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3 1st Year

— No.

3

Conestoga College, Kitchener JANUARY

Students

1999

18,

concerned

about

From

left:

Brett

McKee, Paul Hinsperger and

Wes

Reinhardt flood the ice on their 30X60-foot backyard ice

rink.

(Photo by

Usa wiiheim)

Skating away winter’s blahs By

Lisa Wilhelm

it brought back old memories.” took a week to build the rink and all four said it was a little harder to build the rink in Kitchener than back home because they didn’t

and It

Five Conestoga College students from small towns in Bruce County have decided to bring a little bit of country to the city by making a

30x60-foot skating rink in their backyard. Brett McKee and Paul Hinsperger, third-year civil engineering students, Wes Reinhardt, engineering mechanical second-year a student, Eric Millen, a first-year mechanical engineering student and Joel Poechman, who is picking up some business courses at night

OCCO genera!

manager vesiacms.

PAGE 8

have the proper

“We

coming from a small town, to see if we could do it,” said McKee. “We’ve always built rinks

with our families since

we were kids

when

it

time because

it

always

turns daylight.”

“We already have a game of four-on-four set up with our neighbours,” said McKee. Despite the long hours and hard work, they all agreed it was worth it. “It’ll all be worthwhile in the end when we’re out on the ice every night enjoying our masterpiece,” said Poechman.

“We

challenge,

that’s the best

gets colder

harden.

that,

it

because

Other than improper tools, the only problem they encountered was snowy days when they which will the rink, flood couldn’t

was a

and

part of our past

is

by packing

because back home we used tractors and snowblowers.” Reinhardt said after they packed the snow, they put a light sprinkle of water on it and let it

school to earn his general business diploma, decided to build the rink two weeks ago.

“Hockey

said

feet,”

tools.

it down with our own McKee. “We had to improvise

started

“We’ve put endless hours into it,” said McKee. “We had a couple of late nights and some pretty early mornings. Hinsperger also said some days were pretty long. “I was up one morning at 6:30 a.m.

we packed it down one more time we started flooding it,” Reinhardt

“After

flooded

really cold

15 times one day because

it

and

after said.

it

was

when it’s best to do it. You when it’s sunny out because

that’s

shouldn’t flood

it

will melt.”

it

chance to

definitely be used for hockey.

rate school

graduate employment, graduate satisfaction,

By Jaime Clark From

Feb.

1

to

5,

College students are going to their

rate

school

student satisfaction

the

by participating in a survey, which is part of

collection

data

Conestoga get a chance to

full-time

for

defining

Key

Performance Indicators (KPI) which measure

Gtmdor men

college performance.

victorioiis the

over Stars.

KPI’s

will

be

Some components of used

to

determine a

portion of government funding to colleges

py^Ei2

is

rate.

The survey Conestoga students

will

a method of measuring

how

well

be

completing consists of a series of standard questions and up to five college-specific questions, to

which

are questions directly related

Conestoga College.

The

objectives of the survey are to identify

the proportion of students

who

are satisfied

with their school with respect to resources, learning experiences and several other

staff,

areas.

A

next year.

KPI

employer satisfaction and graduation

committee

set

up

at

Conestoga chose the

five college-specific questions

on the survey.

we

Ontario colleges meet the needs of students

“We wanted

Commentary

and the marketplace. In the fall of 1997, the Ministry of Education and Training (MET),

can do something about,” said Jack Fletcher,

Page 4

along with Ontario’s colleges of applied arts

did

The wonders

of

winter driving

and technology, worked together to define five KPI’s to

to ask questions about things

director of student

not

sit

and recreation services. He

on the committee, but was

designated the contact person

at the college.

satisfaction,

DSA education coconcerned about KPI results

Llanes,

ordinator,

is

affecting funding

measure college performance.

The KPI’s include student

Tara

See survey

.

.

.

page 3

colleges.

allocation

to

Ontario

(Photo by Jaime Clark)


,

Page

2

— SPOKE, Jan.

18,

'

1999

NEWS

New Another great Canadian winter By Linda Wright “We’ll just have to wait and see what Mother Nature brings,” Barry Milner, head of physical

was quoted

resources,

as saying

finance

running into our clients," Another concern with cleanup operation is

system the

By Lisa Wilhelm

the

neighbourhood kids who tunnel into the large

snow

Conestoga College has

piles, said

using

Milner.

4 edition of Spoke. When the snow crews clear Mother Nature snow on the weekends, there is has delivered the worst the danger that children will be snowstorm in 16 years. tunnelling from the other side Snowplows have been going and the plow operators may not non-stop, 24 hours a day since see them. The plow midnight Saturday, Jan, 2. .^operators have to exercise “We cannot do any better "said extreme caution, said Milner. in the Jan.

Since that

Milnef.

,

aI

Hunter,

supervisor

taken a lot of work to clear security services', said snow. For the time ifr:.?<faople,-Mvej%^een,^^

I It IS

*

to

.the

will

article.

^Their th

0

one

l-a-jl

year, contiactors

used

two people but this year, they have been using five or .six. 1 he contractors are around the cl(K'k, and Milner

cial

Milner college

said

stalT.

security

stall’

credit for their elloi

'Ihe\ have been

hard

hours

ts.

working long,

elearing

snow

to

make roaduavs. walkways and patlivvays

and

passable for students

stair.

'J’he

that

f,(>r

.Vliliicr

the

college condiiets classes throughout ihc is

day and evening

campus which biiow

die

at

limits

the

Doon time

removal crews can clear

Although

Peter Higgins, snowplow..

lead

hand

on

grounds,

operates

a

(rhoto by Linda Wright)

mmit

want our clients running into the snow-clearing equipment, and we don't want don’t

Before

snovv-eleaiing

equipment

at iiedeslrian

^

""'

get in a lot of paper reports

this

new system should

are

Hunter

the

same

Although

give

w

it w'ill

probably be

it’s

only the

program

first

year

been

has

implemented, Akerlund said the

^

that

using

are

the

program now haven’t had any major problems. “It’s

first

“It will

Akerlund. Processing

as the old system.

colleges

altemativbs.^,^,,14^"

cir to school

help

us get them out faster and on

the

that way,” said Hunter.

transit

kind of early to year

because

learning about

haven’t

it,

tell

but so

seemed

to

in*4he

we’re far,

be

still

there

any

problems,’’she said.

Under

Friday, All

Day

Lift

Ticket

Lift

January 29

Ticket

Only

8c

Transportation

$25

$20

Rentals $12 Snowboard Rentals $24 Ski

($400 credit card deposit required) Construction continues on the

Departing

Doon Campus

at 7:00

am

freezing temperatures.

in

reporting.

wise, she said,

fortunate to date find we’d Uke,^to

„ifriviag^^a

was using

Conestoga

it anymore. She said one of the advantages of tills new program is tKe

“We

unforgiving

parking conditions are notjap to

TlTiUTAT

at

1970s.

and

it

it

system, was

with "

comes in contact witli a person and -we’ve been veryss; keep

six

Akerlund said the program was very old and there was not much that could be done

to

traits and, other areas not be readily visible until they are almost in front of the

when

new

this

program written

the

of these problems^

pretty

or

right now,

by end of April, 12 out of 25 colleges will be using this new'

a

of bush

is

five it

introduced, the college

may

“Steel

only

colleges are using

line,” said

“We

college’s account-

same format.

