in

period to earn a 2-2

hopes

and keep

tie

alive.

But the dramatic finish was over-

shadowed by which

a brutal

first

period,

enough but snow-

started innocently

with a roughing penalty,

balled out of control as an endless

stream of Condors did time in the penalty box.

Conestoga racked up an incredible 61 minutes in penalties in the

period alone, spending almost

first

two men short and keeping goaltender Anthony Gignac busy. the entire frame

Miraculously, the Condors only, trailed 2-0 at the

end of the first and somehow managed to claw their way back to grab a point from the Sting, a team that is

fighting for their playoff lives as well.

Condor coach Ken Galemo was suprised by his team’s lack of discipline in the first period.

“We knew that if we were five on we could play them,” said

five

Garlemo.

“I

never in

all

my

of coaching, coached where

Condor defenceman Dave Grist (#5) jockeys for position in front period penalties, overcame a two-goal deficit to earn a 2-2 tia

years I

was

shorthanded, five on three, for the whole first period.” Garlemo said at the first intermission he didn’t have to tell his team a whole lot. “Until these guys leam that the refs rale, we’re just going to keep

hockey long enough from wrong.

to

know right

guys play with their

shoulders,

The Condors, plagued by numerous

Obviously frastrated by the offiIan MacDonald of the

game during

final period.

trouble

minutes in penalties during the

pulled out the tie were the guys

roughing, high-sticking and cross-

incident and received a

who didn’t pull the

checking penalties two and a half

conduct.

the

first

that the

guys

shenanigans in

The Condors got

minutes

period.

into

in.

facts,

then get the vox

Hepatitis B Vaccine

game mis-

Tues.

0

1

The Other For

am

-

Room

2

pm

-The Sanctuary

and to piease go to the DSA Office

more

pre-register

March 23

information

Conestoga called a timeout with 1:10

left in

the

puU Giganc

Greg Devos ^so

hit the

showers

early while the rest of the

Condors

make

it

out of the

Seneca capitalized on the two-

With only 16 seconds on the Ryan Martin slammed the game-tying goal, crash-

ing Seneca’s hopes of clinching a

advantage, with Paul Smith and Ryan Thorpe each scoring

victory.

power-play markers.

both teams

early in the second period with a

power-play goal of their

own by

Overtime decided nothing and separated

game

still

by two points

and

left

the

holding an identical 1-1-1 (won-

record

versus

each

The Condors improved

their

lost-tied) other.

They remained deadlocked

for

the rest of the second and well into

record to 8-7-1 with their

the third.

of the season.

first tie

*Jomar Computer Systems* Recruitment Day For 3rd Year Business

-

CP/A Students

When: Wednesday, March 10, 1999 Time: 10:30 am - 12:00 Noon Where: Room 216, Student/Client Services Building Bring: Cover

letter,

resume, transcripts,

references Attire:

Hepatitis B virus can KILL you

to

clock,

man

Conestoga cut into Seneca’s lead

game and opted

in favour of an extra

attacker.

home

period.

Jeff White.

Clinic

Giganc kept the Condors in the that time, making a timely save on a Seneca two-onone a minute and a half into the

ciating,

early in the first period earning

Galemo noted

we’re not going to be a national or provincial contender.”

first-

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

straggled to

Get the

Sting net.

who

I

wasn’t aware of,” said Galemo.

putting ourselves behind the eight-

Galemo. He said that the guys who took the major penalties have played

these

above

Seneca

Condors was at the middle of a melee that broke out moments later. MacDonald racked up 20

“Obviously there are emotions digging inside of these guys that

ball,” said

“Until

what’s

of the

Formal Business!

For more information see Karen Parrinder, Student Employment, Room 2B04


SPOKE, Mar.

SPORTS

1999

8,

— Page 13

Women’s indoor soccer

Alumni clinch

soccer league

first in

By Brian Smiley scoied.into

Time

running out for teams

is

and they continually challenged Kesselring, but she made a couple of spectacular

want to challenge the Alumni women’s indoor soccer team's undefeated record,

[

The Alumni record by

j

retained

saves and several steady ones, to

perfect

its

defeating

keep the score

the

Amy

I

Portuguese Leos 5-1 on Feb. 16

the league This gi\cs them a Ine uilo the ><emi final round ol the

lea\ev onl> two

it

for soinobodi to

last year’s

knock

m

ball

to notch antnher

win

in

league action.

was a nice way

it

to

eomc

'

l»tck,“ sJie

Amy

the final 5- 1

in

Olson

took

tlio

two

when

necessary.

