Page 1

31th Year

— No.

5

Janitor

charged with theft By Melissa

On

Dietrich

the evening of Jan. 19,

an

on-duty

was

janitor

arrested while on Conestoga

by

property

College

Waterloo regional police and

charged with theft under

The band Superfreak performed at a charity event Dave Nicholson and Mark Gage memoria! fund.

$S,000. Allan Hunter,

of

supervisor

security services for the college,

said the arrest of the 23-year-old

man

occurred as a result of an

ongoing investigation. “A number of thefts had been reported in one of the electronics labs,”

he

said.

The janitor, whose name has not yet been released by police, was and tools stealing caught from a lab B-wing of the school. Since the man is an employee of

at

Stages Jan. 21 to raise money

for the Const.

(Photo by Eiieen ovniz)

Business boogie was far out, man! By

Eileen Diniz

electronic equipment in the

M&M

Cleaning, the agency that

employs the cleaning staff at the college, it is not up to the college to fire the employee.

He had been working at Boon campus for two years.

money

fund,

making the total donation $1,000. Green lasers, strobe effects and a rainbow array of lights lit up the Stages in Kitchener

has not been a problem at the

disco attire danced the night away

of

parts

been

theft

the

in

school

always a concern for us,

“It is

when we have a theft

especially

what

is

in

typically a secure area

after hours,”

he

said.

Hunter said

is

it

unfortunate

someone

when an employee

or

a trusted position

involved in an

is

in

other staff said.

staff

By

to

put a cloud over

who

are working,” he

far the majority of the

are

honest

working people.”

to

and

at

warm bodies

dressed in

disco band

the well-known

Superfreak. “It

was a good opportunity

ordinator

hard-

Laurie

From left, DSA president Kristin Murphy, CBSA communications co-ordinator Laurie Campbell, CBSA representative Kristi Mason (Photo by Eileen Diniz) and CBSA president Hong Chau.

for

something for the community,” said CBSA communications co-

Campbell,

a

help of the

DSA.

body.

who

personnel and bystanders tried to

32,

year while conducting an

underwater search for Mark Gage,

students about the fund

Gage had been swimming in the Grand River around 7:30 p.m. when he was sucked into the

that

it

make

the

idea,

said

was quickly decided would be a good idea to

Campbell.

it

It

a

association

business event

students

with

the

was

police in Cambridge, died Aug.

Nicholson,

James Wilson, a third-year manstudent, studies agement approached the other management proposed

force of the current

for the Waterloo regional

Dave worked 12, last

and

The

too great and Nicholson’s lifeline broke after 50 or more emergency

third-year marketing student.

studies

offense of this nature. “It tends

Jan. 21 as

the school to get involved and do

including the electronics labs.

Wee Willy

own

their

the

to

dance floor

several

versus

amount of

campuses,” said Hunter. Hunter said theft by employees

numerous reports of

Bill

at a disco night

Dave Nicholson and Mark Gage memorial fund. The for the Const.

the

and served with a trespass He is no longer permitted

college, however, there have

Big

Student Association

associations are also giving a sub-

on any of -Conestoga College’s

Page 4

Doon

of the

have raised $435

the

notice.

Commentary

Business

Conestoga

stancial

“He has been removed from site

The

Students Association with the help

13,

at

the

Parkhill

Dam

in

Cambridge.

sluiceway of the dam.

was sucked

into the

way while looking

Nicholson

same

sluice-

for

Gage’s

pull

him

to safety.

Both bodies

were found two days later. In November Nicholson was

honoured posthumously with The Bravery of Medal Ontario award.

He was

the first

member

of the regional police force in

25-year history to line

of duty.

die

in

its

the


Page 2

— SPOKE,

Feb.

1999

1,

NEWS Too

space

little

Business department By Melissa

Dietrich

The construction of the new wing located next to the woodworking centre has

The room located beside the in the main cafeteria

microwaves

been

has

used

by

(DSA)

Student Association

prompted the

Doon

the

of a space

striking

allocation committee.

for

“The space allocation committee

storage since the construction of

has become a place for negotiation

the Sanctuary in July 1995.

But and students

among

the business faculty

administration to say

want

space

to

use this

for

John

Scott, a

students,

room and to

a

meeting room. with

member of faculty

we have and

it

most,”

the

it

and

faculty

who wants

find

who needs

School

said

Cleaves.

brought up the concern of more

He said when the

meeting

business

build the business wing, students

students and faculty at the last

his

and faculty were cramped and was a fight over which programs got to use the new

the

space.

the

college Jan.

rooms

of Business, for

meeting

council

11.

He

says

understanding

on

was

it

that

after

“Now

room, which was a part of the old available

for

to

become

use

of the

was the

is

currently space,

Gerry Cleaves, vice-president of

DSA who

was

also

college council meeting, says the

DSA

would be willing

the room, but only if

an

given

room

“We would room

love

DSA vice-president

Gerry Cleaves, stands

room 2A01

in

that

used

is

for storage, located

cafeteria.

does not Cleaves

said

generated

requires

more

the

DSA

space, they

would

when

would be used

not leave their present location.

but build out from where they are

of the school right next to the cafe-

now.

teria. It

“We’re located in the centre

a

office),” said Cleaves.

for quiet study, a

Dental plan By

Lisa Wilhelm

C

oiiesiogd

urrcnlly

looking

(

oilcsu-'s

lu

into

the

implementing a

who

Cleave.s, vice-president affairs,

c\ery

said

a.sk if the

college

plan covers dental work because,

terms of health plans,

to be covered less

today’s workforce.

tends

it

and

less in

More

parents

there's

plan

Cleaves said of Ihe

.sluiiciiLs

arc automatically .signed up

don't opt out until

Now

it’s

too

and

laic.

that the health plan has

something the students

want,” said Cleaves.

Although there have been some promotion problems with the health plan in the past,

it

was

refined and streamlined and the

SI, 000 to have

out became

come

the

next

level

by

incorporating a dental plan. dental plan

•A

is in

dciUist^^ ^twice

As with

.

a

Currently, the

the health plan,

it

The next directors

Miadian

Tiro Plara)

893-2464

step is to take the

board of meeting where details

wants to find out what the students want as far as dental

coverage.

coverage

is

input will

conceme4 but thencome later in the

process.

The plan will cover anywhere from 80 to 100 per cent of the

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AT THE AREA’S LARGEST SELECTION OF USED CDS

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find the best deal

of the plan will be determined. Cleaves also said the DSA

being offered or opt out and use

own

looking different

propo.sal to the next

TRADE thf

is

said

be optional whether a student wants to stay in and use the plan their

can

“sealed with alumni kisses”

WE OFFER THE MOST

DSA

into

students.

line with

year,

plan will

in.”

SELL

402 King

wasn’t covered and

that's wiiere the dental

Shock your sweetheart with a carnation

BUY

St.,

I

cost me almost my wisdom teeth

It

it'

to

CleavesLr-

“It is

helps to soften the blow',”

been tuned up, things arc being

means they don't have health -

are looking for, something they

it

moved

are also working contract which ,

im ludmg general ciean-

and meeting with companies to see

what the students want because people grow up visiting the

benefits.

conI.

Cleaves said. “

anvmoie and nothing we can do about

ihc

for the plan at registration

year students

in

that the

i>

opi oul before the

but

it,’'

Gerry

i

student) decides he/shc doesn’t

who

their parents’

lefi

for college

want

don't have access to coverage at

of student

d

'

work or through coverage.

KITCHENER

to have the

mgs, emergency dental W'orkand deadline, said C leaves tlie removal of wisdom teeth, “Halfway through the year^ttle""’* *TT doesn 't pay for everything,

Doiiii

(DSA) is pnuess of

dental plan for students

TORTURE

problem

Mudonis don

(

UKE g%

works

In

onlv

Student Association

385 Fairway Road

makes sense

student lounge here,” he said.

ideas include

used bookstore, a store for DSA merchandise, a deck near the pond a student pub downstairs and more funding for programs.

DSA

USED CD

near the

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

'

additional

the group has

The brainstorming

in

have

to

closer (to the

DSA

need any

it

said.

a second student loxmge which

exchange.

storage

building,

additional space in the future.

up they were

to give

alternative

new

what they call a wish list which might require their having

the

at

with this

happening again,” he

Although the

business students and faculty.

the

a couple of years ago college had decided to

there

construction of the Sanctuary, this

student lounge,

need of more room

in


SPOKE, Feb.

NEWS

1999

1,

— Page 3

Crash victims finish fail term By Carly Benjamin

to finish the first year of their

Sperling lost a kidney as a result of injuries suffered in the accident and dislocated her ankle because she jammed her foot on the dash to brace herself for the impact of

business-management program,

the crash.

Adam

Passmore and Jessica

Sperling have returned to school

being involved in a car

after

accident late last year.

Passmore and Sperling were seriously injured after their car

collided with a

Coke truck

at the

Manitou Drive and Sasaga Drive in Kitchener on Nov. 20 The two were driving up Manitou Drive when a transport truck started to exit one of the intersection of

.

MA

K

R K

N

1

driveways.

MARTIN lAWRENCC UMITEIT CDITIONS

The

Paul Knight was awarded a Mark King print of the 12th hole on the Augusta National Golf Club on Jan. 19 for his dedication to the Purchasing Management Association of Canada. (Photo by Jeanette Everall)

By Jeanette Some

Everall

Conestoga

students business and materials program are management concerned about the Purchasing Management Association of Canada’s (PMAC) decision to build a relationship with Wilfrid

enrolled in administration

the

Laurier University.

The brief announcement was made at the association’s aimual

attend seminars and network with

who was

professionals at business meetings held throughout the year.

PMAC

The meeting to

all

annual the only meeting open

association’s is

students enrolled in the

program.

“It

doesn’t

mean we

are

Rolf Bodendorfer,

through

membership

district president

the

intensify job will competition between university

of PMAC

university

and college students. “I understand

way

for

an excellent

it’s

PMAC

increase

to

its

Conestoga College grads may be affected because there will be more however,

scope,

competition for jobs,” said Craig

Maw, who

a third-year student

is

program. Keri Quipp, also a third-year said, Conestoga, at student “Companies go after universities because students have a degree and (college students) only have a in the

diploma. So,

The

dinner,

held

Rolf

Bodendorfer,

PMAC

said

in

decision

the

interview,

an

the

we

mean

doesn’t

are

our relationship with

the college;

we

are just increasing

with

relationship

Wilfrid

Laurier,” he said.

who

Paul Knight,

of

co-ordinator

management

is

the former

the

materials

program

the

Gulf

from

the association

was

internal organs.

Both say they remain confident, however, they will finish their programs, despite these obstacles.

available to fourth-year business

the

WLU who are enrolled

university’s

purchasing

course.

PMAC

be increasing the WLU, and like Conestoga, it will be awarded to the student with the highest will

scholarship available to

18 years.

management program. The other organization is the American

“That came out of the blue,” said who was given a Mark King print of a prominent golf course. “It was a bit of a surprise.” The evening was also an

Knight,

professional offer

associations

memberships

enrolled

to

materials

the

in

that

students

Adam Passmore and term during the

Production and Inventory Control In

addition,

Jessica Sperling semester.

will

be completing

The Toronto Chapter of The Institute of Internal Auditors

the

associations

opportunity for the association to

provide bursaries and scholarships for students and support for the

formally recognize Keri Quipp

program.

Scholarship Program

1998

-

1999

$ 2,000

*

Conestoga College •

In addition

Class Rings

if

one

IS

the winner may rece've a work placement orcchop pradicum in Internal Audit

available

CRITERIA

10% Off Sale

of building a relationship with

0

enrolmem in an undergraduate university degree program or a three year college diploma program suitable to the prerequisites of the Certified Internal Auditor Full-tiine

examination;

0 0

diploma program is in the accounting or business fields, or is a degree or with an accounting major, which "ideally" includes coverage of Internal Auditing; a registered in the second year of a three-year program, or in the second or third year of prx)gram of study

four-year program.

January 25th, 26th, 2?th

Jrom 10am

to

28th DEADLINE: March

2pm

1,

1999

To Apply: and submit Please complete the application form on the reverse of this page

Vn the School

docuraeniarion before the deadline

Chair,

The

it

with

all

required

to:

Academic Relations Committee of Internal Auditors

Institute

Toronto Chapter

Cafeteria

173

Homewood Avenue YorK Ontario

North

in the association is

Keep your memories on hand for

M2M

an opportunity for students to

IK4

a lifetime re:

with a School Rin^from Jostens.

their

fall

(Photo by Cariy Benjamin)

currerrt

Society (APICS).

in the process

WLU.

it,”

PMAC.

grade in the specified course, said Bodendorfer. PMAC is one of two

jostons

the

A separate scholarship of $500 is

at

Conestoga, said Bodendorfer did not offer many details, only that

Membership

Sperling was able to get out of

all

can’t wait to get rid of

will

all.

lessening

southboimd Coke truck.

I

of the

not affect Conestoga students at “It

the

The Arthur Child Scholarship

president of the Central Ontario

of

hitting

time,

which was

Steakhouse in Kitchener, was also a chance for the association to honour Paul Knight for his dedication to maintaining a strong partnership between PMAC and Conestoga College over the past

job market for us.”

District

he said. Sperling has regular sessions with a physiotherapist. She also is being treated by an osteopath for complications from the injuries she suffered to her

traffic

a pain in the butt to carry

stupid thing around

could saturate the

it

However,

at

oncoming

“It’s

the

Currently, the association awards

students at

with the college.”

association’s decision to increase

reminders of the crash. Passmore is walking with a cane because of the splint he now has in

a scholarship of $1,000 to the student with the highest grade in

certification course

lessening our relationship

the

The accident has left Sperling and Passmore with physical

awarded to her in an earlier ceremony on Oct. 9 last year.

in

concerned

are

recipient

semester.

the principles of buying course, professional which is a

dinner on Jan. 19.