People corning out

crossovers.

Donna Akerlund,

ing.

.

said Hunter."'

and

and

everyone will eventually use the

designate parking spaces and because .snow was blocking some of the .spaces. Exercising judgement could

..aware intersections

orders

It is not a mandatory change, but Akerlund said it is a package that is modified for colleges so that

lines., that

..fee.

that

system.

There have also been probelms

Hunter also cautions people

biggest eon cein

finan-

the

by other cars which prevents them from leaving until someone moves one of the cars blocking

alleviate a lot

purchase

according to

iy[l.'.Th/;biggest’'Cdm^‘'^-

people have taken too much space because they can’t see the

new

a

is

accounts receivable components,

manager of the

confraetors.

li»msekeeping and deserve a lot <U'

(OCAS)

system made for colleges

payable,

some

finduig a place to park because

all

includes general ledgers, accounts

of?

more

can't a-,k foi

.said lie

used by

The Ontario College Application

removal, crews,,, plaints have been from students also contract but the excess whose cars have been blocked in

ui

eventually be

Service

'owntnow

•vork

started

financial software that

colleges in the province.

eight yearn, cmvs^ have lia 4^/~.'fe®cause they cddnot parlwi^eV "'truck snovv to snow dumps, they want to park because the

While Cohestdga campuses haye?f= lots are

new

new technology

building despite

Photo by Cariy Beniamin


.

SPOKE, Jan.

'

taht

'‘IbW- 'm

student

The

It

employer

satisfaction'

Key

will

Indicators

a

allocate

used“

,.

of

portion

ta~'

^'the

completion and collection of the

"

example.

money:,,

“Where’s

coming

';^ked,.^F§7r7

,

surveys are done according to

being hired"'to tabulate results,

funding to colleges-^' The

ministry’s

,

coming into the system to implement the survey. People are

Perfbrmhnce^'-'for

be

'

.

is

and compp-

fetisfactiorr^'J^;

nents of the

,

^

seeMhat they, could earn" the surveys take ^proximately 30 -money at a later time" she said, _ y minutes to complete.

'"

employment,;

'

*’

.-i the”^

can,;^;77theah'''

graduate

graduate

for

7-^'' 77,-^

'

'

protocol.

Students

the

from?’|,.^.

the

,;of

?

memo

sent to Conestoga

student

students

'

finance

unit.

,A

rnaxinrum two' per cent funding' adjustment

Ricardo Warth from Brazil puts a

Striking

little

Samba

could

bowling

style. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic) in hus

operating .grants

to

made,

be

KPI

success

A

of

College international

Conestoga students and

three

international

education

office

staff

group

of

13

members

hit

the

bowling lanes on fen. 7 at the Brunswick Frederick Lanes of the in Mall Frederick Street Kitchener. The event was organized by the office as a part of a

welcome week

for

all

visa

students.

The atmosphere was one of camaraderie as loud cheers and

applause could be heard after

every

strike.

games were real

Even though

the

quite competitive, the

purpose of

was

this event

provide an opportunity

to

for the

students to enjoy themselves and

pYcr three .years

in

2000-01.

Jong-Hwan Lee, from South Korea said he enjoyed himself. The English and broadcasting student had returned to Canada two days prior, after a two-week Christmas vacation in

One of the

students,

homeland.

forward to

He

said he looks

all activities

organized

by the International Education Office, because the students always have a good time. After the bowling matches, the students enjoyed pop and pizza and then played a game in which they matched flags to the proper

The

countries.

24

flags

24 countries which currently have students enrolled at Conestoga. The flags represented

the

each

KPI

will impact

,

input

a

major area of

1.

Doon

lanes.

Student

wift;*

to

It

has an impact

so take

Oil

the

Llanes seriously.

take

about. If you’re a grad

'

surveyl leally impoi-

the

fOtOveti”

ediicafioh

not doing wbU, will they take

by

money' away? If you take the fufulmg away, yoii'te going to do

admini.siration.

worse,”

ized so the students can meet their

that the student

the

colleges,

say there isn't

for in^rovement.”

,

Larry Rechsteiner, director of college planning and international education, was one of ,the co-ordinators of the event. He says events such as this one are organ-

organize these activities so

room

to,-,other

isn’t to

,

countries.

“We

but that

"

“it's (the

Administration of the student

socialize.

2T think-^’II com"^W^

well compared

doesn't

it

satisfaction surveys will be done'

and

'

everybody should be concerned

ultimately

counterparts

Overall, Fletcher said he thinks^l'

“This- is someftiing

because of the .frmding. If you’re

respective

will be

on a yearly basis.

sturvey

the

with

their

the college

encourages

also

nator.

to

year KPI’^ have

advised Fletcher.

students,’,’

stumped the students and the game ended in a draw as neither team was able to match all flags

first

seriously,

it

mean you’re going to be finished

the

will not

Conestoga^wiir-sucb'^' in^the' ’

want

Association education co-ordi-

really

the

initiated in

erthancing;,.,, ratings.

“I

qualify.

create a positive attitude towards this.

v.'

have’ direct

into

program

.students- to

is

is

conrhlcted

--

,

iTie postern advertising KPI’s

the collegos branch of VlliT.

concern for jFletcher and Tara as

Tibbits sent to college faculty.

college,

Funding

diploma

memo Cohe.stoga president John' L system,'- Similar smvpys

up to two per cent of the general purpose operating grant, according to a report prepared by .

such

countries,

in,

When

a^blhh

Guyana, Laos or Caymen Islands

tani

to

the

college,

^d Fletcher. express*^

cr,mcerns.

^

volunteers

and suggested laculty

college'

that'^'

;»taH',

Metchei

'ludeat.^

.who

simitar.-

from

suj'poit

——

any*^ taculi' ^ ""

Ases'

“The main concern^, should hot survey a

try to have the surveys scheduled

money taken

during two-hour classes. The

away. We’d like to

and

survey

could

fmprov^ents

to the

satisfaction

teaches.

attempt has been

director dV recreation says the student

Fletdhe’r,"'

ptudenf sei vices,

govennnent has is the frmding. We don’t want to see the schools tliat score knv get

An

’Jack

made

to

rneari'

coliegaj

students have a chance to

participate

go

don’t

some

in

social

who

especially those

activities,

much,”

out

says

Rechsteiner.

The

have fun.

his

some

phased

'

say stirdents

Itegiuning. in

By Neven Mujezinovic

reward

'frmdhig adjustments will

be phased

Visa students hit the ianes

to

peiftjrmance.

according to

accoantabilitj^,'

are not pursuing a

participate in the survey.

Martin Hicks, manager of the > ministry in dieir'mutiial goals, ^'V-Thts ministry’s

who

certificate or

both Conesft^a College %nd the

by

international

education

home away from of the many

office is indeed a

home

for

says

students,

international

f/inter 'fv&ina

Rechsteiner.

The

office

students

sometimes about

to

any

way

just

by

can,

it

them

talking to

concerns,

their

Rechsteiner.The

the

assist

tries

in

says usually

office

organizes two to three events a

month ice

for

its

skating,

students’

students. Skiing or

depending on the

interest,

being

is

planned.

A

co-ed volleyball team

being

international

competition

in

also

is

by

the

students

for

organized the

college’s

intramural volleyball league.

.>^£31

kia.Lss.toiA.

-

tlA.cLuC£?l CS

trci kv.spOKt«ttc>iA.