“We

Amy Yeowell

alone against the Loos goalie fircl place nlaro in in the Ihn league. Innniin first

is left all

A Umni won wnn 5-1 S-1 Alumni uj> b\

.1

p.ui

Shi, blastLd

her hr^i

shot off the right jH>sr .md then

took

her

own

slammed

that

into

the

in

a

game

to clinch Hinrh to

rebound

and

half,

lop

left

corner of the net.

into

wealed her way through. two

and began to tally prossuie the Leos in the .'^Ci.oiid

defenders and placed the ball past the kecpei to make it .^-0.

.At

minutes

anolliei geru-

i

The the

mark,

.tlvb-ntimite

MargaJida .Aguilar Uiok 14/VA. advantage of a l,co.s turnover and j

®

’‘low

The

tPholo by Elnan Smilcyi

Alumni lumped

the

Feb. 16 at the recreation centre

shot eieii liaidcr

^

I,

cos finally rospoiidcd 10

when Tanja

Percival

beat the out of- position

Alumni

later

go out and have a

good time, but still' play good, competitive soccer,” she said. "W'hen we have to step it up. we Wiih

the

clinches the

Win the .Miimni number one seed in

the playoffs and will he able to rcla-K imiil their is

the

next game, which

semifinals,

slaied

lor

Condors defeat Guelph despite fatigue

You’ll have to excuse the women’s indoor soccer team for their sloppy first-half performance

Guelph on

Feb. 16 at the recreation centre.

The Condors were a tired squad and it took them a half to overcome their fatigue, coach Geoff Johnstone

said.

“A lot

of these girls have played 21 games in the last three weeks,” said Johnstone.

The team played in three tournaments in just over two weeks, as weU as playing their regular Tuesday league games, where they now hold a record of

Ang Papazotos in

of the Condors blasts a shot at the Guelph goalie a game Conestoga won 5-0, Feb. 1 6 at the recreation centre.

9-1-4.

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

Even though the team was fatigued and didn’t play

up to their

regular standards in the first half,

when

it

ended the Condors held a

because they weren’t doing what he wanted with their passing and defending. “I

had some words for them at because they were

2-0 lead.

half-time

only took the Condors 52 seconds to notch the first goal of the game.

playing sloppy, “ Johnstone said.

It

Danny of

Sirio blasted the first goal

the

game

into

comer of the net. At that point it seemed the

the

was quick

to lead her

team

and scored her second goal of the game before a minute had been played.

She converted on a nice bank

game might be a blowout, with

pass from Papazotos off the wall.

Condors scoring so early and facing a team with only two wins in 13 tries. But

it

mark

wasn’t until the 14-minute

that the

Condors put another

goal on the board.

and Jen Melnyk passed the back and forth and finally

Sirio ball

Sirio

out of the gate in the second half

as though

the

dished off to

Ang

made no mistake

Papazotos,

who

in putting the

ball past the keeper.

words for the

girls

Eleven

minutes later Sirio completed her hat trick by capitalizing on a Guelph turnover and slipping the ball past the

at

the half

shutout with Rebecca Miller,

game.

While the injury

more

make the final 5-0. Stephanie DenHaan shared

for precaution than anything

bug still seems to be following the Condors. Also missing from the lineup were Karen Melanson with an ankle injury, Beth Taylor

who was and Sasha Gruetzmacher who has a knee injury. sick

Johnstone said he thinks he

knows how

chase that bug. “Something’s telling me we need

rested

slipped the ball past the

DenHaan

else, the injury

Jen Melnyk finished the scoring with a marker of her own with

goalie to

to

wasn’t serious, and she came out

rest

six-minutes remaining in the game. Taking a pass through the middle from Rebecca Little,

who

took over when DenHaan injured her ankle midway through the

keeper.

Melnyk

Johnstone said he had a few

J

after

the

reading

week

layoff and a first-round bye in the

playoffs,

a result of finishing

second in the league.

