Page 1

Woodworkers

shop

talk

By Neven Mujezinovic Woodworking Canada

‘99, host-

ed by Conestoga College on Feb.4, was a great success. “It

went off practically without a according to Mark

hitch,”

Forgeron,

co-ordinator

of the

woodworking-technician gram. “The response

pro-

was

absolutely terrific.”

The feedback from students and industry people has been extremely

positive,

said

“Students want

it

to

Forgeron.

happen again

next year. They weren’t aware of important an event this was

how

going to be.”

The dean of technology at Conestoga, Michael McClements, was a day unlike any liis

“I have not yet seen a day quite

one

in

many

parties

industry

interested

together

brought as

said

place,”

He added from

McClements.

students’ standpoint there

the

was not

going to be a better opportunity to talk to potential employers.

The day included a competition woodfor students, meetings for industry associations, information sharing and product

working

from the

displays

V vy,. ,au, biuueni co-orainator tor tne woodworking less-power jigsaw.

About 50 booths

t*|»

t*y

represented by their human resources personnel who took

had two booths set up to promote the woodworking program to College

Conestoga

students,

potential

a

Cronsberry, officer,

industry.

at the booths.

resumes

also

Leisa

says

college

liaison

who was manning one

Canada

’99 event,

of

there were several high school students as well as teachers, showing an interest in

was good, as

the program.

Another highlight of the event

blue cafeteria.

industry

The general forum showcased guest speaker, Camille Roberge of

employers

Formation Success Detail Inc. Speaking to more than 150

because a happy employee is the one that will do the best work and

and industry up the room members, Roberge

have the best attitude. Wrtndwnrkine

faculty

students,

lit

had

ber.

“A

lot

good cause,”

of people thought

we

were crazy.”

The night started at 4:30 p.m. and was ended at 8:30 a.m., when The

activities

off.

included

end up going

would “I

oase 10

bed

to

until

all

the

it

for sleep, not

was time

retain

“1 only

Melissa

step outsidewhile still sleeping bags at the winter camp-out Feb. 4.

McShane and Diana Abernethy in their

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

heat.

had on a heavy sweater, sweat

ski pants

curled up

body

wasn’t cold,” said Campbell.

jacket,

shirt,

and two

flannel RI’s,

pairs of socks.”

Nestled inside a huge army tent borrowed by a studeni involved in the military reserves, the group

hauled sofas out of the Sanctuary to use as beds.

said

CBSA mem-

a rash of pagers went

.

coats and hats and anything that

to

in sponsorship

Laurie Campbell, a

.

for,

group used a substantial number of blankets, a large number of

selves to the elements of winter. for a

.

what

the campers curled up into their sleeping bags. To keep warm the

who

before they could subject them-

was

is

looking

are

an ounce of flesh was exposed as

the streets.

“It

Happiness, said Roberge,

When

assists in getting kids off

$20

or in any other

2 a.m.”

and to raise money for ROOF (Reaching Our Outdoor Friends).

Each.\t)f the participants

retail

was happiness.

freeze for charity

Man

raise af least

message, as well. The that the key to

serious

success in

Winter on a blustery night, Feb. 4, to have a good time

BVGE11

constant outbursts of laughter can attest, the presentation had a

forums, which took place in the

Fifteen souls took arms against

ROOF

was delivered in a which to

fashion,

message was

could brave the cold.

Condtas

it

humorous

didn’t

worthy challenge for those

Leos. 1-L

Although

was the general and industry

With the temperature hovering around -10 C, the annual DSA winter camp-out proved to be a

tfe

cord-

by Neven Mujezinovic)

Elizabeth Sackrider

Old

checks out a new

an opportunity to talk to people from the field and ask them questions. Many companies were

Campers By

wore: sot

various industry companies and had Students associations.

college.

like this one, that

^uuy

regular

camping

traditions like a

marshmallow toast and weinie roast, some guitar playing- and a little

bit

“They Elmo,”

all

beat up Tickle

said

Kristi

business student and

Some

of the

activities

watch a

of rough-housing.

Me

Mason,

DSA

class

When

representative. less

traditional

included going inside to

movie and

to play a

video

game.

“We were entire

inside and outside the

night,”

said

Mason. “We

the

first

rays

of sun

appeared on the horizon and the night was

over,

most campers

were glad they had participated. “I’d go again next year only

would bring more

I

sleeping bags,”

concluded Campbell.


PaRe

2

— SPOKE, Ffb.

15,

IW8

NEWS

Candidates’ posters defaced

DSA officer wants By Jaime Clark

hung

were

around

college and a large

A large number of posters promoting the candidates in the Student Doon upcoming Association (DSA) elections have Candidates’ been defaced. pictures have been scanned and derogatory and distorted comments have been written on some.

Mike

Harris,

chief returning

Harris said his reaction is

knows this kind of on in elementary

goes school but he didn’t anticipate

thing

he write

program do-ordinacan be told about it and disciplinary action will be taken. culprits, their

tor

Harris

was surprised

at

how

quickly the original posters were

taken

down and

distorted images.

replaced with the

About 55 posters

it

wants a

the

campaign

the

election

running

were acclaimed (Ellen Menage, DSA president; Jenn Hussey,

vice-president of and Steve Coleman, vice-president of student affairs) will still be participating in the speeches and Harris hopes about 20 per cent of the student

the

operations;

serious

Harris said the culprits could be banned from all DSA activities and the incident would be reported to their program co-ordinator.

population turns out to vote.

“Hopefully

Harris said while the altered

next

week,

we

everything will go smooth,

may

created have publicity for the campaign, it also reflects negatively on the election

Mike Harris, DSA chief returning officer, would like to see the people who defaced candidates’ posters make anonymous

process.

apologies.

,

is

tions

at

apology. If that doesn’t happen,

posters

posters, Harris said

process

smoothly. Candidates whose posi-

college.

to

the

“This

Harris said he

said

in

is:

college, we’re adults.”

Harris

staff turns

ously did it with school resources because it was done in the same day (as the posters were posted),” he said. Other than the disfigurement of

as they noticed them.

offenders

If cafeteria

of time on

changed the same day the posters went up. DSA members took down the defaced posters as soon

saw people taking down the posters and knows who the culprits are.

“Obviously, somebody’s got a lot their hands. They obvi-

the

number were

officer for the election, said cafeteria staff

apologies for vandalism

(Photo by Jaime Clark)

won’t have any more problems,” he said. “We want to have a good, fair election.”

Conestoga joins Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program

School board forms partnership with college By Lisa Wilhelm Conestoga College and the Waterloo Region District school board signed an agreement governing apprenticeship training in the motive power trades on Feb 4. in the Guild Room at Conestoga. Under the agreement, students from high schools within the school board who earn sufficient secondary school credits grades 11 and 12 in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) will be able to continue their

m

theoretical apprenticeship trainin g in automotive service technician,

program,” said Barfoot. The signing of the articulation agreement opened with a welcome

from Hans

at

Conestoga or any

other college in Ontario.

According

to

consultant

of

a good program

“It is

the experience, said Massengale. “It

schools are providing

but it

gives students

Duncan,

and

Haskell signed

McClements

the

to see

I

was

in a

articulation

agreement following

the speeches.

Currently,

there

are

approximately 30 students at Glenview Park and Kitchener Waterloo collegiate who will be eligible for the exemption under tbi.Q aareempnt

I

want to

inspire

HAS YOUR

young women

TLOAF

said.

initiative to finish this

pro-

gram.” Linda Barfoot, consultant of Region District school board

ago as

a pilot project.

App, who works at Marden Motors in Kitchener, said he has had a fairly good experience with the OYAP program and it gives

LOST ITS TACTC IMv I

students a chance to encounter

world problems in the shop. “It’s a good program because a student can go out and actually experience the trade before committing themselves to it,” App real

said.

a good program because the high schools are providing

involved in the program, as well as the guest speakers.

colleges with students and it gives students initiative to finish this

Christine

“It is

apprenticeships at Conestoga.

to seek a career in this field,” she

experimental

started three years

was plain

man’s world and sometimes the physical elements challenged me,

colleges with students

and

Owner/Manager of Galt Chrysler Dodge; Patti Haskell, director, Waterloo Region District school board and Mike McClements, dean of technology, trades and

get a head start in the field with

because the high

learning at the school board, this

program

who

a great opportunity for the future. It was a chance to gain first-hand experience from professionals and

at

He

experimental learning, Waterloo

Linda Barfoot,

program. Massengale,

OYAP

then introduced representatives from the school board and the high schools

Conestoga.

of

directly into the intermediate level

of training

collegiate institute

students involved with the

works at Downtown Automotive in Kitchener, said she found out about the program in Grade 9 and thought getting involved would be

Zawada, chair apprenticeship and trades

truck and coach technician, farm

equipment mechanic and heavy equipment mechanic. This can be done by entering

App, Kitchener

Two of

these guests

included

Massengale and

R.J.

Other speakers

who commended

program included Henry Duncan, Ministry of Education and Training; Angelo Longo, the

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SPOKE, Feb.

Marketing team

15,

1998 -

Page 3

next year

will try for third victory

Conestoga to host year 2000 college marketing competition By Jeanette

Everall

included Bernadette Giet, Maria

Lacko, Jen MacKinnon, Ambrose Garvey, Hulya Erol, Lisa

After winning two years in a row,

Conestoga’s

marketing-

team

competition

chance to

will

get

strut their stuff at

Cashmore, Michelle Sebastian, Sheila Jackson, Kristi Meyer, Kathrine Crespo and Joaime Scott.

a

home

in next year’s Ontario Colleges’

The announcement Conestoga will host

first

that

about the competition

Ambrose Garvey

governor’s meeting.

December 1999 competition

year’s

marketing

is

start

said

over,

win.”

will be in of planning the event, however, organizing the

charge

fimd-raising and other preliminary

marketing

to go,” said Reyner,

we are going who expects

250

to participate

to

300 students

Members of board

at the Jan.

to

college

The team members on the winning marketing team include back row, left to right, Bernadette Giet, Maria Lacko, Jen MacKinnon, Ambrose Garvey, Hulya Erol, Lisa Cashmore and Sheila Jackson! Front row, left to right, Kristi Meyer, Kathrine Crespo, Michelle Sebastian and Joanne Scott.

winning award to

(Photo by Jeanette Everall)

26 meeting.

ultimate

test

students

of knowledge for

taking

part

the

in

Last year proved to

competition.

Conestoga team

who

also

won

The win was a

result

of hard

students

said

support,

the

is

LASA teacher

By

having put so

work

into the competition,” said

who won

first

the fact that a lot of us were in the

Garvey.

"^

Bob Hays, a former faculty the law attd secmity member

m

;

program,

administration

i

expected to return

is

home from

'

13.

recently retired but

academic year when the stroke occurre4 is constantly improving, according to Susan

this

Hrntiey,*

winners are presented.

team.

members

team

Conestoga’s

1961, and

“He

is

side, but

When

it

won’t occur again

proees|

the

in

co-authoring a book on criminal

and civil law that will he used 1^ students in

“He Ims

tiie

pre^am.

it all

stored iqj in

said. “He down on paper.”

memory,” Hartley has to get

it all

hk just

he

still

moon

occurred

second will

its

,

moon

full

single

calendar

moons

is

month

is

as a

says

of Waterloo. interval

between

about 29.5 days,

roughly 30.5 days.

no

that there is

moon occurring What makes this

special (Staff photo)

is

that

that

regarding the significance

will

p.m.

and

have two

in every century, so

once in a blue

full

saying once in a while, it wasn’t used in terms of astronomy until as late as 1946.

On March

moons

you could say

moon

While the expression, blue moon, dates back to at least Shakespeare’s time, as a way of

once every 2'lj years,” says

in February.

year

more

year in which a

last

double blue

moon

occurred was

The

sight

is

DSA Slum^e'

Party

Thurs. Feb. 25

The Sanctuary Sign

just

take

a

something you only

see “once in a blue moon.”

1999 has two blue

moons. The

31

look up.

actually

possibility of a

blue

Bob Hays.

10:50

31,

average, there will be 41

months

Mann

to occur in a

month,”

it very unlikely that any given month will contain two full moons, though it does sometimes happen,” says Mann adding

result

March

it.

means

This makes

up strength,” said Hartley of

would do it again was that much fim.”

It

the

to

Robert Mann, professor of physics at the University

block

that

What is a blue moon? “A blue moon refers second

occur around

“On

while the length of an average

needs to build

of the stroke. Although Hays uses a wheelchair now. Hartley said he hopes to eventually be walking with the aid of a cane. “He still needs support in both

and

31,

“The average

his right

Hays who was paralyzed

you

In fact,

already.

it

blue

first

Jan.

full

faculty.

movement on

1999’s

literally.

seen

occur on March 3 1

of^,

According to Mann, the next

should be visible unless clouds

came from

I

tomorrow.

of blue moons.

from? In 1999, you can see where

may have

didn’t

a blue moon?

is

blue moon, on

on

stroke occurred, he

tile

continuing to progress

in getting

certainly heard

member of the

another

law and security

:

the**!

was

was still teaching until the end of

!

m

after suffering a stroke in his

Hays, who

wants to be involved

and we had worked

At the ceremony, individual awards as well as the overall

the phrase “once in a blue moon.” But where did the phrase come

it

Alftiough still

continuing educatitm program..^.

Cambridge home on Nov. ‘

Hartley.

