Issuu on Google+

ISO launched and ready to go By Lisa Wilhelm

and

Tibbits

Conestoga College continuously seeks opportunities for improve-

The logo

ISO 9001 launch

held Jan. 28 at the

“Our goal here

is

ISO 9001 college

is

going to try to achieve.

to ensure that

the

reflects the

registration that the

Doon campus.

we become one of

then

the

graphics design.

ment, Conestoga president John Tibbits told the

George

new ISO logo, designed by Wade Convay of

unveiled

Doon

Brian Bambrick,

Student

best

Association promotions assistant,

colleges in the world, that we have world class standards which will be in the interest of all employees

then announced the winners of the prior to the launch.

and certainly in the interest of all our students,” said Tibbits. “I

T-shirts.

think

there’s

a

ISO trivia contest, which was held Winners who were in attendance received ISO

tremendous

get involved in this process and

the turnout at the laimch. “It

I

was

think it will help us to improve our

the

operations so that we can continue

Jeffrey.

Bill Jeffrey, a member of the ISO committee, said the launch was to commemorate the completion of

the construction of the system that will

implement ISO 9001

Conestoga.

at

Another reason for the launch

and Martha George

ISO 9001 banner

unveil the

was to make students and teachers at Conestoga aware that the college is implementing ISO

John

9001, an international series of generic quality standards that

campuses on

provide guidelines for establish-

the first of the three to occur,

She said the board

ing a quality assurance system

began with opening remarks from Jeffrey and then comments from

the college’s

within an organization.

Launches were also held at Guelph and Waterloo the

Tibbits

student Wade

designed by graphics

The launch

Jan. 28. at

Doon, which was

(Photo by

Convay.

usa wiiheim)

of the board of governors, also brought comments of support. is

excited by

embarkment

into

we

She also offered the board’s full

JohnTibbits.

Martha George, vice-president

support for the college’s initiative.

wanted,”

said

“We have

the students’, board’s support

and that’s what we wanted.” Bambrick, a student member of the steering committee, said he was also pleased with the turnout. “It went over really well. (The cafeteria) was full and that’s really what we were hying to get,” Bambrick said. “As for students, there could have been more, but I think it went over really well.” With the ISO steering committee already in place, Jeffery said the is to develop and apply

next step the

ISO requirements

to

become

should

take

between 15 and 20 months

to do,

This

registered.

he

ISO 9001.

was exactly

excellent. It

launch

employees’ and

be proud of either being or being employees

to

he was happy with

Jeffrey said

opportunity for everyone here to

said.

“Then

we’ll have another big

celebration,” said Jeffrey.

Parking lots targeted

Security reports rash of car break-ins By

students) have

“If they (the

Elizabeth Sackrider

anything in their vehicles that

Lock your doors and put your valuables in the trunk, security

Condors escape wifli a 4-3

officials

are warning students

after a recent rash

victory over Vipers.

of parking-lot

.

.

.

suggest they either cover it

it

or put

in the trunk of their vehicle,”

head

Hunter,

Allan

thefts.

said

Seven cars were broken into in January, with three of the thefts

security at the college.

occurring in one day.

sports equipment are targeted

About $3,000 worth of stereo equipment was stolen from a vehicle in parking

lot 12,

a cell

phone was taken from a car in parking lot 5 and a stereo and CDs were taken from a vehicle in i

visible

parking

on

lot

Jan. 26.

2 in a looting frenzy

is

and it is from the outside, I would

not fastened in

CDs,

cell

of

phones, stereos and

by

who

been working with on the

has

someone acting

problem.

manner,

“We have

asked for extra patrols

in this area,”

Hunter

parking

unnoticed.

generally get to

causing us (security) a

fair

said Hunter

right

Since the college

really very

“It is

know

popping a door lock. “When you have 2,600 vehicles

during the primary class hours between 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The large, busy parking lots make it easy for the thieves to go

amount of concern,”

security

away,” said Hunter

most have gained entry by breaking a side window or by In

thieves

difficult to

thieves

attack

see

vehicles from parking lots this

of the theft cases, the

1 1

generally

let

you

in a suspicious

Thieves have also taken three

said.

spread over

who

If

students.

sister

Waterloo regional police

them

By

all,”

he

lots, it is

monitor

said.

parking in the same

lot for

eight months, however, students

know

others

who

use the spaces.

“Be

alert for

your brother or

year.

Two of

the vehicles have

been recovered by the

Highway 40 1

,

it is

is

police.

located by

i

not unusual for

a car thief to pull off and “snatch

;

another ride,” said Hunter. “We have recovered other stolen vehicles

from

other

jurisdictions here,” said Hunter,

has suggested the thefts are being done by individuals outside the college community.

who

;


Pane

— SPOKE, Feb.

2

8,

1999

NEWS

Student association raises technology fee to $80 Thonnson

The new

lab will be located beside the

current lab in ^

ppUege’s^^iliary

ipii|

y’s

Other

are also to be purchased for

tlie

Room

on Jan

students

must pay

^|:he colleges lec w'as mid-range. in

^ ranged from

Fees

$454 65 1

^promispwasmadeto students ml 997 $70 for the coming year He changed his mind. at

in the past, covered the

whole cost of upgrading computer equipment, and the increase of SIO per student would generate enough money to pay for the new 30-computer open access lab

DSA

donations were the focus of the Doon Student Association (DSA) meeting held on Jan. 26 in the Sanctuary’s Other

minutes, the board decided the executive would create

how

the

Key

Performance Indicators survey would be carried out from Feb. 1-5. Ellen Menage, DSA promotions

After a discussion that lasted at least 30

ftieir

^hind th^oalie. Mike the

DSA

own brochure

Harris, chief returning officer for

elections,

outlined

the

election

schedule. Campaigning runs from Friday,

29

-

Friday, Feb.

place Monday, Feb. 1

8.

on

The

1

12.

Voting takes

5 to Thursday, Feb.

unofficial results will

be available

Friday, Feb. 19.

than buying items for the bags.

including

participating in the

bursaries

the

at

student

DSA

also suggested the

DSA offices.

their offices.

DSA director of suggested the DSA

president Kristin

in the

how once

option considered was giving the computers to teachers who don’t have computers for

finals to

left

from orientation packages the 200 bags required.

DSA

motion was also passed to donate $3,000 to the peer

life,

also discussed

One

at the rec centre.

use pens and highlighters

registrar’s office.

A

used

Becky Boertien,

$100 scholar-

can pick up forms

DSA

OCAA provin-

and national hockey

be held

$250

10

The meeting

to dispose of four computers

donate grab bags to hockey teams

will donate $3,000 in

for

board and informed them of

recreation services, outlined

Jan.

may be added

centre, has requested that the

and scholarships again

apply

go with another company.

The other auxiliary fee discussed in detail was the proposed dental plan that

representative at the recreation

cial

bursaries and five to

the

alumni’s services.

would be better business to stick with the aassistant, gave an iqjdate on activities., same company that does the health plan. It Tiel^.,were still available for the Buffalo was also suggested that brochures ^ahres'hM trip and ftte’seafri are four rows quoting prices from the specific in.surancc

tutoring service at the college.

Charitable

ships. Students

^d

out ire promotion proeess holding tiS referendum would be imetliical because it

company not be used because tliey would give students the wrong idea about the rates they could expect! f the ns A was to

Diane Santos, media relations

year

to

Monica Himmelman,

officer, introduced herself

donates $6,000 for bursaries, scholarships, tutoring

By Jaime Clark

this

^

would sec t^igible benefits from the technology tec in software and hardware, not in the hiring of technicians, said McGregor.

to student tuition next year,

In other business,

alumni services

Jack Fletcher, director of student and

Tara Llanes, vice-president of education, suggested the insurance company carrying

technology fee was implement-

icn the

ed, that they

explained the technology fee has not,

the promotion of the dental plan

DSA elections Feb.. 15-18.

a

^^ex>, C^^ga%^^eiSrfn,t fe«^-,.was -ompared to other colleges at the meeting,

dental plan.

company and

would be done leading up to the referendum held on the issue during the

m»mnrgm^

te i^^Ae tseclsadlo^^^^^ though he had approached the board

bursaries

how

don*t^ave the government money "^%^^^techaolo^,” McGregor said k:

wh^

discussed the quotes and coverage

options from one insurance

^^toology fee,

police, aj^^o^lie^^ ^the

Room. The DSA

affairs,

Zip drives, wiring and new printers ^pll also be :pirchased with the T999’^0

i^plaining

He

Gerry Cleaves, vice-president of student

coming

be distributed.

It was also decided the would hold the referendum to show the student body their support for the

to

DSA

subject.

year.

The h,o^#xesiiattwo'«^

x^Gratnt

pending a student referendum on the

Internet

and firewall upgrades

servers, software

wk«-^S'

tte%Qon

2A1 1-3. Five new

to

The executive possibility

over

computers to students and employees of the college. The

fill

DSA

Murphy fill

also discussed the

of auctioning off the

decided to hold an auction

for the computer.

It will be open to any student or employee who

the

bags with items on hand rather

wishes to make a bid.

Doon Student Association Annual Awards Criteria for

Awards

Certifleate of Appreciation to college life has

been

Award of Distinction life

-

The Recipients of this award

members of the College Community whose

-

The

recipients of this

award are members of the College Community who contribution

The

highest award presented by the outstanding leadership and involvement in college life. -

Doon

Name of Nominee:_ Address:

City:

Student

m

Peer Services t, Dotn SDidM Anodtfon

NOT ALL STUDENTS LEARN IN THE SAME WAY OR AT

Phone

#:

Postal

Code:_

Program:_

a Faculty

to college ®

Student Association in recognition and appreciation of

Doon Student Association Award Nomination Form

THE SAME SPEED

Year:

School:

Staff/Administration

Award Nominated

contribution

significant.

has been outstanding.

Award of Excellent

are

Kristen Murphy, Doon Student Association president, presents Lynn Robbins, student-services counsellor with a $3,000 donation for peer services. (Photo by Jaime Clark)

Dept.:

HIRING A TUTOR MIGHTJUST BE YOUR ANSWER

for:

Certificate of Appreciation

o Award of Distinction D Award of Excellence The above named nominee has made

the following contributions to College Life al Conestoga:

Nominator:

Phone Please submit your Nomination form to the

DSA.

attention

#:

Becky Boertien

Nomination Deadline Friday, February 26, 1999

DROP IN TO STUDENT SER VICES FOR MORE DETAILS


SPOKE, Feb.

NEWS

8,

1999

— Page 3

Vice-chair promoted

Board of governors gets new chairperson By Melissa

Dietrich

have on opportunity to help ensure that

programs

The current executive

director of the Order of Nurses (VON) for Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin has been elected as chair of the board of governors for the 1999-2000 academic year at Conestoga College.

needs as

Victorian

nities that

Hanmer

Sandra Hanmer accepted the nomination from her fellow members in September of 1998, after being a

studies

certified

as

we

through

the

serve,” she said.

said she has several responsibili-

think

“I

I

can bring some strong

some new

in

decision to

my

trends

Hanmer

involvement

and

ilar

Hanmer

it

because

board of governors chair

I

is

we need the

students to

can

bring some strong influence in some

new

Hanmer

“I have a responsibility to the student

show

interested in

in

that

the

board

of the

and supportive of issues that and providing the

opportimities

for

those

issues

to

the ministry to obtain feedback on behalf of

said one of the issues the board

be

faculty

I

Married and a mother of four girls, also sits on all of the college committees, the provincial board for the VON, VON Canada, the district health

look forward to working with the members of the management group, the to achieve this registration,” she said.

being a part of the boar4

the college to ensure they are meeting the needs of students and their education.

“We

background includes a masters in health science from the University of Toronto and a bachelor of Hanmer’s

now,

with the coimcil of regents, the college and

be addressing this year is the college’s journey to ISO 9001 registration.

are facing the students

educational

and the students as the college

Hanmer, who

is

the sixth

is

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

will

is

director of

the current chair for the board of governors at Conestoga College.

my industry and bring these trends

the students have for higher education.

it is

VON

work with-

in our industries,” she said. “I think I

addressed,” she said.

especially in the exciting time

Sandra Hanmer, executive

a strong linkage between the

employers in the area as well as the needs “I feel that

not

out from other board members.”

important that

the programs reflect the needs

is

trends in

population to is

is,

as education, yet very sim-

some ways.

“There

Sandra Hanmer,

have

said the fact that the college

same

education system and the other industries

appropriate placements,” she said.