The team next

sees action in the

second round of the playoffs on the

March 16

USED CD 385 Fairway Road S

to

more than anything,” he said. The Condors should be well

at the recreation centre.

KITCHENER (Conadian Tire Plaza)

n

!

!

try to

By Brian Smiley

in a 5-0 victory over

j

j

aaid

a half,

make

While Ford emphasized it was important to have fun while playing, she said the team is able

Amy

'Veow^i sewed the Alumni’s first goal at the eight-minuic mark of the llr'if half on a nice individual eftori.

left in

Andrea

to rise to the occasion,

“We. were a little fired and banged up from the loiimameni, so

game

tap in. to

George Brown College the previous weekend and finishing was nice

from

Heroux concluded the scoring on a nice

After coming off a tournament

it

the

from the Leos defender and

the

said

up

slammed it by the goalie. With just over a minute

fdf

l-'ortl

moved

Olson

.at

.'Vlailenc

in

midfield to the goal area, stole the

defending champs.

second, coach

left

game.

impuivcs to 11-0-3 and ihev ha\e dinched fir«.i place in recoid

games

i

under three minutes

With the win the Alumni ’s

plajoffs and

at 3-

Olson put the game out of

reach w'hcn she scored with just

at the recreation centre.

1

net.

Leos

who

[

^ empty

That goal seemed to spark the

(AiToss^oniMd}onQ«s)

1


— SPOKE, March

Pane 14

8,

1999

ENTERTAINMENT

Rushmore adds new face

to

comedy

By Brent Clouthier

craziness felt by a middle-aged

man who

befriends a teenager as

an act of redemption.

Comedy,

the best of times,

at

The

should amuse an audience because it reveals a truth about the absurdity of

human

something they try to regain through each other: Max, his mother; Cross, her late husband; and Blume, his life. The audience doesn’t laugh at each individual’s pathetic situation, but with them in the true sense of sympathy. Everyone can remember being there at one point or another. Rushmore's laughs may not • always be out loud, but the lost

nature and

Rushmore, a new Wes Anderson, probes into these conditions and reveals the bittersweet weaknesses at the heart of human beings. everyday

life.

film from director

Fifteen-year-old thinks

Academy

going is

Max

Fischer

Rushmore

to

the end-all-and-be-all

of his existence. That is, until he falls in love with Miss Cross (Olivia Williams), a primary grade teacher at the school.

humour sticks with the viewer long after the film is over. Anderson takes the audience on a

bittersweet

After his

mentor, and Rushmore alumni,

Max

Herman Blume

tells

to success is to

do one thing

nostalgic walk

the key

paradoxes of teen existence, the need to be recognized as an adult but lacking the experience which makes one so. Max may be involved in every brilliantly portrays the

only,

and to do it well. He sinks all his time and energy into winning Miss Cross’s heart. When Blume himself falls for Cross, Max goes over the edge and uses all means at

Blume. Newcomer Jason Schwartzman, son of Rocky's Talia Shire,

characters are tragic rather

than goof-ball cut-outs. Each has

activity Rushmore open to Academy, but he’s also the worst

of love, which sparks the humour of the film. He may be a

a

dramatic

illustrating

but Max is master of none. In sharp contrast is Herman Blume, a wealthy industrialist who

comparable to Robin Williams. Blume is a broken man who may have the world, but hates himself and the life he’s created, trapped in a loveless marriage and father of twin boys who are the worst

jack-of-all-trades,

sees

in

Max

a

younger

his

version of himself. Bill Murray, in

human

yearning to be considered an expert in every field, including the

a role tailor-made for him, pulls

just a wrinkle of an eye,

off the performance of his career,

relates

his disposal to destroy

student at the school.

Scared

It

is

depth

art

With Murray the desperation and

beings imaginable. all

and

makes

down them

lover’s lane

laugh at themselves rather than the developmentally challenged or gross-out

gags.

Rushmore

emerges a heart-warming winner in a field where comedy comes at everyone else’s expense but our own. 1

234s

Gotta get a message out?

Silly

Advertise

in

Spoke

and we reach as many as 5,000 readers weekly. Classified ads (up to 25 words) can be run by students for only $5 ($10 for non-students) which means it will cost you only 1/10 of a cent to tell each reader about the wonders of that old guitar.