Memorial Cambridge Hospital at the end of the monfih

the

I

in the future,” said

some time

class

we know each other,” said Sebastian. ’’But when we went down there we became a

the heck

You have almost

front

same

.

.

By Judy Sankar

and back, but he sees walking on his own coming

Lisa Wilhelm

was

competition.

feels

much hard

after

Ambrose

until 2018.

f

that I love

really

What

Improving after stroke

“The main thing

together (on class projects), but

Ever wonder

Retired

partner

her

The awards banquet is held at the end of the second day of the

of

feeling

the

is

place in the Entrepreneurial Case

who

with

wins the competition. Conestoga’s victory was the resu.lt of team effort, said S e'b a st i am

celebration after the awards are

Kathrine Crespo,

work, team effort and faculty event

calculated from from individual events and the highest team sum is

earned

competition

accomplishment the team

the

1997 competition.

compete against other marketing teams in

two-day

Sales

attended the competition. “What’s more important than the

presented

be another successful year for the

Ontario.

The

the

score to decide the

final

points

competition, held The in November 1998 by Durham College in Oshawa, was an opportunity for Conestoga’s 11 -member

team

in

The

this year’s

^oa»*

with Crespo,

place

winning team

in next year’s competition.

tca.171

finish

first

competition.

competitions in the past have looked to corporate support. I think that’s the route

first-place

won

Also winning firsts for the team were Lisa Cashmore and Bernadette Giet in the Retail Case

1999.

the

Garvey,

Presentation event.

planning for the event will begin

May

adds, “All the

any pressure on us to along with his

didn’t put

member

faculty

“Traditionally,

that the

amount of effort to get us there and then when we got there they

after this

Deborah Reyner, who

in

is

faculty involved put in an extreme

Planning for the event won’t imtil

in

Interview

faculty believe in the students.

26 board of

the Jan.

at

Job

the

in

competition, said the best thing

the

competition in the year 2000 was

made

who came

Michelle Sebastian,

Marketing Competition (OCMC).

Up at the DSA Office


Jordan or no Jordan, basketball fans Well,

care about what

of the 29 franchises playing.

only

it

took an extra

Before the season even began,

six

months, but

there have been several factors to

the

1998-1999

make

go down

it

in the history

was going

on.

to rest

when on Sunday,

just

the

Feb. 7,

on

of

the

day

third

say

1

But broadcasters’ fears were put

that

because

it

emotion-filled

his

was

speech

retirement

could not have been

books as one of the most eventful

season, the majority of stadiums

seasons.

reported selling between 90 to 95

world did not care when

per cent of

announced

Never before have fans waited

Melissa

tipped

iDietrich

finally

off on Feb.

such a long time for a season to begin. During the lockout, there

came

5.

what promises to be a strenuous and compact season for the players, the first night had 24 For

where many sports they worried

a point

announcers

said

about

fate

the

because

it

of basketball

seemed that fans did not

Coping with the How

do you

Basically,

This question

has

I

philosophers centuries.

It is

difficult to

define what

my

said grabbing

not?”

I

asked,

getting

rather angry.

and I were driving downtown to browse in the used friend

record store,

when we became

invovled in heated debate on the issue.

“Because

reality

experience. For example, in

my

know

was

opinion,

1

was

driving the

real

the car

because

seat underneath

I I

could

me,

I

my

I

have a boyfriend.”

A

Bam! slammed

large

into

now

“What?”

had suggested reality for an individual is what they presently I

feel

my

Mac face.

truck

A

stammered through

I

laughter.

“His name

By

is

time

this

overtaken

my

Tears rolled like rain

Lucas,” he began.

my

emotions had

system.

down my cheeks

on a windowpane.

smiling yet crying at the

and

time.

could see

it.

Spoke SPOKE

is

new

existed for me.

could touch the steering wheel I

go on

hand, “I don’t want to date

“Why

is not.

My

coffee,

your friend.”

is

was same

I

appears that the fans have

Another factor

to

unforgettable season

make

this

had become obvious that the

over; sports fans

and hockey

an

would be the

the attention of the

games.

will only

is,

it

be 50 games this season, even though the best player of all

which came

time

is

no longer a

threat to the

of the teams, the fans have

rest

welcomed open

game back

the

with

wallets..

homosexuaiity silent type

and very masculine.

passed and I grew accustomed to seeing gay people when I went to the “big city.”

definition they

Now,

For me, gay people had always been a line on the horizon, something you see but don’t

jiggling to the bass rhythms.

experience.

apprehension.

saw gay people all around but I had never had a personal friend who was gay. The first gay men I had encountered were in a hair salon on Yonge Street in Toronto. I was only 15, and coming from a small farming community in rural Ontario, I had never witnessed the outright flamboyancy of these men. Their behavior confused and bewildered me. Every man I had had contact with was the strong.

fine with homosexuals, at least

I

watched them on the dance floor with a sence of amusement and

from a

I

thought

I

I

left

It

was

issue first

in

my

everyday

To me, gay people were to

be perfectly honest,

was so open about the It

wasn’t

until

I

And

realized

I

hadn’t had

friend

any

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor: Sarah Thomson;

Editor: Jaime Clark;

Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthicr; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg; Features and Issues Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy Sankar; Multi-media Editor: Neven Mujczinovic; Production Manager: Jeanette Evcrall; Advertising Manager: Janet Wakutz; Circulation Manager: Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarly; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE ’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4BI5, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

gay

is

am

I

topic,

when people any

say they don’t

prejudice

that

real

hatred begins.

Right

I

now,

experience this

real

SPOKE is mainly

Keeping Conestoga College connected

It is

have

revealed his gay identity that

best friends

feeling weird.

I

issue.

my

to

I thought I was completely open about it. At least I have admitted I am

in the

thought

you begin

when

life.

shops and clubs of Toronto.

experience the

that

and I have realized uncomfortable with the

gave gay people a second thought because I had not experienced

gay people

hand

understand.

never

I

the

it.

when you

is

One of my

the clubs

unreality.

was faced with

I

This doesn’t cut

distance.

When

were an

problem of accepting this idea. A lot of people have said, “Oh, yeah, I am okay with gay people. Hell, I watch Ellen.”

saw gay people in clubs in same-sex couples

I

By my own

contact with gays.

Time

Toronto;

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@concstogac.on.ca

to the

had football

follow.

I

coming out

appears that even though there

was enough to capture media and the

pre-season,

pushes through the rain clouds during a storm. It might still be raining outside but a rainbow will

may be because is now over that

But whatever the reason

it

shortly before the beginning of the

player Michael Jordan.

My laughing and crying were comparable to when the sun

it

was lockout was

still

speech,

Jordan’s

for.

Perhaps fans are

that the

to watch.

timely leave of Chicago Bulls

reaiity of

what you

suggested

“Elizabeth,” he

and what

real

is

my companion a date with my friend.

plagued

for

reality

know and understand. As we were having

define reality?

It

forgiven the owners and players.

desperate

football season

Basketball Association (NBA) season

at a

better time. It

something the sport was so

fans,

timely

National

their seats.

return

will

I

am

new

funded from September

to

trying

to

reality.

May by tlie Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be seht to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain

any libellous statements and

illustration

may be accompanied by

(such as a photograph).

an


SPOKE, Feb.

FEATURES AND ISSUES Students enjoy job

15,

99

— Page 5

fair

Looking for perfect job isn’t easy for students Jennifer LaForge, 21, thirdyear geography student at the University of Waterloo.

By Janet Wakutz

A

Students wandered around the

Partnerships

Employment

for

University and College Job Fair at

Bingeman’s on Feb.

looking for

3,

dent

at

Laurier

Wilfrid

and

Waterloo

University of Waterloo student in

summer

the

camp

like

the different jobs

confident; the

ing

from

represented

companies

like

hi-tech

Com-Dev

to

Tim

Horton’s.

A

wide variety oE jobs woro on offer from summer camp positions longterm career positions. Brightly coloured booths giving

to

away

consistently

freebies

like

Jeff Russell

the

jobs

different

Jon Nunn, 22, will graduate from Laurier in April with a bachelor of

job,

A

little

in the spirit for the ultimate

Nunn

said he

was looking

for

a “high-paying job with flexible

hours in the

He added that

Conestoga

work

marketing graduate

human if it

resources

was up

to

him

location too.

Two

21 -year-old managementstudents

Patty Eckstein and

employment opportunities booth. “Working with kids would open the door for a position in a teacher’s college,” she said. visiting the

at

Conestoga,

Nancy

Patty Eckstein, 21, third-year studies student

management at

Conestoga College.

Farias,

were looking for management positions with good pay. Eckstein said she was flexible about the type of company she

summer camp

booths was 21 -year-old Katherine Jackson, an economics and

would work

had

for while Farias

her sights set on the Gap.

accounting student at Laurier. “I could work summer,” she

that

would

experience

Photos by Janet Wakutz

outside all “something;

me

give

and

good

finance

my Nancy Farias, 21, third-year management studies student

continuing education.” Jeff Russell,

26,

marketing graduate

attracted the largest crowds.

stu-

dent at Wilrid Laurier.

marketing,” he said.

studies

of employers wQre

Jon Nunn, 22, business

he would be able to choose his

Also

A wide range

a

associated with advertising and

and marketing.

many

common thread was

Shoe but

like

field.”

folders full of resumes.

Some were

Factory

full-time job in advertising.

more

fingernails

didn’t take long for the

at

would

business administration.

some laughed and joked,

and others waited nervously biting and shuffling file

working

“I

a

21,

associated with advertis-

job searching.

College marketing graduate.

LaForge,

immediately entrance lines were formed.

interested students.

Conestoga

Jennifer

at

“”l

timid while others appeared more

26,

them would be well paying.

and

booths to become surrounded by

Russell,

it

Conestoga College began arriving Bingeman’s at 9:30 a.m. and

It

Jeff

find the ultimate job for the fair

visiting

Students chatted as they waited

stu-

they could

Busloads of students from the universities of Wilfrid Laurier,

to enter,

eco-

selection of students

fair said if

her third-year of geography, was

at

Katherine Jackson, 21,

job

the perfect job for them.

Guelph

nomics and accounting

random

at the

a Conestoga is

at

currently

Conestoga College.

Emotional, psychological links to eating disorders, panel says at meeting The woman explained why some

By Judy Sankar

get help.

people are afraid to “When you admit it and get help,

“When

I first

my

down

fingers

it

or

throat

starving myself for days,

think

my

began shoving I

didn’t

would beeome out of

there

is

you

that

fear

a

have

automatically

will

gain

to

just one of four people

who spoke

at

a panel discussion

on eating disorders

at the

Waterloo

Complex Feb. 4. The soft-spoken woman, who

untreated, the longer the recovery

and the less likely,” he said, adding that even after recovery, people who once suffered from an eating

to eating disorders.

reminded the audience of about 15, mostly

The

kinesiologist

females,

weight,” she said.

Panel members also included a

eating

that

occur in both

“When ing

my

I

began shov-

first

fingers

problem got so extreme

to hide her disorder

from her parents.

Now

in her 20s, the

to

other

Signs that a person

is

suffering

from an eating disorder, according to the panelists, include obsessive

register their children for a sport.

exercise,

“The longer

this condition

goes

continually

decreasing

meal portions, depression and

withdrawal from everything.

“An

eating

disorder

is

the

disorder of a perfectionist,” said

the

parent

high-aehievers

adding are

that

good

eandidates for eating disorders

because they

The

strive for the best.

reminded the numerous the community where

panelists

audience

there

agencies in

are

help can be obtained.

down my

didn’t think

Creating awareness

would become out

it

of

that she

hid plastic bags filled with vomit

under her bed

I

victim

encouraged parents to interview coaches before they

throat or starving myself for days,

disorder

fall

physical illnesses as a result.

men and women. He

Recreation

asked to remain anonymous, has suffered from both anorexia and bulemia since she was 15. The

disorders

also

control,” said the young, blonde

woman. She was

agreed that there are

emotional and psychological links

panelists

woman

control.”

Women on panel who asked

to

remain anonymous

is

recovering from her disorder with professional help.

“I

am

living

proof that you can get over an eating disorder and have a fulfilling

and wholesome

life,”

she

Although she

is

happy with her

now, she said she doesn’t

know what physical damage has been done to her body from anorexia and bulemia, and ries her.

it

wor-

a physician and a

woman whose two

daughters

suffered from anorexia. “It

said.

life

kinesiologist,

seems

the

more

concentrate on the food, the

you more

aggravated the problem becomes,” said

mother

the

emphasizing that the problem with

an eating disorder goes deeper

than

food.

much All

Lynn Robbins to Feb 7.

of student services

organized the information table

for Eating

Disorder Week, Feb.

1

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 6

15,

1999

STUDENT

LIFE

Broadcasting students By Jeanette

dream

fulfil

Everall

NYC

in his idol.

is

After the highlight of the trip was

A

radio documentary project has

turned into a dream

two

come

second-year

and Pierson spent three

over, Staub

more days

true for

broadcasting

toured

New

in

NBC

York. They

saw the Lion

studios,

King on Broadway and attended

students.

Johnny Staub and Sabrina Pierson

tapings of the Rosie O’Donnell

New York City

to interview Katie Couric, co-host

Show and Conan O’Brien show. The trip wasn’t all glamour,

of the Today Show, for a project in

however, say Staub and Pierson.

recently travelled to

their radio

The

performance spent

pair

The accommodations were

lab.

over

$1,000

than favourable, to say the

each to complete the project, a

30-60

minute

“I

biography

audio

worth 40 per cent of their

final

Sabrina.

mark.

prove

But, Staub says he would have

paid that

much just to meet

“Johnny has been Couric

Katie

says

point

Johnny Staub and Sabrina Pierson sit at the news desk York City to interview Katie Couric on Jan. 22.