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— Page 3

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1999

18,

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Doon Stodont Association


— SPOKE. Jan.

Page 4

18.

1999

SPOKE

Winter driving another fine art Flakes flutter

down

gently

from

sky

the

Shadow, the back seats were empty. Opening the trunk,

as

white my

on

juice.

land

particles

Anyone who knows me

eye-

knows

and

lashes

black

jacket.

It

such

is

with

my

speckle

from

blizzard

one

mammoth

winter

out

all

The worst

hell.

blizzard Ontario has witnessed in

always packed

I

guess the mitts

glance

last

time

have

my

breath fogs up the

driven a car in the winter.

Preparing

shift

you ever

headlines fight their

tried to drive a

Shadow with bald snow?

tires

I

Have Dodge the

in

not the most desirable of choice for winter

It is

driving.

mind.

Unfortunately,

learned

I

snow

in the

how

way.

slides

to

get to the

grocery store and back with

body and

my

my

car in their original

states.

Before

have to dig

my

drive, into

my

in

icy

killed

into

Okay,

traffic.”

you can do

this.

My car slips forward through the lot.

Rodeway Making it

Drive,

A

Suites

the

to

Homer Watson

on

stoplights

my car stops

easily.

of green signals the way to go, and I floor the gas as usual.

can even think about

I

going anywhere

into

way

curves of the

parking

The goal was

crank the defrost.

collision.” “Foiu' teens injured as

car

to

the hard

to

“Couple

Elizabeth,

maneuver

I

brave battle.

I

first

my

the

windshield and

vehicle

start

soggy mittens on the passenger seat. They had fought a lay

Shivering, the

is

my

at

gray mittens and

windshield. Finally inside the car

16 years.

This

well

is

hauling the white powder off

snowflakes, but an

little

Well,

stuff.

take

I

glorious

a

realize these aren’t nice

I

the car

have to do the dirty work.

wonderland. Until

find

I

an old iron shovel circa 1920 and a half-empty jug of monkey

flash

Now,

let’s

take a look at what

I

car out from under three feet of

pounced on the gas pedal, a bad, bad habit for a road

snow.

filled

It is

I

a tough job

when you

lack the necessities to clear off

just did.

I

with snow, slush and

Now,

if

ice.

you happened

free

to be anywhere near this intersection, you would have seen a little green car doing a complete circle in the middle of a four-lane

of Old

highway.

your

car, like

a brush.

So, without this basic tool,

I

look aroimd to see what to use to

my vehicle from the clutches Man Winter. Having just cleaned out my teeny green

never stomp on the gas pedal.

imagine

other

motorists

amused by

fairly

my

I

were

display of

ignorance about winter driving.

The light is now red and the Shadow is still in the centre of the

Lesson one of winter driving;

intersection. fishtails, I

Pulling

angry honks from the behind me.

Homer Watson

few

a

my

ease into

lane with

whiz past

irate vehicle

is

30 km-h.

my

sedan.

to

Top speed going down

get

hang

the

4X4s

feel like a

I

wienie, but at least I’m safe.

My pulse rate is up and my hands are shaking.

Drive

Drivers with their flashy

I

need

of

this

winter-driving jazz.

Can you see the difference?

College classes cozier than those Last

close to

1.500 learners wailing with bated breath for Prof. Peter

attended lecture

W L

Erb

a

u

r

University discover-

the

point.

diffejcenoef and

college

and

its

Instead he rambled on

down and questioned of a

participated in a religion and

culture class

listened eagerly

about the subtleties of evil. He pointed out what is up may be

university classes*

evil

begin his lecture, I

which considered

symbols.

The first thing that struck me was the size of the class; it was an ocean of students^

There were

bird out of her

‘Looking around the auditorium

was anxious to see if anyone else was following what had now turned

into

a

lesson

in

,

it

you

bookbag.

The man who was cartooning in

sat

ahead of

A- mature*

notebook.

his'

who

me

his surroundings

sat across the aisle

had brought a manicure

was painting her

and gaudy

set

nails a

shade of orange. I

interested

in

A

would not go unnoticed a college classroom due to the

at

am moment

and

if

to answer

tlie

teacher with

In college

in

most

Hands-on

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor: Sarah Thomson; Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthier; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg; Features and Issues Editor; Julie van Donker.sgocd Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy Sankar; Multi-media Editor: Neven Mujezinovic; Production Manager: Jeanette Everall; Advertising is

Editor: Jaime Clark;

Janet Wakutz;

Circulation Managers; Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarly; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

college classes

which normally

cuvLf spiLilu

mfoimituin but

lea\e less

some

teacher in college, and there

marks are allow

is

is

for indiv idual attention

The intimate

is

activities

for independent

.A personal relationship can be developed between a student and

body bu^^d^^ room

cases,

room

thought.

class

awarded for class participation.

Keeping Conestoga College eonneeted

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spokc@conestogac.on.ca

you

you are required to be

mind. Attendance

arid

gain the practical

Based on the lecture I attended Lauuer 1 perceived the lesson to be vague, compared to my

degree of intelligence present not only in

to

employers require.

at

question could be sprung at

SPOKE

Manager:

skills

were busy with an origami bird, 1 doubt whether you would be able

in

assured myself these types of

would be

impossible for a studenl to 'dimply blend into tin. baekground as is

to her

activities

the

gum wrapper

students

In a college selling

possible in university.

philosophy. Sadly, no one seemed in

small class size.

and was amusing herself by making it fly from her notebook

student

I

Spoke SPOKE

the validity

fact.

wisdom.

The girl who sat next to me was busy making an origami

hoping he would eventually work his way around to some sort of

to

between I

to

he spoke,

i

professor’s

university

.setting

makes

it

of a college ^

vir^tually

impossible to do your riadl^or

make

origami animals during a lesson.

mainly funded from September

to

May

by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DS.A. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be

liable for any damages arising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

out of errors in advertising

or

MS Word

tain

file would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration

(such as a photograph).


Page 5

— SPOKE, Jan.

18, 1999

Kitchener Transit Strike?

Students say attendance threatened

Francois Phaboriboun, firstyear materials management

Aarti

student.

student.

Sharma,

should

first-year

management

materials

get

more

public

the

involved so they can get support,

she said.

Conestoga College students board a Kitchener Transit bus outside Door 3 on Jan.

Ball

also

should

not

the

drivers

knowingly

disrupt

said

the passengers’ lives in order to

9.

pressure management.

“They are

By Jacqueline Smith

mess, they should look at the public’s perception.”

Students at Conestoga College

who depend on

Kitchener Transit

means of getting

and from school are deciding whether or not to buy a four-month bus pass as a

because the

Atsupe Numekevor, a secondyear accounting student.

go on

transit

to

drivers nSay

JoAnn

Woo(toall, transportation

30 students were an impromptu survey 7,

would

they

get

if there

to is

a

Most of

the students surveyed

said they are hesitating to spend

$169 for the four-month pass that

provides

access

throughout a semester.

buses

to

More than

95 per cent said they are worried that their attendance will be affected.

analyst

does not

Chad Hagan

said he

know how he would

get to school. “I’d be in a lot of

trouble,”

he

said,

adding that

Kitchener Transit should give the drivers

what they want so students

can get to school. “I

go on

drivers

missing

strike

college,”

will

I

be

Aarti

said

Sharma, a first-year materials

management student. Steve Wood, a paramedic student, said from a public relations stand point, the drivers

won’t gain any public support.