Students

the

scholarship,

last term by the end of the semester but teachers in their program are allowing both students to finish their fall term courses while attending this

his knee.

pinned behind the steering wheel. Sperling was rushed to Hamilton General Hospital with internal injuries, while Passmore was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital with a broken nose and knee.

raises student job concerns

work

remained in the road. Passmore tried to avoid a collision by veering around the truck, but lost control of his car and shot into

the car but Passmore remained

PMAC announcement

Brief

driver stopped his truck but

Passmore and Sperling were unable to complete their course

Scholarship Program

SERVICES APPLICATION FORMS AVAILABLE IN THE REGISTRARS OFFICE & STUDENT


.

Page 4

— SPOKE, Feb.

1,

1999

SPOKE

^mmmm

C(

No commemoration F ebruary

black

is

month

history

North

over America.

While

much

all

event has

this

significance

the United

States,

rightfully so,

DSA

most

not doing

is

“We

is,

why

is it

that Conestoga’s

doesn’t trouble

DSA

advance so something could be planned. I spoke with a member of the association, however, I was informed that, at universities for example, there may be a club that looks after such things. A black lit-

guest comedian, but not enough resources or budget to commemorate the role Canada

played in black history?

erary club perhaps.

slavery.

When

Fair enough, the

DSA

it

the best hope of

We

but as the conversation

know about

all

does that make

it,

doesn’t have the resources or the

it

official

e-mail can

DSA

we

admit

you.

Canadian workers have

become enslaved

by

e-mail and

it’s

in a catch-22. Society

communication

increasing

Jeanette

making them

mentally ill, according to a report released on Jan. 20, by a coalition of mental health organizations. report says workplace stress,

including an explosion of new technologies presents a “clear and

present

danger”

health,

to

named

Wee Willy, on the other hand was bum. He was spoiled. He was lazy. He thought life should be one

William, they

a

were known to their

friends

long party. In the ’60s,

Wee

as Big Bill and

Willy.

What Big Bill had in size. Wee Willy made up for in charisma and Over the years these two became extremely close. I mean, energy.

Their

friends

their

it

sometimes was that kept

friendship so strong.

They

The

is

last

was

laugh

on

though, because he faked

they

it.

Bill,

Willy

never knew.

Wee chose

Willy was mysterious. to

keep

a

low

He

profile.

People close to the pair swore

Willy was connected.

Spoke SPOKE

when

were both just pups, he even convinced Big Bill to try some pot.

they were practically inseparable.

wondered what

some

surely

although a slightly drunk one.

He was

of

to use

past. is

now needed

It’s

are

it.

and location

The bottom

irrelevant.

is: employees wanting to remain competitive in the ’90s would be wise to use their e-mail, even if it kills them.

to

catch up on backlogged e-mails.

even to the point where people coming to work earlier and

was able lifestyle.

sort

to

of a gangster. life,

He yet

maintain a lavish

He’d disappear off the

face of the earth and then

pop up

when it was least expected. As Bill moved up in life association with Willy

embarrassment.

his

became an

He

tried

to

would never sever. Willy had some for him.

Willy would have none

of that.

line

You

see,

Willy always

knew

He

saw

opportunities for himself this

didn’t

Bill

was one

endless

No

Sure, he

sir,

mind

all

as if he

here.

For

that.

misfortune of having such a vile

was self-absorbed and

and slimy buddy as old Willy, at least learn to use your own good

all

his heart.

he thought only of

bad.

were

1

mean,

it

judgement. Sure,

was not

own

your friends’

to

head. Then, if you get into

trouble, at least

wasn’t that Bill was a saint.

Keeping Conestoga College conneeted

listen

advice, but always think with your

a Republican, for

SPOKE is mainly

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

The most important moral is you should choose your friends carefully. If you have the

old

Pete’s sake! It

just tasted

when Willy was aroimd. Now we come to the most important part of this tale. You see, there are many lessons to be learned better

himself and his pleasure, but he

relationship Willy

He

he loved

reason,

egotistical. Yes,

wasn’t

vices.

that

some strange

his

bud would be a somebody one day. He was determined to ride on the wave of Bill’s success.

But

little

Oddly enough, they

It

his smarts

way with good

his

loved Cuban cigars, for instance.

Bill.

Willy with

best

all

always got his

distance himself from his devious friend, but

For

He had

either.

of magic

sort

was so easy and fancy titles. Big Bill was a bit of a simpleton when it came to dealing with Wee Willy. Somehow, Willy control over Bill.

Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthicr; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg; Features and Issues Editor: Julie van Donkersgoed Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy Sankar; Multi-media Editor: Neven Mujczinovic; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager; Janet Wakutz; Circulation Managers. Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. is

For Canadian workers who feel overwhelmed by their e-mail, this is a gloomy reality. But, no matter how demanding and timeconsuming the act of e-mail is, Canadian workers will be forced

to stop

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor; Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor; Sarah Thomson;

address

e-mail.

says the report. That’s a lot of e-mails to reply to in one day.

Editor; Jaime Clark;

SPOKE’s

are being greeted

story of friendship for the ’90s

never worked a day in his

they

people will continue to do the opposite. That means, Canadians are going to be forced to use their

faster

down

Bill

both

So why don’t people revert and do what’s good for them? The answer is, no matter how many facts and figures there are to tell people what’s good for them,

a thing of the That time

grinding

were, after

Since

moral.

they’re doing, that causes a terrif-

-A

were

In doing one could assume that stress would decrease and there would be an improvement in workplace so,

For all its evils, e-mail has made the world smaller, communication

That can contribute to a biochemical reaction that produces depression.”

two

good for them - an

e-mail free workplace.

and take a breath. For some people coffee and limch breaks are

of the

in the National

relax.

lived

Perhaps people in society should

because their competitor won’t stop and they need to remain competitive. Consequently, this vicious circle can lead to an untimely death. E-mail was never intended to endanger people’s lives, but it has. It has made the workplace a health

Some people

you

later

Post saying,

was quoted

self-confidence and the ability to

great buddies.

their health.

situation.

When people are being inundated with e-mail to such a magnitude, there is no longer time

ic

all, so different. Big was a hard worker. He had dreams. He had plans. Someday he would be a big shot. He looked like a clean living farm boy,

which worsens

by some 50 e-mail messages when they come to work in the morning,

“When a worker loses any sense of control over the job

there

on-the-job

risk.

Bill Wilkensen, co-author

Once upon a

people’s

kill

revert to what’s

is

Depression can impede recovery from gastro-intestinal and blood diseases, lung disorders and cancer. And, according to the

report,

Bill

stress,

e-mail

contributing to depression.

report, depression kills.

Big

remain on

like

whole

this

because of the increased amount of information they have to manage.

Unfortunately, they can’t stop

Everall

physically and

The

of things

would be the perfect

acknowledge the obstacles

to

staying

competitive, but trying to stay

top

it

create awareness.

emerged from

needs faster

to

know

has a lot of power whether it or not.

logically,

medium to

This is serious. Modem technology has got society caught

#

kill

doesn’t

African Americans and Canadians have overcome, at least some good will have

about any less important?

would be no point in having any sort of memorial day, week or

budget.

know. The

moment

we know

Certainly not or there

DSA

If just one person learns that February is black history month and takes even a

Underground

the

Railroad. But Just because

I

if the

other people at Conestoga don’t

this,

So

know Canada was

all

freedom for African Americans fleeing

was informed that it wasn’t that didn’t want to do anything, it was

continued, just that

We

Presumably,

like to

that the

black history obvious that there

about

It’s

time

much

so

body, has the resources and the budget to have a buffet spaghetti dinner featuring a

Workplace e-mail stress can -

Wee Willy and

me

know about

didn’t

assumed they were unaware of I decided I’d inform them well

in

search for a story on the events the Student Association was holding to

month. It

My question

anything for black

Month

month as it does that it is was no intention of doing anything.

Initially, I

my

usually do things for bigger events,”

powerful association, which is supposed to represent Conestoga’s student

the event so

be significant in Judy Canada. Sankar Yet, it seems as though some people don’t know about it or don’t care. Maybe it’s both. I am troubled by the situation here at Conestoga College concerning black history month.

Doon

they said.

in

and

also

In

commemorate this event, 1 ran into a brick wall. The blow was heightened by the fact that it was the last thing I expected. The

history month.

should

it

for Black History

it

will

be on your

own.

May by the Doon The views and opinions expressed

funded from September to

Student Assoeiation (DSA).

in tlris newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be

liable for

out of errors in advertising beyond the

any damages amount paid

arising

for the

space. Unsolicited submissions

must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS Word

tain

file would be helpfiil. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, Feb.

1,

1999

— Page S

Campus Question

Should our freedoms be restricted by courts? Jeffrey Barter, second-year civil-engineering student.

By

Elizabeth Sackrider

Matt Grahlman, a second-year broadcasting student, had some

B.C. Supreme Court Judge Duncan Shaw dismissed charges against

pornography

child

collector

John Sharpe on Jan.

The judge ruled

freedom of expression and rights

the world.

to

should be placed especially

comes

He

the restrictions

was discussed in commentaries and

expression

editorials,

One of

management-studies student.

was

restrictions should

Patty

what

privacy of their

said

of

majority

students

Conestoga on Jan. 21

at

restricting

an

individual’s

was acceptable only if the person were violating somebody pornography does.

else, as child

Nevin

agreed

with

the

our

own

majority of respondents.

“We

leading

are

destruction,” he

“We

the

of

desecration

children because

it

Nathan McLaughlin, a third-year engineering

civil

rights should

be

student,

Nancy Farias, third-year management -studies student,

student.

of

Charter

Freedoms, then

it

in

he

Karen Horst said she agreed be imposed on what

limits should

Canadians can and can’t do.

“Some

any way,

and

Rights

wouldn’t be the

said.

rights are extreme

only go so so

far.

control

restricted.

we compromised,

the

said

far.

Rights can only go

You have got it

be able to

to

somehow,” she

okay

is

comes

utterly ridiculous.

to

stuff

and can

like

limited,”

David Pettigraw, a third-year materials management student, said he thought individuals’ rights should be limited when they are dealing with pornography and other “Saying child pornography

is

When

it

child pornography and that,

should

it

be

he said

Nancy Farias, a management studies opposed any type of

said.

offensive subjects.

do

third-year student,

restriction

on

rights.

“We’re in Canada so we can do what we want,” she said.

Photos By Elizabeth Sackrider

our

will deteriorate

our society and we are just going to

become

want

they

can’t

really allow anything that has to

with

said

Charter of Rights and Freedoms,”

to

said.

Eckstein

when in the own homes. .“In our own home we should be able to do what we want,” she said.

“If

Second-year marketing student

Rob

“I

definitely think

should be

restrictions

animals.”

Second-year

student

business

Ken Egerden

civil-engineering student.

student

David Pettigraw, thirdyear materials-management

individuals should have rights to do

of expression and right to privacy.

rights

Nathan McLaughlin, third-year

can’t restrict everything,” he

be placed on the public’s freedom

The

on freedoms of

Third-year management studies

the questions raised

surveyed

is

said.

his ruling.

whether or not third-year

“You

political

cartoons that criticizfd the judge

and

it

That

did say there must be limits to

public outrage. Countrywide, the subject

when

to child pornography.

just sick; let’s just castrate them.”

This ruling sparked debate and

Eckstein,

definitely think restrictions

“I

privacy had been violated.

Patty

the child pornography lovers in

all

18.

Sharpe’s

that

on what to do with

interesting ideas

said he thought

it

when

placed especially

comes

it

to child pornogra-

wouldn’t be intruding on an individual’s

ta privacy to be

right

having

with

charged

child

phy.

That

is

just sick; let’s

MEET THE TOP DOG.

just castrate them.”

pornography.

“There between

big

a

is

sitting there

and

magazine

difference

Matt Grahlman, second-year

reading a skin

having

broadcasting student

child

pornography,” said Egerden.

Second-year student

restrictions

engineering

Barter

with

disagreed

Karen Horst, third-year materials-management student.

civil

Jeffrey

said

he

imposing

bn freedoms and

that

it

Third-year Tricia

marketing

Duncan

student

said people often

More destinations. More buses.

use their freedom of speech for

jeopardizes democratic rights.

things that aren’t proper.

“I would rather live in a country, where we had our freedom of choice to do whatever we wanted to

pornography,

do,” he said. “But there have to be

freedom of expression too

limits to the laws.”

said.

“In cases where there I

More value. is

child

Low student fares. Climate controlled,

think there should

be restrictions placed;

it

is

far,”

she

Guelph

Conestoga’s 31 st birthday goes by quickly and quietly On digit

Conestoga

Jan. 8,

students

hit the last

on the calendar. Yes, the

college

is

31

years old, yet

its

was

made

construction

available

of a

for

and 20 portable classrooms for three areas of study; applied arts, business and commerce and technology.

Three years

later,

the first

Conestoga grads now reside tries

in

over 31 coun-

throughout the world.

the

community

college in Kitchener.

made up

in the core building

went

unnoticed by students, faculty and staff. Because it is not a significant number like the 25th or the 50th, it went by quietly. In 1965, 137 acres of farm land

birthday

met

186 students class. These

The community college concept,

Doon when it

was most

Ottawa

$91

who wished

to:

London

$18 Peterborough $46 Windsor $52 $101 Sudbury

does not include GST.

other discounted destinations plus oneway student fares available.

to

a career.

Over the yeacs, Conestoga has expanded and given birth to five satellite campuses: Cambridge, Guelph, Stratford, Waterloo, and Clinton. Its areas of study have increased by the dozens, and it has sent out graduates by the hundreds each year. Conestoga grads now reside in

niRAVELCUIS 1

70 University Ave. W.

Erm^tKmmdi CarasuMa^f 15 Charles

St.

W.