Waterloo Region makes

and

job as the

said being involved in a public-

exactly the

members.”

much the role the college has

have

to

Hospital.

said her leadership, coaching

sector industry, as health care

value the opportunities for students in this

area

assistant

chair of the governing board for the college.

in

trends out from other board

programs.

community and as an employer,

was the

facilitating skills will help in her

and bring these

industry

Conestoga College, especially in the nursing and related health-science

in the

to that she

Hospital and before that she worked at

at

“I value very

VON since

executive director of Stratford General

its

Hanmer

committees she belongs to and her job she has always been involved with the students

of

leadership as the board tries to fulfill

She has been a member of the

Grand River

become a board member was because of her work within health care. Through the

executive

College

1997 and prior

influence

said her original

care

Canadian

ties as the chair. They include facilitating monthly board meetings and providing

member on the board for

vice-chairs last year.

health

a

Health Services Executives.

mandate.

two years and serving as one of the

Hanmer

geography and environmental from McGill University. She is also

in

arts

all

meet the students well as the employers and commuat the college

woman

Hanmer

tries

coimcil for Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin

and the mental-health/long-term committee for the health council.

to chair

the board, said she will also be working

care

KPl student surveys to cost

budget

six per cent of governors’ By Melissa

A

College where present to speak to

Dietrich

discussion of details involved

in the data collection for defining

Key Performance

the

Indicators

(KPl’s) that measure colleges’ per-

formance was included in the agenda of the board of governors meeting on Jan. 26. The funding for the KPI program was discussed and it is estimated that the program will take up six

Two members of

regents were present to inform the

included;

board of the council’s purpose and

Bernadette Giet, Maria Lacko, Jen

issues they will be addressing this

MacKinnon, Ambrose Garvey, Hulya Erol, Lisa Cashmore,'

year.

students

Participating

Jackson,

Sheila

Crespo,

Katherine

Meyer,

Kristi

Michelle

included a

also

detailed report for the financial-

audit committee.

A

copy of the

for the

second year in a row. They also

of the board members.

One of the

other items discussed

per cent of the board’s budget.

aimounced that Conestoga would be holding the competition in the

by the committee was the Y2K issue, which was addressed by

Conestoga students are currently

year 2000.

Tony Pimenoff, director of information and technology services

completing student satisfaction

KPI

surveys as part of the

What

data

Two of the

college’s graphic arts

students were also present to

tell

for the college.

the board about winning the poster

that the

and pin-design contest for the Ontario Skills Canada competition. Heather Miehm, a first-year

tests

will

from the surveys and where they will

be stored was also discussed

at the meeting.

student,

Chaired by Sandra Hanmer is

who

the executive director of the

Victorian Order of Nurses for

Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin,

was attended by 17

the meeting

people including students, faculty

won

the pin contest.

Jug Vagha, a third-year student

was

winner of the poster

the

contest.

The event ally at

that takes place annu-

Conestoga College will be

celebrating

its

10th year in 1999.

and management at Conestoga College and those representing the industry of Kitchener- Waterloo and surrounding area.

Some

of

addressed

other

during

items

the the

meeting

included the presentation to the

board of Conestoga students

who

had recently won awards for

their

work. First, five

of the 10 marketing

students that took part in

Ontario

Colleges

Competition

held

at

Durham

result

of the

new millennium.

The computers used by

faculty

and support staff at the college are still being tested for possible glitches.

The next meeting on Feb. 22.

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told the board

CLASSIFIEDS

the

Marketing

And

He

committee has run several on the computers used by students and they do not expect any major problems to occur as a

be done

with the information gathered

collection.

MEET THE TOP DOG.

budget review was given to each

Sebastian and Joanne Scott.

The group won first place

The meeting

Canada^

the council of

the board about the competition.

170 University Ave. W.

Canatto'Hr 15 Charles St. W.

886-0400 741-2600 Take

it

Easy.

Take the Greyhound.

www.greyhound.ca


Page 4

— SPOKE, Feb.

Anger

8,

1999

enough

isn’t

I’m scared. No, I didn’t rent Scream 2

my car, without gramming 91 1 into my

or get a

and keeping a finger

hovering Feel free

don’t walk anywhere at night,

I

even

little

to

procell

too involved in

above the “send” button.

a recent episode

to call

of The

don’t forget to call

X-Files.

am

I

talking

me

paranoid, but if

I’m angry

comer

of

friend, usually

that

makes me wonder about the

foot-

store

at night

without a

aware that stabbings,

and sex-

ual assaults are incidents that occur every day, the victims splashed

needs

garage of my

million pieces.

my help and isn’t really me into a

A new phenomenon, well, new to me

at least,

has begun to emerge in

our twin

During the past two

cities.

woman

assaulted a

home, a cab

driver

will

soon be

upon end

us.

is

it

the

computer glitch, or bug, that will cause mankind’s downfall. For those of you back from another universe, the Y2K bug is a

computer affliction that is the of computer programmers’ short-sighted implementation of two digits to record year dates, as in 99 instead of 1999. The potential for chaos is the result of embedded microchips misreading the year 2000 as 1900. result

Surely, the hard-line apocalypse-

fare

moms

and service clubs. How his sermons about restraint and restructuring translate into improving and upgrading is anybody’s guess. These groups, however, seem to get it. To others, “Common Sense” has become dollars and cents. Hungry kids and sick people appear to be pesky road

minimum-wage

peons

running industrialists’ squeaky-clean factories. Last Thursday, the king of

Ontario

made

his usual

rounds of

bumps beneath

this

Sherman

ward off looters. There are also Web sites flogging emergency rations, survival domes and property in the middle of Nowhere, U.S.A. Not every Y2K bug problem yields anxiety. Perhaps you’ll go to an Interact machine and find an extra zero attached to yom bank

lava bursts?

Maybe you won’t get a long-distance telephone bill for three months. Conestoga College may

waves? But two

foot

on a

digits

his

busy

knife.

Money now

prematurely

you

mail

and

of Elmira, needn’t fear a man who’s slashed the Environment Ministry’s budpolluters, like Uniroyal

healthier

accordingly,

respectively.

opinion

polls,

enemy for

public

is

the

king’s

nostrils are sniffing out election strategies.

approaches.

bodies and stronger minds.

Meanwhile, the naive and the well-to-do sleep well, the

cuts

Even taxes

create

will

over an opposition that Harris says “stands for absolutely nothing.”

drearning

get and staff by a half and a third Uniroyal’s real

filled with welfare pennies. Voters must choose their messiah

These murky lines between Tory rhetoric and official govenunent announcements have blurred further, resembling a pre-election smear campaign. Taxpayers have become docile enough to sponsor Tory television ads with hardly a whimper. Should Elmira’s residents,

that

someday

only in history books,

exist

leather

bound and funded from piggy

dismiss Harris’s unscripted suggestions to boycott Uniroyal’s products? Isn’t that like refusing to

why? The simple

.

truth is that you,

and every other commoner

powerless to solve it. It’s our own human nature of putting off problems despite long-term consequences that landed us in this mess anyway and now we just have to live with it. So whether you decide to bunker underground with kegs of distilled water, freeze-dried rations and lots

of batteries, or simply forgo anxiety and find solace in apathy, take whatever Y2K problems you encounter in stride. The only thing you need to arm yourself with is patience and a sense of humour; it may be the only resource you have.

The sky

is

not falling, but come

2000, it may be a closer to the ground. Jan.

1,

little

all,

Elmira’s shoppers don’t

where evil

to

go

to avoid

know

buying these

goods, anyway.

The

premier’s sincerity, however, should not be on trial here, anymore than his soul. That’s another’s jurisdiction.

As

voters, our job

is

to decide if

the strikes, the pain, the losses and the gains are truly worth it.

Hopefully, voters are not like sheep lining up for a regular shearing.

If the messiah has truly arrived at Queen’s Park, then business won’t

survive without him. Others

may

not survive him.

Few

will ever forget him.

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

News

Features and Issues Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy Sankar; Multi-media Editor: Neven Mujezinovic; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Janet Wakutz; Circulation Managers: Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca address

I,

are

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor: Sarah Thomson; Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthier; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg;

’s

board a

bus that didn’t even stop? After

Keeping Conestoga College connected

'iij

Editor: Jaime Clark;

SPOKE

your

banks

rules Ontario,

tank of deficit reduction. Elitism and business will mix well as the new millennium

Toyota plants and chambers of commerce simply adore their king, while penniless wretches scatter before

S;PO KI

Another militia-style group, called the Home Defence Forces, suggests stockpiling weapons to

wishful thinkin g,

of course,' but it is no m<jre ridiculous than the extreme amount of hysterical paranoia surrounding this malignant critter. Sure, you can cower in your basement along with all the other cultists and fanatics under an imminent cloud of doom, but

Bomb 2000

riots.

is all silly,

is

sense means dollars and cents

Waterloo Region’s Rotary clubs

or the

This

account.

One thousand

end?

diploma before the semester completed.

it?

co-author of Time and guru of a Y2K safe-haven movement, said he expects people to die of hypothermia and starvation as the bug causes industrial shutdowns, stock-market crashes and food

When we turn a we turn a blind

eye to ourselves.

fill

watchers something

were for p ining of more biblical proportions. Clouds of swarming locusts? Simultaneous, worldwide

heeled supporters, however, rarely walk the same boulevards as wel-

are our neighbours.

Ed Youden,

Y2K

These well-

doesn’t

society will revert to savagery.

year 2000

elite.

It just

Acknowledging the

blind eye to them,

really spell the

grim

however. Instead,

become

we lose sight of

us to acknowledge that the victims

not enough.

these

tidal

the problem.

the violence is

with

tions,

Ontario’s

around us

filled

the basis for these prognostica-

charm

To be angry about that occurs

But there are those who would have you believe when the clock strikes past 00:00 hours on Jan. 2000, planes will fall from the sky, nuclear devices will detonate and

is

2 a.m.?

victims of violent crimes will force

does

is

at

faces of violence

ties too.

microprocessor?

The

you considered who

being affected by the

blurred into “them”,

you with the same sense of dread,

from the Book of Revelations are not

Mike Harris continues to

When was

crime to happen. Rapes and murders occur in small communi-

We must consider the human faces

The

really

When

city for

was stabbed

near.

is

was

don’t have to live in a large

Action must accompany our words.

Does 2000

the last time

I

own

in her

Citations

times. Premier

by vio-

lives that are affected

lence on a daily basis.

assaulted

You

prophecies.

at

and

sexually

you out of your sleep

now.

Internet

hacksaw

was

piercing wail of that siren that jolted

coming.

Despite

woman

own neighbourhood.

news have never had an impact on me, until

Doomsday

having the tact of a rusty

another

across the evening

Armageddon

Common

repeatedly over a cab fare, and

cities

really

weeks, an intruder has sexually

sicko that will hack

our

in

on a bus. must have been turning a blind eye to the crimes happening in my

from those who prey on “the weak.” that I can’t assume a person stopped at the side of the road

some

building.

am

I

invasions, shootings

the generally peaceful confines of

I’m angry

I

While

home

me

really

hear when

to the

a male, to protect

voice behind me in the underground

I

you do,

walk

walk to my car at night. The kind that makes me jump when I hear an unexpected steps

phone

me angry too.

that I can’t

about the kind fear

combat violence

to

is

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be

liable for

any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

rejection

or

MS Word file would be helpful.

tain

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, Feb. 8,

1999

— Page S

Keeping happy in the coid

Chasing away the winter blues By Neven Mujezinovic Are the winter blues getting you dovm? If the answer is ‘yes,’ don’t Crystal

Seigmiller,

first-year

despair, because you’re not alone.

materials-management

In fact, over 25 million people

worldwide

student.

Klobucar also had words of encouragement for those who do not have the time or money to do winter sports. “Just go out and

have fun and do creative things, or even spend time with kids.”

by

Ryan Hicks and Lisa Cashmore,

Seasonal Affective Disorder, a

second-year marketing students,

affected

are

condition that strikes during the

agreed the best

long, cold winters.

is

The symptoms of the disorder include

depression,

lethargy and

In

irritability.

conducted

survey

a

anxiety,

at

Conestoga College, students were asked

if

they had any tips or sug-

gestions to help keep the winter

to

be

way

to stay

happy

“Just do stuff outside. Don’t

sit

second-year

Hicks,

way to keep busy and

exercise as a

marketing student.

stay happy. Others had different

recommendations

another

important ingredient to seasonal contentment. Crystal Seigmiller, a first-year

“Just don’t

student,

suggested winter sports. She said a lot of people neglect physical activity in the winter time, which

one reason they might down.

feel

is

“Any winter Jackie Klobucar, second-year general-business student.

home and

and down-

vegetate.”

those

who

are crirninally minded,”

men

Three Kitchener

have been

charged with different counterfeit offences

reminding Kitchener-

Waterloo that counterfeit money

is

a serious problem

“There were 517 separate times last

year that

we encountered

Kitchener- Waterloo,

In

counterfeit bills turn

during Oktoberfest at fest halls,

and stores The reason counterfeit turn up so often at

convenience

at

make a

Moore.

bill

said

police

the

money

that the criminal can

is

small purchase with a $50

and receive

money

real

for

“I don’t think

it’s

don’t think

it’s

he said. “I think it problem in any metropolitan

area.”

more

Moore agreed

that

is

it

Stajf Sgt.