“Before

'

they

“They are their

Chad

Hagan, first-year mechanical engineering student.

get

in

biting the

would

describe

would

a

Kitchener

she

some

buses

strike,”

electrical

who can

drive

should

days

engineering

student,

me

affect

hope

I

to that,”

said Ball.

it

I

will stay

home.”

every

in

doesn’t

The

Photos by

come

Jacqueline Smith

drivers

while his dad will be able to give

him

a ride to and from school,

be able

may

strike

it

not

to get a ride every day.

“I don’t think the drivers

because the bus

xIIm

should

my

is

only

alternative,” first-year journalism

Luke

student

added

that

Jeffery

said.

He

he cannot afford to pay

taxi fare every day.

engineering

Answer

ISO knowledge

these

in the cafeteria (all

testing questions.

said

Place your completed entry

in

the

ISO boxes

campuses), the Sanctuary (Doon), the staff lunch rooms or mailrooms

campuses) by Monday, January

student,

25"'.

Be sure

to include

number.

Be

at

your “home” campus ISO celebration on January

28'" for the

draw

for prizes.

strike.

“I

won’t

come

do, because

I

I.

What

is

the origin ofthe term

“ISO”?

cannot afford taxi

said

fares,”

to school if they

second-year

the

2.

How many

elements are there

3.

Who

ISO Co-ordinator at Conestoga College?

4.

Which

5.

Name

in the

ISO 900

1

Standards?

student.

management

is

the

Phaboriboun,

Francois

student

doesn’t like the idea of a strike,

level

of ISO registration

is

Conestoga College pursuing?

especially in the winter. “I

do

drive, but

1

drive on the ice, so to

and

from

Phaboriboun

Jody

am 1

scared to

one benefit of ISO

registration.

take the bus

college

now,”

said.

Bishop,

an

Hint;

electrical

For answers, check your

ISO

Committee member

newsletter, ask a Steering

or read Spoke!

said he doesn’t think the drivers

hands that feed them.

We

Name:

Student

Campus:

Phone #

pay

wages.”

.

paramedic student Chris Ball

(all

your name, campus and phone

she

hopes the drivers won’t go on

the

said second-year

Kljiljana Ljajic. -“The other days

aspect so

engineering technician student, this

me

Ruben Guevra, a first-year computer program analyst, said

First-year materials

don’t have a car, so if the

how

their wages.”

have friends

should she miss classes because of

Dijana Barukcic, an electronics

First-year mechanical engineer-

ing student

she

that

will be difficult since he

transit strike.

program

said

the strike.

Jan.

is

catastrophe

“We pay

said.

“I

“The bus is my primary means of transportation, and a strike

back,”

adding

in his class to give

Paramedic student Chris Ball said

biting the hands that

feed them,” the paramedic student

a ride.

who

passes last semester.

and from college

student.

money

that

someone

sure he can

is

Transit strike.

should be refunded her tuition fee

how

computer

get

him

but

strike,

walk

Conestoga College students bought the four-month 441

asked in

first-year

“If the drivers decide to off the job, students

Numekevor,

On

Guevra,

Atsupe Numekevor was not aware there might be a strike when she bought her four-month pass.

planner with Kitchener Transit, said

Ruben

find

Second-year accounting student

already bought their passes should

strike.

should

o Employee

Other


— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 6

18,

1999

ISSUES & FEATURES Puppy Prozac

Medicating dogs newest trend By

Julie

van Donkersgoed

want

no longer a need to feel abandoning your dog the day to attend class. There

There

is

for

now

own “It

American

“Woody” does not

include

While

behaviour

and

.

society.

yet to be

mixed.

dependency and overprescription. Barb Kraler, a counsellor with

already have their own foods and cemeteries, ” she said. “I guess it

United

is

to

the

of the drug, others are

validity

IPs not new, but nine out of 10 people surveyed were not that

Ddon’s on-catr^us

on Mondays between

12:30 p,m. and 2:30 p.m. and on Thursdays between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. On Wednesdays

Wang

medical clinic offers the sarhe any other walk-in clinic. Services range from blood tests and flu shots to

if

physicals.

have a time available

services as

“Anydiing that a

we

basically

clinic does,

do,”

says the

clinic’s nurse Trish Weilen,

“I am surprised at the iaqk of awareness (about the clinic),” says Weiler, who has worked at

two

the clinic for

years.

Most

often students learn about

tite

and its services through word of mouth, she says. The clinic jtas two female

clinic

doctors

who

are available for

two hours on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Both doctors work at tether clinics in the region.

It’s

Dr. A. Mingiardi attends the clinic

5

Dr.

J.

is

works.

it

Dogs

Collins

not the season to be so jolly

increasing

status

“We seem than

our

Parker expressed concerns surrounding the dangers of using medication to treat depression

at

Parker.

more

children,”

“I think

“There’s

we

really

said

need

to

get our priorities back in order.”

something

comical about

in

quite

but there’s

this,

something quite frightening about he said. “I just can’t

this as well, ”

imagine using similar treatments as you would use on

on animals

people for purposes of alleviating depression.”

Parker pointed to the trend of medication to treat

using

behavioural

animal -

disorders

any

in

human or canine. new development

is

representative of our world,”

he

of animals in

to value animals

own

drug,

“This

said. “In our society, we have a tendency to medicate rather than seek out a long-term, more

effective treatment.”

appointments, but someone walks in and we will

The clinic, open to all Conestoga College students, is located near Door 3 in the health and safety office and is open Monday to Friday from

of the snowy beast. The pre-

stranded

the truth of this statement this past

and more.

Winter spread its icy cheer beyond Ontario, however. Four people were killed, in the American state of Virginia on the

week.

freakish

eternal life to

days

spring

of

4.

see tliem,” says Weiler.

ple of Waterloo Region have seen

annual Farmer’s Almanac

cancelled flights.

November were buried in as much as 40 centimetres of snow on Jan.

“We book

dicted a hard winter and the peo-

reality

anymore, for some people. Those

the

available

Although two runways were at Pearson Airport thousands of travellers were pain.

open

who wanted Christmas snow got it Those who wished

between 1:30 and 3:30 p.m.

we

if

By Wayne

on campus

By Jc^ette Everall

aware

“Maybe

at

a

new

Winter makes friends and enemies

^iif|ents unaware of clinic

services

faculty

Conestoga College, was -quick to concern over the

concept of a separation anxiety drug for dogs.

approved in Canada. Reaction to the drug

student

quick to mention dangers that mirror those experienced with Prozac use in humans, such as

in the

Clomicalm has

States,

open

express

defecation.

Although approved

are

services

social

Conestoga College, remains open to the

inappropriate

and

suffer from depression or separation anxiety. (Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

some

the other hand, as the

owner of a stressed-out dog that seems to suffer from separation anxiety, maybe I should keep an open mind on this.” Dick Parker, a member of the

Clomicalm tablets are to be used as part of a behavioural management program to alleviate separation anxiety symptoms in dogs. Some of those symptoms

Is the whole end up on Prozac

to

acknowledging side to the

both humans and dogs.

cope with things?” she

“On

said.

behavioural modification drug for

W'hile

humorous

sounds so crazy.

to help us

dogs.

urination

you

dog, a collie.

world going

Food and Drug Administration approved Clomicalm, a

destructive

far

as part of

of Clomicalm for her

potential

for your lonely pooch.

barking,

dog

Kraler went on to suggest the

a version of Prozac suitable

Earlier this week, the

to take the

your family.”

guilty about

is

depends on how

really

major

as

airlines

Not everyone, however, blunders about in wet shoes through snowbanks, shivering and searching vainly for city

icy Interstate 81. “I think Old Man Winter can just go away now,” one woman was

sidewalks.