Our

rates are reasonable

Give us a (Cash up

front; deadline is 10 a.m.

748-5366.

Monday, one week prior to publication)

DSA. Now Hiring Executive Positions

Phaedrus Geluk, Tressa Morrish and Britman Rapai are emotionally overwheims«3. during a screening of Urban Legends for DSA's Movie Night. First-year graphic design students

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrtdor)

call at

.

‘f

Positions Availabie HELP IS A VAILABLE!

HIRE

A TUTOR! APPL Y IN STUDENT SER VICES (2B02)

^§l?Iices

Entertainment Manager

Promotions Assistant (4) Applications available at the

DSA

Office

Application Deadline Thursday,

March

18, 4:30 p.m.


SPOKE, March

ENTERTAINMENT

TLC album By Judy Sankar After

more than three years, TLC

Boz” Watkins

drew

first

After

featuring

Tip,

.

.

On

the

TLC Silly

TLC

The

took a different

approach from their fun-loving

why

will be apparent

It

the song

is

so impressive.

Although Fanmail consists mostof fast, hip-hop songs like those

ly

already

mentioned,

slow Miss You So

love

Another example of the futuristic sound is Lovesick. The song

their return in

begins with a tune generated from

Come On Down, prove that TBoz, Left Eye and Chilli have

a phone’s busy signal and dialing

strength in ballads as well.

the release of

it is

not the

first

tones. This forms a

background rh)dhm of the song which discuss-

The song, which was an instant hit, sends the message out that some women are independent

What About Your

girls

Ho, although

many

to the lyrics.

girls

single.

second album release, was exactly that.

annoimced

group.

the

to

a computer-gener-

of the album’s songs including Silly Ho.

of

release

mid December with

the

CrazySexyCool, TLC’s

Friends.

the

is

ated animation featured on

sold 10 million albums.

world’s attention with their first

album, Oooooh:

Virtual Vic-e

Light Special.

CrazySexyCool in 1994, the

member

fourth

demeanor Creep and Red

laid-back

yet

with songs like

emerge once again with Fanmail (LaFace), an album solely dedicated to every TLC fan. Rozanda “Chilli” Thomas, Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes and Tionne “T-

— Page 15

dedicated to fans worldwide

debut album and took on a more erotic

1999

8,

es being left for another person.

of February, proving that TLC has-

The album’s first single. No Scrubs, came out at the beginning

n’t lost its touch.

No

Scrubs has

also been a success receiving heavy radio play on mainstream R

and Dance stations. With Fanmail, TLC reveals a transition that combines both of the first albums with a futuristic

plays with

tempo.

by the addition of a

song,

called

Unpretty,

should receive extra recognition for the

comes

message

it

conveys.

It

I

Much

and

should be noted that executive

It

on Fanmail include Antonio “LA” Reid and Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds.

producers

Any

TLC will by no be dissapointed with Fanmail. While the album posfan of

means

a different sound to

its

the heavy use

of

sesses

One

’n B,

feel explained

Good

at Being Bad, TLC tempo jxamps. The song switches between a slow mellow tempo and an upbeat hip-hop

In I’m

and won’t be taken advantage of

songs like

predecessors,

computer-generated

makes

it

sounds,

perfect for the present.

off as a lighthearted tune in

the technical perspective but listen

Just kickin’

234

1

5

cmHfmut Page 1

it!

X:>

*^C6mputer glitch

disrupts

usaae Just

when

Clayfield

was

back on and con-

able to log

tinue working, toe computers

would .shut down again. "1 ended up going to the computer services and was told to wait

a half an hour to and log back on to -the computci,” she said. try

Renee

won a It

Jade

trip

to

Panama (Pherto

Ra„lat

City,

"

Aster’s, Peb. 3.

^

.

Meanwhile, back upstairs in

by Bizafjefi Sackrider)

tlie

Win niii^acatlciiiwas

SPOKE

lab, deadline for

production day was drawing closer as toe computer serv-

worked frantiand reconnect the

ices technician

fate foFstudint

printer.

By

ElizalNstb Sackrider

receive a ticket

When asked if she wanted to go to

cally to try

Conestoga Night at Jack

Renee Maephee was She was tired and

Astor’s,

reluctant.

didn’t feel like going. “I wasn’t

I

go and drive everybody,” said the general

arts

student.