886-0400 741-2600

over 31 countries throughout the

world.

campus, was

Conestoga’s over 25,000.

appeared that a university degree

Belleville

likely unattainable to the

according to the history of initiated

Toronto

$10 $22 $52 Price

average student

pmsue

free coaches.

STUDENT RETURN FARES Kitchener

By Jacqueline Smith

smoke

taking

In

countries these graduates number

Take

it

Easy. Take the Greyhound. www.greyhound.ca


-

Page 6

— SPOKE,

Fi-b. I.

IW)

STUDENT A

thrifty

LIFE

purchase

New

cardiac equipment

used

day and night classes

for

By Sarah Thomson

paddles

defibrillation

Conestoga’s health seiences department

course

that

teaches

professionals advanced cardiac

The order performed

health

currently

purchased $25,000 worth of equipment to

board, in a well orchestrated dance that

recertification is also taught at the college.

teach the advanced cardiac

ensures a better outcome for the patient,

support

life

aimed

course

health

at

life

(CPR), deals with the support of the patient until he/she reaches the hospital.

new

actual course is

ACLS

course,

which include cardiac monitors and a cardiac rhythm simulator. Mannequins that can be intubated, permit tubes to be put into them for airway management, are also used to practise

who is

teaches the like

£l

based on

There are

recipe.

recipe

different

follow

for

the student expects to pass, said Baby.

This requires three sets of equipment,

ACLS

cards

to

varying

the

cardiac

rhythms.

The

involve a variety of drugs,

steps

problems,

respiratory

such as

of

lack

breathing, and the certain things done to

success

enrolled

in

ACLS

course.

new

that

kind of frustrating, because a

“It’s

the hospitals in the

critical

care nurse,

Aiming

two days and requires

Dorothy Baby, a cardiac care and said

(Photo by Sarah Thomson)

itself is

intensive preparation before the course, if

two eight-hour days and 12-18 students are enrolled. There is some theory but it is mostly group work where pupils work in case scenarios as they would in the hospital setting.

support class, which

students

preparation

graduates take this course.

The course

similar to cardiopulmonary respiratory

26

ACLS

Baby does not recommend

said Baby.

The

The basic cardiac is

the

course started in

10 students and there are

the

nursing.

Saving course.

with

fall

should be doing the same thing across the

on a continuing education The equipment is also used for the paramedic course and in semester-five

Life

ACLS

The college-run the

Canadian Heart Association, so everyone

basis.

Advanced Cardiac

is

support.

life

professionals

new

in the college.

which these steps should be based on standards set by the

in

Last year, the health sciences department

(ACLS)

Dorothy Baby demonstrates the cardiac equipment used for

to decrease the expense of contracting out the work by doing it with-

patient

the

if

experiences a strange heart rhythm.

offers Waterloo Region’s only continuing

education

was an opportunity

help the patient breathe, such as using the

want

graduates

students

have

to

come

before they

and

you

of

But

in.

it’s

course

the type of

more out

lot

of,

understand

don’t

really

the

ACLS

this

you get a

thing that

lot

States that lure our

unless you’ve been working

everything,

for awhile,” said Baby.

She take

strongly

a basic

and need

they

drug

ACLS

take

know

to

graduates

arrhythmia course

emergency

an

before

new

suggests cardiac

course

because

they

rhythms

their

defibrillation.

exceptionally well. Just taking this course

The college previously taught the course on a contract basis, but decided that there

rh)dhms, she said.

is

not

going

to

them

teach

those

'

Student services offers free workshops By Janet Wakutz

A series of workshops offered by

things aren’t great and be willing

juggling everything,” Magazine

to change,” said

said.

counsellor with student services,

student services to help students

who

cope with college pressures

20

starts

in February.

new

is

especially

who

students

entered the college in the January intake

of students for general

business,

has worked

years.

at the college for

“Changing takes a

effort for three to four

Student services targeting

Joan Magazine, a*

ECE

and journalism,

Scheduled

February,

prepare for

tests.

“Some students work too hard

haven’t had to

terms

in

of

the

studying, they have been getting

provide

information on four topics. The

by on their ability,” she said. “Now, that may not be enough.”

workshop, time management,

Effective textbook reading, third

for

workshops first

will

was developed

nursing students

are busy with jobs

when

of

said.

along with the February intake of “Students need to admit

lot

weeks,” she

The second seminar, listening and note taking, helps students

“Sometimes

for students

it

who

and families. is

difficult

in

the

focuses

series,

ways

different

effective to

that

on the

are

more

approach textbook

reading.

IK RMlljj hA ttMt «iM tut....

Memory

joggers, the last in the

series, shares

methods to improve

students’ recollection of material for the purpose of taking a test.

Magazine said sometimes mature students have anxiety around

memory “It’s

each

students

year

orientation in August.

it

is

tration is necessary

shops are open to

during

No

regis-

and the work-

all

students.

at student services or

4,

1999

up

at the

DSA

Office.

be donated

to R.O.O.F.

way

students can access help.

“Any

participants are asked to collect pledges for the event. All proceeds

student

individual

help

appointment to

Reaching

lor,” said

our Outdoor Friends.

who wants make an

can

talk to a counsel-

Magazine.

Student services can also help with

WIIft«RF«St‘99t Doon Studwnt

AHBOclallon

of student services looks over the winter workshops. (Photo by Janet Wakutz)

test

anxiety.

“Sometimes

students have difficulty applying

said. stuff,

marks don’t reflect of knowledge they feel

dents, said Magazine.

“At Waterloo campus

actually

I

yet, their test

come

the level

for upgrading students,” she said.

they have.”

into classrooms, especially

Sometimes faculty

Two group-education

sessions

semester will be longer than

the workshops.

Registration will

invites coun-

sellors into classrooms.

Magazine, strategies

who

has taught the

success

student

for

be required for these sessions on relaxation and stress management

help students are proven and used

and on public-speaking anxiety.

in other colleges.

Relaxation

are not the only

All

will

by calling

the college ext. 360.

Workshops

Sign

for

what they learn,” Magazine “They feel they know the

this

Schedules are posted on bulletin

boards around the school and complete information is available

THUR/DAY, FEBRUARY

schedule

issues.

not really an age issue,

more about techniques,” she said. The series is also available to

WINTER CA

Joan Magazine

is

offered for the first

Magazine said the public speaking group session has been time, but

extremely successful.

Handouts are available in the brochure rack outside student

course, said the methods used to

“I’ve

had many students who put

the strategies to

work and had

Not

all

students.

work

for all

said. “I

always

strategies

Magazine

say to students, ‘Keep what works

services and other study skill re-

for

sources are available in the

change.’ Sometimes

Student services

approaches

in

LRC. has tried many

reaching out to stu-

suc-

cess,” she said.

you and what doesn’t work

parts into their

own

it’s

adapting

routine.”


STUDENT

SPOKE, Feb.

LIFE

1,

- Page 7

1999

Pain of procedure a myth

Bone marrow donor

relates experience

By Sarah Thomson

A

A

from the marrow registry,

representative

unrelated bone

operated by the Canadian Blood

who donated

Services,

marrow

his

bone marrow transplant can a patient’s odds dramatically from less than 20 per

jokes

increase

anaesthetic.

cent with conventional treatments

surrounding the pain, factor. As with everything, there are risks, he

Unrau

such as radiation and chemother-

bone

anywhere from 40-85 per

apy, to

five years ago, shared his

personal story and encouraged

two

students to join the registry in

The

first presentation,

the

the

Peter Alpaugh.

blood the

gift

marrow

think bone

of a lifetime,” said Unrau. gift

Bone marrow

is

substance found in

of

recipient.

the

is

is

Crystal Navratil,

18,

from Calgary, was told she had a 20 per cent chance of surviving a

David

marrow

the Jelly-like all

acute

the body’s

transplant

pletely

for her leukemia. 22, recovered com-

malogineous

Navratil,

long bones such as the ribs, breastbone or pelvis. Bone marrow produces all blood cells, red cells to carry oxygen, white

now

and visited Unrau

in the

most

summer of 1995 with her mother. Bone marrow transplants replace a patient’s diseased bone marrow with healthy bone marrow from a matching donor. The recipient receives .the bone marrow intravenously and it finds its way

treatment for fatal disorders of the blood, or leukemia, aplastic anemia, severe combined immune deficiency syndrome and many other

from the blood stream into the bones, and hopefully grasps and produces healthy new cells. Most people are worried about donating because of the fear that it

cells

to

fight

platelets to help

infection

blood

Bone marrow been

found

and

clotting.

transplants have

to

be

the

effective

David Unrau presents information about the unrelated bone marrow registry. Pictured on an overhead in the background is Unrau meeting his bone marrow recipient. (Photo by Sarah Thomson)

diseases.

is

inherently painful,

International student advisor dwells By Neven Mujezinovic

“The

student certainly

as

an

international

and secretary keeps you on your toes. advisor

Just ask the newest addition to

the international education and

college

plarming office, Jayne

Thomas. “You always have to be up on things and remember a lot of little details,” says Thomas, “because, basically, thus position is a detail

position.” Still,

work

Thomas

says she enjoys her

greatly.

Even though she

busy time, in October last year, and was thrown into the action after just two days of orientation, she says her co-workers have been a tremenstarted at a very

dous support.

(Larry

director’s

Rechsteiner) door

Working

myths

also a possibility, but

it

can be

treated with antibiotics.

lifetime.”

However, only 30 per cent of patients needing a bone marrow transplant have a compatible donor in their family. Unrau’s bone marrow donor

2A56. The presentation was by second-year recreation and leisure student call

a

The 30- to 90-minute procedure making tiny incisions in

David Unrau

organized

I

of

tried to dispel the

the general anaesthetic. Infection is

the hip area, that don’t require

session

in

“They

gift

without

involves

held between 3:30 p.m. and 4:40 p.m.

life.

bone marrow

held in the

Sanctuary boardroom from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., attracted about 35 people. Only two people

attended

think

“I

be

said. The risks associated with bone marrow donation include nausea and/or a sore throat from

cent.

presentations held Jan. 19.

would

it

always open. I can ask questions any time and Karen (Vanderkruk - international student advisor) is a great deal of help,”

says

is

Welland-born

the

After working in interior design for five years,

Thomas decided

to school in 1991

the recession

to

because

was not conducive

to

a career in that field. She complet-

ed several computer courses at Niagara College and has been working in an office ever since. After

her

husband

transferred to the

K-W

was area in

1998, Thomas worked Southwood secondary school

June

learning

is still

about the job. Her work involves sending information packages to international students who have expressed an interest in taking

She also

courses at Conestoga.

advisor.

go back

says she

helps

an

maintain

and most people recover wi thin two to five days. After the procedure, there may be some soreness in the lower back area and some discomfort walking. “The only lasting side effect I have felt is I feel like the Energizer bunny,” said Unrau. “The good feeling I continue to feel just doesn’t stop.”

After the presentation, students

were given the opportunity to fill out a bone marrow donor registry form. Unrau warned those wishing to fill out forms not to jump to a quick decision. Prospective donors will be contacted by phone in two to three to go for a blood test at a

weeks local

language barrier is a little tough, it is extremely satislying to see

MDS

clinic.

The blood

sample

is

there

a match in the registry.

is

then analyzed to see if

details

the progress the international stu-

dents are making.

“A lot of them are taking English language studies and as their English becomes better and better, we can communicate a little more,” says Thomas.

extensive

database of students which have already received the information

packages, so the administration can have an idea of the percentage

of students

who

actually do

come

here.

Information packages are also sent

to

recruiting

companies compa-

outside of Canada. These

at

nies promote studying abroad in

in

their countries

Cambridge, but when an opening came up in the international education and college planning

and they enjoy the' same things such as skiing and snowboarding and going out.” Thomas says overcoming the but

stitches, and going in with a needle to draw out the bone marrow. There are no lasting side effects

on the

“Basically, students are students

office she decided to apply.

Thomas

which he

-

and Conestoga has agreements with many different companies, says Thomas. Another pleasant part of the job meeting the international is students who have chosen their Conestoga College as

PEER TUTORS

CAN HELP!

educational institution.

“They’re

all

really nice people,”

says Thomas.

These students drop international

where they

into

education

feel at

the

office,

home, Thomas

says. “It’s

come

them to be able to good atmosphere and

nice for into a

feel comfortable,” she says.

Although there are definitely a of cultural differences between Canadian and international stulot

Jayne Thomas, international student adviser, works

at her desk. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

dents,

Thomas

the similarities.

CHECK INTO HIRING A TUTOR

likes to point out

COME TO STUDENT SER VICES (2B02)


Page 8

— SPOKE, Feb.

1999

1,

Second shot

at school

LASA

By Jacqueline Smith

because she has always

liked the aspect of law enforce-

ment and because

Mature student Claudette Daley can

college

says

more

be

The

meaninful for older students.

The

of those fly-by-night things where you can fool around and expect to walk out of here with a diploma.” She said she likes the program

to learn, or acting

much

in class.

this

human

resources; Julius Avelar, student represena-

I

first

it

focuses

my age, there is no way that would think of going into

“At

time in

I

when you are at a you figure you have all

guess

policing,” she said.

the time in the world, unlike us

older students,” said Daley, 35,

who

is

18, 17

mother of children ages 20,

and

14.

Daley said mature students

Alumni devoted to school

except for the fact that only on policing.

their

is

certain age to right, Linda Hart,

others

up too

could because they are young

college.

left

much when

too

want “It

includes,

student

student said as a mature student

and

Sara Tholfpson, president; Sarah Todd, past-president; Mary Wright, manager alumni services; Monica Himmelman, alumni services officer; Donna Leader, member-at-large; Anabela Cordeiro, chair of public relations and events; and Gavin Fitzpatrick, public relations and events. (Photo by Eileen Diniz)

LASA

third-year

describes the program as “not one

talking

tive;

wide

third-year law-and-security

one of the problems that she encounters is younger students

The Alumni Association

a

is

it

field.

be

at

try to

school every day despite the

have families to take

fact that they

care of and other responsibilities.