Some

take to the hills

Southern and central Ontario were nailed by one of the worst

quoted as saying in The Record on

their

storms

30 years. Ontario’s snowplowing costs were reported

Jan. 4.

resorts like Chicopee.

in the millions of dollars.

made more enemies

spent

in

$5

which

million,

one-quarter of

its

Toronto is

annual budget.

Old this

Man

with wild abandon as they yahoo

Winter had already

in British

the slopes of ski

The mess of snow remaining at Conestoga College’s parking lots

than friends

year with the death of Michel

Trudeau

way down

is

Columbia.

clear evidence of the wild and

swiftly executed

power of

winter.

8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Students should bring their health card

Municipal

irate,

Que., recently mourned the four

only

and student card with them

defending the expenditures while facing criticism over slow

adults and five children killed in a

will clear as sure as spring will

New

come, and those who want forever

progress.

Blizzard conditions even delayed

summers

the funeral service four days

farmers, praying

punching

when visiting the clinic. Services clinic

available

include

at

tlie

treatment

of

tests,

bags

for

became

the

Seven souls were swept away

sexually transmitted diseases,

pregnancy

politicians

in

the storm’s aftermath. Shovelling

medical

was blamed

assessments, urgent care and

least three

injections.

for the deaths of at

people and ambulance

crews were sent to help 15 people who complained of chest or back

Residents of Kangiqsualujjuaq,

Eve

Year’s

Winter’s often

plans,

avalanche.

Cambridge

later.

however, are

treacherous

unpredictable.

Cleanup

ongoing and

when

will

pause

the skies clear.

They

will pray just as hard as

for

rain

in

a

drought.

and and proved

Meanwhile, winter

Kitchener residents

is

is

in

its

proper place and time, and those

who

warnings and notice are like using rubber knives against the harsh

cannot learn to love or

the season will learn

respect for

it

like

some new

by spring.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR HEALTH?

/EftVICC^ YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE We information first

&

-

aid

-

non-prcscription medications

VISIT

&

can provide:

advice

a place to rest when you arc

Colour Photocopying

ill

OUR OFFICE LOCATED

INSIDE

allergy injections

blood pressure monitoring

-

birth control counselling.

-

pregnancy testing

DOOR

#3,

DOON CAMPUS

Scanning These services are now available at the

DSA

Office.

Nominal Fee applies.


SPOKE, Jan.

18,

1999

— Page 7

Getting published is author’s goal

Graduate chronicles

hockey

local

By Rob Himburg

A

journalism

from

graduate

Conestoga College has written a

book and

attempting to get

is

it

published.

Gary

Wiebe,

50-year-old

a

divorced father of two, graduated

from Conestoga’s print journalism program in 1 994. Through his book he is trying to bring to light the events of local hockey from as early as 1893 telling tales by the and chronologically putting together

work

events in his

the

Hockey

entitled

in Berlin Ontario.

He has a prominent family background in local hockey, which extends back to his grandfather.

He

also has a distant relative

who

played for the National Hockey

League Stanley Cup Chicago Blackhawks It

champion in 1937'.

also evident, through the

is

numerous

items of Montreal Canadiens memorabilia around his

apartment, that this~

man

is

passionate about hockey.

The idea

book came from Wiebe wrote magazine writing class

Gary Wiebe, graduate of Conestoga College’s where he put the book together page by page.

print journalism

program and author

of

Hockey

in

Berlin Ontario, sits at his

computer

(Photo by Rob Himburg)

for the

a historical story that for his

while

enrolled

in

Conestoga’s

journalism program. While researching the story, he

which hockey players were encouraged to lay down their sticks and take up arms

saw an

article in

Germans during

against the First

the

World War. I

thought, ‘hockey’. Being

the fan

I

am,

led to

looked into

and

it

more research and then

it

the

$5 Gotta get a

message out? Why

spend $5 and

not

that item

Our

in

sell

SPOKE?

rates are reasonable

and we reach as many as 5,000 readers weekly. Classified

ads (up

to

words) can be run

25

by

students for only $5 ($10 for non-students) which will

means

it

cost you only 1/10 of a

cent to

tell

each reader about

the wonders of that old guitar.

Give us a

call at

748-5366.

(Cash up front; deadline a.m. Monday, one

is

10

week prior to

publication.)

Wiebe spent time

at the library

almost every day for two years researching the book. “I

was

getting to

know the

peo-

ple there on a first-name basis,” said Wiebe. “I

was obsessed with

this project.”

Unfortunately Wiebe has not

;

“And

I

was too

book.”

publishers

interested,

my

said that the market

Wiebe who

Wiebe said he is not in money, but he would

for the

it

1

my costs.”

5 cents a piece for

history of the whole district.

“There

is

some hockey

here,” he said. “This

is

history

a hockey

hotbed, always has been. People

recoup the cost of writing the

look at Montreal and Toronto, but

book, such as photocopying.

this area

money,” said Wiebe. “ to

make back

in

like

making

I’d just like

the 4,000 copies at

should not take a back

seat to them.”

But

Wiebe

money on this one. The best part of the book for Wiebe is that it gives him a title. “It’s good to know, that on my epitaph, it will say that I was an loses

Wiebe would consider writing another book on the hockey

to

“I’m not interested

found a publisher for the book.

“Nobody was

small,” said

cannot afford the $10,000 to print 1 ,000 copies. “It has really been frustrating,” he added.

author,” he said.

“Even though

now and one, lot

said

he

cannot

continue with another book

if

he

it’s

it

one

of people

written.”

I

have one book

may be more out

the

only

than

there

a

have


Page 8

— SPOKE, Jan.

18,

CKCO By Melissa

1999

general manager joins board was

Dietrich

being

forwarded

to

the

council of regents, the board that

The vice-president and general manager of Baton Broadcasting’s Kitchener

CKCO

television

station

has been appointed to the

16-member board of governors at Conestoga College. Dennis Watson became a member of the board in early October last year after learning of the position from Conestoga president John Tibbits. Watson said a call went out to people interested in serving on the board in September and he put forward his name. Tibbits called to notify him that the nomination

governs colleges.

About 30 days

he received a the mail that said he had later

college system since he graduated

experience.

from Seneca College

in

1972 with a degree

in

days of my acceptance, I received a large three-ring binder from the government that spells out all of the rules of operation and responsibilities,” he said. Watson said he believes his experience with community

Toronto in marketing

administration.

been accepted. Watson said his decision to join the board comes from his belief that people should give back to the community. “There is an old saying that the

“I am a fan and admirer of cornmunity colleges,” said the father of three who has been married for 26 years. Watson said he thinks Conestoga is an excellent college. It does a lot for the community and CKCO has

chain

its

employed

and I think by returning to the community and helping the community, we have a better community,” he said. Watson said he has always been

graduates.

letter in

is

weakest

interested

only as strong as link

in

the

community

Watson

of

its

said he isn’t sure

what

several

his responsibilities will be as he

begins his three-year term as a member of the board of governors, but it will be a learning

“Within

years, has

a

few

graduating

has worked with

a subcommittee on communications and marketing

chairing

for the college.