Today Show during

of the

their trip to

New

(Submitted Photo)

Today Show religiously

would

“I

in

12. fall

with

asleep

and wake up to it in the morning,” he says. The Today Show has been a live program, airing from 7 a.m. the television

to

9 a.m.

No.

1

for

on

60

at night

years.

It is

show

rated television

who

America, says Staub, spent

the

year

last

also the in

has

collecting

with

a

says

day,”

have the pictures to

“I

says

where

place

the

get

people

for

At two

in the

couldn’t

that

mental

into

institutions.”

morning

ftiey

could

hear people banging on doors

Staub says he started watching

Grade

every

it.”

Staub

with

in love

forever,”

shower

to

they stayed was “like a half-way

Couric.

Pierson.

the

had

cockroach

less

least.

magazine

articles

and research on

have 20 minutes on tape of just us with her,” says Staub.

the show.

(talking)

The pair requested the interview in After about 40 phone calls to NBC, they finally

pre-interview talking

landed a five-minute interview with

taking pictures.

Couric on Jan. 22. However, Staub

chunk (of her time).” The interview aside, they learned

October 1998.

and Pierson managed

to get triple

amount of time with the star. “We were only supposed to have 10 minutes maximum and we that

“And

not

that’s

talking

more

afterwards

how

than

the

with her,

and She gave us a huge

her

to

including

do

to

a

much

got so

advice from

and

from

other

the

anyone

says. “In general,

gave us a

But

and yelling

On

lot

we met

of advice.”

meeting

obscenities.

the whole, however, the trip

was an eye-opening experience, says Pierson.

Couric

wasn’t

As for meeting Couric, Staub says was something he always knew

the only highlight of the day at

it

NBC,

he was going to do.

Staub and Pierson also got to meet two of their heroes. Sabrina met head news anchor

Ann

documentary, says Pierson.

“We

(Couric)

performers of the Today Show,” she

Curry,

whom

she admires and

Staub met co-host Matt Lauer

who

“You wake up every morning

to -

this

you

woman

feel

like

you’re married to her,” he says. ” “Meeting her was the greatest gift

Literacy lab officially opening in April By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

students with specific learning disabilities to

The

grand

opening

of

first

week

in April.

According

to

Conestoga

the

literacy lab is scheduled for the

colleges

be successful. is one of eight

participating

the

in

access

the

“By the end of this

semester,

we

lab,

staffed

one evening and one weekend a month.

New

electives

component

project.

Marian Mainland,

to

with tutors,

of

Opportunities

another

are

Learning

the

The

Project.

project co-ordinator, the literacy

will

located in room 2B22, is one of the most costly components of the Learning

$100,000 on software and equipment in that lab because the computers are all new, and we have scanners, reading machines and software for writing-support

students with the “meat” of what

programs,” said Mainland.

was previously covered

lab,

Opportunities Project,

which

funded by a $2.7 million grant from the provincial is

government.

The four-year

have,

The college project

is

to

determine the kind of services colleges can provide to help

probably

also plans to utilize

the literacy lab as a resource.

spent

community

This will provide the

community with an opportunity

courses,

strategies

success;

for student

and

specialized

employment

issues

the

for

disabled, are designed to provide

specific

learning

disabled

in

a

non-credit Workshop setting.

Mainland said the college plans to offer the courses as

an elective

during the day, beginning in May,

and as a night course through continuing education in

May

and

Su Lyttle, the computer technician associated with the Learning Opportunities Project, works on one of the new computers located in 2B22. (Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

June.

The recent hiring of an employment advisor Charlie Matjanec is another component of

the

project

that

has

recently been fulfilled.

HELP IS A VAILABLE! TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

A

5days/40 hr. (June 2-6 Guelph) TESOL teacher cert, course (or by correspondence) 1

APPL Y IN STUDENT SER VICES (2B02)

rHPeer 1

^ Services

9

responsible

for

employment disabled

teaching

issues

elective,

the

for

the

providing

transition

learning

support for specific disabled

students

entering program placements and

advising students on postgraduate

employment.

CLASSIFIEDS

HIRE TUTOR!

Matjanec who began his duties after Christmas will be

just

DAYCARE NEEDED

CONGRATULATIONS!

two children, 2 yrs. and 8 mos., in

To Matt Grahiman who has been voted best overall guy around (by

for

my home

beginning March

NOW!

info pack, Toll free:

1-888-270-2941

special Valentine’s

1.

someone,

who Call Debbie:

767-2626 Free

And a

to his special

,000s of jobs.

Available

himself)

full-time

to

is as equally lucky have such a wonderful

boyfriend

Matt Grahiman you wish you could be me


STUDENT

SPOKE, Feb.

LIFE

15,

1999

— Page 7

Speaking out about technology By Sarah Thomson

and

their success as a student, particularly a student

with a

Speak out” was the message Conestoga’s special needs services sent to students with disabilities encouraging them to participate in a national survey about the use of computers and information technologies for students with disabilities. The adaptive technology project, or Adaptech,

is the national project of this scope. Some 3,000 questionnaires were distributed across Canada. Conestoga

first

has 30 surveys and Rick Casey, special needs transicounsellor for the Learning Opportunities Project, estimated a third of them were tion

filled out the

morning of Feb.

Dawson College

3.

in Montreal,

in

co-operation carrying out the

with Concordia University, is research in partnership with the National Education Association of Disabled Students (NEADS) and the

Quebec Association of Disabled Education. The study is funded by

Students

in

the Office of

Learning Technologies under Human Resources Development Canada and by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. “It is really important for us to have our voice,” said Casey about the opportunity to participate in the Adaptech survey. It is also a chance for the students to express themselves, said Casey. “This is a real opportunity for (students with disabilities) to have a voice and an impact on those services that ultimately affect them

Rick

disability,” said Casey.

The survey was

available in alternative formats,

such as disks, so students could use voice adapters, and it was also available in large print.

The goal of the survey was to pinpoint students’ needs, get students’ opinions on v.'hat the college is doing and what they are doing well, what needs to be changed and what some of the students concerns are around funding support for repair of that equipment, said Casey. There was a whole range of questions in the survey that really get at the heart of what students with disabilities experience, said Casey. Students were selected randomly to complete the survey and included students with disabilities who

use computers and those that don’t. Conestoga has approximately 300 students with special needs.

“Generally speaking, most of the students have been more than willing to do it when they realize the importance of this,” said Casey. Coimsellors and advisors in special needs ser\ ices suspect some of the issues that will be identified m the questionnaire research will

match those they have looking forward to finding out from the research what some of the frustrations are and whether the findings of the survey validate identified.

Casey

is

special

needs services experiences Survey results will he in six months to a year.

in

respect.

thi^.

availab^.

Casey,

special needs transition counsellor for needs services looks, over the survey students with disabilities were asked to fill out. (Photo by Sarah Thomson) special

Problems

with

t

Feb. 22

-

26

Responsibility.

.

during Spring Break OON STu^

to spe-

to

acceding to Rick

cial needs,

Casey,.a specis^Jeeds transition

access a^qitive technology

Drawbacks prc^aiua

computer

tb^

^cra^b,'

the

expense of thi/^uipnient and the

avaiiabili^ of financial

resources

to ^/purchase

technology. j^^ftpipment

the

in

can come

two warn They special £

tOi

and/or tl^y can also get access

hu^ary disability to the

for students with

OSAP

Movie Niaht

and

is;

outdated depreciation

l^^l;^nd

b|, the

pr#»ncial

Casey.

$7,000 and itlhas

Servi

? t^hhh

i.sability

areas

larg& «feo^ili.3n such as Toronto and

is

that

sometimes the technological environment changes before something else is in place. About a year and half ago when the college went to a Windows environment the adaptive technology wasn’t there yet to allow students to

move from a

based system to a very

visual system with icons.

Trying to find screen readers

would

actually

identify

those icons and be able to

manipulate

‘'bption

one

is

^asey describes as the “Ideal.^" Technology changes so rapidly that special

use. It

io adaptive technology

that

Tuesday, February 16

needs ends up with

8:00 pm , The Sanctuary

a bln of etpjipment they don’t

Mississauga.

DOS

for

related expenses

Theyseoond

be of

be used

some

of

the

software that runs with the

it

makes more sense

to the student

to give

and when the

student graduates they take their

employer and

responsibility

it

is

their

system

for

upgrades, said Casey.

Special stodents

needs

who

also

serves

don’t qualify for

OSAP but they

don’t have a lot of cash to throw aroun4 said

The lab at becomes critical

Casey,

learning.

receive

For

the college for

their

people

who

they

will

often purchase a system to

work

on

at

bursaries,

home and

use the lab

while they are at school.

.

Tickets

it to

$3 students $6 guests purchase tickets at the door Free Coke

&

Popcorn


SPOkP,

Paoi S

Feh, !5,

1

^ 9 *)

get foot in the door

PAC experience helps By Sarah Thomson

Program advisory committees also run

mock

dents through

Conestoga students are encouraged to

'

participate as student representatives

on

Suggestions

stu-

from

and

faculty

the

committee members.

all

interviews, arrange

forward people to

job shadowing, sponsor awards and mentor students on projects.

sit

arc chosen in the first year of the

for

and many arc

program advisory committees represelt their classmates and to net-

the college'^

Boon

Mechanical Engineers.

The

criteria

and selection process vari^ to the next and depends

from one program

on the co-ordinator who establishes the S'tudents serving on a are committee advisory program with the meeting for responsible requirements.

committees provide

committee

''Imep^epllege^re^adhreaotpttty to eur-

at least twice a year.

There are various other events in which

rmt)

become

can

they

sm

tionof

Students

involved.

serving on the committees are always a

place.

part of the agenda and have an opportunity

The board of governors has a primary responsibility for assessing community

tives to

Program advisory' committees play a key Board exercise that

IVc^ram advisory committees batiste, promote, assess and advise. Members serve as problem identifiers and assist the

nicate students’ needs and

was a guest speaker at the woodworking forum. Woodworking a program advisory committee initiative.

Camille Roberge '99

Canada

is

'Ibcic are V' tommittee-. u,preNenling

members are not .resmay include: pn^gram

60 programs, including apprenticeships, post-diploma, part-time and certificate

for

tricted to, but

review, program effectivraaess, labour

mar-

ket chai^es/tresds, student ptacemetet, co-

educ^on, profcssiimal dewlopment, facilities' and equipment, Shidcnt

c^etafive

awards, student related

activities,

public

and

fecial

college functions

cafeteria

at

the

Feb. 4. in the

college

and i^rcsentativcs from woodworking industry come together share information and exchange ideas.

students, faculty,

College’s Collins

McConville describes the experience of

people volunteer their time to make these

committees happen, said McConville. They

bers because the college wants to

programs

are the

at

Conestoga. Close to 400

“community

in

community

sure there

col-

is

regula-

them busier during months than at any

a \ariety

Advisory committees are mandatory for

to

eiali/ed

'

the

exceptions

of plumbing

apprenticeship, motor vehicle maintenance and a small busines.-, course at Doon, all programs have an ad\ isory committee.

' iiiii

Ed

students usually

non-smoking asked, the rule

primarily

for renewal at the

security’s

is

a nuisance to

entrances.

site

and 5 are the biggest

Reese says security

discourage any smoking

tries to

around these

doors.

entering, said

end of

The board of governors appoints

problem. Both are non-smoking

enforce each day.

'

However,

and enforcing the smoking rules does take time. Hunter says Conestoga

weapon

security

smokers

in

College,

First,

unlike

Sheridan

College, doesn’t have any

smoking

rules

built

anti-

into

metres away.

move

ing regulations requires constant

pension. Faculty caught breaking

technically, receive a two-day sus-

smoking regulations can receive a week’s

print

what

about

ever happened.”

have

to

say

he says, smoking

Hofstetter,

college maintenance worker

He blames some of

it on and strong winds. people, he says, are

the required 10 1

Cliff Laurin, of the colleges’

many of the too lazy to move

security staff, says

most of the time. “(Some people) don’t want to walk a whole 20 feet from the door because they’re afraid of the wind,” says Laurin.

Len Hofstetter sweeps up cigarette butts around the college’s He says somebody must do it. (Photo by Wayne Collins)

entrances.

a

fair

number

and

and

four.

five

are

smoke-free, says Laurin, despite

number of people

the

lighting

up

Meanwhile,

of

Len

Hofstetter,

who’s worked with college main-

accompany on-campus offences. Sheridan, meanwhile, fines

tenance for five years, removes

first-time

college entrances.

offenders

$20;

second-time offenders $30 and third-time offenders $100.

“This

make

could

difference,” says

cigarette

“Someone’s gotta do

a

Hunter, adding

he’s

down.

repeatedly

“would a form of

adds,

perceive this as just

revenue generation.”

it,”

he

He says it’s an unavoidable part of his job, but that doesn’t mean

revenue from these fines would also keep tuition costs he

from around the

butts

says without stopping.

that

“Some,”

Laurin says the security office gets

permit-

there.

winter’s chill

offenders are just

one

know,

doesn't

is

ted at doors two, three

that.”

ten

smoke.

who

For anyone I

Doors

include crowded entrances and

move metres from Door

su.^'pension.