“Meanwhile, the other students

By Carly Benjamin

student

Conestoga’s AJuimii Association is

currently trying to change

image

to

meet the

its

different needs

of today’s graduate.

As

well as

the

association has

committee

liaison

events

and

and

the

membership services committee, chaired by Linda Hart, Anabel Cordeiro and Tom Langan respectively.

making changes

executive,

PR

management,

its

In the future, the association

10-year-old

hopes to form an executive committee consisting of a past-

to

streamlined

structure

its

and

mandate.

president,

on the college grounds and their maintenance. The association trees

has donated $2,375 to that cause

from 1995-1999.

but their own,” she said.

Ontario student opportunity trust

attendance

grants to students in need.

By the year 2000 the association

vice-

president,

which provides loans and

The

LASA

sum. All of the money raised goes

Monday

adding that she

president of the association and

Recruitment for the committee currently underway.

Angela Martin, a business administrations -accounting is the new treasurer. Monica Himmelman, alumni

graduate,

services officer,

committed

said both are

an

to

active

partnership between the students

and the association. Currently only one student, Julius Avelar, a third-year business student, sits

on

the board of directors.

By

mandate, the association hopes to

more student involvement

by planning

activities that involve

student participation.

The

association

is

explore

the

constitution

and

The

who

now

divided

donate

time and energy to benefit

the school. association has donated a

computer and a printer to the alumni office for the use of students and graduates.

The association

also contributes

Adopt-

A-Tree fund, the money donated to this fund goes towards planting

prepared to match that

who would in

the

would be involved

like

to

association in promoting

the organization to fellow students

to

Friday,” is

some who

student

employment

in the

office.

The association hopes to plan an alumni sponsored event for every

month

in the calendar year.

A skating party has been planned for Feb.

28 from 2 p.m.

-

3 p.m. at

the recreation cenfre.

and dispatcing. Daley said she has a positive attitude concerning landing a job when she leaves Conestoga. She said hands-on skills, guest

said, all

speakers and security stints along

with a college diploma to show

When asked who encouraged her

employers give her a boost.

The 35-year-old

Daley said her was one of her

her

“She is one of those people who, even though she works, she is always going to school either

summer or

own

security firm.

“Security

is

becoming a major

part of society. These days, people are looking for people to keep

them

just night

safe,” she said,

she believes law enforcement

Daley said when she decided to go to college, she did an upgrade

one of the better

fields to pursue.

“Hopefully

be making some

and

in English

that she

chose

I will

mega bucks

out of it.”

There is no charge to students and alumni but they must register in advance.

Intramural Ice

Games

Hockey

Tuesday February 2 .

4:30 p.m. TIE

2ND

BREAKER

VS. 5TH (Bof3)

Wednesday February 3 4:30 p.m. A -2ND VS. 5TH 5:30 p.m. B -3RD VS. 4TH Ball

Hockey

PLAYOFFS Information Not Available

fire drill

adding that

classes.”

Upcoming

Students and faculty gather inside Door 5 during a

said five years

from now she might be running

biggest motivators.

during the

constable for the

court, corrections

are really dedicated to

sister-in-law

Himmelman,

to learn

the civilian aspect of

field, like special

their college career.

events.

would like to get involved,

Daley said she wants

young students because there are

to return to school,

please contact

she

not blaming

through various fund-raisers and If you

strategic plan.

association consists solely

of alumni volunteers their

to

association’s

to fiind-raisers such as the

into three committees: volunteer

participate

one-day workshop committee and

March

Students

is

association hopes to have a

executive orientation in

The

updating and clarifying the

recruit

The

is

much

working in the law enforcement

to the college.

programmer/analyst gradxiate and of two, now sits as

Ontario

other fields, but not as

does policing.

“I mean, in our program, Friday would be the worst for attendance. But for us older students, we are here through sleet and snow,

relation issues.

Thompson, a computer

Sara

donated $11,366 and

an

it

more about

mother

president, secretary, treasurer

as

example.

will have

its

as

life.

She said the teaching touches on

some

on Fridays

hectic

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

student uses poor

and a staff member. This committee will handle finances and human

crystallized

and a

like

The association has also made a financial commitment to the fund,

Claudette Daley juggles school

show up whenever they feel it and then when they don’t get a good mark they say it is the faeulty’s fault. It is no one’s fault

just

on Jan.

19.

Photo by Melissa

Dietrl

is


SPOKE, Feb.

FEATURES AND ISSUES

1,

— Page 9

1999

Program causes grief to Ontario car owners By Judy Sankar

A new

he/she has spent $200 at a Drive

Clean repair facility, a conditional pass will be given to the owner for

program designed by

Ontario’s

Ministry

of

many

“We

drivers.

The program, already in effect in Durham, Hamilton-Wentworth and Greater Toronto Area (GTA), cars

between three

and 20 years old

in these areas

effect in North America.” Calgary and Vancouver are among Canadian cities that already have

will be required to have their car

tested

by an approved

emission programs. California’s emissions program has been in

inspector.

A probe is placed in the tailpipe of

the

which

car

effect for the past 18 years

concentrations of nitrogen oxides,

monoxide

carbon

22 years.

and

About 80 to 85 per cent of passenger cars and light-duty trucks pass the inspection or merely require a tune up.

hydrocarbons.

The results of the compared to

then

test are

emission

standards for the vehicle’s year

“It

and make, considering vehicle

of grief from that 15 to 20 per

than 20 minutes and costs less than $30 plus taxes. The owner of the test

takes

less

cent,” says Darcy.

For residents of Kitchener, there still time. Phase two of Ontario’s Drive Clean program, which is the same as phase one but applies to more cities in Ontario including Kitchener takes effect in 2001. is

vehicle receives a report detailing the

amount and type of emissions

the car

is

If there

producing. is

a safety problem with

the vehicle, or visible

coming from the

Madeleine Poynter, of the social services faculty, says her woodworking hobbies in the off season help give her a lighter perspective on things. (Photo by wayne coiiins)

smoke

repaired. This is

is

Initially it may seem to be more of a burden than a benefit but when fully implemented, the program will cut pollutants that cause smog by up to 22 per cent. Drivers could be saving 10 per cent in annual fuel consumption and prolonging their vehicle’s life.

the

tailpipe,

vehicle will not be tested until

it

is

done to ensure

the safety of the inspectors and to maintain the testing equipment. Should a vehicle fail the test, the required repairs must be made, and the car tested again until it

Woodworking relaxes

many people we will probably get a lot

shouldn’t cause

grief but

deterioration.

The

and

Switzerland has had a program for

for

tests

way behind

Anthony Darcy, a

Drive Clean information officer from Toronto. “There are 35 to 40 emissions programs already in

called Drive Clean.

Owners of

[Ontario] are

the times,” says

the

is

his/her

sticker expires.

causing pollutants could cause grief for

when

registration renewal

Transportation to reduce smog-

owner can prove

passes. If the

social-services teacher By Wayne

Collins

Despite insisting she’s not a

says.

was a

creative person, she does like to

even the

carpenter by trade but she says she

most rewarding professions but

never wielded a hammer or saw until she took a woodworking course at the Haliburton School of

experiment with different project ideas using various types of wood. During winter the cottage is closed and playing squash is her main outlet. Meanwhile, she curls up in front of the fireplace at home reading historical novels

Poynter’s father Vince Stress is unavoidable in

Madeleine Poynter, of the social services faculty, says her hobbies smooth many of the bumps in Poynter,

who

has a masters of

social work, says teaching at the

sometimes demanding. “It means always caring and being concerned for students,” she college

is

says, “but there are days

can’t

face

or

it

snapping heads Still,

Fine Arts in the

“The

her career.

when you

you

feel

like

idea

summer of

must

1992.

been

have

brewing in me for awhile so I decided to spend a week and take this course in making twig

looks at

proud when she a coffee table or a wicker

chair she’s

is

made with her own

she says, most jobs have

good and bad days

and

her

co-workers feel like family after

Making

furniture is not her only

carpentry talent, however.

Poynter and husband

spend

Andrew summers

10 years of full-time teaching.

also

imagine doing a job that I would enjoy more,” Poynter says. Working with people’s minds, however, also instills her with a

renovating their Manitoulin Island

need

types of specialty woods.

“I can’t

for

physical

activities.

cottage.

their

Andrew,

who owns and

actually imports

insists he’s the real

a sizeable vegetable garden on her

the

Cooking

gourmet meals for guests is another hobby and many homegrown ingredients end up in the pot.

Woodworking, however, she calls her other

is

different,”

says

cutting totally

Poynter.

things

“You

instead

of

people.”

She gets great

from making things with her hands because the results are more immediate and tangible.

“You results

satisfaction

actually get to

of a finished

see the

project,” she

“I would definitely say woodworking relieves stress,” says

Poynter. (Internet photo)

A&

sells

various

She

craftsman in

but

does everything from mixing cement, measuring and cutting flooring and siding, to framing doors and windows. Dangerous carpentry tools like slide saws or lathes don’t family,

intimidate her at

“You still use your mind and measuring, but it’s

work with

what

life.

smnmer they

plan to add to the cottage but Madeleine also looks forward to

M on Eagle Street in Cambridge,

Besides playing squash, she keeps property off Highway 97.

the Poynters. Next

building a chaise lounger.

hands.

off.”

ing projects.

Vacations are never boring for

fumiture,”says Po)mter.

She says she

and researching books for upcom-

all,

Poynters practise procedures and

she

Joh Fair ‘QQ

10 Steps for successful attendance

Largest Fair in

1

Canada

Wed., Feh. 3,

10:00 am

-

.

2.

1999

3.

3:00 pm

she says. The

fashions at the cottage.

Room 2B04

approach this kind of work with a kind of healthy caution,” she says. Poynter doesn’t recall any close calls she’s ever had but does admit to mistaking the odd

200 employers

to attend.

lots of

prior to the

copies on the day

Go

through the Fair alone to

see

all

the employers you want to contact

Have questions

ready: see the

Employer Guidebook 7.

8

expected

for

ideas

travel through the Fair

Prepare a short “commercial” about yourself

10.

some

Be courteous and patient..., smile! Watch your language and behaviour as you

9.

Over

and have

Attend the Fair early enough

For more information see the

“I

critiqued (at the

5.

6.

Student Employment Office

Have your resume

4.

safety throughout the day

business-like attire

Research the employers

Fair,

Transportation available

rigid

Wear

at;

Fair ‘99

Student Employment Office)

Bingemans Conference Centre

Madeleine’s steel-toe boots, hardhat and safety glasses are her main summer

finger for a nail.

Job

HAVE A GOOD

TIME!!!


— SPOKE,

Page 10

Feb.

1,

IWO

STUDENT

LIFE

Students display their projects

Constructing connections at Network ’99 By Jaime Clark

on

show

began

Some of

event called Network ’99, held in

exchange, recruitment project

idea

of the

the

and

fair

requirements

those

from her

elass

piek the groups.

was

display,

construction

Members

of

each group

composed of

is

were responsible

industry representatives.

Winslow,

Arthur

basic

the

were then elected to randomly

engineering technology advisory

committee, which

they

where the

out

set

pool. Three people

as

information

technical

before

included a parking garage and

promoted

’99,

show,

trade

groups

the

requirements.

the blue cafeteria on Jan. 20.

Network

memo

was

project

all

their projects

owner and

and

potential employers at a first-time

a

a

said

teacher took the position of an

their stuff to

representatives

industry

display,

received

Conestoga College construction engineering technology students got a chance to

whose group

student

1987

a

for

every aspect of their

Conestoga graduate and member

projects from the floor

of the advisory committee, said

was to meet and

the purpose of the event

give students a chance to

demonstrate

their

plans and structural

drawings to the written

to

abilities

from each sector

representatives

addition

In

the

to

and models.

reports

within the construction industry. students’

in-progress final design projects, industrial displays

were presented

by firms engaged

in such fields

engineering,

consulting,

as

After the requirements were met, the

groups were allowed some

room

Vogel’s group, which also includes

landscape architecture, building

Pat Danbrook, Traeey Kearley,

Buchanan

Chris

design,

residential

Hermes

and

sub-trades, environmental servic-

Alveras, decided to include a con-

and construction materials manufacturing and supply. “We’ve got a snapshot of each

venience store, craft room, chapel,

es

owns

his

auditorium, games woodworking centre

projects

were

By

Lisa Wiiheim

Because the water level in the pond is so low, Conestoga

majority of the

responsible for every aspect of

College’s annual polar plunge

but

students,

their projects

and

there

from the floor plans

structural drawings (Vogel’s

may not of Jan.

take place this year. \^

group had 25 drawings) to the

represented the culmination of the

constructing a building from the

decide

students’ technical studies, both

ground up, Vogel said they also learned a lot about working

postponed

together in groups.

will

be the

that

(the

Leslie

written reports and models.

Besides

and applied. Vogel,

third-year

a

was

plunge

polar

still

undecided. The Polar Plunge, or

about

learning

the

the decision to hold

21;,

two projects from second-year and two from first-year students. The displays also

theoretical

for

Queen Margaret’s Manor. •Members of each group were

on display were those of

third-year

room and for the resi-

construction

own

said the

Polar Plunge postponed

dents of their retirement home,

company.