Counterfeit

Waterloo but says the increased

especially

amount of

crisp, said Shantz.

counterfeit Canadian

currency has occurred within the

“In the ’70s, ’80s and early ’90s,

money.

It

was

US

and 20 per cent Canadian,” he said. “Now, I’d

about 80 per cent say

it’s

Both Shantz and Moore said technology is partly to blame for the increase in Canadian and

it’s

“Now

feel the

it’s

waxy bills,

bumps

are

in the

engraved,” he said.

Shantz and Moore agree the solution

the problem is some of Canada’s cur-

to

redesigning rency.

in Australia,

for example, has clear

panes and watermarks paper.

Not only

easier

duplicate,

seen as an opportunity to

photocopy

it’s

a

real

new ones which

“You can like

to

The currency used

the opposite.”

counterfeit bills.

as

paper

past five to 10 years.

US

Sandy Shantz

money has

opposed

feel

was mostly

tip

to the point.

much it,” said Popovic. Edmond Kwan, a first-year

pretty

He

said students should

do

it

“Just don’t tate,” said

for you, then

sit at

Doug Johnson, and

security student.

first-year law administration

home and vege-

Kwan.

Johnson,

a

first-year

student, the key to

To do

lot.

the gym.

in

partying was a good way to gp, but he said people basically should

not worry about too

would be

to ^exercise a

aerobics, rrm

Then you

and go to up

will stay

much and

to stay stress free.

try

I

“Take time to enjoy yourself,” said Johnson

healthy,” said Seigmiller.

nursing

First-year

students,

Jennifer Ford and Melanie Hunter,

in

P*hotos by

Neven Mujezinovic

Jennifer Ford, nursing student.

first-year

on overcoming

different ideas

K-W

black.

offences involving

money

coimterfeit

are indictable

and punishable by up

to 14 years

imprisonment. Innocent passers, that is people

who

are

unknowing-

in possession of or passing

“When a case like that occiurs, we analyze that person to determine not,” said

if

he/she had intent or

Moore. the

incidence

money has

of

increased

a change in the design of Canada’s currency, said Moore.

a

has

second-year

any plans to take action regarding

a problem here

of

long been an issue in Kitchener-

it

any

any more of a else,”

Sgt.

“I

than anywhere else,”

problem here than anywhere

and

a

the Canada, government has not announced

Sgt.

especially during Oktoberfest.

Popovic,

throughout

K-W Record Jan. 25,

Sandy Shantz said counterfeit money has been a problem for a number of years, Staff

“My

counterfeit

major problem”, according to an article in the

is

happiness.

Although

change.

a “major,

is

agreed that exercise

counterfeit bills, are not charged.

regional police Staff Sgt. Nigel

Although

materials-management

bills

Shantz,

of the house,”

law and security administration, agreed that

ly

convenience stores, aceording to

friends more.

drink and party.

first-year

nightclubs.

counterfeit money,” said Waterloo

counterfeit

up most often

short

Doug

In Canada,

said Moore.

Ivan

student

money a problem

By Judy Sankar

my

to stay out

If that doesn’t

marketing student,

had

said Klobucar.

Anything

do something to occupy the mind.

Edmond Kwan,

and

is fine: skiing,

skating, cross-country hill,”

Counterfeit

sport

going to the movies,

like

gestions.

at

sit

cold.”

general-business

“I

marketing student, had a few sug-

construction-

Jackie Klobucar, a second-year

to

feel good.

“Don’t worry too much. That’s

engineering student. “Get away.

Get out of the

be doing things outside in order

management-studies student, was

adding

Cashmore, second-year marketing student. Lisa

Hunter, on the other hand, has to

Cashmore,

“Go some place warm for spring break,” said Dan Machmueller, a second-year

said Ford.

says Hunter.

make.

to

is

home. “I love to get a movie and popcorn and make it fim,”

around and watch T\C’ said Hicks. “Be with your friends,” said

The majority of respondents

Ryan

For Ford the ultimate serenity in the

going out with

active.

blues at bay.

suggested outdoor activities and

the winter blahs.

but it,

is

in

the

difficult to

one tries to image turns out

if

the

it

window-

The incidence

of counterfeit

money

in

K-W

is

a serious problem.

(Staged photo by Judy Sankar)


5

'

Page 6

— SPOKE, Feb.

8, 1*)‘)9

Doon Student Association

elections ’99

M^^

andidates decided for upcoming 1999-2000 schooi year

By Jaime Clark

a

The

Conestoga

50

signatiircs

run

College

who

students

(E^) ^den|" 'and

the

for

Association president,

or

more

Doon

Tara

ro

Steve

Mce-proidciu of student affairs and vicepresident of operations met chief

Nfike

Hams

on Jan

returning

m the Other

Room their

ediuation

ol

Coleriaii.

a

tirsl-vear

candidates ran

Tlic position of

Manage, who

DSA

will

autoinaticallj

replace

ihc

position

September 1999.

of

The

positioti

is

r^k of vice-iui^deat

She

assistant.

assistant. but decided not to nin for president

so he could focus more on his school work.

Cleaves,

in

protocol for posting, as well as

Bambrick, promotions as.sistant .and Jessica Umlandt, public

surrounding promotion

be

expenses. -

,

be

will

graduating this year and their positions will also

campaign meeting

dealt with question.s concerning

issues

manager,

in the

will

Bryan

Ltanes.

relations

The majority of the information covered

a

Murphy

Kristin

Hussey said Murphy may be coming back next year as a promotions

president

currently

is

student,

holds the

-

was also acclaimed. No one

assume

by Gen^'Clcavei Jeim ^Hussey, who* currently

Running for vicc-presidcm of is Rebecca Slaughlor,

that

coming

against her for the position.

promotions

airreiitlv held

education

No

school year.

computer piogrammcr anal>M

the election.

candidacy.

of operations, will be taking position again* in the

decided to run against Ellen

Mcc-pmsideni of studbit afMrs after his opponent drof^ped oUt of

officer

2K to discuss

holds

currently

posiiion

co-ordinator.

education,

with

lanes

I

the

of of

vice-president

f|r^«yeat

general arts and science student.

Student

positions

Uai^n»\a

Jennifer

collected

childhood

tirst-yearN^early

education

'

filled.

Jenn Hussey

Harris

encoutaged all the candidates promote tlicmselves as soon as possftile. Voting takes place from Feb.

VP

Operations

of

(Photo by Jaime Clark)

1

to 18.

VP

Operations

New DSA By

president acclaimed

By Jaime Clark Lisa Wilhelm

As a second-year

accounting student, has been acclaimed president of the Doon Student Association for the

1999-2000 school said

she

president

year.

decided after

to

Menage run

President (Photo by Lisa Wilhelm)

“After

position,”

organizations

Conestoga

between

other

such

school as

Business

the

Student

Association (CBSA). “I

would

also like to bring

DSA

more

as

the

classroom.”

this

She said the DSA has been fun on a regular basis and she wants to

seeing

what

the

be good said Menage.

I’d

for

I

the

and

to the

see that continue into the

new

school year.

Her position assistant

and

clubs

awareness

weeks.

In the past, she also served on her high school student council for five years and has also

chaired

committees

different

within the college.

assistant

president’s job entailed this year,

thought

interaction

and

awareness to the

year.

Menage

more

DSA

for

serving

DSA’s promotions

the

she would like

president,

to see

Ellen Menage,

Ellen

replays role

Menage with

is

involved the

soccer,

women’s resource group, CBSA activities, and the program advisory committee for accounting.

Menage won’t be campaigning as

DSA promotions

included

organizing

since she has been acclaimed, but

she

does intend to encourage

students

to

vote

the

in

DSA

more then 100

show support and be

400 want

satisfied with only

students voting,” she said. “I to get

of

operations

satisfied.”

students to

that’s

when

I’ll

Doon

the

for

Student Association in September 1999.

Hussey,

who has been acclaimed

won’t be running a campaign, but does plan to do posters encouraging students to to the position,

vote in the election.

Hussey, a second-year marketing student,

make

elections.

“I’m not

enthusiasm of Jenn Hussey as she replays her role as vice-president

also

varsity

Students at Conestoga College once again get to experience the bubbly personality and will

says she wants to

her name is recognized within the student sure

that

population,

but

she

more

is

DSA

concerned that the

get the

voter turnout they need.

Hussey says she is looking forward to another stint as vicepresident of operations because

some

she wants to keep

DSA

within the

Voting Stations Mon.

Feb. 15

9

am

-

11:30 pm, The Sanctuary

9

am

-

1 1 :30

pm, Tech. Wing

to

do things better next time around. “I’m really excited to do the position again because your

time around

is

first

never perfect,” she

says. “I’m working out the kinks. There are a couple things I didn’t do that I would’ve liked to have

done and

this

giving

is

opportunity to take

Tues. Feb. 16

continuity

and she hopes

and do what and more.”

I

my

me

the

third year

had wanted

to

do

Hussey says she still wants to be team she has been a part of her entire college life. a part of the

Wed. Feb. 17

9

am

-

11:30 pm. The Sanctuajy

When

she began her

Conestoga,

Thurs. Feb. 18

9

am

-

11

:30

pm. The Sanctuary

first

year at

was hired on

she

as a promotions assistant on the

DSA

two weeks

after

school

started.

Please take the time to vote - it is your student

government!

DSA

Since then, the

her

part

life,

has been

of her college

experience. “It’s

an amazing thing,” she says.

“When

I

thought about not run-

ning this year, think of

it.

I

couldn’t even

Basically, I’ve

up with the DSA.”

grown


SPOKE, Feb.

Doon Student Association

By

Lisa Wilhelm

>

Coleman, a first-year student in the computer progranrmer analyst program, has been acclaimed to the position of vice-president of student atfairs after his

Coleman

elections ’99

Coleman wants to see

communicating

better willi other

organizations ^ifliin the college.

He run

wants

more

things

smoothly

,

snd

to to

atrhosphere for ,;eV«pyOtt^

said he decided to run

because he wtrs impressed with the organization and the events

held by this year's

DSA.

(to Conestoga)

For the past

two summers,'

Coleman has been employed

Jennifer Harron

by parks and recreation as an adventure leader, which involves

was very impressed when want

and

1 it

to get involved

planning

working

and

vice-president of education

witli

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

supervisors as well as children •ind tlieir parents.

involved

He was also impressed with the nsv. Luirent vice-president o‘‘

the

in

the

DSA.

Students’ issues

grub

student affairs, Gerry Cleaves.

for

was very impressed with Gerry. 1 want to see if I can do as “I

(Photo hy Lisa Wilhelm)

— Page 7

students getting involved and

opponent dropped out of

the running.

‘i

all

1999

he did.”

If elected,

Steve

8,

ttly

are her issues

' '

•:

t

I

.

:

.

.

J-

' :

'

I

ECE

Goal of

make a

to

is

By Melissa

student difference

Jennifer Harron,

Rebecca Slaughter, a

first-year

running

program for

(ECE),

is

vice-president

of

Association

Doon (DSA)

Slaughter,

who

can

Student

(OSAP)

College and wants to

want

make

lation

to

get students

more

Rebecca Slaughter

involved in their education,” said

“And

want them to someone here to

I

know that there is

vice-president of education (Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

their behalf.”

Slaughter

sits

directors

in

on the board meetings

at

Conestoga, involves herself with activities

tuition

and events in the and said she volun-

ECE program

teers her time for as

many

DSA

to represent students

activities as possible.

you can’t just come to college and do the academic part of it. You have to be able to experience the whole “I really believe

college experience,” she said.

Slaughter does not have a campaign slogan in mind, yet, but she said she and her people were sure to have one for the start of the campaign which was scheduled to begin on Jan. 29.

and

working are you on OSAP and going to

school, it is hard to only $600,” she said.

Harron serves as tative

for the

science

make

class represen-

general arts and

(GAS) program,

attends

board of directors meetings for the

DSA

and also

herself in as

many

tries to

DSA

involve

activities

as she can.

“I’m always informing students my program and all over the

that

school activities

about

OSAP is the regu-

students

funded by

the

events

and

happening through the

DSA,” she issues that she wishes

to address with

a

students.

of

Assistance

and

sure their voices are heard,”

One of the

difference for the school and the

on

fight

at a

like this

in

she said.

fight

election.

students

Program

said she decided to run because

Slaughter.

help

Ontario

make

want

(DSA)

would

to be- raised to at least

“When

people running for this position, she enjoys being at Conestoga

make $600

$1000. part-time,

“I

one of two

is

amount

of vice-president of education in the upcoming Doon Student

hikes.

elections.