“This,” says Laurin, “has not

Hunter says most of the complaints from non-smokers

Many

suspensions.

they obtain the person’s stu-

have smoking regulations, but are part of the City of

attention.

allergies to cigarette

is

real

keep

to

a reprimand. If the student contin-

“You wouldn’t want to smok-

line

has

ues to defy the rules he/she can,

A1 Hunter, head of security services, says enforcing the

only

the

dent ID card and then give him/her

says

Reese.

says

The college does

discipline policy.

good

on,”

Laurin

its

Kitchener’s by-laws and no fines

at least six

“Usually, (they’re) very

conUiel your program co-ordi-

IS,

complaints

should be

reluctant to

'

to enforce

these

to

nator or Lesley McConville at ext, 257.

many people move down three when they

metres from the door

when asked

jvULbe

sentative

open

IS

move away from when

1

in,^a&tlX. fec>

thig,

which

supervisor for the past 10 months, says doors

the

represent Waterloo Region but some come from l.ondon, Toronto and Hamilton. They arc asked to serve a three-year term,

says

entrances

know

to

McConviUe. If you would like more infonnation about your program advtsoiy committee, who sits on it and who your .student repre-

their term.

Reese,

get

will

' :ttstenwa.,;ibiuut

i

1

members

he-she

membems, gam pifelic speaking experience and learn to make presentations. .Mostly, they will be doing a lor of

.'.pc-

smoking rules tough security

career,

of background on the

rtw»]iiw* «M iiwii»i» » i.i

Willi

advisory committee his/her entire college

be of a dlsad^antage. »aid

iee

years ago.

fee door.” If a stufemt stays on a program

make

committees. This way they are not too

lege,” she said.

other time.

college’s security staff says

minutes available.

in leadership

being a student r^esentative as a “foot in

Although enforcing smoking

m

students

program about what happens at the meetings and they make the meeting their

of industry'. Thev try noi to focus on an area of expertise when choosing committee mem-

w’here

the

tlie

said

also

are

and people from a cross-section

positiorus

immKmmmm

woodworking forum held

the winter

alumni of the college, people

stu-

commu-

ideas,

Representatives

responsible for informing

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

college in developing solutions. S^edilic

tions keeps

communicate with the other

McConville.

responsibility.

By Wayne

important for student representa-

dents in their program so they can

role in helping the

relaticHis,

is

It

needs and evaluating the effectiveness of college in meeting those needs

functions

*

to speak.

the

The

Student Association or the Society of

W

to

progrtffife

involved in other

also

student organizations such as the

work wth^eoplejn the industry. •‘Prt^^'^'ifsary committees are one sew^^At CbaestogaC le| McConvrlle, program

blue

progrartij

advisory committees. Usually, the stud^S;

on the committees.

McConville said the college looks

on

serve

also

Students

members of the board of governors bring

happy about

it.

When asked how he

to

print

about that.”

butts,

wouldn’t “You what I have to say

Hofstetter said,

want

feels about

sweeping


SPOKE, Feb.

FEATURES AND ISSUES

— Page 9

1999

15,

strais0es imfhrtant

iP

««**»*»»»

to stress?

By Jacqueline Smith will

Do you if ih^e is

from mood swings,

suffer

no meaning to your

of stre^. Stress

life?

capability

strategies

of^ ways at different times for

Duane

says

stressful,”

^

Shadd.

academic '^ppoit instru^or

The

who teaches an eteciive. Wellness;

The ,S^er ybu,-sdd depending ,pmpecdve,_

'''-'son’s

^If

you

can,be 'good or

cannot^,e<mtrol

you

,>

Duane Shadd (left), an academic support instructor, said stress management is a matter of control: what one can control and what one cannot control. Karen Rittinger, a counsellor in the student services office, gives students stressmanagement handbooks at workshops. (Photos by Jacqueline Smith)

While he is not claiming to be an ejcf^rt, Shadd says stress managemait is a matter of knowing vsdiat you can control and what

-

-

For students, Shadd saysV laclfhf ito is one of the biggest stresses. One way of coping widi stress is to ha\ e a plan in advance says Kar^ Rittinger, a

many wavs

.rSa.

y,

if.

,

which students can reduce

their .stress

The counsellor says she generally sees

gets closer to

exam

_l(»t

coping with

gettmg enough sleep can go a long way to

making sAdenA physically capable of cop-

mg with stress. are not constantly doing school work, but

they feel they have lost control of the ”

have a bit of social life that is iir^iortant to Aem have a good way to deal with tension and stress,” RiAnger said. She said people who are under too much ^ ^

Rittinger says February is a

students to start planning,

it

who have some baAnce, who

and

the pressure

all

situation

a

good time for and keeping Ac

amount of work they bavc^ to

lime.

Uuiing

:

difficulty

niunbcr of .students with stress-related

fair

problems but the number increases as

counsellor in the student services office at the coEesCv.She says Aero, are T

who Ake care of Aeir boAes physically are better prepared to handle stress. She said gettmg at least one hot meal per day, exercising and

“SAderrts

m

£

v-^§

-

that works,

Rittinger' says students

sweatihg itf^/he'mys.

you can’t

have a

of Aings to choose from when Aey are under pressure will more often choose

someAing

oh' a per-

stress

who

counsellor said people

variety

'

_

smaller

can mcrease Aeir coping strategies.”

an

Conestoga

at,

bothered by a

are

amount of stress. They can eiAer reduce Ae Aings that are stressing them, or Aey

not

is

wiA wiA

“People with enough coping strategies can deal with larger amounts of stress, she says Aose who do not have enough coping

itself in a

Ij|||l|||^|l^i|i^llllll® “There is not a single thing that

to cope

scheme,

coping strategies on one side and the amount of stress on Ae other side.

'

occurrence of a between environm

ental demand and the response of aii'in^vidual that manifests

^

anoAer way

Rittinger says

is the

substantial imbalance

Shadtl,

exams which

better prepared for

stress is using a balance

fhese^re some of fee pl^sical symptoms

n^ber

be

leads to less stress.

dp. under

pressure cannot deal with stress and this

(it

.

Education important to manager’s success By Carly Benjamin

and promote

the past 18 years.

took the sAlls

“I

I

John Sawicki, a journalism and of graduate newswriting

Conestoga and went into a work term at Conestoga based on my

Conestoga College, continues to

practical

gave him

enabled

As first taste of journalism. He is now the manager of public affairs for As alma mater.

school.”

work

at the college that

“I tend to

shy away from the public

description it

stood,”

Sawicki

is

relations

easily misunder-

because

said.

“Some

level

program.

affairs

similar

obAmed

he has

with

four

SawicA works with

development office and

is

Sawicki

said

extensive

the

education was important for back-

ground and context to he values

The

it

Aaw on and

a great deal.

practical sAlls

Conestoga helped

he learned

Am

at

get sArted

m As job at the college, however. At

SawicA

the end of the journalism and

hand

are co-ordinatmg events.

“Sometimes I also do some consulting on the side,” he said. “There may be questions or procedures people need ironed

He

said his job basically covers

these aspects at one time or

all

another.

complete

a

four-week work term. SawicA’s

placement was that is

at the college

and

where he has remained for

SawicA has had a hand in raising the level of respect the community has for the college.

sAAs

degree

being considered

is

by the Committee of Presidents, the group which represents the provmce’s 25 college presidents.

John Sawicki, a former journalism student, still works at the college in the same place where he completed a four-week work(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

term.

the

what they do for the community,” he said. Sawicki has not only raised awareness for Conestoga but also the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of

general perceptions were lagging

OnArio, the volunAry provincial

behind the reAity.

group

“It

has been a long effort that

involved a

lot

of people

at the

college,” he said.

He acAeved tAs by changing stereotypes that were atAched to

college programs.

Basically

out.”

was

to

and may work

m hand with Ae people who

newswriting program everyone expected

co-ordinating

has

gain

to

province

The push for various college programs to be granted applied

co-ordi-

ceremomes every year. Sometimes he deals with ongoing events on an annual basis and sometimes he handles events that pop up on short notice. responsibilities

the

programs,” he said.

the

of Arts from George University in Washington Washington, D.C., Bachelor of Education from Ae Umversity of Prince Edward Island and a Master of Arts in Education from

MicAgan Umversity.

trying

in

of such quality they should be as applied degree

at

nator of the college graduation

Master

now

recognized

a national conference that the

well,

are

acceptance

the

Canadian Identification Society,

As

will con-

because some of our programs are

and

ximversity degrees, a Bachelor

Central

“We

and analysis and anAor plans special

project

SawicA

In the Ature,

summer he worked on

past

a

college.

tinue to change perceptions.

trend

events at the college.

TAs

of

value

high

the

community

identification

helps with

trying to

well as the public as a whole,

research,

information,

is

Ae

about public

his job to an

educate segments of the public as

college attends.

In addition to his Conestoga certificate,

SawicA compares

which

continue here at

As manager of

a

occupation.”

The journalism program SawicA attended was a 40-week certificate

me to

college system as

educator because he

Sawicki has a hand in media

people have a negative under-

sAnAng of that

training

skills

Ae

a whole, he said.

learned at

college

he

He found

made

was always

sure

clarifying

which

represents

25

the

community

“If the opportumty arises for to

make

or groups

Aen

I

will

cerAmly

make that a priority,” he said. SawicA said he is proud of growth

and

development

college has achieved years. “I

have seen many changes to the and I can say without

college

hesiAtion, by

far,

most of those

changes are for the best,” he

He

said he

is

and

colleges.

college education and feels

“Over about a 15-year period I have done a lot of work for ACAATO on some of their

the

committees,” he said.

here

“So much of what we found was people didn’t have a clear under-

sAnding of what colleges are and

The

goal is to increase awareness

said.

a real believer in a

province’s

lege in a positive light.

the

the

over the

the

promoting awareness of the col-

me

that point with colleagues

it

is

wave of the Ature.

“It’s

a

positive

looking at and

and

be

Sawicki said.

I

foAre we are am happy to be

a

part

of

it,”


Page 10

— SPOKE, Feb.

15,

1999

Students assemble at Bingeman’s for job By Carly Benjamin

fair

network with employers. This particular fair featured full-time posi-

number

The

Conestoga

of

attending

students

Partnership

the

annual

Employment

for

tions

and summer placements,

offering a variety of possibilities to students.

students attended the job fair and

“The intent of the job fair is the employer will have a position available within six months of attending the fair,” Wright said,

671 came through the door this

“so they are actively recruiting.”

University and College Job Fair

has increased.

“Last year over 500 Conestoga

Mary Wright,

year,” according to

“Last year there

manager of student employment, Co-Op education and alumni

employers here and

services at Conestoga.

is

The

fifth

annual job

Bingeman

Wednesday, Feb.

3, at

Park

venture

a joint

is

held

fair,

among

Conestoga and the universities of Wilfrid Laurier and

Waterloo,

number has grown

to 145, so there

increased interest in the

of

objective is

four

the

to bring potential

fair,”

There are no statistics available on how many students gain employment by attending the job

COM

DEV, Space Group, located Cambridge, who attended

Wright.

cent of the graduating technology

employers and

opportunity

it

was a

of the

DEV

wireless eomponents.

at

AWMAC

competition

satellite

well

as

Mickie Churchill, from human

Wright said employers pay a fee

Students work on their cabinets during the Ontario S shop area.

that

manufactures

Conestoga over the past several

to

this year’s job fair at

Bingeman Park look around

at the var-

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

in

resources at

company

is

COM DEy

said,

program in May.

her

ing to Churchill.

“They are

also in the process of

utilizing Conestoga’s first

years.

telecommunications program

and

fair.

COM

the

fair

to the operating costs

said.

students

for

of $395 to attend the

money goes

great

she

institutions,”

students who attended search of employment.

components for communications as

students at the

Wright explained

90 per

from

students

in

in

year’s fair has hired about

one stop shopping for both

ious displays

this

employers under one roof, said

“It is

Some of the 671

fair.

However, as an example,

institutions

128

year the

she said.

Guelph.

The

were

this

co-op

Wright speculates the job

that is scheduled to start

the

COM DEV

largest

also looking to

Canada

techemploy a number of nologists and technicians, accord-

because

is

demand but

in great

fair

and it

it

of

will

fair is

kind in

its

continue

has been so successful

in the past.

the Woodworking. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

continued from page 1

Woodworking competition held The industry forum was an

Conestoga

at

Stephane Association,

opportunity for students to ask

overview of the industry. He emphasized that there is much

questions of a panel of industry

opportunity in the field which

applicants

people.

diverse industry.

Six panelists gave an

Students to

woodworking industry. The panelists were optimistic

possible about computers,

Lloyd Love, vice-president of manufacturing at Durham

a

He encouraged much as

invaluable insiders’ look at the’

about the future of the industry.

is

learn as

their

poised for growth,

Ted Fadfield, a product engineer West Furniture Durham and a

at

graduate of Conestoga’s

woodworking program, said he thought the education at the

gave

students

a

good

asset

experience

when

definitely

than it

building his cabinet in

tht

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

said students

game plan to

be

COiSTOi fiflNfSTOSA

CONISTOSA

wrong with down the road have my own furniture

a

hands-on

came

to finan-

1

want

to

factory,”’

says

Cockerill.