He

(Photo by Jaime Clark)

who

Winslow,

said

division,”

Manor.

for creativity. For example,

general contracting, architecture,

inspection,

From bottom: Pat Danbrook, Tracey Kearley and Chris Buchanan show an industry representative the drawings of their in-progress construction engineering technology project, Queen Margaret’s

whatever event the

hol4

to

alternate activity. Physical

Cleaves said tus only hope is that the

plows -to build up the snow bowl if that’s the' idea the DSA decides to' go with. Cleaves said that by far, this is one of the most popular

off into die

ha|^>eQS, then

events at .Conestoga in terms

every year they’ve been here

water

snow will melt and run pond to make the

level

higher.

he

said,

If

that

die

plunge will happen. “Students

vsiio

have done

it

does

of sponsorship, coverage and because the

really

DSA

participation

Cleaves. “I want to

has

been

proceeds go to the Heart and

can only do what the weather

Stroke Foundation.

allows us.”

until Feb. 17.

“(If the plunge doesn’t run) first

an

resources even offered to provide

want

this

to^h^en,” said jump but we

it

time in 18 years

college)

be

won’t

holding the plunge,” said Gerry Cleaves, student

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: GRIEF

coming

vice

president

affairs.

“People

in

and concerned

of are

that

it

will not happen.”

You

can’t stop crying,

numb. All of these

you feel normal reactions

If the

feel angry,

feelings are

—a

loss in our lives

you

reaction

we

to

are

call grief

Grief

il

one

to death;

we

I I

the healing process. Writing your thoughts in a

sometimes

journal, reading

books about

grief,

If

come

out

you have a

later,

friend

i to

left

bottled up will

I

I

who

is

grieving, don’t

it

snow

with water

worry

I I

I I

at the

end ft»

land

to

in or even snowlmil fighht Byit those

aefivitiBs also wquiro &ow. Cleave said ihs ^1:^ time the pond has ever been this low before was wh«»i it was draiiRd

‘‘One year they had to cut

down

18 inches to g/d to the water, but

now (die water level)

t.s

d<rwn t«s

said Gcaves. “Right now, all it is is

at^otte

there, be a good listener or remind them how much you care with a card, a hug or some time together.

Submitted by: Student Services

snow

sliders

intentiomlly.

delaying the healing process.

about saying the wrong thing to them. Just be

i

m

Most of all, give yourself

permission to grieve. Feelings only

and talking

a pile of

the

helps to talk them over with a counsellor as part of

friends can also help.

I I

ipij

(3 it

filling

Or setting up a slip ami slide with

P i P m i

natural,

ideas in the works,

bowl and

grieve any kind of loss: the

breakup of a relationship, the loss of good health or even the loss of a dream to reach a certain goal.

Although these feelings are

allovy

including bulging a giant

does not only have to be a result of losing a loved pi

weather doesn’t

for the plunge to occur, there

water aiid muck, so

if

to jurrn) in, they’d

sti^ into the mud.”

I I i

m

Cleaves

said

at

this

point,

student atid faculty are odferiiig to help

by providing si^ggcstions

Qerry Geaves, Doorv Studbfn i^s^iation^ v student affairs, attempts ia last-minute plea to help save toe Polar Plunge.

(Pt»tobyUae\Mlhelm).


SPOKE, Feb.

DSA

1999

1,

— Page

11

serves spaghetti and lots of laughs

Comedians shine despite smaii turnout By Brent Clouthier

special brand

brought

intimate setting.

Metal Comic.

The Doon Student Association (DSA) sponsored the Canadianborn comics,

who

assaulted the

Sanctuary crowd with their

own

humourous

the

Conestoga College’s student lounge played host to the stylings comedy of Rick Bronson and Wade Macblwain 19 and the few who Jan. turned out were treated to laughter non-stop in an

vocal delivery, creating a more

of comedy.

Mixing

personal and casual atmosphere

observations of Jerry

Seinfeld

around his show.

with

Moving freely across the stage and among the audience, he was able to interact directly

of

the

off-beat

delivery

Howie

Mandel,

Bronson

hilarious

to

light

from smoking and Americans and college his show entitled Full

everything

with

sex to

times, involve

in

life

Turning turnout

to

student

advantage,

his

Bronson set aside the microphone and opted for a straight

them

and,

at

directly with

his act.

He small

the

audience

his

attempted

to

phone

an

audience member’s mother on a

phone,

cell

imitated

Fred Flintstone’s. door-banging

“Wilma!”

shout

member locked

DSA

DSA

a

as

herself in the

and even went so

office

far

as to drag an unsuspecting night

student passing through the hall into the show.

Bronson, manic one minute, subdued and self-deprecating the next, used his unpredictability to

keep the audience disorientated

with

hilarity.

For his finale, Bronson mixed

magic

tongue-in-cheek

tricks

with direct audience participation,

embarrassing

his

much

delight

the

to

Jan.

1

(Photo by Brent Clouthier)

9.

is

somethiiig

College

graduate

Being outdoors Conestoga

Matt Code craves. Whether he is snowboarding, rock climbing, canoeing or camping, he can always

be

found

and

outdoors

many

outdoors,

in

amount of time spent with

the

whom

the heckler,

MacElwain, Bronson’s opening act, warmed up the Sanctuary crowd with a blend of crass and cynical comedy. one-time a MacElwain, area resident, based his act on sarcastic comments concerning the local bar scene, growing up on a farm, sex, drugs and

and

as the weirdest he

His beer-drinking although

approach, style

in

to

differing

Bronson’s,

life

was

Bronson’s

Both

The

act.

were

acts

subjected

from repeated heckling one audience member. MacElwain and Bronson skill-

to

fully

to

DSA

night with a spaghetti dinner,

and

salad

caesar

featuring garlic bread.

heckler’s

the

paried

he referred

had ever heard. began the comedy

outbursts

with

derogatory

comments

hilariously

Turn

to

Page 15 for

losing any of their professionaism.

SPOKE’s

interview with

Bronson, however, was forced modify his act due to to

Rick Bronson.

best

without

when Outdoors

the

perfecting

climbing.

with

love

in

He went

the

successful

from the audience gearing them up for

indoor rock climbing gym in Waterloo and he immediately fell

experiencing

nonetheless

he enjoys, his love for adventure activities was something he only discovered in his first year at Conestoga in 1995. A friend took him to an

Although Code may seem like someone who has spent his life

the

activities

doing what he does best.

entire

of

getting laughs

Conestoga grad finds By Lindsay Gibson

volunteers

remaining onlookers.

alcoholism.

Comedian Wade MacElwain warms up the Sanctuary crowd on

Rick Bronson has some fun with the audience during his Full (Photo by Brent Clouthier) Metal Comic show on Jan. 1 9.

out the next day and

bought climbing equipment. This experience sparked a great in

interest

Code

outdoor

for

activities.

Code began working

Higher

at

gym

Ground, the rock climbing

Sports World in Kitchener,

at

then

and

ago

years

three

opened

his

own company

summer

after

he graduated.

He

is

president

currently

which

Outward Roots,

the

of

is

not part

He

has

of.

Higher Ground.

him to

to':

the

part

three

instructors/guides

take

rocks

time

working with

the

participants

of the

Niagara

Escarpment, Milton, the caves in Collingwood and the rivers and lakes of Algonquin Provincial

Zach

Trainer,

coach and guide Gorge.

ice-climbing at the Elora

(Photo by Matt Code)

to the Elora

Gorge, cross-country

and Collingwood, skiing

in snowshoeing winter camping,

rock climbing and kayaking.

Code, the

who

graduated

recreational

from

leadership

Roots

Conestoga College Jan.1

1

to

(Photo by Lindsay Gibson)

offers

ice

climbing and kayaking packages

and

networking

program,” he

from

the

said.

Code has been rock climbing

for

business knowledge, connections

a

who wants

The

or

doe's

ice

because

not instruct kayaking

climbing

he

says

himself, his

other

canoeist

through

future looks bright for to

the

Canoe

Recreational

cross-country skiing,

He began

He learned a lot of

Ontario

experience.

regular

certified

Association.

helped him in his business endeav-

I

is

Rock-Climbing

teaches others seeking adventure.

“If anything,

is

and

Ontario

Association.

snowshoeing and winter camping now and ago years three

at

He

four years and

the

more

instructors have

is certified through

Conestoga College learned he said in 1997, much from the program that has

program

our.

Park.

Outward

visited

offers

guided out-tripping year round. Outward Roots runs out of, but

Conestoga grad and president of Outward Roots, Matt Code, promote his outdoor adventure company.

continue

Code with

his business and hopes to one

day expand. “I eventually

land on the

want

to

purchase

Grand River and

run more instructional programs in both canoeing and kayaking.”


Page 12

— SPOKE, Feb.

1,

1999

FEATURES & ISSUES

Week promotes awareness

Eating Disorder By Judy Sankar

body image issues will members. They will parent whose child has

ders and

feature five like everywhere It seems one looks these days, one is bombarded with images of how

an eating disorder, a kinesiologist,

one should look physically.

physician.

At any given time 70 per cent of women and 35 per cent of

Information Centre

men

is

include a

a child and youth^ worker and a

The

are dieting, says a Canadian

study.

The pressure

athletic bodies

so high that

it

for slender or

in

is,

some

“trash

in eating

results

6

is

eating

week

awareness

Waterloo

the

body image. “The Eating Disorder Coalition of K-W was actually put together by professionals who were extremely concerned about the high incidence that was occurring nationwide, but also locally,” says

Lynn Robbins, a counsellor student services and a

in

member of

the coalition.

consists of throwing

typically

self-induced

as

Although for

Lynn Robbins, a counsellor in student services, scans the Internet media for negative image portrayals.

for

Adbusters, an organization

that scours the

Doon

the

Student

(Photo by Judy sankar)

disorder awareness

eating

week, be

student

services

taking part in “trash

A

week.

booth

ply

problems,

physical

says

Robbins. “It’s

obses-

and now we also

Although it is evident that problems surrounding eating

have moved into

this

everything

toned type that

also excessive.”

psychologically,

disorders exist, Robbins says that

As

is

body -mass

part of this year’s awareness

what

to

set

up

a lot to be

Recreation Centre on Father Bauer

best

A Canadian study, for exam-

admired,” she says. “I do feel that

Drive on Feb.

inside.

increasing, there is

still

ple,

followed by self-induced vomiting

dren in grades 3 and 4 say they’d

showed

that

Canadian

chil-

the

even though we’ve made changes, we’re not

after the

all

Calista

The panel

is

sponsoring a

4.

discussion, designed

to educate people

on eating

eat-

if

you or someone you a problem will be

as well. that diversity is a

wonderful thing and people need

week, the coalition

“Before

do

Robbins says

panel discussion at the Waterloo

is

on

know may have

body image of Marilyn Monroe was what people

awareness

public

all

ing disorders, help centres and

the images change.

While done.

types,” she said. “They’re sively slender

engulf

physically,

through nuclear war than be

live

Moss body

Flockhart and Kate

fat.

also a control issue. These

problems

rather lose a parent, get cancer or

will it”

provides

that

students with information or the use of laxatives, are not sim-

and bulimia nervosa, the repeated act of binge eating starvation

and

scales

pills,

Association has nothing planned

emotionally.”

Anorexia nervosa, characterized

to appreciate that.

on being be from

“Concentrate

you

can

the the

Appreciate other people

as well.”

disor-

Heart and Stroke Month

Campaigning to disabie Canada’s top By Jacqueline Smith

and

Heart

brochure,

There are many misconceptions

making in

people perceive heart disease and

mass

stroke to be “men’s”

targeting

is

diseases.

contrary to the

reality

40 per cent of women die from heart' disease, compared with 37 per cent of men, said Judy Hyde, area manager at the Kitchener Heart and Stroke that

Foundation

According

the

foundation

Ontario

to

correct

misconception by

comniuniation

Hyde are

the

1998-1999

the

campaign

women.

women

highest risk category. it’s

men, and

not,” she said, adding that only

about 29 per cent of women

know

they are even at risk.

attack

is

“They they

know

first

heart

which occur

hold true, the incidence of strokes

wiU probably

they are having a heart

gen and nutrients to part of the brain bursts or becomes clogged, is an old person’s disease. “But now we know it’s not. More younger and younger people are

per cent by the year 2006.

is

With women, Hyde warning signs are it

the

said,

different.

just feels

and

indigestion,

times

often

don’t recognize

like

she

it,”

having strokes.

She said

electrocardiogram

been done on

testing has

that

women

We have

volunteers with us stroke

said.

when

several

who have had a

they were 30,” she

increase to about 36

“And we know

that our health

care

system could not handle

that,”

she said.

The foundation

v^ll

he adding

another program, to provide a stroke

line,

visit

^pport groups,

to

program and accommodate

stroke victims, their caregivers,

said.

Hyde

also said that if statistics

and families and

friends.

many have had

heart attacks they were not aware

they’ve had.

“That

serious

a

is

women because,

issue

for

had a heart attack, you don’t know you had it, and you don’t make any changes to your lifestyle to prevent it from happening again, you are going to

if you

have another one,” Hyde

She also said are

more

said.

heart and stroke

common among baby

The foundation uses of February to

raise

awareness* for the No.

By Jacqueline Smith Each year, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario launches various activities as

month

and educate the public about

money and

heart disease and stroke during

the

1

cause of

February, which

is

This year, the

death for Canadians.

Hyde

Joining hearts for a worthy cause

part of their effort' to raise funds

boomers.

heart month.

first

campaign

be the third annual Hearty Soup Luncheon, which will be held on Feb. 2, at activity will

said the foundation

year-round

does

fund-raising,

but

during the month of February

Knox

volunteers go from door to door to

Waterloo and the Newfoundland Club in Cambridge. The luncheons are scheduled from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. For the event, 21 area restiiurants will be donating five gallons of soup each. “Celebrity

raise funds.