At

vsere

The

lottery proved to

be a

.Maephee

who

solution

for

the last minute she

hopped and headed towards Jack Astor’s for a good time and won a free trip. Maephee was'ftie winner of Brealmway Tours free March in her car

over the holidays.

ail

took almost an hour to get computers up and running

again.

^

Now

that she

some plans she 'decided to ask someone to go with her. “Everyone at the bar was asking me who I was going to take,” she said. “The bartenders has

offered

me

free drinks to take

After

some

friends, Kristine Stillar instead.

since

other 150 people in attendance to win the top on Feb. 3.

“We were so excited, we were hopping around,” she said. To win, each person at Jack a number to be entered in a draw for the vacation. However, Maephee didn’t

YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE

careful considera-

of the bartender’s offer, she opted to take one of her girl-

tion

w^s on her side when she decided to go. She beat out the Fate

NEED HELP WITH YOUR HEALTH?

them,”

Break top to Panama City, Fla.

Astor’s received

It

a second-year graphic arte studertt, takes a break from class to play hackey sac outside Door 6 on Feb. ^0 when the tempemture was an unseasonably mild $ C. Photo by Jeanette Evera#

handed out. “The tickets were at another table and I jumped,” she said.

wasn’t sure what do with herself

going to go because

couldn’t drink, but I decided to

first-year

when th^

have to pay her way Breakaway only furnishes

Stillar will

We &

toe ticket for one.

-

information

Maephee said going to Florida for March break and getting away from toe cold and snow

-

first

-

non-prescription medications

-

a place to rest

be worth it “The hotel is by toe ocean and is si^posed to be gorgeous,” said Maephee.

can provide:

advice

-

aid

-

when you

arc

ill

allergy injections

blood pressure monitoring

-

birth control counselling

-

pregnancy testing

will

VISIT

OUR OFFICE LOCATED

INSIDE

DOOR

#3,

DOON CAMPUS

,


— SPOKE, March

Page 16

CD By

8,

1999

release of Aura a success you?

Eileen Diniz

my

1

my fear from

can’t separate

What do you see when you look upon me? Do you feel envy? Do you despise me?” hate.

Derivation’s debut CD, Aura, was released Thursday, Feb. 8 at the Metropolis Nightclub in downtown Kitchener. Brooke Parry’s tremendous

These are lyrics from Ancient which was written on the day of the group’s recording

vocals backed up by the band’s

session.

outstanding instrumental genius

called

Killer

put on a dazzling performance.

frenetic

baseline

1

Derivation

Brooke Parry, lead

is

vocals; Olaf Szester, drums; Chris

Pepper, bass; Wojtek Kubicki, lead guitar;

and Rolland Sike, rhythm

History,

was

It

During

show

the

members of the She told of the time they

band.

also includes a

It

from

intro

rhythm

guitarist Sike.

“What do I

see

when I look upon

Parry

singing ability as well as funny

Aura was mixed and recorded in Toronto in 20 days over a

screaming

by

crowd with her

entertained the stories about the

guitar solo.

the

to

delivered

Pepper.

guitar.

seven-month period. Parry paraded around with the greatest confidence and it was well deserved. Her vocal sound caimot be compared; she is unique and gifted. Parry sings with the deep emotion that allows the listeners to feel what she feels. The band was also remarkable in their performance and they had a good time with the fans. Parry and the guys in Derivation are what great music is made of Their sound has been described on a Derivation fact sheet as a unique style of productive pop rock that is captivating, enchanting and redeeming. The song Drop features Wojtek’s first ever one-take backward

originally

due

were playing at Lee’s Palace in Toronto and Kubicki unplugged himself right in the middle of his guitar

solo.

Then she made

of Sike asking why a fan handed her a beanie bat during their song Bats are a joke

Blind.

thought the concert went well because we’ve never had such a huge amount of people at one of our shows “I

really

before,” said Szester. “Overall

it

was our CD release party and was pretty happy with the way

it

I

Brooke

CD

Parry, lead singer for Derivation, at the Metropolis Nightclub release party of the band’s debut album. Aura.

Parry

was

also

the turn-out.