“I

(GAS)

back against the ever changing the dealing with issues

education in the upcoming

Student

first-year

student, is running for the position

she

student in the early childhood

education

a

general arts and science

Harron said she decided to run for the education position in particular because she thinks

Dietrich

only

part-time job. She

Association

By Melissa

OSAP may

Dietrich

said.

Harron said her campaign slogan will be: “Your issues are my issues.”


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 8

1999

8,

I

By

Efieen Diniz

Green

Backbone

and spotlights crowd as the Canadian rap.

lasers

Maestro also did some of his newer rhymes including the No. 4 hit on the^ MuchMusic Top 30 Countdown, Stick to Your Vision,

flashed across the

of

godfather

Conducting

Slide,

Things and Symphony in Effect with his fresh, clear voice.

Maestro (Fresh Wes), sang to his loyal fans at Stages Nightclub in

gave a tremendous performance to

from his latest CD, Built to Last. The song, which is also his first release from his new album,

chanting crowd

includes samples from the Guess

Kitchener, Jan. 28.

Maestro, featuring the screaming,

Who original. These Eyes.

speculation the rapper

despite

may

DJ Legal “E”,

have had his day in the spot-

“People used to say he had Drop

at Stages,

he

“Fresh

has

Wes” from

his

dropped name, is

restarting his career with his

succeed

this

time around.

one

point

serious

dining

and emotional

“This next joint

time.

who

his determination to

his

appearance. Maestro showed a

music business for a long

Maestro,

and

more

definitely going to stick around

in the

for rap

At

He’s done,” said Maestro, but as

he told the audience

is

Williams, was brilliant in his

performance, illustrating his love

Backbone Slide and Conducting Things.

the Needle, Let Your

is

name

Maestro, whose real

Wes

light.

new

album. Built to Last, released in

side.

dedicated to

is

rhymes.

He

he entered a rap

by the radio

Melody

festival

station

later

joined

fellow

said.

In

LMR

New Music

Seminar

New York.

He

screamed,

later returned to

Toronto and

Maestro performs Kitchener.

favourites

such

as

^

Let

Your

Spam and

but

his

fans

He was perform

stopped loving his cheerM, party

Kitchener- Waterloo’s squeegee

Someone

time) is

which

somebody

it,

a

like

English might sound bizarre breakfast

combination, but they are the

is

aliases of Kitchener- Waterloo’s two squeegee kids.

squeegee kids have acquired. don’t get

The rips

pair

make about $30

eight-hour day washing

in an

windows

off our buckets but leaves the

on the

antifreeze behind,” said 19-year-

Erb streets in Waterloo, “The most I have ever got (at one

old

English,

a

teenager

1990,

Symphony

shields.

is

ironic considering the reputation

“We

In

makes money by cleaning wind-

Spam and

stealing their buckets,

never

his

debut

in

Effect,

album.

went

the

Awards

rapper

first

and the

to

annual Juno

live at the

performance

large

number of

the crowd, stopping occasionally

dance with one of them. thanked the audience

to chat or

He

helped other rappers get their

repeatedly

career going.

performance.

Symphony in Effect earned Maestro two Junos, including Rap Recording of the Year and

support you’ve been giving me,”

“I

want

throughout

to thank

you

his

for all the

said Maestro.

MuchMusic

Despite the sometimes serious

New York

undertones, Maestro’s perform-

and released The Black Tie Affair, Maestro Zone and Naaah, Dis Kid

ultimately upbeat and gripping.

received

Can’t

three

He moved

to

Be From Canada

before his

ance was of the highest

He is definitely built to

calibre,

last.

English don’t do welfare, they do windows instead

By Judy Sankar and Elizabeth Sackrider

kids have a problem.

for a while

definitely

one young man.

autographs, he even mingled with

Canada.

old-time

and

CDs

and signed a

may have been gone

off

to his fans

to sign five

copies in Canada.

awards.

rhymed

comments

several

even promised

platinum, selling over 200,000

agreed to distribute the label in

He

in

After Maestro did as promised

his riveting performance. Maestro

who

signed with Attic Records

Stages

at

(Photo by Eileen Diniz)

for

rock Kitchener just like a symphony,” Maestro said. “I’ll

lyrics,

Maestro also writes his own which are usually about something he enjoys. During the show. Maestro made

clapped and sang

night long to

for the fast,

raps,

late 1998.

all

known

aspect to them.

MC (Marlon Bruce)

and they formed The Vision Crew. The duo played around Toronto until 1987 when Maestro decided to go solo. In 1988 he adopted the name Maestro Fresh Wes and recorded. You Can’t Stop Us Now, an independent demo. He then released I’m Showin’ You, with DJ LTD. After adding his current manager, Farley Flex, Maestro released Let Your Backbone Slide.

annual

is

upbeat sounds and cheerful

which occasionally have a serious

rapper Ebony

at the

His music

as

MC

Maestro

The new

Built to Last.

the story of the ups and

his career.

sponsored

CKLN

CD,

is

downs he has encountered over

like

This earned him a record deal with the independent label

fans

CD

when he was

and was influenced by artists Grandmaster Flash. In 1983

1 1

'i'

latest

started rapping

all the single mothers in the house and everybody who was raised by a single mother in the house,” he

Maestro’s

9!

who

intersection

of Weber and

was $10,”

said

Spam, who

also 19.

Since moving to Kitchener from

their expenses, however, the

Toronto in

July, the pair have found a place to live for the first time since they have been on the streets.

“Anything that was livable

would

we

live in,” said English.

Home

is currently a motel were where the rent is $150 a week. They never make enough to cover

motel

owner lets the pair do odd jobs help pay the rent. “Usually our rent English. “Every

is late,”

to

said

petmy we make

we spend on rent.” They used to live in squats (old abandoned factories and houses) with other street kids. Home became any shelter they could find.

on the

Instead of working

streets

every day, the pair could be collecting social assistance but

refuse to let others

pay their way.

“We don’t want to be on welfare. It is for women and families that don’t have a place to live,” English

smd.

Spam agrees

saying, “When you you should be doing something, not just hanging

are young,

around.”

According to Spam, there are four basic ways to survive on your own.

“You you

you have a job

are squeegeeing,” he said.

working

years ago.

with

and

BEERS.

“I

about an alarming

tells

in

experienced while Toronto a couple of

have had a gun pointed

directly at

“Don’t go live on the streets because you think it is fun. I’ve

using his hand as a gun and holding his finger just inches from

seen kids

come out on the streets and end up on cocaine,” said Spam.

his face. “I wasn’t

at 13

with him.

Spam and in the

isn’t the

Each day

is

a

only

English face.

middle of busy

intersections also has

MUCH ALCOHOL AS REGULAR

angry

English

incident he

commuters.

Working

8%

cold

traffic,

Living on the street

MODERATION. THIS BEER IS ALC. VOL. WHICH IS NEARLY TWICE AS

throw his weight into a car when he is about to be hit.

deal

danger

IN

(Photo by Elizabeth Sackrider)

Spam and English go to work every morning equipped with buckets and squeegees, ready to temperatures

CONSUME

Shadow.

are either in school, living

off the government, or

Spam, a Squeegee kid, washes the window of a Dodge

its

hazards.

game of dodge

ball

my nose,” said English,

just

dreams. “If I could be anything, I would be a Supreme Court judge,” said

English. “I just think

with speeding vehicles.

ftin.”

“The worst was when somebody saw me squeegeeing and decided

philosophy on

to hit hit

me with

his car.

I

have been

Spam how to

a lot of times,” said

adding that he learned

going to argue

walked away.” Just like college and university students. Spam and English have I

Although

it

has

neither life.

would be

Spam

a

does

have one outlook.

“You have do,” he said.

to just enjoy

what you


STUDENT College pursues granting applied

Nursing by degrees

degrees for RNs

By Sarah Thomson

By Sarah Thomson Conestoga

College’s

president

is

RNs

applied degrees to

new registered nurses have

since Since

in the

all

province will

have a degree in 2005 as part of

to

new entry-to- practice standards. One of the main arguments President

the

John

Tibbits

using

is

the

is

fact

and

78 per cent

is

letter to

three- year

diploma

is

the

same

as a

RN

He

he wanted students to realize the choices they have made to become diploma RNs does not have to change because the recommendations do not say that current students must said

“Competencies were needed because of the turbulent environment new nurses are

are

not

being

evaluated

finding themselves in,” said Barb Milden,

team leader and research and program evaluation for the College of Nurses of Ontario. “There are fewer resources for new nurses.” Milden, speaking at a health sciences fac-

in

Seaberg said there

are,

“Having

reviewed

competencies

it

proposed

the

would not be possible said Jeffrey.

level,”

“They do

collegch opinion

is

she went

home

crying for

In regard to the educational training of nurses, Rivie Seaberg, a College of Nurses project leader for entry-to-practice standards, said they

were very specific in

using the term baccalaureate education

they allow’ only university graduates to be

instead of university education.

would also

have to upgrade their

facilities

She

lab spaces and classrooms, wdrich cost

means changes

would the government more money, said

diploma graduate certainly possessed the knowledge and skills at a lower level of performance in each of the categories cited.”

said there are a couple of areas where

Conestoga

is

some

suggesting the province pilots

and

start with those

universities.

success on the provmcial

work or from the

exam and have

entena and standards, said

certain

is

looking

An estimated 80 per cent hold masters’ degrees, which they obtained as part-time students while working, and two faculty members have PhDs. Students should faculty

at,”

is

feel

quite qualified, said Caspar.

to

HAS YOUR LOVE FOR

It

both community college

the standards to

work backwards

universal competencies.

Conestoga’s nursing program

is

not clos-

ing shop because of the changes. Students

Tibbits.

Another avenue for training degreeis a combination of college and universities courses. The College of Nurses wants colleges and universities to woii together to grant RNs dt^ibs,'Ih^| entry nurses

>,

,'W(ni]d require that

Conestoga have

have

can look

They

Reflective

Practice

the college

same

Model when they model allows nurswhat they are doing to

their nursing

level in the

competencies

coming

Students currently taking the

course will take the

university value system is based

tile

The

Tffiibitf.

on the

RN

The

new

entry-level

knowledge

who commence

RN nursing education in 2002.

thi^" we

decision-making, clinical, technical

Fm

not sure

it’s

going to

said Tibbits adding that getting articula-

agreements are a problem for

college ‘T think die easiest

us a crack at this,” he said.

SELL

and

core

research,

higher

and assessment skills and excellent communication and interpersonal

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All of these skills are required to

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care in a practice setting because there

is

a

higher acuity level both in the hospitals and

community.

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402 King

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their basic

Competency changes include improved and expanded knowledge in leadership,

the year 3005

1

diploma

in the year

practice competencies will be introduced

pnde in the fact the lowest mark program is 88 per cent, he said. “We would be quite happy to have an till

RN

BUY

2001 based on the current competencies.

with students

articulation arrangement h\3t

year.

exam

creation of knowledSge. and they take

‘caH be woridng on this

FAOED

com-

reflective practice tell

at the

agreements becau'ie of

at the

will have to

decisions through the College of

upgrade or keep

suj

may be less than

clash in value systems, said

RNs and

Nurses of Ontario’s Quality Assurance

es to

and willing,” said Tibbits There i.s an unwillingness artieulation

make

The

and are

arrangements but history tmiverstties

can become

petencies in the future.

register annually, said Jeffrey.

articulation agreeraemt with a uni-

tion

what the government

tinued learning.

because the competencies allow the frame-

colleges that have demonstrated student

and

individuals would have to expand their" knowledge base. She is confident in her faculty members, however, she said the vast majority of the faculty are very conscientious and acutely aware of the need for con-

80 per cent of the RN graduates entering the market were college trained, with 20 per cent coming from In the past,

to

establish

“We

Lois Caspar, chair of the nursing program,

and university programs and is understood mean a great deal of flexibility in how one crafts that program. This is possible

Tibbits.

met

some professional development required for

education

baccalaureate

said

represents a certain type of education.

including

said.

many days

be able to meet the demand for nurses if registered muses. Universities

isn’t in the universities future to

because of the situation.

new

the province will not

It’s

faculty, said Jeffery.

really

how

it

education.

can carry on as they

require degree preparation. In the past, the

described feeling totally overwhelmed and

community

Curriculum will continue to be based on current competencies, and there may be

these competencies to be achieved at a

diploma

but

work with them, she

for

This college can produce top quality

and the ability to learn, said Tibbits. .Another argument the college has on its side is the impending musing .shortage expected by the year 2000. It isthe

a minority of univer-

work with college-based

their opinion colleges

“You don’t have to be a genius to understand that colleges and universities working in a collaborative effort to make educational programs that prepare a baccalaureate from entry to practice is

skills

to

(Photo by Sarah Thomson)

of a person from a focus group that found herself in charge of a long-term care setting on her second day of practice. She

practitioners that haVc critical thinking

is

to partner with

in their areas of specialty. She said the majority of universities have the attitude that they did not go into nursing education

Rivie Seaberg explains the new RN competencies to Health Sciences

on whether th<^ got a 92 in philosophy and 95 in bio-chemistry. They are beit^ evaluated on how well they can do the job,” said Tibbits.

ulty meeting on. Jan. 25, related the story

want

colleges so both institutions could educate

students discussing the

acquire degrees.

hospitals

'

all

four- or five-year degree at the University

nurses

education and electronic technology are also viable options, she said.

dean of health sciences, sent a

of Western Ontario, but the Conestoga program content would be modified and the college would add a year or two to the length of the program. ‘^Wc are talking about a degree in a vocational area, which ultimately means

goodwill within the system for colleges and find partners. Distance

universities to

Faculty.

recommendations.