Watson

also serves on the of directors for the Kitchener- Waterloo Chamber of Commerce, the board of directors for the Better Business Bureau, the marketingadvisory committee for KitchenerWaterloo Oktoberfesf and the marketing-advisory for the Kitchener-Waterloo Community

interesting perspective to the table

board

he

said.

After attending two meetings so Watson said he found it

.

far,

comment on what

the

board of governors’ focus will be for 1999.

Watson,

who

current job at

has been in his

CKCO

for 3

Group

of Canada, Power Broadcasting Inc. and in his own consulting firm, Watson, Weis and Associates Inc. of Toronto. Besides being a member of the board of governors for Conestoga, Watson is also

“Having graduated from a community college, taught at a community college and hired graduates from a community college, I think I can add an

difficult to

CHUM

Television, the Television Bureau

colleges will add to the board.

to help plan for the future,”

had several jobs since 25 years ago. He

Foundation.

1/2

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: GRIEF You

can’t stop crying,

numb. All of these

you

feel angry,

you

feel

feelings are normal reactions to

loss in our lives a reaction we call grief. Grief does not only have to be a result of losing a loved

we grieve any kind of loss: the breakup of a relationship, the loss of good health one to death;

or even the loss of a dream to reach a certain goal. Although these feelings are natural, it sometimes helps to talk them over with a counsellor as part of the healing process. Writing your thoughts in a

Dennis Watson, vice-president and general manager of Baton Broadcasting’s Kitchener CKCO, has been named to Conestoga’s board of directors.

friends can also help.

television station

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

permission to grieve. only

come

If you

Higher Maries with

books about

journal, reading

Uss Study Ttme!

out

have a

later,

grief,

and talking

to

Most of all, give yourself Feelings left bottled up will

delaying the healing process.

Mend who

is

grieving, don’t

wony

about saying the wrong thing to them. Just be there, be a good listener or remind them how much

you care with a

card, a

hug or some time

together.

Submitted by: Student Services

Upcoming Intramural Games Focus

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Tuesday January 19 4:00 pm Blades vs. Killer Bees 4:50 pm 6.50 Pitchers vs. Crazy Canucks 5:30 pm Enforcers vs. B.B.B

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-


STUDENT

SPOKE, Jan.

LIFE

18 1999

— Page 9

New co-ordinator for early childhood education program

Better training, education standards By Janet Wakutz

Armitage teaches two courses

new

Conestoga’s

early

she said.

said Hamilton-Armitage,

delivery course.

Another area of interest, said Hamilton-Armitage, is the

taught at the College in the

program since 1989.

She

training of people to

facilitator

childcare

hopes

Settings

improve the quality of education for people entering her

course offered to students for the

field.

first

want

“I

develop policies and

to

to

ensure

fairly

students

are

treated

is

an independent study

time this semester.

for the

go

students,”

into

ECE.

She volunteers as chair of the Canadian Childcare Federation, an

Students

study on their own and meet with Hamilton-Armitage for a weekly, one-hour tutorial.

the

quality of

ECE

for

the

programs,”

who

has

ECE is

a

federation and has been involved

college in Alberta.

In her current role she doesn’t

have contact with children.

ECE

issues.

“I

“We’ve developed a

facilitated

who

children attending the

Hamilton-Armitage has always

want

to

program

devc

to

p policies anci procedures for the

ensure students are treated

of the college.

ECE program

responsible for supervising nine

placements,

in

providing

academic leadership, reviewing and updating curriculum, faculty

cost-effective

maimer. In addition to her co-ordinator responsibilities,

has

not

yet

taken

which would

daughters started her career at nursery schools in Guelph. She

maintaining the quality of the a

Conestoga

programs.

The married mother of two

placements while

in

ECE

require an impartial facilitator.

student support, admissions and

program

promoting self-studies in other

college

part in the program,

meetings, attending committees,

field

fairly

and

Birdena Hamilton-Armitage

Appointed co-ordinator at the beginning of this semester, she is

overall

daycare

facility.

professionally.”

says another one of her goals is to enhance the working relationship of their program with other areas

student

The

students provide care for the

organization involved in national

ECE training

and professionally,” said

Birdena Hamilton-Armitage,

self-study for colleges to enhance

self-discipline

Observing and Recording in Early Childhood

procedures for the program to try

and

equaling nine hours per week, including a brand new alternative

childhood education (ECE) program co-ordinator says she to

“It will take self-motivation

mandated

Birdena Hamilton-Armitage has settled into her position as the new ECE program co-ordinator.

Hamilton

new

office

and

(Photo by Janet Wakutz)

enjoyed teaching and children.

what led me to go ECE and that’s what keeps me

“I think that’s into

here.”

She said she enjoys seeing students

excited about learning

and they usually are year

when

beginning.

government

their education

in

both Manitoba and

gratified

at this

She

when

said

students

collective representation

loumahstn

pwgram

of

tlie

and

diem about the wail. Not e\eiyone lias been cooperative though, rhe wall has been vandalized. “People arc

everyone is represented equally. he journaliMii department Tlicre are no name.s on the created a photo wall to pictures either on the front or taking photos just to dcstioy the showcase the work of students back, and all the pictures are tiie wall not because they like the in the program. he photo wall, same size. pictutes,” said (leimmgs started in the summer by Getmings found people were Photos submitted for the wall ~ journalism student Jason really^ co-operative in his ^\ me reprmts and are hot returned Gemungs is a collage of black -^’^experience looking after the to the photographer. and white 8X10 photos located wall. When approachetl dn ati * Submissions to the. wall can be on the wall 4BI5 and 4B16. individual basis to display their dropp^ off for Wakutz in the, ^ The wall features pictures work, students were responsive, Spoke newarbom, 4B15. “ ranging from accidents to said Germing, Pictures, to be displayed, should * portraits and artistic Tliis semester Janet Wakutz, be 8X10 black and whites that experimenting fourth-semester joumaUsra, is are of publishable quality" and “A lot of people are really currently in charge of the wall, content. Since the wall is a qmet but have amazing work,” she intends to address first- and reflection of the journalism said Gennings, who is how on second-semester photography program, only journalism work term at the Cambridge students to generate more students are allowed to submit Reporter. The wall is a interest for the wall and inform photos. I

1

Join

Conestoga College

celebration to officially

a launch in

the college's journey to

ISO

certification.

The fun begins at lunchtime in each of the cafeterias at Doon, Guelph and Waterloo. Join us for:

^ ISO information ^ Music ^ Refreshments ^ Trivia Contest ^ Prizes

Watch for more details! Brett Blckerton, second-year

computer programmer analyst, looks

at the photo wall. (Photo by Sarah Thomson)

ISO Trivia Contest in today 's Spoke or in the ISO Newsletter.

Also, look for the

she

is is

further

and come back to

share their successes.

A photo forum for Conestoga studerits By Sarah Thomson

time of

new semester

a

has been involved in the childcare policy divisions of the provincial

Ontario aad taught community

co-ordinator


Pago 10

— SPOKE, Jan.

18,

1999

SPORTS

Condors’ basketball By Brian Smiley

back

is

However, he would

like to see

Although

it

might have seemed

Condor’s varsity team had

like the

joined the professionals on

any truth

to

strike,

those rumours are

The Conestoga College men’s team was just on a long

team

The Condor’s last game was Nov. 24. They don’t play again until

next year.