“You

should have your head read, but there’s nothing

wrong with that.” woodwork-

Cockerill also said

ing students from Conestoga have

Love did not agree completely, saying there was not really that much of a distinction and there is

a real “Icg-up” over others whO;;

real

on

young

cial expectations.

a

Basiliers gets going

AWMAC COmpetitiion.

“There’s nothing

of

knowledge greater

of.

and know where they want

saying, ‘Five years

owner

working advisory committee

and downsizing, hut now seems

He

today should have a

AutoCAD, Carmen Howatt,

was

always

cannot see past

in the future.

Ottawa Valley Kitchen Cabinets, said he thought computer

Conestoga, said the industry has had a few years of restructuring

who

getting a job.

is

number

at the

systems and programs such as

Furniture and chair of the woodat

amazed

said he

crossover as far as

the

financial rewards are concerned.

college

Gerry Cockcrill, president of the

.solid

Ontario Furniture Manufacturers

want

to get into the industry.

^

The general consensus among the panelists was that if you have the right attitude and

work hard,

rewards, both financial as well as

emotional, will be reaped.

in

short supply,” she said.

Leisa Cronsberry stands beside the Conestoga College L Which was set up to attract students. .

.(Photo by NeverV'M)^|py||jy


Woodworking Canada

’99

Students honoured at banquet — *

By Bv Neven Mujezinovic Muiezinovic

Photos by John

One of the highlights Woodworking Canada especially

to take the trade-off,” said Taylor.

One

Sawicki

of

that

(AWMAC)

was held

It

at

in the

Conestoga College on

seem day

The competition involved each

to

of the

1 5 contestants producing a complete finished architectural millwork cabinet to specifications

experience. The apprenticeship competition started at 7:30 a.m.

1 First-place winner in the AWMAC competition, Jason Talbot (left) poses with 3M Canada market rnanager Brian Brady at the annual student awards banquet. 2. Chris Taylor, who placed second in the competition, shows the second prize, a power tool given by Ryobi Canada. 3. Peter Coates third-place winner poses with Daniel Reiley, store manager of Lee Valley Tools in London. .

and ended at 4 p.m. in the centre’s shop area. Competitors worked all day with only a mandatory 20-minute lunch break.

working-technology

The winners were announced an awards banquet and dinner

second place to Chris Taylor, also a third-year woodworking-

Waterloo First

Inn

later

at

that

went

place

at

to

himself and

great

learning

the shortest day in

Jason Talbot, a third-year wood-

be enough hours in the do everything that needed

be done.”

annual

woodworking

awards

student;

technology student; and third to Coates, a second-year

Peter

The winners were: Jim Durksen, Royce-Ayr Machining Award; Chad Nikiforow, A. Grant Glennie Award; Cherie Morrison, Bob Hoffman Memorial Award; Peter Coates and Rick Carvalho, S.C. Johnson and Son Award; Matt

McLean, woodworking-technician student. Talbot said it was a real

he had built the winning cabinet. “There were a lot of nice

challenge to get everything done the time allotted to the

cabinets out there.

in

competitors.

He

when

surprised

it

said he was was announced

did well, but

I

was hoping

I

was

I

surprised, for

sure,” said Talbot.

Taylor, place, to

who came

was a

bit

in

second

disappointed not

have been able to take in the

day’s other events.

“Other than

that,

it

was a

really

good day,” said Taylor. Both Talhot a.n<d Taylor

said they did not think the time for any

future

competition

changed

should

be

accommodate and allow them to

the

to

contestants

take

part in the day’s other activities.

“This will probably work out best and if

you decide to go into you will just have

the competition

Krug

Award

for

Excellence;

Robert Law, John Roffey Memorial Award; Steve Bader, La-Z-Boy Canada Award; Jody Wyman, Woodworking Centre of Ontario Faculty Award; Sabrina Erneman, Architectural

Millworkers of Ontario Award; Paul Brandon (first-place) and

Don MacKay Blum Award

(runner-up), Julius for Excellence

Miller

chase^ tbe

bait during tie against the

Fraser

Burton,

Delta

Machinery Award; Doug McDowell, A&M Wood Specialty Award; Doug McDowell, P. Findlay Materials Porter-Cable/Toolex

Bursary.

Ptwtuguese Leo's Feb, 2 {Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

'•

,

^

P^ondoni%ke Irst tie of

season

Kinipton the weekend prior to

matched

tte

I'afdte recreation cepfre

'when

the

indoor

^

Condor team

Featugese Leo’s

had played the night before as weiL “Thig? played a good team and got a tie out ot them,” he said. “They’re not happy with

the bail, but they got frusfrated. It

wasn’t until kter in the sec-

ond half

that

Ang P^zotos

scored a great goal, sneaking

the Condors in front of a crowd

passed the Leo’s This boosted the moral of the Condors but not in enough time to take a win. Defence played strong aiding Stephanie DCnHaan in keeping the ball out of the Condor net.

of 13. It was a fast paced game and the girls played aggres-

Danny Sirio played well, making many attempts on the Leo’s

3obnst@B»^'the

sively.

net.

after playfiig in

The

M. have had a sueseaHon thus

far,

cur-

in

second flace

i8~I -3

wir^io^’-tie

nred

game and a number of

:

in

fhemselves.”

The tei^on was high ijeo’s

at half-

were dominating

die g&ihe with a 1-0 lead over

girls

were vocal, trying

to help one another out passing

the

ball

defence.

Nadia Recine scored Leo's goal.

the lone

in

Woodworking; Cherie Morrison, BoscH Canada/Toolex, TvIacViiriery Award; Jason Bidan, Freud Canada/Toolex Machinery Award;

m Rebecca

my

were also announced at the banquet. There were 15 awards in total.

students and apprentices, techni-

and technologists with less than two years journeyman

a

to

to

student

by AWMAC. This competition was open to woodworking cians

enjoyed

was

said Fairfield. “There didn’t

The

set

evening.

was

“It life,”

Feb. 4.

the

it

experience.

Woodworking Centre of Ontario’s shop area

he

says

Manufacturers

competition.

first-year

was a good day for him. Even though he did not win, he

of view, was the Architectural Association of Canada

three

it

from the students’ point

Woodwork

of

competitors, Bryan Fairfield, said

’99,

Hotly Melchin, left, and Chrissy Dunn, a first-year early childhood education student, took advantage of the free skating time as part of the DSA’s Winterfest Feb, 4 Photo by Eileen Diniz


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 12

15,

1999

Recent homeless death caused by government cut-backs, says teacher By Wayne

Collins

Last Thursday’s discovery of a

homeless man’s body, underneath the window of Premier Mike

Park

Queen’s

Harris’s

office,

social

eollege’s

the

program co-ordinator for the past six years, says the whole saddens him, but he thing services

hopes be

death

man’s

this

will

new

of a

beginning

“the

low-income, permanent housing

the cuts, have been evicted in the

units remains the lowest for single

last

two

persons

years.

Parker says Waterloo Region alone had about 2,000 homeless

youth in

He blames

1998.

the

Harris government for making a

doesn’t surprise Dick Parker.

Parker,

cent of those families, affected by

bad

situation wor-se.

the

and

support

welfare

for

eligibility

lowered

People with no source of income,

consciousness”.

says Parker, were often evicted.

hoping the government will finally take the bull by the horns and put long-needed financ-

He

ing into social programs.

in more untreated mental health

Parker

is

“We

becoming

are

Americanized,” Parker says, “and it’s

becoming very

He

says child poverty

linked

These

poverty.

directly

is

in

living

families

to

the

are

says he believes the lack of

counselling programs has resulted

and

problems,

few

the

refuse

many

that

just

services

same

“They

have nothing to do

will

with the systems Parker.

NDP

the

Ironically,

(in place),” says

“They handle

money

their

needed

handle

to

the

newly of

college’s social services program,

responsibility

appointed

trained

would

anticipate

little

ment.

students,

with teaching the basics of hygienParker,

front-page news, now, because

translate

thefts

and

(Photo by

property crimes.

CD

Local band releases debut By

Wayne

Collins)

there

says,

ing the vocals for that song.

Waterloo band, first

at

Kitchener-

local

Feb.

1

made

be

is

hands, whieh she out where she

CD and seemed to

name of the

the

“It

and had

play on the

CD

is

a

and was done

face

insists,

CD came was photographed

before Madonna’s latest

longer than expected.

Aura

come and

of Parry’s

close-up

and artwork took

one of the songs.

me

also

song.”

released in mid-October 1998, but the printing

“We

The cover of the set to

It is

difficult for

string arrangements

a quartet

8,

the Metropolis Nightclub in

downtown Kitchener. The CD was initially

most

to sing,” said Parry.

releasing their

is

CD, Aura, Thursday,

of

Aura

definitely the

a

numbers

larger

are

it’s

homeless.”

entitled

Efieori Olniat:

Derivation,

only

Parker

downtown Cambridge on a cold Sunday morning.

the problems of the poor often

more

“but

Chris Craft wanders around

support, they can’t manage.”

Parker says the construction of

of

adding

poorly but, because of lack of

says 20 per

how

multitude

a

government cut-backs. “We’ve always had the homeless and it isn’t a new phenomenon,”

deal

vive in the private market, due to

He

with

deal

These

learn

says^

suffer

must

programs

people, says Parker, .who can’t sur-

the welfare cuts.

he

problem situations, but their skills go untapped when programs

some, he says, but others, various addicts, lack “normal-

into

the

Parker.

says

areas,”

to

Affordable housing would work

says

with

skills are transferable to

“Their all

Social

work

to

homeless.

in terms

of positive programs or supports,” Parker says of the Harris govern-

ics,

next.

anymore and the government must develop long term solutions. Meanwhile, Parker says there are people, such as graduates of the

of money

short

municipalities

like

was

won’t work

govern-

the deficit, says Parker, leaving

for

class

Parker says, band-aid remedies

ized living patterns.”

available.

frightening.”

The middle

in 1994.

“I

1994,

in

hoping no one would notice.

first,

have been no increases since the Harris government took office

housing.

benefits.

power

took

intending to cut social programs

there

ment’s social programs only raised

He says the current government made the problem worse when it tightened

and

Ontario

in

Parker says the Harris govern-

ment

same manner.

in the

Michael Chambers, who

is

most

represent the dimensions of the

well-known for his Afncan nude

songs, their meanings and

emoBrooke Parry, vocalist for Derivation “It just sort of came to us and it made sense.”

photos, did the photography.

tions,” said

The graphic artist was Todd Dekoker from Imagine That Communication.

Parry said the meaning of the

word

derivation

is

“Michael

the source of

the band’s name.

“We

ing something here’.

It

is

The band

consists

of Brooke

Members of the group Derivation, from left, Brooke Parry, vocals; Rolland Sike, rhythm guitar; Wojtek Kubicki, lead guitar; Chris Pepper, bass; and Olaf Szester, drums, with their K-9 friend. (Submitted photo)

vocals; Wojtek Kubicki,

Parry,

lead guitar; Rolland Sike, rhythm

Chris Pepper, bass; and

guitar;

precise in his music abilities.

Szester

is

“If they put $ 1 ,000 into a record-

oddly enough the only

ing studio then you put in $1,000,”

Olaf Szester, drums. They range in age from 17 years old to 19

member who owns

involved in acting as well as music

money

years old.

and has numerous roles

scene, to keep

Parry has been singing since the

He

a car.

is

in film

and commercials. Derivation started in October

singer of a London-based band.

1995 and soon after that they hired

She

their

currently working at a the-

atrical

shop and as a makeup

artist.

Kubicki wrote his

when he was classical

looking Sike

10.

He

music and

first

song

is

trained in

is

currently

Irvine

a competitor at heart.

He

They received $7,500

funding

in

from FACTOR, Funding to Assist Canadian Acts on Record, and every

CD

sold.

band.

He

is

very confident and

the

and band’s

for dollar.

from

FACTOR

money

guitar.

from

at Lee’s Palace,

The Generator and They have Kitchener at The Robinson’s and

the Horseshoe Tavern. also played in

Lyric,

he enjoys playing rhythm

the youngest in the

going.”

Conestoga College.

an organization that gives

is

it

Paul Sanderson and Associates, an

enjoys the challenges of tennis as

Pepper

Canadian music

into the

entertainment law firm.

plan to pay them hack $1

at jazz.

is

manager Paul

“That puts more

Parry said.

Derivation has played in Toronto

age of five and her father was the

is

He

in

one of

is

perfectionist

people,” Parry said.

the

therefore derivation,” said Parry.

been

great, he’s

supremo

those

decided, ‘O.K. we’re start-

beginning, therefore the source,

is

reviews everywhere.

usually

is

artists

matches

investment

dollar

Mrs.

They have showcased during Canadian Music week 1997 and 1998,

NXNE

They

were

festivals

Ontario

1998, and also

Summer 1998

in

in

southern

Sounds to

their

CD at Phase

Studio in Toronto,

where Big Sugar recorded their last album, using the same engineers. It was released and mixed in 20 days, which were extended over a seven-month period. Kuhicki and Parry wrote the songs on the album, including Ancient History, Aura, Garden Gateway and The New Song.

A

version of Derivation’s song

Hannony

is

recorded on Echo Trip

City compilation 1998.

of

Waterloo. Parry

would like SkyDome some day. said she

featured

throughout including

COCA.

They recorded

One Recording

play the

also

featured

many

CD K-W

The

other

She hopes the band can soon into some mellow techno. She wants to get some electronics into the band so it doesn’t just consist of drums and guitars. “I am even willing to play an instrument if the band needs it,” expand

said Parry.