“We just ask people to canvas streets for three

month,” Hyde

the

hours within the said,

adding that

high schools, colleges and universities

Judy Hyde, area manager for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, shares upcoming plans for February. (Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

that strokes,

is

when a blood vessel bringing oxy-

arm

attack,” she said.

women

tion

kiiier

munb and

and reveals

the big one.

pain in

feel a crushing

their chest, their

“Sometimes

said middle-age

“Most people think it’s

is

unveiling a

She said for men, the

office.

to

Foundation

Stroke the

public education efforts

when it comes to heart disease. One misconception is that most

This

the

laxatives.

seriousness of the problem

concerning eating disorders and

It’s

it”

such as dieting

Kitchener,

trying to raise awareness about

the

promote

stepping stone to eating

“Trash

Region Eating Disorder Coalition is

to

dieting,

out any diet-oriented materials

in

Canada. In

nationwide

disorders. to

1

disorder

against

Toronto

in

a

activity

it”

fight

leading

disorders.

Feb.

encouraging

the

cases,

Eating Disorder

*-National

ly

usually take part in the year-

guests” will also

campaign.

Hyde

Presbyterian Church in

to raise

said another

misconcep-

money

come

together

for research

and

health promotion against Canada's number one killer, heart disease and stroke. Judy Hyde, the area manager at the Kitchener Heart and Stroke Foundation office, describes the luncheon as a “nice cheap lunch, with all the soup you can eat.” She said a family physician who teaches stress management, will speak at the Waterloo luncheon. Jon Dald author of the book Fnm Couch Potato to Baked Potato, will speak in Cambridge. Hyde said people who wish to volunteer with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario can contact them toll ‘free at 1 888-HSF-INFO or (519) 5719600. Those interested can e-mail the Heart and Stroke Foundation at jhyde@hsf.on.ca


'

..

New bugs discovered daily

Computer health costs big bucks By Wayne

Collins

Computer maintenance

costs,

“What happens with your account is your which means if we catch you doing malicious t hing s with responsibility here,

such as

fighting viruses, could explain part of the

your account you’ll be visiting the principal or the (information tgchnology)

increase in college tuition costs.

Hackers continue to write new viruses and invent ways to spread them through,

director,

» Big

computer systems. According to Wayne Hewitt of the college’s computer services,

many

students are unaware of the

problem

who

war

has 12 years encperience,

on anti-virus hardware alone. That fig-

ure doesn’t include the $50,000 cost of providing Internet access to

^Since, the coUege went from Wmdows 3.1 .tho^^ds of f) .Wpdows ^5 ^ virosf» have, been detected by Symantec’s Norton AntiViros scan i^stem. 'Ihe college, ,

i

In this case, no virus actually' exists. Some computer programs, however, must remain i

1

t

........

Wayne H^ltt has worked

He

says

fighting

at the college’s

nn

computer services

on hold until the hoax can be exposed, Hewitt reconunends students install good antivirus software at home and run it

-iwriiiWiTi

over 12

office for

macrd viruses costs about $1 1,000 each

year,

Wayne

one

Co«ins)

regularly to avoid infections.

People wishing to research viruses or (feterxnine

f can

vsnite^ virus in J^an,

onto a^sfte and seconds later

dpwnlot^bd

in

'

California,”

it

says.

Even though,the person obviously didn’t know what it was, he could stilt get into trouble, .says Hewitt.

“t ihmlclll

.

what ^ Conestoga

rf;

virus.

; f

•icr.

,

student

messing:

Heta

ii

He

warns

anyone

that

caught

tanjpenng with viruses at will be in trouble

t

is,

Pretty innocent.’

By

is

DSA to

CBSA

Eileen Diniz

ordinator

The

Conestoga

Students initially

Business

who

Association,

used

fund-raising

to

upgrade the business program’s computer labs recently held discussions with the college administration. As of next year, the CBSA will be h andin g the responsibility of upgrading the computers over to the college. “We had to take a loan out to upgrade the last time and we just can’t keep up with it an5nnore,” said Laurie Campbell, the CBSA communications co-ordinator and a third-year marketing student. The CBSA is behind the biz bashes, almond sales and other fund-raising

money

events

to

for the business

communications coand a third-year ,

marketing student.

She said the CBSA has also donated some of its fund-raising community organizations. Their most recent involvement with the commxjnity was the disco fund-raiser they held at Stages Jan. 21 to help raise money

money

to

CBSA

for the Const.

Dave Nicholson and

Mark Gage memorial

“In previous years the

who

CBSA

money to donate to the Children’s Wish Foundation. We have also given many donations to the food banks. Last year we raised

decided to give back to the school and collect donations for the people right here at the school

Intern^ at www.sare.com. Sanqjfes of suspect virtues can be mailed

but SARC wkim, “Don’t write ‘Contains live virus,’ oh foe envelope because it foe, post office may

to them,

contest and decided

CBSA

most well-known

is

around the college for their biz bashes, a primary source of fun(k.

“They

are lots of fun

enjoy

really

and you can

yourself.

It

good time when the comes out and parties with

especially a

faculty

“Stages doesn’t usually charge us anything to use their place.

They

it

what we do

CBSA

is

Bash Sammy’s Garage

presenting

Valentine’s

Feb. in

1 1

a at

money we

of income, bashes. the

We

especially

the

are not subsidized

school like the

receive funding

from

fees,” said Laurie

biz

by

DSA, who registration

Campbell, the

It

will

executive members, pictured from left to right are president Hong Chau, second-year accounting; communications co-ordinator Laurie Campbell, third-year marketing; promotions co-ordinator Ryan Hicks, second-year marketing; vice president Teresa Bricker, third-year marketing; and treasurer Trevor Topping, second-year accounting. (Photo by Eileen Diniz)

executive.

Build your

resume! Give to the community! Friendly volunteers are

desperately needed to

There are five members on the

CBSA

Toll free:

888 -270-2941

provide companionship

feature

cash and prizes.

CBSA

1-

the

Wheel of Love and offer people the chance to win over $500 in

get

NOW.

Free info pack,

downtown

money

for all the business pro-

5 days/40 hr. (June 2-6 Guelph) TESOL teacher cert course (or by correspondence) 1 ,000s of jobs.

for

Kitchener.

grams.

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

to us and we very much. Stages is

them, bringing business to their organization,” said Campbell. The CBSA has already begun thinking of new fund-raising activities for next year.

The

CLASSIFIEDS

good

are

appreciate

would be

and communications co-ordinator Laurie Campbell, third-year mar'' keting student.

Available

years.

the

basically use the

:,,n,

is

although they have held them at Irmer City and The Lyric in past

collect

by fund-raising to help the business programs and students. Fund-raisers are our main sources

uL

“The biz bashes are basically just

fun to do fund-raisers to help raise

“We

^,n„

:

a large party,” Campbell said.

The event is usually held at Stages in downtown Kitchener because of the good relationship the CBSA has with the club,

all

it

i

us.”

programs

for

the

eollegi.

also thankful for

money

is

Symantec AntiVirus Researdi Co., (SARC), on the

are in need,” said Campbell.

The

fund.

of the business students at Conestoga. They started out about six years ago when marketing students were going to marketing competitions. They were selling almonds to raise represents

contact

business students

at the college.

The

own computer

if tijeir

can

infected

CBSA

this

Hewitt says.

vktis at

to

hackers send out warning of a fake virus.

expenses each year for antivirus software,”

i has encountered evpry known

immune

Another nuisance, says Hewitt, is the “Dear Friend” hoax. This is a sham that

have more and more

to

not says.

trol processes.

students or maintaining a firewall to keep users '‘in or out” of the system.

“WeVe going

either,

According to Hewitt, major software manufacturers, such as Microsoft and Novell, have also had problems with viruses slipping through their quality con-

says the college ,spends over $1 1 ,000 annually

is

he

Employees often bring viruses from home on the 3.5 diskettes and millions of dollars are spent on antivirus software each year.

against computer infections.

Hewitt,

or both,” warns Hewitt.

business

President

Hong

Chau, second-year accounting; VP Teresa Bricker, third-year marketing; promotions co-ordinator Ryan Hicks, second-year marketing; treasurer Trevor Topping, second-year accounting

to people who have Alzheimer Disease. Two hours/week commitment. Training and support

provided. Call the

Alzheimer

Society.

742-1422


Pagf 14

— SPOKE,

Feb.

1,

IW

John Howard Society rep

visits

Sanctuary

Art gallery offers lectures

Sexism and violence

By

Elizabeth Sackrider

The Kitchener- Waterloo Art Gallery is

topic of presentation By

Julie

providing an opportunity to attend a

Tuesday morning.

On

van Donkersgoed

crowd of approximately 50 people

Walter,

The

former

a

art

secu-

editor at the

Record,

Kitchener-Waterloo

talked

about the process inmates underwent

violence.

sponsored by the women’s

event,

resource

medium

inmates at the Guelph Correctional

Centre,

sexism and

dealing with

presentation

John Walter PhD., spoke

using art as therapy with

gathered in the sanctuary, Jan. 21 to attend a

Jan. 19,

about the benefits and disadvantages of

rity

A

of free publie lectures every

series

group

while creating various types of

Walter

of Conestoga College,

Dan

now does

art.

art restoration at

a

studio in New

with violence, was also included in the pres-

Hamburg. indi“The inmates were affected vidually by how much effort they put into it,” said Walter. “Sometimes it was an almost immediate effect.” The program, which ran from 1992 to 1995, encouraged art work by the prisoners. The program ended in 1995 because of government cut-backs. The next lecture will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 16. Dianne Cruxton has been asked to speak about the famous elephant “Jumbo” and how 19th

entation.

century glassmakers commemorated

featured guest speaker

Beckett, the

family violence prevention co-ordinator for

John

Waterloo-Wellington

the

Howard

Society.

Throughout the 50-minute

presentation,

Beekett focussed on the negative role males play in violence towards

women and

chil-

dren.

“All dle

men have work to do in

on

their

getting a han-

emotions and issues,” he

said.

A brief video. Nobody Knew, depicting an average guy

talking about his experiences

While Beckett included an overview of

the beast.

Photographer Pamela Williams will

five theories of violence in his discussion,

the feminist theory

was

the concept that

talk

reeeived the most explanation.

“Wife beating

is

to

On April

a controlling behaviour

and maintain an imbalance of power between a man and a woman,” he said. This philosophy is the one supported by the John Howard Society when creating programs for the men’s violence groups

which serves

1 1

men

the’ fact

that not

all

Dan

Beckett, the family violence prevention co-ordinator for the John Society, speaks about sexism and violence in the Sanctuary on Jan. 21.

of damaging someone

Howard

^ The gallery will trip to

(Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

also be hosting a day Boston to see parts of Monet’s

/^collection.

.

Thi|, is one ' of. Monet’s

iinntedshowing^ in North America.

men

else, in either

a

“Guys

lose

they lose

it

it

a

sometimes -

lot,”

he

said.

sometimes “Generally

I

pervasive role in society. “It is

about treating

women

like they are

think

men are good people. The people that

inferior

am

talking about today are representative

preferences, feelings or potential,” he said.

I

of some of the

men

to

men,

He went on to

out there.”

as

objects

Entertainment happenings Conestoga Colleges Winterfest ’99

without

explain the dangerous link

kicks off Feb.

1

and should be just the

cure ,,

physieal or emotional way.

Beekett also discussed sexism and

its

that exists

between sexism and violence.

“Some men

see

women as

objects that are

.

''2

Univmity’s, Tteet. Tickets are avail^le*'

if

not

some men eonsider

women to

Doon

be normal.”

StcicJent

night.

.

Assoc latio

Wed. Feb. 3 6:30

pm

-

still

The Flying Dog plays host to bluesman Mel Brown every Wednesday

f,

this way,

violence against

up today at the DSA Office.

*

being controlled and discarded

“Seen in

Grad Photos

,

Canadian rockers Big Wreck will be playing Feb. frVaf,. Wilfrid Laurier

a means for a man’s ends and subject to needed,” he said.

Sign

for

f

abuse their partners or lose control to the jjoint

will

bronze casting.

years.

play in abusive relationships, he

acknowledged

16.

Kay Marie Wallace

.spirituality in creating

While Beckett emphasized the negative role

on March 20,

walk the group through her quest

create

Beckett has led for the past

about photographing European

cemeteries

7:30

pm


^

/

SPOKE,

ENTERTAINMENT

Nolle and Penn shine

Feb.

1999

1,

— Page 15

an uneven Thin Red Line

in

By Ken Groulx debut, Badlands, based

Charlie

Adapted from the 1962 James Jones

novel

American

chronicling

victory

the

over

the

Japanese at Guadalcanal during

killing

with

Steven Spielberg war film. Saving

tions.

Red Line

war. The Thin

more

delivers a

moral

convoluted,

ambivalence. Director Terrence

Malick delivers a brooding, oftencompelling war epic, but his over-

on introspective mono-

reliance

was met

1958,

conflicted

Days

follow-up.

of

veil

cynicism

himself to admit,

Academy Award nomina-

undermined by

be his undoing. In attempting to

Sean Penn

plays Sgt. Welsh

in

The Thin Red

under endless scenes of swaying foliage and an assortment of

major acting talent with robust performances by the entire cast.

an admittedly sound

But aside from the meaty roles of Nick Nolte and Sean Penn, the

performance as the sadistically

to

ambitious Lt.-Col.

cinematographer

but

expertly executed,

is

makes

often

forcing

about

all

cynicism

Pvt.

is

an

Witt,

Earp) in a memorably haunting

Line.

boasts an impressive stable of

concept that

Lieut.

idealistic deserter, played by the doe-eyed Jim Caviezel (Wyatt

draw the parallels between the brutality of war and the cruelty of nature, the film is bogged down

wildlife. It is

by

“It’s

property.” But his

Malick’s over-indulgence proves to

as

struggles to cocoon himself with a

of Heaven,

Richard Gere, received

starring

character

Walsh, a soldier whose practices and thoughts are also at odds. He

But with The Thin Red Line,

While Spielberg’s commemorative vision of war presented audiences with imdeniable moral heroism in the horrific face of far

spree in

kudos and launched the careers of a young Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek. His 1978

four

Private Ryan.