Jan. 30.

of things.

athletics

half of the

first

manager of

and recreation, said the

team has been quite successful, winning more games than they’ve lost.

The games they have

lost

have

been by the narrowest of margins. “They’ve done very well,” he said.

“They’ve played some of our

OCAA

league basketball colleges

and have beaten those teams more than they had lost.” While the play of the team has

happy team receiving from Terry Upshaw,

impressed James, he

with

the

Ian James, manager of athletics and recreation, praises the Condor men’s basketball team for their excellent play on the

is

court.

of Guelph.

Think about the kids' players Baseball, football,

same

hold

literally

Then

The

up

the

needed

been said and done, went on.

ensure that the players aren't taking sterends

has been ignoring one corinnon ail their strikes

and

lockouts: the fan.

of

the

involved

in

dealings

seem

participants

to care that Joe

and Jane Fan have they can

boardroom

the

to explain, if

understand

selves, to their kids

it

them-

why

these

games aren’t being played. These professional big-wigs don’t get

never It

And

it!

they probably

going to matter

isn’t

when

who

the next

round of collective bargaining

comes along

any of the major

in

leagues

the

sports.

If

treating

their

the

Or maybe tlial

children,

fans,

keep

especially

second-class

as

come a time have no money to

to teach all tho.se

greedy players

a lesson about

who

lose

interest

which

argue over.

as

they’ll find

knows

why

players

exT)laining to children

owners were still cheque for a $465

national

is

as

a

basketball to

be

fundraising

progressing well. Coach

is

Upshaw

and the team are raising money through the sale of Nevada tickets and by working at bingos. Secondly,

all

basketball athletes

full-time

students,

but

members of the team Other members of the team

good

students to colleges and that the

community

partially funded.

said

that the sport itself recruits

the

is

college

program

in

being served has

which

when

basketball

a

local kids can

participate. “It helps recruit students to the

college,” lot

James

said.

“We

have a

of really

players

good basketball coming out of high

only half the

schools in the Tri-City area, and

are.

they’re going to all these other col-

are part-time students

ing

to

gain

who

are

entrance

because

tiy'-

leges

into

basketball.”

we

don’t

The Condor’s next home game 4 p.m. on Jan. 30 against Redeemer College at the

Conestoga.

the

“By about the end of February I will know who the athletes who

tips off at

are trying to enrol in Conestoga

recreation centre. Tickets are $1

the University

College are, so

we can have an

for students

and $2 for

others.

CATCHING A SNOWBOARDING GROOVE i.

'ti

another hobby.

what players and management don’t understand. is

Sure,

spending and salaries

have ballooned out of control, but the

children

who

these sports can’t be

follow

blamed and

television

The only ones to

money hungry to out-earn

When

try

players,

who

try

each other.

the final act plays itself

stadiums watching the games or

buying answer.

them understand why good

who

out and there arc no fans at the

game wasn’t

the owners were in such a

blame are the

outspend each other, and the

will

seen on television,

to

purse-wielding owners,

tlie

merchandise, there

be only one question

left to

Will the owners and players realize the fans aren’t tliereV

have

also

as

This

contract, even though a single

will help

all,

catching a cold,

sport’s economic.s. to a kid

needed a minimum salary of almost $300,000. Most young children can’t even comprehend $5,

million

of

said.

also quick to point out

something,

in

as everyone

They

collecting a

He was

over into adulthood. If children

about

NBA

each other, James

The youtli of this generation is consumer of the future. More than likely, the interests that a youth picks up w'ill carry

much

Maybe

true

the

don’t understand

that

a

actually

when

basketball

is

it

runs the show in “their family.”

shouldn’t be punished.

Try explaining

that

championship format, where most of the top basketball players in the

and

citizens, there will they’ll

means

understand

they’ll

in

province are able to play against

program, the team needs

must be

participate

the owners were just trying

common

will.

gets the best deal

the

schools

basketball. This high percentage

using marijuana.

Professional sports

None

men’s

year,

That decision hinges on a couple

James

Currently about 90 per cent of

to be. locked out

so that the owners could

element in

this

looking forward to joining

First

around,” James said.

again, ti^ telling

has

all

at

OCAA

the

a

to

rolls

the youth that the players

tfie

result.

games, after

an instructor

is

not

is

need

season.

work

stoppages with

is

coaching

an the

we’ll

by the time September

OCAA

squhd

league

how much money

bargaining position to

and now basketball have all

hockey

experienced

member of

layoff from scheduled games.

Ian James,

of

part

college environment.” this

equally competitive team and also

raise

like to see

maybe

basketball

Recapping the

community.

would sooner

basketball

season,

photo)

“I

assistant,

While

false.

(File

the college’s

an

from within

assistant step foiward

Paul Britman, a graphics design student, flys over a ramp Jan 10 Rodeway Suites residents have been taking full advantage of the snow*covered hill across the street for activiiies like sledding and snowboarding. pnoto by Elizabeth sackndef


SPOKE, Jan.

SPORTS

1999

11,

— Page 11

Surrendering the top

Loss lands Condors

second

in

By Jeanette

Everall

the scoring action with her first

goal

Unable

hold onto

to

Condors

the

first place,

women’s

indoor

midway through the first half later, teammate

Three minutes

Kerri Walker followed suit with

soccer team surrendered the top

another goal.

Alumni in an emotionally charged game on Jan. 5. Aluirmi

Alumni ’s third goal was scored by Amy Olson when Condors’

spot to

defeated the Condors 4-1, but the

seemed more preoccupied

fans

with shouting their displeasure

at

the referee than the final score. “I

the

felt

bizarre,”

said

was

refereeing

Condors’

coach

Geoff Johnstone. “There were so calls that went one way.” Alumni coach Marlene Ford said it looked one-sided, but

many

it

was

the

way Alumni was

“Alumni jockeyed for the and used less body contact,”

playing. ball

she said.

goalkeeper Stephanie

made it

open for Olson’s

shot.

Angela Papazotos scored the Condors’ lone goal

second

by

half,

Amy

late

in

YeowelTs second goal of

Missing three of their best goal scorers,

work

Condors had their them in Tuesday’s

the

cut out for

game.

was

“It

a

tough game,” said

“We

didn’t play great,

and aggressive, the Alumni team dominated the first half of the game, keeping the

team’s performance.”

action

against the Nights on Jan. 19 at 7

in

Alumni ’s

the

Condors’

Amy Yeowell

end.

started off

but

I

wasn’t displeased with the

The Condors next game

will

p.m.

Contact SPOKE with your story ideas Phone: 748-5366 Fax; 748-5971

Alumni goalkeeper Marlene Ford makes a save

The Condors

lost the

game

after

Condor Angela Papazotos takes a shot on

4-1

net.

E-mail: spoke

@ conestogac. on. ca

(Photo by Jeanette Everall)

.

Are you between the ages of 17 and 50 and in good health? Are you eligible to give blood? If

how about

so,

trying to

save someone’s

Ilfs'?

This is not your regular blood donor clinic. Canadian Blood Services and the Recreation and Leisure Services Department would like to invite you to join /

The Unrelated Bone Marrow Donor Registry Information sessions

first

be held on

Tuesday, January 19.