The concert Admission

is

starts

at

The band

p.m. all

ages.

Derivation will play a 40-minute set

and another band, which has

not yet been named, will also

perform.

Aura

will

be available

concert for $10. available at in the

up

Sam

It

the

at

will then be

the Record

Conestoga Mall

at a

Man

marked

price.

“If anyone wants to

artists.

8

$5 with ID, $7

come

out

most proud of Garden Gateway, which they spent

and support the band, that would be great,” said Parry. “Hopefully

hours perfecting, said Parry.

we’ll sell lots of CD’s,

“I spent

is

hours and hours record-

our main goal.”

which

is


SPOKE, Feb.

ENTERTAINMENT

music

Affinity for

Entertainment you hepcats out there. Van Gogh’s Ear in Guelph presents live swing music for its Martini Mondays, but if you pine for

all

days

the

of thin

neckties, pennyloafers

leather

and Cyndi

Lauper, you can always drop in

performance, local musician Pat Powers nonetheless maintains an

for Retro

Fridays... Tickets

for

now on

sale

Collective Soul are

upbeat sense of humour in the face of such adversity. in

is

K-W

believes he has

native said he

come

touring in support of their

hall)

way

a Jet Plane. steadfast musical

including Bruce

Springsteen, Elvis Costello and even Gordon Lightfoot, he has earned a solid reputation as a performer on the K-W music

Pat Powers enjoys a more sombre moment at home. He can be seen most Friday nights performing at Joe’s Noodle Factory in Waterloo. (Photo by Ken Groulx)

inspired by a simple

by campfire on long weekend camping

just repeating a song.”

says he

admittedly aware

is

of the limits of his

but

vocalist

to

another

local

Powers says matter of chalking

the

of

ear

Matt

musician.

Allen.

Accompanying Allen for an entire summer in Grand Bend, Powers eventually found he was able to support himself and live at

beach-side

performing

by

cottage

such

at

popular

watering holes as Gordie’s, Dirty

and Gable’s. “It’s cool to go away into a small town and have that limited Girtie’s

celebrity

status

as

‘that

“They the music and

Powers

guy,’

get into

says.

it

Michigan and

just classic rock hell.

They just try

and turn you into a jukebox.” But performing can also be a humbling experience that also provides

own

its

rewards,

particularly in performing, with

other acts. Powers explains.

that’s

“We

were

performing

jam

week

night during the

and

at

for us.”

short supply as a neophyte per-

“I was impressed with her enough that I turned to someone and said ‘What the hell? She has no business opening for us. We should be opening for- her. She’s great!” The girl was none

that drives

regardless

him

of an

audience’s reaction or size.

“Even if two people get it, that’s good enough to keep me going.”

As

a self-taught guitarist with no

former and sometimes he resorted to

pounding back a few drinks

to

get his courage going.

But support from such musicians

singer/songwriter Matt

as

Emm

other than

with a newfound assurance.

scored a hit this past

He

said he has seen a definite in

his

own musical

progression and presentation, as

evidenced in his re-invention of songs by other artists.

“A song can get on

is like

a bicycle. You

musicians

him at Noodle

emphasis on what he thinks the song is about.

as

“I to

think

make

it

have an obligation

I

a

little

different. It’s

what separates a real performance of a song as opposed to

with

He

who

his

to

is

anything in life that sometimes can make me feel so complete,”

Powers “If

other

in Guelph presents House of Velvet Friday, Feb. The Woolwich Arms Pub in

out and hear

who want to play, why

me

think

it

I’d

be lying

would be nice

if I didn’t

if I could.”

Craig

artists

View

Fantastical

featuring a diverse

more

to

at Jose’s

“It’s like

who have

improve and flesh

creative

Symphony... If

and spoken word

artists,

Columbian^,

Tbe Afghan Whigs

and Sublime {Bradley Nowell and Friends) are all worth a listen... For all you club kids, MC/DJ Danger Boy from Edge 102’s Humble and Fred Show can be seen and heard at the {1965)

Revolution in Waterloo

Wicken, Adrian

Friday. .Have fun.

Jones,

Jen

every

.

Voting Stations Feb. 15

9

am

-

11:30 pm, The Sanctuary

Tues. Feb. 16

9

am

-

11:30 pm, Tech. Wing

Wed. Feb. 17

9

am

-

11:30 pm. The Sanctuary

Thurs. Feb. 18

9

am

-

11:30 pm. The Sanctuary

Mon.

music avenues.

Please take the time to vote - it is your student

having Joe Montana as

your quarterback when you’re a rookie receiver.

K-W

including Lindsay Stewart, Scott

appreciative of his

Cardiff,

pushed him

nied by the

by Fun Lovin’ Criminals (100%

20 and Tinkers Sunday, Feb. The Rain Tree Cafe in Waterloo is hosting an evening

Dole

cross section of musicians, visual

music, but

The Centre in the Square for one performance only, Tuesday, March. 23. She will be accompa-

Guelph presents Neil Murray and

doing

have a career in

who b rin gs

Jeff Tanner Saturday, Feb.

entitled The From the Tree,

it?

Natalie MacMaster,

you’ve got about $20 burning a hole in your pocket, new releases

.

not keep going out there and “I don’t plan to

mem-

going fast for

local

regularly jam with

weekly gig is

28.

available... Boo

.

have people

I

come

says.

still

offered for Princess Theatre bers... Tickets are

who

interaction with other artists such

out

Liona Boyd Sxmday, Feb.

Powers said he believes he

Factory.

says he

screen at The Centre in the Square and accompanied with a restored score by conductor Carl Davis and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony. Special rates are

her brand of Cape Breton fiddling

summer with

While Powers cut his musical teeth mainly as a solo performer, he has recently struck a musical

and just go anywhere with it.” Powers says he enjoys taking a song and twisting it around to give it a different it

Gryner,

her song Summerlong.

relationship

11-13. Interestingly, both

films will be featured on a giant

the

Osborne has emboldened Powers

evolution

The Kid, and The Thursday to Satruday,

Mrs.

admits his confidence was in

music

perform,

Robinson’s,

March

presents two Charlie

films.

a

formal musical training. Powers

affinity for

his

bill

the big

of thing one

sort

booking manager told me we had an opening act. He said she’s some girl who plays guitar and piano. “I thought it was funny because we were just hacking around anyway, so it seemed strange that someone would be an opening act

it’s

Idle Class

.

-enough of an audience for him “I’ve never experienced

was

Symphony

27... On

Kitchener-Waterloo

presents classical guitar virtuoso,

up as a

It

the

supportive of one another that

Radley’s

they wanted to

all

screen,

20 and Olive Wide

Feb.

way.”

musicians and intends to continue

hear was Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Saturday, Feb.

local

Mark Perak

Hawkins and the Rusty Nails will be at Mecca (Walper Pub) Friday, Feb. 21.. The Centre in the Square

Guys like that can only make you better. The local scene is very

playing as long as he feels there’s

“Once when I was playing, the bar was jfecked with guys from

presents

tour.

albums 14:59 and Whitey Ford

a

learning experience in perfecting his craft as a performer.

.

Chaplin

.

Tickets are

it’s

Friday, March 5. .Fusion on College (next to Kitchener’s city

sup-

comes to Copps Monday, March 5.gar Ray and Everlast rock the Warehouse Wednesday, Feb. 24 in support of their new

part of a comfortable circle of

audiences.

half-assed

Powers says

is

really

Financial gains and cult celebri-

to

available for

by

unappreciated

music

rewarding.”

ty status aside.

his

over-zealousness to be original

sometimes

attract

a

abilities as

singer/songwriter,

he eventually became a proficient enough guitarist and trips,

a

ticket... Tickets are

26.. Sings the Blues... Vion

He

desire to play guitar light

luck getting a

-

circuit over the last four years. Initially

in

19.. Coliseum

convictions influenced by a wide artists

Hershey Centre

Good

The double

Backed with range of

the

Johnny

bringing

Saturday,

at

Korn and Rob Zombie in port of their Rock is Dead!

through John Denver’s Leaving on

also

19

Mississauga.

since he bought his first guitar six

years ago and fumbled his

is

Cavaan

in Kitchener

Favourite Swing Orchestra to

singer/singwriter

15..

way

a long

and Daoula... Lulu’s

new album. Dosage. .The Tragically Hip play Friday, Feb. terrific

Technical problems aside, the

evening will feature Black Flies, the Jerry Donnelly Trio,

town

7 at the Lyric in Kitchener.

band

he jokes.

The Mill-Race Folk Society’s annual fundraising show will be held Saturday, Feb. 27 at the Cambridge Arts Theatre. The

show Wednesday, March The

for their 1

28-year-old

town

in

.

For

Lamenting a guitar glitch that plagued a previous night’s

some Sambucca

— Page 13

Pidgeon and Cindy Clasper. Admission is free.

By Ken Groulx

it,”

1999

By Ken Groulx

drives locai performer

“I think I got

15,

government!


— SPOKE,

Page 14

Feb. 15, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT

Actors save Playing by Heart By

Eileen Diniz

circumstances Paul and Hannah

off her feet by a

would be arguing over such a thing. Although the

architect

are facing, they

Playing by Heart, written and directed by Willard Carroll,

is

a

story

is

a

little

chemistry between the

Angeles about love and family

remarkable

matters.

There are several great

performers

film including

in the

Sean Connery as Paul, Gena Rowlands as Hannah, Gillian Anderson as Meredith, Ellen Burstyn as Mildred, Dennis Quaid as Hugh, Madeleine Stowe as Gracie, Anthony Edwards as

and

is

it

two easy

40

years.

It

feels real

director

who

is

Mildred (Burstyn) plays a

way.

mother

(Mohr)

her.

Roger

and

whose son, Mark, dying of AIDS. She

in denial is

shows up at the hospital where the two engage in a series of sickroom

to

having an affair in selected hotel

discussions,

and

never forced.

Meredith (Anderson)

a

(Edwards), an unlikely match, are

believe the two have been married for

bookcase topples on

after

is

unbelievable, the

romantic drama/comedy set in Los

good looking

(Stewart)

a theatre

refuses to be swept

(Stowe)

Gracie

Roger wants more from

rooms. the

Gracie

but

relationship

is

which end

fictionalized

doors.

tions is

also

some pain along

the

truth

with

a series of

barroom conversaClarkson,

Patricia

Nastassja Kinski and Alec Mapa.

so hot and cold with her,

is

but his secret

is

Keenan’s

revealed at the end It

Joan’s

is

relationship

and that

develops the most during the film so

we end up

the one

it’s

caring

about. Jolie

an original. She manages

is

the

steal

to

spotlight

with her

stunning stage presence, pouty lips style.

Keenan, Jay

Mohr as Mark and John

She can’t understand

(Phillippe).

why he

meets

Keenan

sullen

blue-haired,

Ryan

as

who

crawler

Roger, Angelina Jolie as Joan, Phillippe

blabbermouthed,

(Jolie) is a

of the film.

Hugh (Quaid) has

happy staying inside the bedroom There

in

and acceptance.

Joan club

and fashionable punk-rock She does this with little help

from Phillippe, who doesn’t have

Stewart as

Trent.

much of

The movie originally called Dancing About Architecture

with his

interweaves the stories of a dozeji

characters

The

a chance to do anything

role.

movie

with

ends

the

connecting in unex-

couples engaging in

pected ways.

It is

a near miss;

two person conversations about

there are too

many

characters to

how

develop any of them deeply.

characters,

they

all

feel.

The

and Hannah

(Connery)

Paul

actors

likeable

and

moments

its

(Rowlands) are approaching their

occasional charming

40th aimiversary. They begin to

save the film from complete disas-

argue over an affair that Paul

ter.Overall the

might have had almost 25 years ago. It is unlikely, however,

but

Meredith (Anderson) and Trent (Stewart) discussing their almost non-existent relationship

considering

by Heart

the

other

in

way

movie

is

to

satisfying

too convenient.

Playing

23 45

1

(internet Photo)

Just desserts?

Audience should get

their

By Brent Clouthier

Archie comic book.

It’s

not unfair to have expected

more from

What did movie audiences do to Mel Gibson to deserve his new film.

For

Payback'?

shelling

exercise

After

acclaim

starters,

out the $9 to see this is

grand theft screenplay.

scoring for

some

his

critical

1995

effort

Gibson than this disappointing Elmore Leonard

rip-off, especially after

with

first-time

Helgoland,

teaming up

director

who

Brian

scripted

the

Academy Award winning L.A

$130,000,

and

Payback, “allegedly” based on

never got John

Travolta’s

of Chili Palmer

point-blank; in another, he has his

in

What he should have done was tickets to this

waste of

time.

worth

Payback

hard to cash in on

tries

success and style of such

contains

none

dialogue,

and

toes

smashed with a sledge ham-

mer, one-by-one.

Elmore Leonard-based films as Get Shorty and Out of Sight, but

after pulling off a heist

frustrated Elmore Leonard waimabe. Maybe Gibson is still

upset that he

a small-time thief (oh, the irony)

who,

Perhaps Richard Starkey was a

warming scene, Gibson shoots his unarmed ex-partner in the face,

$70,000, his cut of the loot.

the

and

end of the film.

Helgoland

cold-blooded revenge and reclaim

Hunter, features Gibson as Porter,

star in front of,

for the

void,

chocks the movie with plenty of

the Richard

cop” action

the

ham-fisted violence. In one heart-

could be more than just a “crazy behind, the camera.

fill

Five months

dead.