Tibbits said the college is not pretending

.

10 years.

college in Chitario. Colleges already grant

Columbia.

of view from her research She has a sense there is enough

findings.

sities that

Bill Jeffrey,

collabo-

her point

groups.

would be the first time such powers would be given to a community applied degrees in Alberta and British

.

the year 2005.

by the Ontario College of Nurses on Dec. 10, are based on a combination of two competancy projects including one at the national level and one done by the Ontario College of Nurses involving key impact interviews and focus

it

2005

rating to provide nursing, Seaberg offered

standards, passed

medical/surgical acute-care centres has had on the nursing industry over the last five to

request

'

The new

provincial average, of both university

If the minister agrees to Conestoga’s

.

by

as entry into practice

— Page 9

know how we are going to do it.” As for colleges and universities

will require a baccalaureate

Both projects assessed the impact that the shift to community care and to hospitals as

college graduates,

.

which

Conestoga’s graduates have a 98 per cent pass rate on the national while the

ex^

-

tencies

in

1999

9,

said Jeffery. “We would like to continue to provide nursing at Conestoga, but I don’t

Registered Nursing students should not be alarmed by the changes to RN entry compe-

pursing the Ministries of Health and Education to allow the college to grant

its

SPOKE, Feb.

LIFE

& Burger King)

OUTLET

415 Hespler Road.

23 Wellington Road E

CAMBRIOGE GUELPH 622-7774 823-5341 (Across from McDonald's)

(Across from Wendy's)


SPOKE,

Feb. 8, 199*)

— Page 10

STUDENT

LIFE Don’t be fooled,

Hoping

it’s

a Sunday.

to collect $2,000

rsiieinn

I %41 1 iCr R R 1 Bhv '•mr

PC

to buv

Barbara Kraler. a

colleagiie

coun.sellor at student services.

Appro\imaid\ beoii

SlOOO

by the Conestoga

lai-jcd

College community ^cok and

drive

raising

in the

half of

a

to

a

first

fund-

S who

hast

been peertwo

personality.

a

says

the

in

been

have

years and longtime Conc'^toga

Nicholas’s

was

ch3£^»»$«^

generosity,

multiple sclerosis last year

|| Recently, she Liecided to tiikc

li

sick leave to try

a new drug

touched

by

and

kindness

which

why

i.s

Nominate a candidate

thcl

Faculty award

progress

in

response has been so good

“Feeble have been generous with their donations, but even

more

^herapy.

Smith

.laixiuelini'

in

many peoplti college tommumty

Kraler

Photo by

|

community everybody knew"

services administrator foi

employee

General arts and science, health option student Neil Vandenberg is doing his biology' assignment in the college’s learning resource centre on Jan, 31. Vandenberg Is using his current program as a footstool to get into the paramedics program

campaign

this

“She was the kind of person

M>rna

Nicholas.

says

has a Jot to do witli Nicholas and her fncndly and outgoing

purchase

personal computer for

Nicholas,

Kraler

h4#;

been

have

they

emotional

about

very

giMitg

the

for distinguished teacher

donations too” savs Kralei

“She was the kind person

“People have

of

a community

in

come

lold

diffeiciit

luiw

muuh Myriia

Kialcr

fSarhani Kruler, stuJ( fU sii\u fi coun.\i‘Uor

s.ijs

a computer will be

colleagues to collect $2,000 to

Distinguished until

i.solation.

will .also help Iter to

“A in

of people were coming

lot

and saying

keep

in

touch,

e-inail you,’

say

‘I

‘1

hope we can that

w'c

can

and Myrna would

don’t have a computer

am

at

home.

I

be

able

to

do

not going to that.'”

says

keep and

skills

look up information about

her health concerns

on the

Internet.

Kraler

a computer.

Aubrey

the

for

sense of It

say.s

she

hopes

enough money to pui chase the computer will be raised by the end of February'. computer will be The presenteil to Nicholas at a reception

major North American conference in Austin, Texas, at the National

helpful in lessening Nicholas’s

to

This prompted a few of her

By Carly Benjamin

has done

Nominations are being accepted

up with her computer

lier

and

aboui

for them.”

everybody knew"

buy

m

Stone's

planned

for

early

March.

March

Teaching Award

CHANCE

from

Winners of the award receive $800 in professional development

was

a

as

specially

must be a

the award, the teacher

faculty

same

member.

minimum of

four people, consisting of at least

one current faculty member and

course,

Bruce Bjorkquist was the first recipient of the Audrey Hagar Distinguished Teaching Award.

two current or former students. Support staff and managers are also allowed to be a part of the

in

nomination process.

and

The structure for the committee and the criteria for the award were created by college faculty with support from senior management, the faculty union and Aubrey Hagar. Hagar was an administrator with

professionalism, leadership in the

1

7 years before he

He was

director

who

gives

the

chair of the this

Conestoga

opportunity staff

is

to

member

for

award

staff

an

recognize

a

professional

excellence.

McDonald

must also show excellence as an ambassador for the college. Prof. all

the

award

focuses on innovative teaching skills at

Conestoga College.

Selection

check

to

to

recipient

sure

was win

of the award

the

nominees show excellence in the following categories: competence

in

particularly meaningful

award,”

this

said

was from my colleagues.” He said it was an affirmation of his work and efforts and that was rewarding. At the time Bjorkquist won the award he taught introduction Bjorkquist. “Because

psychology,

it

introduction

to

and two electives, quest for meaning and ethics at the sociology,

both electives

teaching

Doon campus After

campus.

He at

is

the

the

award,

Bjorkquist was invited to attend a V

developing a

said

dynamics, which he

teaches

still

won

now, was part of the reason he

Aubrey Hagar award. The course explores group work and was initially taught to nursing

the

This year the course

students. is

LASA

being taught to

and

recreation and leadership students.

Bjorkquist said he this

course because

is

proudest of

it is

something

he designed. Since

winning

award

the

Bjorkquist said he has continued to

do what he always has but

the

recognition

has

allowed

teaching In

that

addition

to

maintained

community the

received

conduct

to

with

deal

skills.

his

teaching

Bjorkquist has

responsibilities,

sat

he

him

involvement organizations.

He

in

has

on the board of governors for

Canadian

Mental

Health

Association in Perth County.

A

couple of times throughout

the year he also helps to train

telephone counsellors at the Perth

County telephone Bjorkquist

has

crisis centre.

defined

the

framework of a recipient of the

this year.

winning

shared the

said.

interpersonal and group

workshops

college’s Stratford

committee members

make

Bruce Bjorkquist exhibited

of these qualities and was the

first

to

said

sensitivity

The nominee

towards students.

“It

committee,

in education,

and concern for and

and director of strategic planning.

selection

up today at DSA Office.

promotion of quality

1988.

McDonald, a

and

integrity

creativity,

of academic and college planning

to Jan,e

innovation

learning design,

he

interests,

Bjorkquist

Candidates for the award must

be nominated by a

who

energy people

post-probationary

full-time,

also valuable to attend the

conference and meet various high

In order to be considered for

consultant

Sign

over North America, said

Conestoga College coat of arms.

According

i

all

Bjorkquist.

While it was great to win the award and receive recognition, it

well

as

college professional development

1

large conference that

designed liripipe and a framed

funds

retired in 1986.

i

was a

It

brought together college teachers

12.

the college for

fhe

Organizational Development.

(Photo by Carly Benjamin)

LAST

and

Staff

for

Institute

Hagar

Audrey

Hagar

Teaching Award.

Distinguished


STUDENT

By Janet Wakutz

my

supposed to be,

Preschoolers at the Elmira Child

Centre

look

forward

to

purpose in

Bosman who

life,”

said

ward

to semester three

work

will

with

- what

when

she

songs, stories and puzzles, to help them get dressed for outdoors and

students the experience to get to

to share herself with them.

know and

Laura Bosman, of Drayton, a

ECE

student,

as

is

comfortable with children as she confident about her choice in

college programs. She

her placement

in

is

enjoying

Elmira

and

appears at ease whether she

toddlers

Bosman

how

from

take

to deal

of Her own.

She may operate a

the slide.

home

care

looking forward to

day

when

“My

desire

work

not to

is

in a

day care for the rest of

“The reason I came to ECE is I’m good with kids and I go with

said the second-semester student.

my

life,”

said she was at peace because she knew the program

Bosman said her desire, from a young age, has been to be a wife and mother and she has always been involved with children’s programs at church. Having children of her own is

was

important to

she said.

Getting into the program did not worry the ECE student who

right for her.

“I

knew

it

was where

LASA By Jeanette

I

was

who

Bosma»i»>

is

involved in a seripm relationship.

people, says Lichty.

made

her feel

there.

being a stay-at-home

mom,

Although

she

who

parents

doesn’t

of her

judge

preparation for activities she plans

use day care for their it’s

important to raise her ovra kids.

because they want what’s best for their kids but said parents should

much

for her placement doesn’t bother her.

In fact, she said

it’s

good

have her activity plans

Bosman said she respects parents

their children as

likes all aspects

program and says even the amount of plarming and paperwork in

children, she said, she thinks

be with

Bosman

as her

own mother was.

as

possible.

Armed

with a flashlight, a cellphone and a radio, two Conestoga College students have recently taken to the streets to deter crime

downtown Kitchener. Michelle Hogeveen and Jeremy Lichty, in

first-year

law and security admin-

istration

(LASA)

things,” he

“When

says.

around

driving

to gain awareness of

way of looking

a different

“It’s

notice things like

at

you’re

you wouldn’t you do when

to

her

at

Bosman

make

would

suggestion

she

thinks

one might

improve the program. Two days a for placement are not enough. She would rather do a six-

week

week placement with tact for

college con-

curriculum questions.

Two

fingertips so she doesn’t have to

days a week

rely

on her memory. During her day-care placements last semester and now, Bosman

irregular for the children, she said.

said she gets to

“I recommend the program to anyone who is looking into doing anything with kids,” Bosman said.

know

all

the

is

staggered and».

While on

police

ment.”

like a

gain

from the organization,

says Hogeveen.

“There’s

For Hogeveen and Lichty, their

community involvement is two-way street. They

experience and the community benefits

more eyes and

ears out

there,” she says.

“When

are tied up at

Sammy’s Garage

(officers)

then we’re their eyes and ears.”

COP

cars. Only one of the marked with the COP logo,

cars is

the

ears for police officers in the 1st

way to prevent

downtown

lurking around the

unmarked car

in

an effective

is

crime.

“Driving by slowly makes the offenders feel guilty

-

being watched.

makes them

It

like they’re

leery,” says Lichty.

Hogeveen says

COP

volunteers

-

are mostly out to deter prostitutes,

drug dealers and drinking and

being

the

are going

driving around the city in one of

police that acts as extra eyes and

the offenders feel guilty

They

more and more towards community involveforce.

Hogeveen and

duty,

but both students agreed, even

makes

makes sense because people into police work are

new philosophy of

ing in the area).”

group of volunteers under the direction of the Waterloo regional

Division.

“It

who go

involved in the community,” says

two a

LASA faculty.

Hartley. “It goes along with the

program. is

community

Susan Hartley, of the

(and you can hear what’s happen-

Lichty spend most of their time

The community organization

issues, says

you’ve got the police radio there

students, are policing Kitchener’s core as part of the Citizens On Patrol (COP)

like they’re

Staff at the centre

welcome the first day by including her and remembering why she was

students police downtown Kitchener

Everall

“Driving slowly

Care Centre are drawn to. In a quiet corner they share puzzles and friendship. Facing the camera are Shelby Hakkers, age 2 1/2, (left) and Jill Refect, 2 1/2, (right) (photo by Janet Wakutz) She hopes her future includes

her future.

my strengths,”

ed here,

a right to be here.”

that

happens.

From the first day, “OK, I’m acceptthey know me and I have

positive.

she told herself,

she said.

Bosman said she plans to work at

is

been

different

a day-care centre until she has kids

life’s

was helping othftrs. “You get attached,” she said. “You want to be a part of it.” Her experience in Elmira has

experiences and build on what you like,”

had problems around

she became a constant figure at

with them while experiencing a variety of curricula.