Way), undeniably the top actor of his generation, delivers a similarly

critical

Second World War, The Thin Red Line will draw inevitable comparisons to last summer’s the

on the

Starkweather mid-west

(Internet photo)

performance.

The In his most complex

The

Prince

of

since

Nolte

Tides,

an

delivers

work

Oscar-worthy Tall. Bitter at

Red

Thin

challenging

Line

a

is

character

piece,

complete with some of the finest sequences ever committed

battle

Oscar-winning Richard Toll

celluloid;

parts played

augments the bloodshed with a

viewing. Malick’s intentions of

by Woody Harrelson, John Cusack and John Travolta are

being passed over for promotion

logue and philosophical metaphor

make The Thin Red Line an

lushness rarely seen in a

creating a profound

largely glorified cameos.

and anxious to further his own career, he blindly orders his soldiers

for

tedious

war film with

uneven experience.

thematic substance are honorable,

of the film

The return of Malick, following a 20-year absence from

but at nearly three hours long, his

lesser-known

metaphors are often of psycho babble.

filmmaking, should be reason for enthusiasm. His 1973 directorial

lost in a

wake

The marquee of Thin Red Line

is

The bulk instead focused on

dismisses the Coghill Trio, but

If rigid musical convention and categorization bore you. The

Waterloo

Stage

Theatre’s

secure Hill 210. Yet his voice-over

Elias Koteas, Adrien

dialogue reveals the loathing and

Ben Chaplin,

Brody and of whom perform

lacks the commercial sheen of Saving Private Ryan, but it is a fine achievement in documenting

consequence of his actions.

the dehumanization and atrocities

all

their roles with

aplomb.

The

production of Cowgirls

may be

strong,

and engaging numbers, the new

multi-talented cast

musical

comedy light-hearted romp musical

a

is

that

successfully cocktails classical

and

country

music

eclectically

into

entertaining

an

and

lire opposite musical dialects

the entire east, give Cowgirls an

Rick Bronson, the featured comic during the Doon Student

emotional depth.

Association’s

to be a recipe for a

of a

down

with

that

thoroughly

is

enjoyable.

The

music adheres to the integrity and convictions of both styles of music, but succeeds

taking

a

comedic

by

tongue-in-

western

In a Mobile

save her

that

has

To saloon from shop for the

ailing

becoming a

gift

world’s largest ball of twine, Jo

Carlson, played hires

Trio,

by Dale Hobbs,

a band called the Cowgirl

A

misunderstanding,

however, brings in the Coghill Trio, three classical

musicians on

a reunion tour, Carlson ihitiaUy

Call

at the stereotypes sur-

Me Trailer Trash

Tramp Blues

ability.

Leslie-Anne Wickens and Tara

about vulgarity or subject matter.

Kent shine as Mickey and Mo,

They realize comedy show.”

considerable

authentic southern gals loyalty to Carlson leads

whose them to

tutor the Coghill ’s transformation

from stodgy

classical players to

neophyte cowgirls. played

by

Maria

The

Trio,

College

shows for them. He was awarded the Canadian

first

-

Sanctuary,

self-deprecation

ances as three distinctly different

1999.

individuals cal

without

treading

too

on traditionalist toes. Wile numbers like From Chopin To Country provide |he production with the heart of its heavily

comedy, there are also moments remarkable

poignancy.

bonded by their musicompassion and courage.

It is

a superb production and if

act

life.

is

a

fine reason for

you

up your spurs and give them a look. to hitch

is

around the

-

-

VISIT

ill

OUR OFFICE LOCATED

-

INSIDE

allergy injections

blood pressure monitoring birth control counselling

pregnancy testing

DOOR #3, DOON CAMPUS

familiar

of post-second-

degree

pitfalls

of the party

obtained a marketing

from Vanier

but

still

wonders how. me,” he confesses with

“I spent

many

a night

wondering what day it was.” Having spent half his life

(Photo by Brent Clouthier)

their

reaction,

crowd

anything goes

as

Conestoga

the

appeared

to

love

the

informal setting. “I

hope

that

answers

question about whether

my

any act

is

pre-planned or not,” Bronson said

most of the show

to

concentrate on an incessant heckler.

“That was

the

weirdest

heckler I’ve ever heard.”

His success on college campuses in

show business working with such comedy legends as The Smothers Brothers and Phyllis Diller, Bronson has developed his act into an interactive romp with the audience. Following no set formula,

loves

a college crowd.

after adjusting

“School was definitely not a

he

has

translated

into

three

appearances in the Montreal Just For Laughs

Comedy

Festival

and

he will be featured during CBC’s

comedy special Comics! is also the host of The a weekly travel show on

half-hour

Bronson Tourist,

the

Life

Network,

which

bounces sharp wit and goofy

chronicles his adventures in North

characters off his audience, often

America’s coolest locations.

setting the tone -

aid

more than

lifestyle

He

Comedian Rick Bronson

poised for another in

ary education and bases part of his

Stage Theatre production before,

Cowgirls

is

Bronson with the

you have never seen a Waterloo

can provide:

advice

non-prescription medications a place to rest when you are

Campus Comedian

Jacquline Sadler and Armitage,

YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE

-

to

Bronson

also deliver absorbing perform-

Riedstra,

NEED HELP WITH YOUR HEALTH?

&

seem

audiences

reciprocate the affection

a laugh.

information

only a

it’s

crackle with the

music

We

fully

Home) and Saddle

genuinely inherent in country

of

performing colleges,” the

of the Year in 1997 and 1998, and, judging by his performance in the

of

sort

(She Lives

“I love

comedian said during a pre-show interview. “They don’t get uptight

priority for

-

comedy night, Jan. when it comes to

fool

college audiences.

cheek poke

saloon

no

19, is

They sing, dance and play a wide assortment of classical and country instruments

rounding them. Songs like Don’t

financial hardship.

all-female ensemble shines

Clouthier

in every facet.

brilliant cast

The play opens at the downtrodden Hiram Hall, a country and on

The

By Brent

marry a musical hybrid of symphony and hoeseamlessly

original mix.

fallen

loves college crowcis

conviction by Jane Anniiage, and Looking for a Miracle, sung by

would appear

of war.

Comic Rick Bronson

country-

versatile talents

a

(Carlito s

them into bonafide, picking cowgirls.

apathy.

by

Penn

desperation forces her to convert

sour musical mismatch, but the

Driven

ever-reliable

to

Numbers such as Don’t Look Down, performed with striking

just the cure for your musical

film.

including

actors,

Cowgirls a soul-stirpng musical By Ken Groulx

on a suicide mission

war

a dark and pensive film that

It is

of his act by

their

“I’m pretty busy with TV” Bronson said as he contemplated

the

his future as a touring stand-up

reactions.

For

his

performance

in

Sanctuary, Bronson did his act

act.

without a microphone and spent

“At least watch my show,” Bronson joked, “just so they won’t pull another Canadian

most of the night running amok through the crowd, poking fun at many of its members. Judging by

program.”


SPOKE,

l>»Rf 16

Eel). I,

IW

SPORTS To boldly go

Cheap

Condor coach aims to break new ground By Brian Smiiey

Another one of his coaching was turning around a high school program that was under .500 one year, to a 42-8

game

record the following year. This

work.

highlights

Most athletes are satisfied letting their names fade from the head-

when

lines

their playing days are

was achieved by

over.

Upshaw of

For Coach Terry

Conestoga’s men’s varsity basketball

team, his ambition reaches a

lot

higher

six-foot

most

than

new

players, just

a

new

coach,

need to be removed

as well as any coach he’s

commitments,

and

school

said.

an awesome coach,”

break

win

to

A

Upshaw,

Scotia,

get where he

way to

is today.

“My

said.

teammate the next time these two teams hook up.

banning

the

If fighting is ever removed from the game, and therefore,

One of the suggestions was a one-game suspension for those

the policemen, the instances of

players

Some of these players need a smack in the head to straighten them out.

from

fighting

assessed

a

fighting

As

1

is

sat

and watched the

ended up back

at

a

Matthew

common

seeking

In the end, back.

It

Said

who

Members of the media aigued that the lack

NHL

when

albeit sparingly,

it

would be

in

the

worse

incidents were

Kings

a Los defenceman

suffered a concussion

aftear

Dallas Drake of the Phoenix

also played basketball for the

Gryphons,

about pay

Doug Bodger,

cheap shot, or hitting

He

it’s all

may be wrecking

if these

.shape

Upshaw attended the University of degrees in

their

permitted to continue.

Angeles

from

be

will for

increase.

ground- Ute elimination of the

he obtained history and marketing.

revenge

these cheap shots are likely to

and Ontario. After graduating,

where

Rob Ray and

Barnaby,

game, but

a policeman.

debate, the argument always

Scotia

pay back. To cite an example, on Jan. 18, Dino Ciccarelli of the Florida Panthers was suspended for two games for slashing Buffalo Sabre Jason Woolley across the wrist. On top of the two-game suspension, you can be sure the Sabres, a team loaded with

being acquired by the players, discussed the possibility of

objective

playing basketball at the high

Guelph,

injuries in

pugilists such as

Another was the reduction of a team’s roster to 23 players from 24 to eliminate a .spot for a player whose main

cousin played at

Nova

few

between media and owners about the state of the game, in particular the injuries

major.

Acadia and I was a ball boy.” After he got cut trying out for Jimior ‘A’ hockey, he started school level in both

well.

debate prior to the skills

game.

The coach says he has always been interested in basketball, since the time he was a child. “I was always around it as a kid,” he

it

contest

realistic.

Nova

game, how-

brought the best

media together as

plished up to this point, that goal

in

disagree on that

that there are so

^

players of the world together,

After everything he has accom-

33, has traveled a long

to

point. Enforcers are the reason

brought the owners and the

national

a

injuries to star players.

have

I

last

ever, not only

CIAU

black head coach in the

Bom

more

was

century. Ttte annual

be the

to

is

work” and “cheap

the league. Players worry about

championship.”

now

HB

1999, it

the

“He’s more of a player’s

(Canadian Interuniversity Athletic

seems very

24',

“stick

shots” which would result in

retired

to

is

ultimate goal

Union)

Jan.

because

“I think he’s

he

like

ground where no one else has been before. first

more

point guards.

tall

His ultimate goal

“My

Mark down

understands the players have other

coach.”

himself.

^

not fighting

ever had, but more importantly, he

the addition of no

shots,

of enforcers

m

would ultimately lead

die to

Coyotes

hit

into

the

them

again.”

him from behind

boards,

“We’ll

see

they were national champions two years in a row. It was while at university that he became involved coaching

Some men can jump

basketball.

He coached a midget team at a Guelph high school that lost the city

and

finals

later,

when he

stopped playing, he coached the senior team for a year.

He coached at Guelph University an assistant and now at

as

Conestoga where he leads the Condors. But, he still coaches high school on the side.

“The reason school,

I

still

especially

Upshaw

said,

Conestoga

is

do high year,”

this

centre.

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

because

“is

not fully varsity this

year.”

He

Terry Upshaw, coach of the Condors varsity men’s basketball team, practises along with the team on Jan. 20 at the recreation

Upshaw

said

says

it’s

much

easier

recruit players to the college

to

when

guys on the team who have stuck

of the game.

approach them.

He

Iceland and Lebanon.

Lebanon

that

It

was

in

one of the highlights

of his career took place. After coaching a Lebanese team to the

championship, the crowd of

10,000 was so appreciative they carried

the

team’s

best

player

across the court.

“They

said he

He

well with

many

different types of

people.

“A

lot

was too good

Upshaw

said.

to

the recreation centre and with the

out,

in the

even though the team

of coaches have problems

isn’t

Ontario Colleges Athletics

Association and hasn’t played a full

schedule.

“If everything

wc’rc

in the

works out and

league next year,

all

because technically they can be

those guys will definitely have a

great, but they can’t relate to the

spot on the team,”

players,” he said.

Those players

Shiv Raj, a first-year general arts

to

Upshaw

said.

will probably

be around next year.

want

One can

and science student who plays for Condors, agrees with

only imagine Upshaw’s road to the

Upshaw’s assessment.

champs

the

touch the ground,”

he was most pleased with the sup-

it

said he also believes that he’s

a people person and gets along

has also coached overseas in

said

he has been a part of all facets

team. The players find you more easier to

Upshaw

port he’s received from the staff at

fact

it’s

for this season,

knowing the game technically and defensively and he attributes this to the

you’re actually involved with a

recognizable and

As

he believes his

strengths as a coach are

Raj

said

Upshaw knows

the

ultimate glory of

the

OCAA.

CIAU

runs

national

through

Tim

Condors Basketball team drives to the hpop as Shiv Raj and an unidentified player look on at a practice Jan. 20. Photo by Brian Smiley Streit of the

at the recreation centre


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS

Condors

raising funds

season

for next varsity By

Brian Smiley

tournament

scheduled

for

Upshaw

the

beginning of March. Conestoga’s varsity basketball

team season

completed

hasn’t yet,

their

but they’re already

Upshaw

$2,000 from

(Photo by

Rob Himburg)

net

fills

bers of the team has been really

essary to

is

make

on

that a reality.

said. “That’s

a

they’d give us something like 15

we

per cent of what

Conestoga College offers a variety of intramural sports to

its

students. One of those sports happens to be ball hockey. There is one team however,

made up of a group of seven second-year management studies students, who have gone beyond just ^

playing the game. They have gone out in search of, and found, corporate sponsorship.

Classes are out on a Tuesday

afternoon and the McGinnis Front

Row

$6.50 Pitchers head to the

on the Doon campus for a 4;50 p.m. game. The door to locker room three is unlocked and five players walk in, one carrying a huge bag of goalie equipment, highlighted by a mask that features the team name and a label of the team’s recreation centre

Another player brings in a portable stereo and the locker room is soon filled with the beats of various hard rock, alternative and hip-hop music in an attempt to induce their bodies into

producing

adrenaline

for

the

forthcoming game. Today’s selections include

Bad

to the

Bone and

Fight for Your Right.