Braveheart, Gibson showed he

Starkey novel The

To

Porter returns to exact his

left for

later.

buy them

Confidential.

doublecrossed by

is

both his partner and his girlfriend

Payback

of

audiences

certainly should not be the victims

like those,

root

Whatever the

be,

for

it’s

dif-

anyone

or anything in Payback except

of

this

kind

of

misdirected

payback.

12

3

45

characters

made

action that

intricate

to

Shorty.

may

case

witty

the

irreverant

With segments ficult

Get

role

those movies so popular. Instead,

attempts

at

Payback

wouldn’t

that

features

hard-boiled

lines

made

have

it

movie from the ’40s, over-the-top performances even William Shatner would be embarrassed by and action scenes that would entertain a dim-witted in a gangster

six-year-old at best.

“No one

likes a

monkey on

their

back,” says Gibson in one of the

numerous

film’s

voice-overs.

“I

and

had

tedious

And

three.

were crampin’ my Bogart must be spinning

they

style.” his

in

grave.

Even

the soundtrack

executed

was

lifted

Starsky

The

ripolT,

is

a poorly

sounding

like

it

from an old episode of

and Hutch.

actors

in

Payback, rather

than act, squint, smoke, swear and

shoot their way through the movie,

Gibson rassed.

in

Payback:

Even William Shatner would be embar(Internet photo)

creating a film with as

stance

as

much

sub-

an

Second-year broadcasting student, Sandy Horton, was one found in the halls working on a class project on people Feb. 4. Photo by Melissa Dietrich of several students


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS

Beyond the

15,

— Page 15

1999

players,

sports lacks colour just that

Terry Upshaw. While

may

one of the most

“It’s

they

not

the necessities

be a manag-

Angeles

Union (CIAU)

would change

championship.

on April 6, Even more unbelievable is that it took the Los Angeles Dodgers two days to fire him

so

athletics,

will

it

be easier

to

The

between

relationship

school’s alumni

and its students is of any colleges’

a vital part

when

success especially

it

“We’ve now

a

approach these alumni for a little of financial support,” he said.

Although

idea

this

beginning to take

Alumni support

an important

is

source of revenue for sports teams

started to

bit

comes

to athletics.

really

he

just

is

James said

off,

pleased with the support

is

athletics currently receives

from

since

Campanis

Canadian

Surprise,

running varsity athletic programs

the recognition athletics receives

especially

is rising.

when officer

Conestoga,

who have

one sport

come back

to partici-

basketball.

graduated

sports but to the success of the entire school.

students.

agrees that the relationship critical,

“I

is

not only to the success of

think

wonderful

a

it’s

and I think we enhance the image of the

relationship certainly

college,”

Himmelman.

said

pate

intramurals

in

“It’s

nice to

rience

they are willing to

athletes

lot

it is

to

do with the student/alumni said the alumni association has been supportive of

with the students as role models.

relationship,

This

athletics over the past five years.

such as current varsity teams challenging alumni teams to

agrees

athletics

Conestoga,

at

Himmelman

that

prosperity of athletic programs.

extremely important where

dollars are being shrunk,”

While the college

money

in

varsity

its

he

sets

said.

aside

budget to operate

programs,

is

importantly,

we want

After those

Finally

the

Ontario

Colleges

(OCAA)

thing as the

me

telling

CCAA,

me

the

same

but they did

an e-mail address for

someone who

told

takes?

it

Nobody

thought

ever

the

athletic

,

questioned the fact that blacks weren’t being represented and

made

a reality.

it

me that there is

to

activity.

a

White,

the

(baseball)

in

membership

at

the

which

enough

make people

to

would

invest

money back

sit

up and

black

This

is

a startling fact that not

only needs to be questioned by the organizations all

mentioned above

the people

in

this

manager

leagues.

the

in

Baseball’s

major

attitudes

changed since Jackie Robinson first signed in 1946.” That was in 1974 and later that haven’t

country.

year the Cleveland Indians hired

While Bob Rae’s Ontario New Democratic Party introduced

manager.

Frank

Robinson

as

player-

8% alc./vol clear bottles 1

2 packs

NEW

who

would combine

alumni support and interaction.

WARNING CONSUME

his

strong

besides Upshaw.

into the

Conestoga, he said.

varsity

was

take notice. “I don’t th ink there ever will be a

Conestoga

recreation centre to alumni,

formerly

in

black

stated

1989,

opinion,

offer

sports from the alumni. James said one of the things he has encouraged his staff to do is set up a database of graduates all

first

only one other hlack: Head. coacH in the entire province of Ontario,

cheap

relatively

Memberships at the rec centre would be relatively inexpensive compared to other athletic clubs such as the YMCA, James said. This way graduates would continue to be involved in the intramurals and activities at

encourage financial support for

when

president of the National League

aspects of alumni

all

He hopes to one day

college to improve the existing

been aggressively supported by the alumni but James is trying to

only

It is

be foimd.

Bill

James’ vision of alumni support

combines

programs. This

hockey has

Jackie

Robinson would break into Major League Baseball in 1947. However, enough people

questions arise, that answers have

Association

responded by forward

my question.

games that we have here and keep them attached to the programs,” James said.

outside support.

involved

Athletic

doesn’t keep

file.

to

department must also look for In previous years,

Colleges

(CCAA)

achieved through activities

“More

aliunni support is essential to the

“It’s

around, that blacks just don’t have

what

have them come back out to the

manager of

with

team.

research.

those

like

games.

donation of $175 to the indoor

recreation

basketball

little

find the answer to

Athletic

stereotypes

important for

the alunmi to remain in contact

Ian James,

about the coach of

expressed by Campanis floating

being

about the program.”

James added

anything and everything that has

and

wrote

being

are

and

contribute,” he said. “That says a

soccer tournament.

Conestoga’s

I

blacks

my senses,

settle for

two unsuccessful attempts it seemed as though I would never

but by

couple of weeks ago article

to

if

regained

I

those records on

is

men’s

particular,

question

come back and

college system.”

made a

in

that product.

know that their expe-

“We’re an integral part of the

This year the association

an

may think. This true when it comes

it

However, we as a society must

was very good when they

were here as student

Himmelman, who works on

A

we’re a lot

Americans than

people

student athletes

and other activities. This shows James how much the athletic programs have meant to those

at

surprise,

farther behind the

whether

program,

decided to do a

Association

Sure we had Cito Gaston managing the Toronto Blue Jays for a few years. And Felipe Alou is still in Montreal after turning down an offer from the same Dodgers who Campanis used to work for. But what about our college and university teams?

to see the best

basketball

would

The CIAU didn’t think my question was important and didn’t respond to my e-mail. The

Sometimes we look at Canada and think we are more progressive

many

Monica Himmelman, an alumni

12

I

pay

product,

involves blacks or whites. Quotas

still

Well, after

years ago.

alumni, not only monetarily, but in

services

said he

CIAU’s

much better made his

sports,

in

support and

and encouraged in sports beyond playing the games. Are the best people getting the head coaching jobs or are there

the first black head coach in the

period.

because the cost of

at the college

He

watch

who

supported

1987.

than our neighbours to the south.

contact alumni.

spin.

television audience

Things haven’t got

win a national was what he said made my head

to It

next that really

or not, Campanis said

it

an American national

to

infamous comment almost

By Brian Smiley

People

athletics.

Los

told

first

type of

this

would never work

Dodgers

(A1

Believe

Alumni important to sports success

minorities,

system

Campanis,

this

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

visible

possible

He

don’t

I

executive, on blacks in Major League Baseball.)

relationship.

employment equity, which encouraged employers to hire

me he wanted to be the black head coach in the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic

er.

know.”

Monica Himmelman, an alumni-services officer, handles anything and everything that has to do with the student/alumni

is

back and upbeat coaches I’ve ever met in my lifetime, one thing he said to me shocked the socks off my feet.

have some of to

Upshaw

laid

IN

MODERATION. THIS BEER

8% ALC. VOL. WHICH

IS

IS

NEARLY TWICE AS

MUCH ALCOHOL AS REGULAR BEERS.


Pa^e 16

— SPOKE, Feb.

15,

1999

SPORTS

Condors drop

to sixth place in

ByRobHimburg

Condors as they opened the scoring early

the Coodof menls indoor soccer team came up on the short end of the stick,

when Dwayne Bell netted a goal midway through the first half. The lead held up at the end of the half as the Condors played and maintained a

suffering a 3«I

loss to

team Steaua

in

action

strong defensive game. As a defender moved up into the play, one of the forwards

for the

or the midfielder came hack and took his spot But something happened as the half ended. With the Condors leading I-O, the defence seemed to break down and disappear in the second half, as Steaua responded with three unanswered goals. Steaua’s first goal was scored by Marcel ^'Bicau on a great shot to the open lower ^corner of the Condor net. This was followed up by Steaua^s second goal of the

Community Indoor Soccer League

league

'

scored by Daniel Petrusa. This is where a bit of confusion sets in. The Condors scored what they thought was the tying goal, but it was disallowed by the referee as the other team had not yet crossed back to their half after their goal. Condors assistant coach Sanjeeve half,

Dhanapala explained the

situation.

an unwritten rule,” he said. “It happens all the time. Tbu get a couple seconds to celebrate, then you start with the “It’s

other team getting the kickoff.

Shawn Samuels keeps

line

the ball

away

from a Steaua player. (Photo by Rob Himburg)

is,

they shouldn’t be

The bottom on

celebrating

our side.”

The game also consisted of a lot of and grabbing, and when a

clutching

Steaua keeper loan Pop dives to stop a Condor

shot,

one

of the few they had. (Photo by

Rob Himburg)

The lack of skill may not be true, as Birau sealed his team’s victory with Ms second goal of the game with about five minutes remaining. and grabbing. The loss drops the Condors’ record to “They’re an older team,” he said. "They'^^ four wins and seven losses, placing them have limited skill in comparison to us. sixth in the league, while the victory lifted They're just trying to get the calls to go Steaua to a record of six wins, two losses Condor player got near a Steaua player, the Steaua team complained to the referee. Dhanapala said the other team’s age played a factor in the clutching

'

and

their way.” £

two, ties, putting

them

in third place.

:

Alumni, Condors lose heartbreakers By Charles Kuepfer

Sirio struck again shortly after to

regain Conestoga’s lead.

Conestoga’s two indoor soccer teams, the Condors and the

Alumni, suffered the same cmel fate

women’s

at the

invitational

tournament: they both lost in a shootout to the same team. It was a disappointing end for both teams who played well throughout the Feb. 6 tournament wMch Conestoga hosted, only to be outdone by the nerve-wracking devastation of a loss decided oh

penalty kicks.

The Condors

loss

was

especially

painful since they had earned a

Condor Karen Melanson bangs a shot through the legs of the Owen Sound goalkeeper. The Condors lost in a shootout to Owen Sound 3-2 to get knocked out of tournament play. (Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

(falo

V

Vs Detroit

bye through the first round of the tournament playoffs and had a well-rested team heading into their bout with Owen Sound. The Condors started the tournament well, clobbering Canadore College 7-0.

They followed with

win over Owen Sound, beating them 3-0 on two goals by Karen Melanson and one by Sasha Gruetzmacher. Conestoga finished the a

Sign

up

at tlie

Office

but

her

blasted

shot

A

five-minute overtime failed to

was held

to decide

who would go

to the finals.

The Condors

started

the tournament well, clobbering Canadore

College 7-0.

Three of the Condors shooters, Melanson, Jenn Melnyk and Gruetzmacher scored, while Sirio and Papazotos missed. Owen Sound converted on four of their five

penalty kicks to earn the

out of the tournament.

round

of the tournament playoffs with a the Condors ran into an

bye,

adrenaline

pumped Owen Sound

The

loss

knocked the Condors

Meanwhile, the Alumni failed to a bye through the first round of the tournament playoff's. They

cam

never losing

made

it

past the first round,

1-0 to

Owen Sound

game

also

Michelle Vandcrvalt replied for

Sound

3-1

Owen Sound

championship game.

team.

Owen

Sound’s

the

win

shootout

Alumni

averted

a

much- anticipated Condor/Alumni showdown. Conestoga started the match strong with Danicla Sirio giving the

Condors

an

early

to tic the

lead.

game, but

the

decide a winner and a shootout

Kingston on goals by Melanson and Angela Papazotos. first

off

crossbar.

victory.

over

DSA

pulled Owen Sound even. Melanson 'had a chance to win it for the Condors in regulation time

preliminary round drawing a 2-2 tie with St. Lawrence College of

After sitting out the

Sunday, Feb. 21 Ticket $65

Vandervalt’s second goal of the

game

in a

decided by penalty kicks. All five of Alumni’s shooters failed to score while Teegan Docherty scored the only goal Owen Sound needed to clinch the match. The tournament was won by the Kitchener Spirit, who beat Owen in

the

tournament’s


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS

15,

1999

— Page 17

Condors sweep indoor soccer

tournament By Lindsay Gibson and Rob Himburg

valuable player. Alycia

game

was a tournament to remember for both the Condor men’s and women’s indoor t

I

when

teams

soccer

they

both captured gold medals at the 11th annual Vikings

Tournament in Kingston on the weekend of Jan. 30-31.

Both

teams

played

games

controlling the

strong, to

their

advantage.