“You

child

day care for him, he got over it. By the end of her placement, the child

love children of differ-

is

The 19-year-old knows her

One

said placements give

ent temperaments and

become

has

separating from his parents, but as

she describes as

helping to supervise activities or helping children climb the steps to

purpose and

— Page 11

connected to them.

and

infants

her specialty.

is

1999

and

children

looks for-

Mondays and Tuesdays when a special friend comes to share

first-semester

8,

purpose clear to ECE student

Life Care

SPOKE, Feb.

LIFE

?m puiiva

driving.

watched.”

Should the pair ever spot trouble, they are not to have contact with

LASA

student,

Jeremy Lichty

anyone committing a criminal

act.

Instead they report the activity to their

supervisor,

a

1st

Division

officer.

After one night on the job, both Hogeveen and Lichty said they are

volunteer program

gaining

for

experience in their “It’s

hands-on chosen field.

valuable

good

for

anybody who’s

Taking

part

the

in is

police

also a

Hogeveen and Lichty

way

to fulfil

a 40-hour volunteer requirement

community and

for their

social-

never heard the police over the

services course.

good experience,” says Hogeveen. Being able to

which

listen to the police radio enables

police foundations program, has

volmiteers in the program wanting

been offered

to pxirsue

dents.

radio, that’s a

become

a career in policing to

familiar with police l in go,

she says.

is

the first year the course,

is

how

also

teaches

to

observe

part of

Provincially

volunteer

The experience volunteers

This

to

LASA’s new

Conestoga mandated,

requirement

in

stu-

the

the

community and social-services is a good way for students

course

Thursday, February 18 Due to the low water level of the pond, the event will take a different twist this year. If you are daring to plunge... details are available at the DSA Office. Funds raised wiil be directed to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.


Page 12

— SPOKE,

Feb. 8, 1999

Guard kept busy as campus troubleshooter By Wayne

hours a day, he says these thieves

Collins

due

are difficult to nab,

Trouble has a way of finding

when

Cliff Laurin

he’s working.

Chasing

If not,

of the

security

19

college’s

guards.

Coping daily with students’ problems might frustrate some “ people, but Cliff says he enjoys

working

security

it

at

Students create

Usually

says.

little

“Most

places

something

it’s

washroom vandalism

minor, like

someone must have

been ticked

off,

because they

adjust

couldn’t

room

the

temperature.

Thieves

create

headache for

biggest

the

The

security.

relatively

to

check out.”

him

keeps

in

via a two-way

to put

chore

locks and emptying

lockers

students’

when he

a routine

is

gets time to

Each one normally

do

it.

yields an arm-

Cliff

then

and,

says,

one day. Although security patrols the campus 24 in

several

it’s still

plain rudeness.”

Getting the cars towed

a last

is

resort because security often gets

stuck with the Cliff

make an

he says. In

this

almost willing to

exception.

pay

“I’d

bill,

is

myself,” he says with

it

a grin. says he could ticket most of

the vehicles at this

meters

lot’s

and probably 75 every other day, if he wanted to. The college’s security staff, howalone,

ever, doesn’t consider this their

prime

security office.

He opens two

lockers quickly

but doesn’t get to the third one on

month.

“but

amazed.

if

not conunon,” says Cliff,

load of items he lugs back to the

his

There could be no incidents for a

is

main

20 on-campus

Cliff says. “It’s mostly outsiders.”

head as

He

away.

it

Removing

incident involved the break-in of

“Students are smarter than that,”

trapped, along

there

three

see

to

student’s car

case.

radio and he seldom gets a chance

latest

vehicles.

The

“It’s

are

supervisor

contact with

or a broken thermostat, he laughs,

explaining

of places

Cliff’s

trouble for

co-workers, Cliff

his

vehicles parked in

and is rows of a two-row lot.

out

scoots

amazed

his

lunch during weekdays.

lots

him and

.

slow but there’s barely time for

and the

faculty.”

10

with several others. CHff shakes

with a smile. “I like the students

he says

another

because

student needs help in parking lot

insurance companies. Sundays are

doing nothing,” he says, “but, here, there’s always a lot to do and

“I like the people here,”

«

thieves, however, is just

part- of the job. Cliff says

a small

beats

backburner

He

lots.

simple, just sitting around and

his work.

-

vehicles and the

of the parking

size

he goes looking for it when mciking his rounds as one

number of

large

to the

Apparently, a student has

list.

locked her keys in her car and Cliff grabs a slim jim

and beelines

to the parking lot to assist her.

it

two minutes she’s driving away with a grateful smile. The third locker stays on the

’Within

Although rules

directive.

such as non-smoking must be enforced, they are mainly there to

and

help

provide

special

a

service to students.

“We’re here for them,” Cliff says.

While the lot

culprits

who parked in

10 are being paged, he trots off

looking for more trouble.

Cliff

LASA

her keys

in

American dream turns bloody By Ken Groulx

Hank’s leads

Sam

Director

Raimi,

best

known for his low-budget Evil Dead trilogy, treads fi’esh, new waters with A Simple Plan. His faithful screen adaptation of Scott Smith’s best-selling novel ’

a meticulously crafted

is

and

stylish

examination

into

and

moral disintegration that ranks as one of the finest efforts of the new temptation

greed,

story unfolds as

Hank

(Bill

Paxton) and his older brother

Bob Thornton),

Jacob

(Billy

along

with

Jacob’s

drinking

Lou

(Brent

Briscoe)

buddy

accidentally uncover a crashed

airplane

Minnesota

in

a

authorities, but

others

the

over

discovery

money.

he

forest.

is

the

coerced by

keeping the hollow

into

make

They

reassurances

to

financial

their

godsend is drug money that no one will miss, but agree to hang on to the cash for a year and bum should suspicion

it

The but

trio

swears after,

to

secrecy,

allegiances

question and

tmst and scruples degenerate as they in

are

their

increasingly

snared

own web of

deceit.

Corrupted notions of by paranoia and irrationality, the trio

is

finally

Simple Plan takes a simple

scenario and creates a fnghtening

exploration

forced

to

the

depths of one’s moral

fragile

Shot

psyche.

pure-white the

plumbs

that

of

sinister actions

sharp

a

and

dark

the

to

the

landscape,

offers

setting

contrast

against

winter

characters

its

reminiscent of Joel and Ethan

A

Coen’s Fargo. In

arise.

soon

A

no one

is

Simple Plan,

immune from

the

measmes they will go

to ensure

moral individual. Paxton delivers

man who

family

struggles

windfall intact.

He

traditions

Hitchcockian

and a stylized film

noir.

believe that you’re capable of

do.”

Sarah, (Bridget Fonda) Hank’s

pregnant wife, sees the

money

as

doing what you’ve done.”

Teeming

with

moody

a

an escape avenue from their doldrum existence. Blinded by greed even their plan as

enhanced by Darmy Elfinan’s ominous soimdtrack, Raimi has mastered a

hopelessly

harrowing character study into

resorts

.

unravels,

maneuvering. to

quell

she

too

cold and calculated

to

In

attempting

her husband’s moral

unease, she offers a fnghtening inspiration,

“No

one

will

eeriness

that

is

the descent of one’s fibre.

own moral

A Simple Plan is laden with

such

human

unsettling

truths

nature that

you long

after

it’s

it

about

will haunt

over.

to

twisted rationality and deception.

in

Simple Plan

finest

his

they never realized to keep their

Steeped

I

Collins)

performance since One False Move as Hank, a well-liked

Upon

and a treasure trove of over $4 million in $100 bills.

ever feel evil?

Wayne

it

maintain

pilot

A

in

(Photo by

even the most seemingly

baits

turn to dark parts of themselves

further

the car.

seduction of easy wealth and the

snow-covered

investigation, the three discover a

dead

moral conscience

to suggest they turn

are brought into

season.

The

their

initial

him

a Conestoga security guard, helps Shadina White, student, get into her car on Jan. 29. White locked

Laurin,

first-year

his

frail

grip

with

cloaks himself under a veil of

false consolation, but

it

enough

him

to

save

is still

Easier tax filing and faster refunds for students

not

from

your fingertips, and available seven days a week.

committing one desperate act

It’s free, at

after another.

As

the

feeble-minded Jacob,

Thornton completes a trifecta of fine work following Sling Blade and Primary Colors. As a bespectacled, 40-something unemployed man who has never

Check your personalized income tax package for a

invitation.

even kissed a woman, his role

would

elicit a

TELEFILE

sense of pathetic

sympathy, but Thornton injects a

For more information, our Web site at:

deeper sense of humility and

complexion. As a product of

visit

small-town existence, he dreams not of exotic tropical destinations

www.rc.gc.ca/telefile/

but of merely re-acquiring his parents failed farmhouse. Yet, his

simple-mindedness

own examination of

Bob Thorton co-stars wit Simple Plan.

Billy

Bill

Paxton and Bridget Fonda

in

A

(internet Photo)

dilemma he and

begets

his

the ethical

his brother face

as he questions, “Hank,

do you

IdIkB

mWm

Revenue Canada

Revenu Canada

.

TiH

^>31131(121


SPOKE, Feb, g, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT Japanese animation fan ciub at

— Page 13

UW

CTRL-A presents marathon anime shows By Brent Ciouthier Japanese animation, or anime, has enjoyed five decades of great success in Japan, but has reached only cult status in North America.

The Club That Really Likes Anime (CTRL-A) would like that

There

is

The

founded at the University of Waterloo in 1993, was designed not only for fans of the genre, but moreso for those unfamiliar with the highly-stylized form of animation.

They

present a marathon eight-hour sitting of anime on the

members,

club’s

totalling

over 250 people, are quick to educate neophyte fans and are more than happy to do so.

Joseph officially

UW TV stations that picked up anime

at

monthly meetings.

also a club website at www.ctrl-a.org.

to change.

CTRL-A,

month

Friday of every

last

in addition to

Chen,

an

electrical

UW

engineering graduate from and a former executive member of CRTL-A, is well versed in the history of anime.

was popular

“It

in

the

Chen

’60s,”

“because

of

population.

It

in the west coast

explains

high

Asian got some help from the

Battle of the Planets and Astroboy, for example, and titles like

dubbed them. I’m certain that all of us have seen it at some point.”

Anime

credible

means

When

a powerful cntertain-

Chen

Tiu

Mononoke,

Princess

In

film

latest

international

Japanese

Jmmatmn

tlayao

N'frvjzacki

“All of a sudden,

'

It

the

s

laigcst-grosMng

animated film in Japan," says Joseph Chen, a former executive

member of

up

the Club

sign

more

m

piiC'it

7/it

Chen

would

that

“It

marketing guys, saying, 'This is not what wc make here ’ It’s undoubtedly the

a

who

i

scenes

a

influence of animators,

now

feel

that

these

would be more acceptable to

a world of

the

explains that Disney

The

releasing

is

Mononoke through Miramax because the film’s content may

never did before and it’s been successful because it’s a good

directly attach

‘‘Omc level

with

it

name

gets put

pictures,

on family-value

doesn’t

it

moan

that

of the Hill would never have been made if The Simpsons didn't take, otf, BeavLs and liutthead, too.” Chen says anime, wildly

Disney doesn’t look at the opportunity to do exciting action films, for example. Disney has always known that

popular in Japan for nearly five decades, lias been slow' to catch on III North Aina ica becaiLsc of

and discard niches they don't

tlie

A'//ig

only”

“kids

they can't afford to

associated with animation. “1 love the way tliat animation

Japan

grtmps;

is

pointed

tliey

at

don’t restrict

Disney video, as triumph for

it just

to the ages of five to 12.

filmmaking. the

for

They younger

.

future

It

a

major

Japanese also cements

nf anime

in

the

audiences, they have stories for

process.

iwcritysomi things thev hav e storio>. for adults,' explains the clcclrii.il-

“One of the largest entertainment companies in the

llic

world has decided that it’s time to bring over a piece of Japanese filmmaking that also happens to be animated," he

enginocring graduate “iVoplc here are really unwilling to accept that a story can be told

animated

torm

uid

still

m be

"

says with a smile.

its

own

really

is

term

the

came

from the bonds of conventional

into

with the advent of

lot

filmmaking.” Zaryski says there are

now over a

dozen

companies who buy the rights from the Jap'anese

the computer.”

manufacturers

Joseph Chen,

former executive

member of CTRL-A

target audience, the film

was

still

written for adults.”

translate it

for North

American consumption. “It’s

disc

“Animation in general is now being written for a more adult audience, like The Prince of Egypt. Even if they weren’t the

to

the anime and package

also possible to get the laser

from Japan and,

if

you know

Japanese, subtitle it yourself,” he says with a laugh. “A lot of those companies were started by fans.”