As they change T-shirts

with gold

lettering,

for-

The

rules

which teams

league play by are a

little

in this

different

ment, the play

five-on-

and there are two 20-minute periods instead of three. The point system is unusual too, as a team is awarded three points for a win, two for a tie and one for a loss. Some members of the team, five

says

Roberts.

jealous

“We fhink of

our

sponsorship.”

Perhaps shirts that

it’s

annoy individuals

in the

The team is in owning a record of seven wins, one loss and one tie. The team, which is sponsored by McGinnis Front Row, a intramural league. first

place,

Waterloo-based restaurant, frequents the establishment every

Thursday night where they get a pitcher of beer for $6.50 instead of

normal price of $7.50. Aaron Adams, the team’s goaltender, said McGinnis gave them a the

it

“They’re very positive

want

to have a

into the

team makes

on top of the 40 hoins he

That’s

spends

if the

OCAA next year.

at

his

job

as

general

Spring Break.

various methods including the sale

“I think this could be a big one because everyone wants to go to

of Nevada

Florida for the break,” he said.

else,”

Upshaw

said the team has been up as a non-profit organization and is raising funds through

tickets,

In

addition

fund-raisers,

bingos and a

Upshaw

to

these

also plans a

raffle for a trip to Florida for the

he

said.

Last Call 3 on 3 Hockey Tournament

Tues. Feb. 2 11:30 am

have to wear helmets when they play and the league has taken out

body

contact.

“They

“It sucks,” says Roberts.

took

out because they thought

it

Sign up at the

VSA

Office

it

was too rough. We’ve only had fight.”

Game

time approaches and the

Pitchers are out

of the

floor

Adams

on the hardwood gym, peppering

with shots, sharpening his

upcoming game. Onto the court walk the referees. It’s 4:50 p.m. and the game is

reflexes for the

to get

underway, only there’s one

problem. There

no team

is

to play

Disappointed,

the

Jack Astors

Pitchers

game

agree to play a scrimmage

Adams

team has “You can

their

says he feels

built a reputation. tell

intimidation factor

there’s

when

an

others

“The other team

didn’t even

show

up.”

Other members of the team,

Adams, Shaun Gingrich,

aside from Roberts and are Chris Kuiack,

John “Grizzly” Grewald, Joe Shaw

and Cory Daum. These students enjoy the intramural games and since they are only in their second year at the college, they have one year left and are already planning for next season.

“We

just think the intramm-al

great deal.

league

is

“We keep our receipts,” says Adams. “We hand them in and the

“We’re

still

management of the restaurant said

it,”

would

about 40

set

good commitment from

play the $6.50 Pitchers,” he says.

not only their team

hours per week

said.

his time,

like to increase that to

however, are disappointed they

against the two referees and two

they’re

week volunteering

four-on-

is

four instead of

passers-by.

us,”

basketball

from those of a normal hockey league. Goalies wear full equip-

how

“All of the other teams hate

mem-

are totally iuto

all

as

over the course of the season for a

ward Chris Roberts comments other teams hate them.

the

basketball team.”

against.

into their black

Upshaw, who

spent there

year-end party.”

one

beer.

said.

because they

the

manager of Boo Radley’s. This type of commitment would help make the team self-sufficient, which is his number one goal. “We would like to make it a self-sufficient program so that we don’t have to rely on anybody

college students.”

By Rob Himburg

Upshaw

“The guys he

“If we can raise $5,000 we’ll be

he

great,

all

fees.

coach spends about 20 hours per

The response from

the funds nec-

tournament entry

through fees and

looking forward to being a part of the Ontario Colleges Athletics Association (OCAA) next year

pretty

and drains beer pitchers

it,

can raise about

other things,” he said.

in the ballpark,”

Intramural team

we

interview on Jan. 20 that the team

and his mind

have obtained

after they

“Hopefully

said in an

must be held every year. He said the team will have about $1,400

optimistic that the

maker.

is

Aaron Adams of the $6.50 Pitchers stops Shaun Gingrich during a pre-game session for the intramural ball hockey league. The Pitchers won by default after the opposition failed to show.

is

stressed that for these

fund-raisers to be successful, they

tournament will be a big money

thinking well into next season.

Coach Terry Upshaw

1999-Page 17

1,

year.”

great,”

says

Adams.

gonna be around next

Molson

Prizes

No cover


.

Pago 18

— SPOKE.

Eol). I,

IW

SPORTS Second-half collapse

Condors

kills

Southwest Under 18s hammer Condors 7-2 By Charles Kuepfer

forget

for

the

Condors as they

were beaten by a younger, faster “1 don't yell

them

into

they had

it

very often, but

I

laid

good beeause

pretty

coming,” said assistant

coach Duane Shadd, summing up the kind of night

was

it

for the

men’s indoor soccer team,

were

hammered

Southwest Under “I’ll

remember

7-2

by

who the

“I told the

on Monday,”

you

and they’re going

to

do

it

and use

to outrun

their smarts

too.”

Southwest came out flying

second

a night to

as

in the

half, turning a '2-2 tie into

isn’t

a

The

out-hustled us,” he

just

Condors

hustling

haven’t

been

out to practice either,

something that concerns Shadd.

“We

who seem know everything know about soccer,”

got college guys

think they

there

to

is

we

don’t

we

have respect for aren’t going to

win

were playing without head coach Geoff Johnstone, to a record of

games no matter how much skill you got,” said Juricic. Juricic said he was disappointed

3-6-0

(won-lost-tied).

remain

in

with the

improved

loss.

“Yeah, and the fact that

on

my own

The

I

scored

Condors,

who

place

They in

the

league’s first division. Southwest

now

its

record to 6-1-2 and

boasts an offence which has

scored

goal.”

loss drops the

sixth

19 goals

Condors

in as

more than

the

many games.

said Shadd. “Obviously they got

beat by

some high school

kids, so

what do you think the message

But assistant coach Sanjeeve

“If

each player,

said.

to

a blow-out.

game was

halftime that

Shadd. “They want to beat your butts,

said Shadd, looking ahead to the

Jan. 21

at

these guys look up to you,” said

team’s next practice.

The

“They

club.

guys

Shadd ’s words were prophetic

18s. it

and hungrier

Dhanapala said Southwest faster team.

ON PATROL

is?”

He

said that players should start

coming

and start what the coach is

practice

to

listening to saying.

The game started well for the Condors with Paul MacQuade opening the scoring in the half.

first

But two quick goals by

Southwest proved to be a sign of things to come.

The Condors pulled even before the half after Zlalko Lakoseljac

blasted

a

hard

shot

past

the

Southwest goalie.

Southwest scored early in the

second half and never looked back.

Giveaways hurt the Condors,

who at

left

the

goalkeeper Bill Johnson

mercy

of

unchecked

Southwest forwards in front of the net.

Condors defender Marko Juricic was no co-operation among the team members. “There was a lack of team work,” said there

said Juricic.

Great ball control by the younger Southwest Under 18s team helped them cruise to a 7-2 victory over the Condors. (Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

“We just

got on each

other’s cases.”

He

also noted that the

team

lacked unity.

Walksafe patrols the campus Monday to Thursday 6:45. p.m. to 10:45 p.m. Pictured are Michelle Hogeveen and Trevor Trewartha. Photo by Sarab Thomson

mi

WATCH YOUR STUFF!

Wednesday, February 3 Due to the low water

level of the pond, different twist this

take a year. If you are daring to plunge. details are available at the DSA Office. Funds raised will be directed to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

the event

will

.

There has been a noted increase in thefts from vehicles, especially in parking lot 10 and 12 on campus. Main target of thieves is stereo equipment, sporting goods. Thieves are breaking windows or prying doors to gain access. Please lock valuables in your trunk when possible and report any suspicious persons or vehicles to security at extension 357. Allan Hunter,

supervisor of security services Doc:^^

Studont Association


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS Team

travels 1,300

km, wins two

on the road good

Life

— Page 19

1999

1,

Condors

to

By Charles Kuepfer Galemo. The new players, added

said

Mission accomplished.

“The coaches are

21, with the objective of winning two of those games. trip, Jan.

They

not

objective,

nation’s

only

met

He was

college

especially

is

impressed

team played He said the team

his

against the Sault.

has more depth than

it

did at the

of the year, when they only

start

had two

overtime Jan. 23, in the thrilling conclusion to their road trip, a

solid lines.

Galemo

said he is happy with McDonald, who recently became the Condors first-line centre.

which they logged over

1,300 kilometres.

The Condors tangled with the Humber Hawks in Toronto on Jan. 21. The penalty-filled game was decided in overtime, on a powerplay goal, with the Condors on the wrong end of a 3-2 score.

the

way

with the

happy coming

really

team said Galemo.

together,”

their

hockey team, the Cambrian Golden Shiel4 in the process: Conestoga beat Cambrian 6-5 in

trip -in

way

with the

but disposed of the

top-ranked

at the

of the semester, are integrating into the team well, he said. start

The Condors men’s hockey team embarked on a three-game road

Condor goalie, Anthony Gignac, centre, was solid ^ing the last home continued his solid play during the team’s three-game Nothern road trip.

“There

Giqnac

led

by team

Hanlon scored the other goal

who had Ramsey

Conestoga.

a goal and an assist.

The Condors

for

in left

Toronto at 10

game and

p.m. after the

arrived

Sault Ste. Marie at 5

time together, but he lamented not

winning

a.m.

all three games. “I’m kind of disappointed,” said McDonald. “It could have been six

the next day.

At 1:30 p.m. they hit ice against Sault Auks and trailed the Auks by two after the first period. The Condors soon made up for the

Sabres ^10 V^

their

slow

The Condors improved

Mike Traynor fi-enzy

Sunday, Feb. 21

assists,

ing to nail

with two goals and two while Snyder, Ian

the

in

overtime.

McDonald

Taylor had a goal and an

fiTiitter Ttf&ing

Ontario

try-

Colleges

Athletic

cham-

Only four of the seven teams in Ontario make it to the finals. Conestoga

is

also gearing

the national championships,

up for which

they will also host.

The Canadian Colleges

Athletic

Association’s national men’s hock-

ey championship will run from

March

As

assist.

Condor coach Ken Galemo said he was happy with the results

They are

a playoff spot in

pionship, which Conestoga hosts, on the weekend of March 5-6.

in Sudbury, despite being outshot

collected four assists while Scott

down

Association’s men’s hockey

had a goal and an assist. The Condors continued their winning ways the following night

goal

tied for third place with

Sir Sanford Flerning.

led the scoring

by Cambrian 50-37. Traynor had a huge night for Conestoga scoring a hat trick which included the game-winning

now

are

MacDonald and Ryan Martin each

Office

their

record to 6-7-0 (won-lost-tied) and

goals and cruising to a 7-3 victory.

Vs Detroit

Ticket $65 up at tlT9 DSA

points.”

racking up seven

start

said during the road

team was having a good

trip the

captain Jason Snyder,

a lot of character in the

McDonald

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

Conestoga was

is

team,” said Galemo.

17-20.

host, the

Condors automati-

cally qualify for the nationals.

One

other Ontario team and one team

because they got the four points

from Alberta Colleges Athletic

they wanted to take.

Association will also participate in

“We Sault

Humber and

figured

were

our best

the

the three-team round robin.

chance,”

THE ONTARIO COLLEGES OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY MEMORIAL BURSARY PROGRAM FOR WOMEN' IN TECHNOLOGY Purpose

Eligibility

To commemorate the women who died in the December 6th 1989 Montreal massacre at I'Ecole

To be must:

polytechnique, the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts

and Technolog>’, in collaboration with Inco have instituted a memorial bursary program for women

-

in

-

technology’. •

Sponsorship This bursary

4io

is

financed by the interest

applied arts and technology; and be enrolled in a full-time technical/technological

the 23 Colleges of

Selection Criteria

;

Applied Arts and Technology

of Ontario.

-Act HA-Lsstoi/c

be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident; be a resident of Ontario; be planning to pursue their studies at a college of

program of study.

program

generated from the trust fund contributed by Inco Limited, and -

Requirements

eligible to receive this bursary, the applicant

Each application

will

be assessed based on the

following

criteria; financial need, a promising career technology as demonstrated by interests, academic record, and a letter of support from a facultv member or employer, as well as a letter of recommendation

in

Value of the Bursary

from the Financial Aid Administrator of the college

iA:<spc>rt«ttoiA.

Tuesday, February 2 River Valley Tubing, St. Mary’s departing Doon Campus 4:30 pm sign up at the DSA Office

Four bursaries each in the amount of S500 will be awarded. One recipient will be chosen from each

the applicant

region of the province

Submission of Application

Northern region (Confederation. Northern, Canadore, Cambrian, Georgian, Sault); Central region (George Brown, Humber, Seneca. Sheridan.

attend.

and more specifically from the Eastern region (Algonquin, Sir Sandford Reming, Durham, Loyalist. St. Lawrence, La Cite collegiale);

Centenrual); Western region (Conestoga, Niagara,

Lambton.

St. Clair,

is

attending.

Applicants must submit the completed application form to the Finanaal Aid Office of the college they

Deadline

Fanshawe, Mohawk). Applications must be received at the Financial .Aid Office at the latest by January 31st.

Evaluation of Applications The Financial Aid Administrators of each region meet to consider the candidates and make a nomination

make

to the

Council of Presidents which

the final selection.

Further Information

Doom Student Assoclatlo

For runner information on The On:ano Colleges of .Applied .Arts and Technology Memor.al Bursary Program for Women in Technology contact the Financial Aid Office at the college you are attending. ,

will

will

*


^Bpmnmpilipp I

iWf'tSW'

i

Maurier

Supporting 215 cultural organizations across Conada during the 1998-99 season

r

Digital Edition - February 01, 1999  
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