The

Condors throughout games as well. Condor manager Vince Alviano said the girls played well and showed positive attitudes. “They had fun and they for the

the five

play well

when

team

went

they have fim,” he

said.

On

team

the men’s their

in

way

their

to

ment, shutting out Brockville 8-0,

3-2.

College

Centennial 4-0 and

St.

4-0,

Lawrence

1 -0 .

of Royal

Kingston and Brockville

In the finals, the Condors in

Conestoga defenceman

ties

up a

tourna-

Conestoga

I

met

a battle

The Condors them for the gold, shutting them out by a score for the gold medal.

defeated

“Our goalkeeper kept us in

unidentified

ment's championship game. Conestoga defeated Kuepfer).

5-2,

up with Centennial

An

then

2-2,

dispose

Military College 4-0, Cornwall 7-2

Military

finals,

tied Centennial

undefeated through the tourna-

Royal

the

to

game

first

went on

women’s

Plummet

played an exceptional defensive

the

games and

I

think

of 3-0.

own

Shadd,

also

had an

MVP

of

in Paul Mouridian.

Condor

most valuable goaltender

assistant

coach Duane

who took over for Geoff who was down with the

Johnstone

award.”

team played well. “We worked as a team and

flu,

Duane Shadd, Condor

assistant

coach

The final medal game saw them defeat Centennial once again by a score of 5-1. Condor

said the

was named the tournament’s most

Boulton

mural

goal,

hockey teams Ontario on Feb. 5

across the

at

Conestoga College rec centre. The game was dominated by

first

award.”

S.-itidens

ball,

which

is

heavier than what

the players are accustomed to.

outdoor

rules

as

there

out the .soonng

To reach the

m the ttnal frame

tlte

Georgian,

oveicamc. a

2-1

Jason Snyder,

Conestoga was

who

coached

by

is captain

of

mst the

first

Jeremy Sabila scored period fur Conestoga

Tliey erupted for three goals in

the

third

period

with

Chris

Todd .Maitindalc and Chris King all finding the back Larosc,

Conestoga

finals,

biking

pne-day

2-0 heading into

third period.

of the most valuable goaltender

.

dto particated tournament Mohawk, La Cite and

the

were

trailed

Brian.

and Rob Horst jounded

in

other two goals for Conestoga,

Coiicsiogii

penod and goals by Chris

llie

who

.Slicrid.111 .

The tournament involved a futsal

scoring the

Chns Weisbrod scored

in

The toumament was organized by Marlene Ford, Conestoga’s athletic progams assistant, who. IS

a member-at-large for the

college committee on

campus

recreation.

The

boundaries and the walls could

Papazotos

the tournament for college extra-

by

shootout with

a

in

the scoring for Conc.stoga in the

was co-winner of the goalkeeper award for the tournament,

Ang

ed

Amtersons two .scconm period goals. Chris King opened

tournament was also played under

while

The Canadorc

m the champioaship game to win

came together out there,” he said. “Our goalkeeper kept us in the games and I think he was robbed

DenHaan

goalkeeper Stephanie

beat Canadorc 3-2

.

Conestoga defeated Niagara 5-0

The men their

he was robbed of the

By Charles Kuepfer

were

Doon Student Association Annual Awards

not be used for an advantage by either team. Criteria for

Awards

Certificate of Appreciation to college life has

been

Award of Distinction life

This space for

-

The Recipients of this award

are

members of the College Community whose contribution

significant.

-

The

recipients of this

award are members of the College Community who contribution

Award of Excellence - The highest award presented by the outstanding leadership and involvement in college life.

Doon

Student Association in recognition and appreciation of

Doon Student Association Award Nomination Form

$50 call

to college

has been outstanding.

Name

of Nominee:

Address:

City:

o Student

#:

Postal

Code:_

Program:

Faculty

School:

Staff/Administration

Dept.:

Award Nominated

Phone

Year:

for:

Certificate of Appreciation

Award of Distinction D Award of Excellence The above named nominee has made

the following contributions to College Life at Conestoga:

748-5366

Phone

Nominator:

#:

DSA, attention Becky Boertien Nomination Deadline Friday, February 26, 1999

Please submit your Nomination form to the

'


— SPOKE,

Page IS

Fcl>. 15,

1999

Weather dampens week of fun

Winterfest victim of the elements temperature and plenty of

rise in

By Brent Clouthier

W

interfest,

DSA,

crystallizing

winter

to

difficulty

in

1999,

Stokes,

“but people were

still

eager

Anything that involve snow was a big

participate.

the

the

event’s

popular

postponement; in

question before Winterfest

’99

It

future

officially

started

because

was no longer any

covering After a record snowfall in the

Plunge

Polar

first

was

there

month of December, Winterfest ’99 seemed destined for success.

the

been

has

ice

Stokes.

“The weather put a damper on some things, but

provides

“It

more of an incentive

for

people were

the

sculpting

to participate. Anything that

snow was a

didn’t involve

The tubing party and snow

eager

still

participants.”

big success.”

were both cancelled Patti Stokes

because of the lack of snow.

The

uncooperative

DSA. entertainment director

weather

of all the events, however.

The

Beach

Jack

Astor’s

Feb.

3,

had

a

held

The Camp Out

at

Wednesday, turnout of

for

Rene Panama

approximately 160 people.

MacPhee won

the trip to

ROOF

to raise

(Reaching

money Our

events affected.

The tubing strictly

success.

alternate planned.

“As

far as the

went,

activities

a

“The

fun

event

whole

with

behind

idea

everything was really successful,”

the Polar Plunge

re-scheduled

Tours and Steve Gnepe was the

said Stokes.

and dare people to jump

for

getting

the

plunge

involved in the Heart for Life

of

tickets

to a Buffalo Sabres

game provided

In the case of inclement weather,

by the DSA.

Stokes

says

has

backup

a

the

DSA

usually

plan

for

the

icy

is

be outside

to

Stokes

pond,”

“There’s not

was no

party, however,

Outdoor Friends) enjoyed similar

City Beach courtesy of Breakaway

winner

“We’re

Party

on

Conestoga pond.

Feb. 18.

general

campaign put on by the Heart and Stroke Foundation,”

wasn’t enough to halt the success

The was

was

any winter weather.

a

damper on

Patti

success.”

simply due to the lack of

January, however,

a

the entertainment director for the

didn’t

In

any of those

explains

“The weather put some things,” said

Conestoga had

festival,

to

hopes.

annual

College’s

end

rain put an

much

into

an

explains.

else

you can

do.”

Basketball tournament

Condors

seven teams

to host

By Rob Himburg

Colleges Athletic Association)

teams ” said Upsljaw.

The Conestoga Condors are hosting tihe Condor Cap Basketbafl tmamneat on the

^

I

here to learn mid raise

money for

OCAA entry next ycai.” he said. the Condors host the Burlington

panicipatc.

Toronto Heat

All

,

The tournament learning

will

experience

Action begins

Stars.'

be a

game

the

noon.

for

Feb.

26

at the

recreation centre at 6 pjn. when,.

will

The championship be

lield Feb.

28

at

1

Sanctuary

I

COUNSELLOR’S COI^R:

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1

or Seasonal Affective Disorder?

Do you

1

Winter Blahs

1 1 1

lack energy and feel like sleeping more?

Are you always eating and gaining weight? Do you feel depressed? During the winter months, many of us have these symptoms and want to get away from the snow, cold and dark days. We call it the “winter blahs”. For one in

a

more

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

SAD

fifty

Canadians, this

is

depression that occurs yearly during the

Four times as many first

women

as

men

serious problem called is

fall

a

form of clinical

and winter months.

are affected,

and

it

usually

occurs in early adulthood. Researchers believe the sleep-

related

hormone, melatonin,

the winter

when

is

overproduced by some people

in

the days are shorter and darker. Bright light

1 blocks the release of melatonin, and people with SAD have 1 found bright light treatments to be very effective. 1 For any of us, more light will help in the winter. You can try 1 taking more walks outside, participating in winter sports, turn1 ing on more lights inside and yes, of course, going south during 1 March Break! 1 If you suspect you may have SAD, you can talk to staff in 1 Health Services, Counselling or the Special Needs Department I for more information. I l°I

puU

then great, but we’re

The

In

i

the

McMa<ttei

off,

pm

12:30

i

include Star-N,

one

Ahunni. Puma All Stars London Ramblers, Kingston All Stars, Brock Alumni and the

“These teams arc better than 95 per cent of the OCAA (Ontano

Mon. Feb

Burlington All

in the

Seven other senitMT men s teams from across Ontario will also

weft ktiiyd

I

“If we get to the finals and

The other seven teams tournament

Condors, said Upshaw.

1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I i 1

mt

Pi(iiv6t

Thursday, February 18 Due to the low water level of the pond, the event will take o different twist this year. If you are daring to plunge. details are available at the DSA Office. ,

Funds raised Heart

and

be

directed to the Stroke Foundation. will

Doon Student Assoolatlon


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS

IS,

1999

-

Page 19

Making a comeback

Condors beginning to win again By Charles Kuepfer

Regardless of whether or not

“Any

C

can go out and

line

onestoga’s varsity hockey

score and any

team couldn’t have picked time

better

a

to

start

line

can

the

in

the

in

championship

national

Mike

Condors’ assistant captain

However, they have turned things

hockey

to take a

Colleges

Ontario

Athletic

not

last thing

and be

Ontarios)

national

the

in

championships,”

said

Mike Traynor. look good on you.”

assistant captain

doesn’t

squeaker victory By Lindsay Gibson

It

women

Nights Feb 2 and

Alumni,

met

they

vriwn

Alumni

won

1

-the

-0

who luve been

I

when

in first

season, did not plav

place

ail

ilicir

best,

as they arc

inclined to ‘crush

by a much

mor^.

imposing

think

than they did

Ihe

we can

“It

Traynor put

it,

get third

.

“the wheels

fell

improved

and

is

has

new

“It’s

the

current

team,

after

our

home

Anything can happen.”

depth.

who

in

is

his

third

Mike

season with the Condors, said that

now

rink.

more

the

team has four

Traynor,

Condors assistant captain ’

solid lines

and six solid defenceman.

“Any

line

can go out and score

line

can play defence,”

of

wins and seven and has three games remaining. They play their next two at home against Seneca on

said Tra)mor.

Traynor Conestoga best, but

he

said

talent

may

not

-our

home

home

rink

wise

be

the

advantage

likes the

they have being the “It’s

seven

losses

.

and against the Sault on

Feb. 17

team.

Feb. 19.

They wrap up

Anything

can happen.”

off.”

But

and

and any

The Condors started the season off on the right foot, winning their first three games before, as

the season on the

road with a game against

Conestoga now has a record

l\/1

Humber

on Feb. 25.

i

r~"i

g

Wednesday, February 24

in

4:30 p.m. The Other

of 11 crowd ol five people

Ironl

Room

final scoic stayed at l-(»

which

1.S

place

Alumni

whose

luiusiial

for the fiisl

The women,

current

w^3n-losl-tle

record stands at

used

laigcr rnatgin

still

Amy

Aiumni's

YoiMcll scored on the Nights

he

“We

vwisn’t until just before half-

time for the

now

roster changes at the start

of the winter semester,

Board of Directors

Alumni claim

was too close

spot but he noted that things look

place,” said Traynor.

we want to do is even make our own playoffs

“The (the

They are now poised

champi-

onship.

record to 500.

serious shot at a playoff spot in the

haven’t solidified a playoff

before they started winning.

around, winning four of their last their

still

a lot better

Association’s

games and pulling

Traynor,

some

Traynor,

Traynor said that the Condors

December.

iciun

action

because they are the host team.

play defence.”

The Condors stumbled into the new year on a six-game losing streak, failing to win a single game in both November and

It

sees

Ontario finals, they will play

winning.

fives

Conestoga

i 0-0-2,

embarrassing

to

are

Agenda

Items will include: dental plan, budget approval, election results.

then

opponents. Asiisl.ini

“The Nights are a very quick and aggressive

their

team and they out hus-

performance.

"We

comiol the “The Nights are a \cry quick and aggressive team and they out hu.stled us." usually

game,” she

usr

tled

director

athletic

Mai lone Ford who oiganized the Alumni team said the women w'cie not happy witli

Marlene Ford.

l

assiMant afldeiic director

said.

ord said the Alumni

won on

smarts and experience, aomc-

Unng

the other younger teams

don't have yet.

game

Tlie

got off to a slow

slut for both teams, as weren’t quite on the ball

.Alumni s

and

The

aggressively, afwaya

competition

appeared to be matched as many attempts were made on both nets to no prevail. closely

Hie

Andrea girls

Walker

K.crn

th^

Ileroux

played

on

tihe ball.

plci>ed

well

as

pasMng and strong attempts on the .1

te iin

with

strong

Nights’ net.

Upcoming Intramural Games Ice

Hockey

Tuesday February 17 4:30 p.m. First vs. A team

Gotta get a message out? Advertise

playoffs Best of 3

Ball

Hockey

Information

Not Available For More Information contact ext. 452 at the Rec. Centre

Our

in

SPOKE

and we reach as many as 5,000 readers weekly. Classified ads (up to 25 words) can be run by students for only $5 ($10 for non-students) which means it will cost you only 1/10 of a cent to tell each reader about the wonders of that old rates are reasonable

guitar.

Give us a call at 748-5366. (Cash up front; deadline is 10 a.m. Monday, one publication)

week

prior to


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