All you need is a computer and a couple hundred dollars of video

equipment.”

What’s on around town By Ken Gray lx

Copps also

s

are available for Ashley and his frenetic fiddle .

Experience

every Friday, the best 'music and of the 1980s... Energy

featuring

In and around town this week. .Attention original artists! Boo Radleys’ is soliciting entrants for its third annual battle of the bands. Entrants must attend an information session Feb. 21 at 3

couch potatoes, the 1983 baby-boomer film The Big Chill is being re-released on home video for a

Little

p.m... David

15th

Subject

your thing. The

Band

Rose

plays

swing legends Benny Goodman, Tony Dorsey and Glen Miller every Friday at the Black

you

Inn... If

want

to

support local talent, the newly renovated Walper Pub pres-

Mark Perak

Shannon

Lyon

Tuesdays,

Wednesday

MacLeod Thursday

Macisaac for his show Centre

Feb.

at the

River

Run

19. ..For

anniversary

collectors

edition, featuring deleted scenes,

cast

interviews and a digitally

remastered soundtrack

. . .

Adrien

Lyne’s controversial remake of Lolita (starring Jeremy Irons and

Dominique

Swain

nymphette

love

also available

as

interest)

on home

his is

video... If

you long for the days of Miami Vice, Madonna and John Hughes movies. Club Abstract presents an ’80s Retro

videos 108’s

Dance Party comes to Lulu’s Saturday, Feb. 20, featuring

MC

and

Flipside

Tamer... On

the

stage,

Theatre

Scot Guelph

presents

The

Was Roses

ThursdaySaturday until Feb. 13... Cowgirls continues its run at the Waterloo Stage Theatre until Feb. 20... The Flora Community Theatre will feature

six

performances

Tennessee Williams’

Named

Desire, Feb

A

of

Streetcar 12-14 and

Feb. 18-20... The

Community Arts Centre

Waterloo presents

Theatre on the Edge, a comedy improv, Thursday evenings at 8 p.m... Have fun.

Mel Brown Homewreckers

evenings... Bluesman

and i

Coliseum. .Tickets

now

his

band the

jam Wednesday nights at The Flying Dog... Sandy MacDonald and Aaron Solomon get celtic at

Movie

Irish pub Thursday Nonie Crete plays Sunday and Wednesday... The Duke of

the

Failte

nights; i

Wellington also has a celtic

jam

s

Wednesday nights; Ernie Lyons can be seen Friday and Saturday... The Bombshelter at

U

i

W

of continues its new Indie Thursdays with Sue Alexain and Liz Sayaflanos Feb.ll...Blackfly nights;

Matt

Room

Thursday

Osborne

jams

release

have

stories

North of The

the

Princess Mononoke, as well as numerous others directly to

more age

“Anime

to

of the in the North American a

that

plays the Circus

views

Amencan

stigma

,

in

there

sit

like."

Chen

think

and Paul

be too touchy for Disney to its name. “Even though the Disney

at

with

I

still

running commentary,

social,

synonymous

ents

Princess

good," he says of the popular animated Fox show. “It got people to watch animation that

pcc'plc can idenlilv

word “anime”

Forest

public."

Chen

the idea that

George

vTOuld have been crossed out by i

a highly-

obstacle

tribute to

continues.

the

inov'c as

biggest

13. ..If swing’s

have been unheard of HI years ago.”

doesn’t limit the type of story that told. You’re really free

CTRL-A. He

Wilcox brings his Hypnotizing Boogie to Lulu’s Feb.

villianous portrayal.

audiences. “The, Simpsons did

au

that

subtle stuff like the

like

the

another way of telling a Not all anime is Astroboy or Sailor Moon. You can tell sci-fi, you can tell dramas, you can tell romances. Anime “Its just

story.

can be

the electronic-commu-

.

understand

“Something

you had a way

of the more recent animation

the cartoon stigma is a hindrance to anime’s popularity.

Concert, movie, theatre listings

says

anime, a styhzcd form of Japanese animimation, has become a more' acceptable form of filmmakmg by North American that

to

is

difficulty

Hunchback nj Notre Hami''' he of tlie cliaracter’s cruel and

Really Likes Anime (CRT! -A) at the University of Waterloo “It*s being teleased here some time in the summer by Miiamax, which i'> a siibsidurv

That

company of Disney.” Chen sees Disney’s

stuff

scene witli the

move away from some

Chen echoes Zaryski ’s opinion that

more than

el.sc."

cight-vcar-old

the

of really exposing the animation from Japan.” Karl Zaryski, although a second-year computer-programming student at Conestoga

“I

point.s to tJic intelligence

saccharine

from

files

Internet.

“cartoon.”

,

tlie

Zaryski sees a

releases.

anime’s widespread acceptance as

of animated shows like The Simpsons and The .Inimaniacs as good exampJc.s of more mature audiences gravitating tt^ards the genre. | “If we track the sort of sttates told by Disney, tor example 'lliey’vc gone from the very

The gemc won't slay small maikct for long. Disney has set its sights on

own

Chen says, because of a computer’s ability to play video footage and download

sees

Croing miunsircam

fighting this

anything

menl company such as Disney divides to associate itself with ^ small market genre, you can brt

its

that mindset, however, with

nications officer for

Disney’s eye By Brent Ciouthier

into

wdth the advent of the computer,

College,

Anime catches

came

really

market is that, historically, a lot of animation has been reserved for kids,” he explains. “There’s only been a handful of titles produced here for an older crowd.”

I

Monday nights. .White Courtesy Phone can be seen at the Fox and .

week

Pheasant Saturday and Sunday... Shawn Kellerman, backed by the Soul Providers play

at the Huether Hotel Thursday evenings... Wilf’s Pub presents an open mike with Craig Cardiff Sundays... The Varsity Club features Derek Hines every Saturday... If you haven’t been to The Loo, the Waterstreet Blues Band is reason enough to check it

out... Tickets

are scarce, but a second show has been added for

The

Tragically

Hip

Feb.

18 at

Wed.

Feb. 10

12:30

pm

In

The

Sanctuary


Pago 14

— SPOKE, Feb.

8,

1999

SPORTS

Women’s soccer team By

settles for a tie

Cl^brles Kuepfer

during the match.

“We Preoccupied with an upcoming tournament in Kingston, the Condors women’s soccer team settled for a 2-2 tie with Waterloo Region’s Nights during league play on Jan. 26. Assistant coach Sanjeeve Dhanapala said his team was focused on the trip to Kingston and not the game at hand. “There was a lot of conversation on the bench regarding when we’re leaving and who’s driving,” said Dhanapala. “That just told me that their minds weren’t really into the game.” The Nights also played well

goalkeeper. Melanson played aggressively for the Condors, scor(Photo by Charles Kuepfer) ing both goals.

the

mood

rough

it

up.”

Assistant

Condor coach

Sanjeeve Dhanapala

did,” said

Dhanapala. “We to rough it

mood

their

lead at the half but Alisha

early into the first half

Groot capitalized on a chance in fi’ont of the goal shortly into the second half, netting her second of

by Karen

the

on a goal Melanson. But the Nights fought back to tie the match with Alisha Groot slipping one by goalkeeper Stephanie

DenHatm. The action went back and

forth

throughout the half, with excellent control displayed by the

DenHaim the scoring

for

lead for Condors.

The Condors maintained

up.”

The Condors opened

was her first week

her second goal, blasting a shot by the Nights goalie to regain the

2-1

Condors. They also took advantage of the walls, sending balls careening dangerously in front of the Nights’ net.

we

It

after resting a

Karen Melanson struck again

tie.

weren’t in the

game back

with a foot injury.

to

ball

than blasts another shot at the Nights

in

defensively, another reason for the

“The other team played tougher

The Condors’ Karen Melanson

weren’t

kept her team on track out direction to them

yelling

game

for the Nights.

Chances were limited for most of the second half but Ang Papazotos had the best chance for the Condors, hammering a shot off the outside of the post. The Condors see their next action on Tuesday Feb. 9 against the league-leading Conestoga College Alumni. The Alumni are undefeated this season and have scored an incredible 81 goals while allowing only eight. They lead the Condors by two points.

College to host hockey championships By Rob Himburg

than

centre.

The

national tournament will con-

of three teams. The Conestoga Condors gain entry as the host team, while the wiimer of the Ontario sist

Conestoga College will host the 1998-1999 Ontario Colleges Athletic Association men’s provincial and national hockey championships in March. The college received word from the Canadian Colleges Athletic Association in May 1998 that they would be hosting the Canadian championships on the weekend of

March 17-20

at

the

recreation

Rodman He’s

He’s

mar-

ried,

he’s

then it’s green. It is

hard to keep up with NBA player Dennis Rodman, who not only changes

mind

as often as his hair

been a hot topic of debate since he was first suspended from the Pistons in 1992. Rodman has had a colourful career, making him a focus of media coverage over the past six colour, but has

years. that

It

is

Alberta Conference ran witii the

Christmas,”' she said. “Attendance

Who

win

host team

tournament for almost 20 years straight,” she said. “The teams from out there are very disciplined and

was lower

week before

replace

the

not work with two teams.

represent the Alberta

Conference won’t be the

to

known

until

the tournament

because their season runs longer

“I never really thought about that

problem until I saw the way the guys were playing and how good our chances are of making it,” said Diane Santos, media relations representative for athletics and recre-

take the

game seriously, especially at

the national level.”

Two games will be played each d^

was

“It

good

really

before

at the Friday night and Saturday afternoon games than the

Wednesday night games,” she

said.

“It’s

not bad, but

We

could use some more student

it’s

not great

either.

support,” said Santos.

tournament with

The Condors have four games

playing fourth and second

remaining in their regular season

at the provincial first place

games.

playing third to determine the teams

with two

at

home and two

away.

a yo-yo reinstated. In total,

Rodman

is

also very familiar

Movie Niaht

with fines. In 1993, Rodman was fined $7,500 for headbutting; in 1994, he was fined $10,000 for verbally abusing ref-

is

red,

his

the

Alberta Conference.

Rodman

divorced. His hair

representa-

tives

come from

management.

getting

OCAA

abe

because the roxmd-robin system wih

will

is hoping for some good crowds for the tournaments and the remaining regular season

Santos says she

national

will

The

team

championship game.

for the

the

team to

represent the Ontario conference. third

ation at the recreation centre.

team won the nationals was the 1996-97 season when the Cambrian Golden Shields took the title. “Prior to that, the team from the

provincial championships, the sec-

tournament as

has been suspended for more than 26 games. This guy should be sent for a course in anger

retiring.

OCAA

Condors win the

nament

was

retir-

If the

ond place promoted

will

Conference

Santos said the last time an Ontario

Colleges Athletic Association tour-

still

ing, he’s not

Ontario

the

season.

unbelievable to

Rodman remains

as an

me

NBA

player after all the countless suspensions, fines and weird behavior he has become known for, but the fans love him. Let’s talk about suspensions.

Twice in Rodman’s career, he has been suspended indefinitely. The first time on Nov. 2 1992, for throwing a bag of ice at coach Bob Hill and an official after he was given his second technical in an exhibition game. Not something to get that upset

again fined for head-butting but this time the charge was $20,000 and in 1997, he was fined

$50,000 for his offensive statements concerning the Mormon population in Salt Lake City. Despite all this, Rodman still has loyal fans. I wonder if people like him because of his ability or because of his off-the-wall style and crazy reactions to regular occurrences in basketball. He seems to have the knack of getting noticed, whether it be dressed in a wedding gown at a book signing or being accused of grabbing the breasts of women. I think Rodman says it best himself in the title of his autobiography Bad As I Wanna Be. He is just that and will con-

Jan. 17,

1997, when he kicked a TV photographer standing at courtside. Both times, Rodman

Tuesday, February 16

8:00 pm , The Sanctuary _

Tickets

$3 students $6 guests purchase tickets at the door

tinue to behave like this just as

long as the

NBA

reinstate him, allow

about.

The second time was

erees and failing to leave the court; in 1996, he was once

continues to

him

to retire

one day and change his mind the next and as long as the fans continue to love him, as weird as he

may

be.

/^ee Coke

& Popcorn


0

SPORTS Early lead squandered

Condors’ wings clipped by Redeemer Royals

SPOKE, Feb. 8, 1999

Less money means fewer sports teams By Brian Smiley

talented

lead the world in

launches, but the

of

Royals’

30

Jan.

well

end

the

in

year,

to

OCAA

this

both teams came out trying

make

their

mark.

Conestoga appeared to be a

little

more pumped and jumped to an early 13-point lead, led by centre last

long.

offence,”

he

Conestoga trying a

“The

too hard

little

some momentum. guys

haven’t

played

together in awhile, so they just started forcing

Upshaw

it,”

said.