“A

were

she

there,”

happy lot

with of people

“We

said.

sold lots of CD’s and T-shirts so we’re extremly happy.”

She said the performance was more about pleasing the crowd and having a good time compared to playing everything perfectly.

“It

was our night

to have fim,”

“Working on more songs is one priority,” said

my number

said Parry.

In the near future Parry said she

hopes Derivation can expand into some mellow techno music. She also hopes to get started on new songs for their second album, play lots of shows and sell more CD’s.

on

feet

Parry.

that

who

Derivation

didn’t

realize

would

go

far so fast said he also wants to work on new songs and make another QD. He said if is the band’s main concern this

future we will get a record contract so we can keep evolving.”

Conestoga replied with a

goal by Brian Anderson.

Traynor responded just over a

minute

Sault Cougars, a loss that sent

with his second goal

later

of the game, banging in a loose

frustrating

puck from the

six-game losing streak.

Now

“I hoped for what we have now and we have it,” said Szester. “I also hope in the

after,

was over four months ago that by the a

and the fans will eventually need new music from them to

doormat

I

the Condors were beaten

on

for the

(ppoto by Eileen Diniz)

listen to.

Szester

By Charles Kuepfer

Conestoga

downtown Kitchener

went.”

Condors wipe It

in

the Condors are poised to

Sault

front of the net.

managed

to cut into the

take a crack at the Ontario college

lead just past the halfway point of

hockey championship while the Cougars are reduced to playing

the period.

for pride.

and worked

They gained

control of

the puck behind the Condors’ net

The Condors handeded Sault

Pagnotta

12th loss of the season beating them 4-2 at Conestoga’s

out into a waiting

it

who notched

his second

their

goal of the game.

But Conestoga held on

recreation centre on Feb. 19.

the

For the Condors it was a big win as they try to secure a playoff

to

win

4-2.

Cougar coach John Becanic was happy with his team’s play despite

spot.

Bob

Condors’ assistant coach

game

the loss.

we

had to make sure they kept the guys focused for the game. “Not being the strongest team in the league you can have a

was playing with a short bench

tendency to take the game a

broke his thumb again during the

Hayward

“I thought

said they

well,”

of only

Hayward said the Condors played a more disciplined game

Ramsey period.

Hanlon, #16, and Mike Traynor, #15, combined for a scoring opportunity early in a game at the rec centre on Feb. 19.

in

the

first

The Condors tamed the Cougars 4-2

than they did against Seneca two

(Photo by Chales Kuepfer)

room

still

for

improvement. “There’s

a

who

are caught

up

bad

penalties.

We

of in

guys

(taking)

have

to

on these guys and get them to focus on the game.” Hayward said he wants his players on the ice and not in

pull the reins in

and

try

the penalty box. “That’s the only

couple

flu

Although the Cougars have a dismal

to

win the

provincials,”

said

Hayward, “(with) five guys on the

Mike Traynor put Conestoga up 1-0 with just under five minutes left in

three-goal lead after stepping out

the

of the penalty box and finding

opening frame with Jeff White

himself going one-on-one with

scoring on a breakaway.

the Farkas. However, he couldn’t

again with 37 seconds

On

ice.”

the first period, wristing in

a shot from the top of the faceoff circle past the screened

Cougar

The Condors

struck

goaltender.

way we’re going

of

Conestoga’s the

first

second

Brown was robbed Farkas, the

made

left in

power-play

period,

puck under the sprawling

nctminder.

Becanic

their

sees

remaining

games. “We’re playing

strictly for the

sake of pride,” said Becanic.

Meanwhile collected the

year

the

their

ninth

Condors win of

and continue to be hottest teams in

Stephen

After neither team managed to

goaltender,

score in the second, the Cougars

the

struck quickly in the third on a

of January. They are unbeaten

goal by Eugene Pagnotta. Shortly

in their last six

after

Sault’s

Paul

slide the

in

2-12-1

of

record

(Won-lost-tied),

meaning

nights earlier, but he noted that is

some of and one who

players,

game.

too light,” said Hayward.

there

12

who

Becanic,

which had the

little

played extremely

said

a big pad save.

Greg Devos nearly made

it

a

one

of the

league since the beginning

games.


Digital Edition - March 08, 1999