While Upshaw said he likes the team to make three or four passes before

recently

attempting

shots,

the

Condors continually made one pass and then shot.

the final buzzer sounded,

Conestoga was on the short en4

by 13. Brian Hibbs finished with 22 points for the Condors while Tim Streit added 17. Redeemer was led by Paul Voortman, an OCAA losing

all-star,

with 27.

Bryan Ferreira, a

185-pound guard for the Condors, said the team was just beaten up and down

While Conestoga was within points with under five minutes to play, that was as close

6-1,

the court.just lazy, not getting

not knowing

each

"The Alumni are currently in place in ttie women’s indoor soccer league and kept that

position after their 16-1

Bum’s How'ir

Jan.

win over 26 at the

know why Conestoga

recreation centre. ,

The Aiumoi have

start

new

a

die Condors record of most goals scored in one game, vihieh previously stood

Margahda

at 14.

Aguilar

led

the

Alumni with an amazing four goals Amy UmwcII. Amy Olson

varsity

criteria

Burn’s

are

financing,

brings to the

it

outstanding.

do

it,”

because

Howff who

had

for

no had

Conestoga

is

lacking in academics, he said.

simply that they want to

“It’s

play a certain sport,” James said.

James

we

just

said.

James

always willing to listen

is

starting a

and

way he

was

have the funding,” he

“Conestoga has a

lot

to students

financial

return to the

student

support

marketing revenues.

way

terms

in

new program. The

“The students know they

In the early ’90s a decision

made to stick with the sports that have proved to bring the biggest

Upcoming

said to them that them half way.”

Intramural

could handle.” Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. against the

The Alumni play

are

Ice

well

4:30 p.m. 3RD VS. 4TH

Wednesday February strong team

ball.

attempts were

was evident at halftime when score was 10-1, that the Alumni were dominating the game. But the girls continued to play as a team with Heroux and Ford

goalie

net,

made on

the

Amanda Kesselring played

to

way we’re (Alumni)

have

Conestoga’s director,

3RD

5:30 p.m. VS. 4TH (if needed)

so in the second half

out for a change. “Either

1

4:30 p.m. 2ND VS. 5TH

The

together.

girls

Few

Hockey

Tuesday February 9

a

fun”

said

assistant

I’ll

out

Ball

Hockey

PLAYOFFS

Ford, athletic

who organized the team.

Information Not Available

can’t

said. “I’ve

try to

Games

Puma

All-stars at the recreation centre.

only

can’t help is the ftmding.

of talent

and athletic ability,” he said. “They gave us everything we

Alumni

It

Students do not choose other

schools

support,

But Redeemer’s coach, Moses Silva, said that even though his team came out on top, the Condors have a lot of talent and were a handful.

five players dressed to play.

the

Although James said Conestoga missing out on student and marketing opportunities, he was quick to point out that academically the college is

contact, if they are interested in

communicate well with one another and show great skill in passing and controlling the

replied

for

those sports are offset by alumni

said.

Heroux each scored once Keating

opportunities

omselves,” he said.

is

Most programs don’t get off the ground because the college doesn’t have enough money in their budget to support any more

can’t

profile

he

who

substitutions since they only

also fonashed

College

college

Chantelle Nadeau and Andrea for the

to attend

because the costs of operating

just

always on the ball

Adele

who want them

don’t get to play together enough,”

and .Ioanna Mills each scored a hat trick. Marlene Ford.

Aliunni.

name

People with

will look to those colleges first,

Alumni torch Burn’s Howff 16-1 first

children

print.

because they offer the varsity sport their child wishes to play. “We’re missing out on a lot of

Higher profile sports provide a

Women's soccer team sets record

By Lindsay Gibson

always in

The Condors see action next on

Ferreira said part of the team’s is

opportunities because their

and meet them half of facilities, scheduling and being their main

complement one another. “We have good players, we

back on defence.”

problem

which have more varthan Conestoga are getting many more marketing

James said that when he is approached by students who want

“Right now, financially,

and how they

abilities

said that the top colleges in

the province

running.

teams, he said. other’s

He

is

college read about the schools and

college.

would come.

still believes the school missing out on opportunities.

women’s basketball, rugby, badminton and cross-country

The

“We were

eight

James has been by students

scheduling, benefit to students

as they

and men’s hockey. James said although these sports meet the four criteria for the softball

sity athletics

into consideration.

When

said.

The second half started out the same as the end of the first, with

opportunities

program, four elements are taken

Condor forward Tim Streit lays in an easy basket as Redeemer Royals’ Paul Voortman looks on. Voortman led the Royals with 27 points as they defeated Conestoga 93-80. (Photo by Brian smiiey)

James said. The four sports are women’s and men’s soccer, women’s

we donT have

said.

and the return

At the end of the half, the Condors trailed by four, 44-40. Conestoga coach Terry Upshaw said his team let Redeemer gain control of the game because they didn’t make plays. “We let them get back into the game because we didn’t ran any

major sports have been successful for us,”

is

to

game.

to gain

James

potential

doesn’t have a sport or want to try

Conestoga turned the ball over more than a dozen times, which helped Redeemer get back in the

that

enquiring about men’s fastball,

to

Brian Hibbs’ 18 first-half points.

But the lead didn’t

losing

sporting

Most

exhibition match, since Conestoga

not playing in the

are

approached

While the game was just an is

a

“There was a decision made to stay with the four

formula of a successful program,

here,”

Royals

the

and

have

didn’t

students because

outlaunched the Condors 93-80.

participation.

he

certain

attempts from three-point land,

but

national

to the

Kitchener.

“We

30

over

the

championship,

and benefit

students measured by support and

the five starting players were from

at the

two teams

recreation centre the

Durham

basketball program, four out of

basketball

teams.

for

and

when

won

College

Conestoga

combined

the

athletics

1996/97,

program doesn’t have an5dhing on the Conestoga Condors’ and

game on

on

according to Ian James,

basketball

In a

because

students

space

Redeemer

out

recreation.

In

NASA may

losing

is

college offers only four varsity

manager

shuttle

return to the college in terms of financial return

Conestoga

sports,

By Brian Smiley

— Page 15

meet


Page 16

— SPOKE, Feb.

1999

8,

Condors hold on

for victory over Vipers for the first time in the

By Charies Kuepfer

Dan The Condors continued at

their run

The Condors regained with two quick goals

Colleges Athletic Association’s

29

way,

winner a mere 65 seconds later. The third period was dominated

and

by penalties and the Vipers blew a

home game. They blowing

two-goal

a

lead

huge

midway

3-2

behind

falling

hard

the

the

through the second period. They

won

also

despite racking

Hartholt

netted what proved to be the

the Boreal Vipers on their Jan.

it

the lead

late in the

game before Andrew

escaping with a 4-3 victory over

did

the

period. Sheldon Mustard tied the

championships,

hockey

after

top corner of the net.

a playoff berth in the Ontario

men’s

game,

found

Bazinet

opportunity

game on

to

tie

a six-minute power

play.Popp closed up shop for

up 30

all

minutes in penalties and surviving

Viper scorers and the Condors

a six-minute penalty early in the

held on for their fourth win in

third period.

their last five

The

The Condors were bailed out by goaltender Phil Popp who made some key saves and picked up his first win of the season. “Phil kept us in it,” said Condor coach Ken Galemo, who quickly any

dispelled

Assistant captain, Mike Traynor, fires a shot at the Viper goaltender. The Viper goaltender was busy, (Photo by Charles Kuepfer) 58 shots.

facing

noting the

is

Despite the win. Condor coach

that

Ken Galemo

starter

right now.

He

said

it’s

an asset to have a

two-goalie system where he can

know

put in his backup and he’ll

The win was big

Popp who

for

“I’ve lately

been having a tough time but I guess I’m pumped up

and play

in the country level,

then

we

manage to play

“I

we brought

think

somehow we

at their level,” said

Conestoga up 2-0

rebound past Viper goalie Eric

The Vipers managed to cut into on a power-play goal, but

game

started the

the lead

capable of.”

Viper goaltender Eric Drapeau early and often. Ryan Martin got the

Galemo was delighted with the two points, but said his team

Condors on the board just before the midway point of the first

the second period and tied the

lacked in the discipline depart-

period,

down

to a level that is a

lower than what

we

are

strong,

the

testing

after

some

trailed 2-1 at the

game just

puek

great

-

Minutes

AS FOLLOWS:

STUDENT

:

1,1999

AUGUST

OPEN TO ALL FULL TIME, PART TIME AND SESSIONAL TEACHERS, COUNSELLORS, OR LIBRARIANS EMPLOYED BY THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS, CONESTOGA COLLEGE.

was

there

We

'

The Condors outshot

the Vipers

58-28 despite failing to register a play opportunity.

infi’action

was

to

expire,

the

play of the team, especially in taking advan-

The most*' creative goal, however, came when Condor Dan Mihelic took the rebound and deposited it past the Cabana keeper before he had a chance to react. Also netting goals for the Condors in the first

tage of the extra-player advantage the Cabana

team allowed

“We

late in the

game.

played really well,” he said. “They’re

the top team in the league. Their penalties solidified the

match

for us.”

half were Zlatko Lokosejak and Paul

McQuade. Replying were Andy

Incitt,

for the

Cabana team

Carlos Alegre and

Dan

Pilas.

TERM OF

OFFICE:

SEPTEMBER

1,

1999

-

AUGUST 31, 2002.

The second half took a turn for the worse for Cabana team as they played a little more zealously which ended up costing them a chance at tying, or possibly the league-leading

The terms

same as

of reference for

those

these elected internal

for externally

Governors. Nomination forms

Nomination forms

will

members

are the

appointed members of the Board of will

be posted on February

also be available

in

18, 1999.

the office of the Secretary-

winning the game.

With about six minutes left in the second Condors took the lead 4-3 on a goal by Lou Capara. Shortly after the goal, Cabana player Joey Ferraro got a blue card and was sent off for two minutes. About 30 seconds half, the

Treasurer of the Board. (Kevin Mullan).

Closing date for nominations:

MARCH

11, 1999.

before Lists of

nominees

MARCH

to

be posted on campus

bulletin

Ferraro’s

penalty

expired,

received a blue card for another

trip.

Incitt

This was

upgraded to a yellow card for an unsports-

22, 1999.

ELECTION DATE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL

boards on

7,

1999.

manlike display towards the referee, forcing him off for four minutes. Seconds before

a

just

couldn’t do anything.”

The Condors men’s indoor soccer team used Cabatm Boys' to their advantage by defeating the Iirstplace"^‘ said his team played well, although they lacked the mental game early on. team on Jan. 28 at the recreation centre, “A lot of the guys were late for the game,” The fast-paced game took place in front of a said. “Yqn cannot mentally prepare for a backhe were treated to a crowd of 30 fans who game when you arrive that late.” !^and-forth battle in the first half. This reckless He was, however, impressed by the overall style led to a combined total of six goals in

of an errant shot off the wall

ACADEMIC MEMBER

when

six-minute power play.

;

®

SEPTEMBER

though,

Condors scaled their victory on a goal by Andre Pereira, making the final score 5-3. Condor assistant coach Sanjeeve Dhanapala

the over-aggressive play of the

OFFICE:

the top lines,

and they ran out of steam,” said Bedard. “We had our chance

shot on goal on their first power-

in.

took the lead

Ferraro’s [

21, 2000.

line.

was going with

'

By Rob Himburg

-

first.

“I

inspired in

over five minutes later they

time of his third

Soccer team kicks Cabana butt

CATEGORIES:

OPEN TO ALL FULLTIME AND PART TIME STUDENTS ENROLLED IN A PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION (A GROUP OF RELATED COURSES LEADING TO A DIPLOMA, CERTIFICATE OR OJHER DOCUMENT AWARDED BY THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS).

end of the

The Vipers came out

three lines,

but Bedard limited the playing

banging a

after

Drapeau.

Galemo. The Condors

ONE PERSON IS TO BE ELECTED AS A MEMBER OF THE CONESTOGA COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY BOARD OF GOVERNORS FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING TWO.

TERM OF

The Vipers dressed

Less than two minutes later, Sean Murray scored to put

at their

BOARD OF GOVERNORS ELECTION NOTICE

ELIGIBILITY IS

handed because some of his players’ marks weren’t up, which meant they couldn’t be a part of

control in the Vipers’ zone.

play a sixth or sev-

“I’m happy with the results but performance,” said the not

little

back.

team can

can play the top team

enth place team and

ourselves

getting his confidence

is

said his

“We

play better.

Galemo.

that

keep them in the game.

said he

Larry

coach,

Bedard, said he was playing short-

the team.

ment.

now,” said Popp.

goaltending

by Anthony Gignac controversy

games.

Vipers’

Condor forward Andre Pereira scores a goal as the Cabanas look on. (Photo by

Rob Himburg)


Digital Edition - February 08, 1999