^ The

will

session

will

the back of

be held in the boardroom the Sanctuary from will

be held

in

"

-

ttie

pSA office.

to lA.

tiA^olKcies-

room 2A56

from 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Please sign up outside room 1C17, 1C23, or

d

at

12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

The second session

the.

only to be countered

the night.

Johnstone.

Strong

Den Haan

a play out of the net, leaving

Monday, February 8 bus departs at 7:30 pm

in

Sign up today at the

DSA Office

be


— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 12

8 18,

1999

Condors gain lieiAi

di^fpnrlpr

l^merrs team With the addition of

^By Charles Kuepfer

C'allaghan, the

Try-outs

beginning for

signified of'

the

the winter semester

men's varstty indoor

the

had any problems scoring.

“We

soccer team, as they sought to

some

address

defensive

experienced defender

who

w'as

was

team,

the

Ibhnstonc ('allaghan’s

“We

out of their

He

noted that keeper

.Fohnson has struggled.

Bill

"He

couldn't get his head into

being indoors

at first,"

Johnstone

muis

Ihe

V

mdooi

irsii\

soccer team’s season consists of

ha’ c some problems defeme effectively," >..ud

Johnstone

Johnstone.

confident that presence will make

b,ill

net that has coneornetl

is

adifference

playing

own

only addition

made. But coach Geoff

nets w-ith balls,” said

ke-eping the

It’s

ineligible for the outdoor soccer

fill

Johnstone.

problems.

John Callaghan, an

team gains some

much needed depth in the back field. Up front, the team hasn’t

“Adding Callauhan

should help that,”

a

senes of tournaments

followed

b\

.1

1

hey are

iegiori.il

ciialifying tourn.imenl at (leorge

Brown

oJIege in .March.

Condor John Callaghan,

Although there are 14 teams

at the recreation centre.

(

left,

battles for the ball with

an unidentified Europe Stars’ player on Jan 7 (p^oto by Lindsay Gibson)

that qualify, Johastone said' his

team

is

\cr>

clcari>

a medal

Conestoga lineup shuffle aids

candidate

"J don't ^ee any reason whaie\er that the> shouldn't

By Lindsay Gibson The Condors

tournament action

in

They say you

Kingston

try telling

team Europa

to lead his

Stars.

At halftime, the 2-1. The

Stars

leading

were

Condors,

quick save.

the outdoor team he

moved

the second half.

well and

to

forward

Thursday,

and he scored three of the

It’s too bad though, that no one was there to see it. The pathetically small crowd was less than enthusiastic about

little

cheering

wiii

The energy coming from the Condor bench, on the other hand, was high and a lot of screaming was heard, especially from coach Geoff Johnstone, who said he

‘99

open Monday, January

1

the election of the following positions:

,

The

Condor team played worked together, even though several players were moved around because of the entire

shortage of players.

Zack Lakoseejak was a key mover,

using

fancy

his

and the defence worked hard, keeping the ball away from the

believes in screaming instruction

Condor net. The ball spent a large percentage of time at the Europa end as the Condors fought hard against the

to his players not abuse.

Stars players.

Johnstone said he was pleased

The Condors were vocal with

with the team’s performance as

one another throughout the game

they

were short five players,

including three off on suspension.

One was

out

another couldn’t

was

for

X-rays

make

and

making

the

team appear cohesive.

Netting goals for the Stars were Ritchie

Antolic

and

Anthony

Perie.

it.

he

said,

Condors’ men’s indoor soccer

“and we may consider moving Shawn to forward permanently

action can be seen every Thursday

“I

President

Callaghan

footwork to move the ball aroimd,

and encouragement.

DSA Elections

John

while Condors goalie Bill Johnson had an amazing game in net, taking one ball in the face for a

however, really pulled together and moved the ball around scoring three goals in

the game, offering

for

Conesotga’s

scored a single for the Condors

Conestoga’s Samuels, who plays defeiice on the men’s indoor soccer Division 1 team, was

tq.'tfee

team is composed of play^ whd^

Jan. 7,

Nominations

after his performance.”

ottrrenl

Johnstone. (Photo by Charles Kuepher)

can’t teach an old

dog new tricks, but Shawn Samuels that. |

Condors coach Geoff

Condor goals

to a 4-2 victory over the

Johnstone said only a couple of

gpys cpie

four

will see their first

win

in

really pleased,”

night at the recreation centre.

Vice President of Operations Vice President of Student

Affairs

SPOKE welcomes

Vice President of Education

your

comments. If

you have any story ideas or

suggestions please contact us.

Nomination forms and job descriptions

be

available Monday, January

Thursday, January 27 at the

DSA

1

8

will

until

Office.

nOM %/s

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca


SPOKE, Jan.

ENTERTAINMENT

Now on home

18,

1999

— Page 13

video

Out of Sight worth a second look By Ken Groulx

G

iven the cool critical and commercial reception of George Clooney’s forays

major motion pictures {The Peacemaker, One Fine Day), it into

appears his film career

is

at

a

perplexing crossroads.

His

role

on

ER

mega-hunk

status,

actor has been unable

yet the to

parlay

number

TV

one

deserves a second

receptive Lopez, prompting

home

video if you passed

ask,

it

over this summer.

Out of Sight

show

into

box-office clout.

revisits

that “the idea like

a

a similar

subdued humour

on home video

passed

it

if

Even

who

Steven

through her wallet to determine

explored similar erotically

which photo could possibly be her

and

character

driven

boyfriend.

Interludes

and

action

versatile

Don Cheadle {Boogie

Nights),

crashes

genre.

robbery.

Soderbergh’s is

vibrant

with Sight,

Out

of Sight

in

Tarantino’s

tedious

disappointing

latest

vehicle,

Out

indicate film audiences

Leonard’s

(Internet photo)

the

Florida

prison,

Foley

begins

terrific

from a

have

film revolves around perpetual

plotting a

Wallstreet stockbroker he served

of

Sight,

schemer

still

aren’t

robber

and Jack

lifelong Foley,

bank

stoically

diamond

heist

time with.

portrayed

intriguingly subtle performance.

increasingly attracted to a female

of Sight

Following a botched robbery attempt that lands him in a

federal marshall (Jeimifer Lopez)

action,

is

a delectable cocktail of

romance

and

subdued

and

GOT ANY ENTERTAINMENT STORY IDEAS? CONTACT BRENT CLOUTHIER AT SPOKE 748-5366

OR E-MAIL: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca

LAST

CHANCE

Things

Ving Rhames (Rosewood) kidnapped during his

jailbreak.

Locked

ready to embrace Clooney in anything other than his blood-stained robe in ER, but Out

by a newly grayed grizzled Clooney in an

is

within his

from Michael Keaton as Lopez’s FBI boyfriend and Samuel L. Jackson as a convict enhance the strong ensemble cast. Alas, Out of Sight is too light to match the best films of its genre, but the movie is seasoned with wit and noir into the sort of dizzyingly

become

complicated,

however, as Foley finds himself

he and his partner, played by the

in the trunk

of a getaway

car following Foley’s breakout, the

intricate

two immediately bond bedroom scene.

should stand up and take more

The chemistry

is

in a quasi-

notice

evident

storytelling

Holl5rwood

of

as

Clooney spoons and strokes the

1

2345

Comedy Dinner

Show

Rick eronson 1 Sign

i

Tuesday, January 19 The Sanctuary

i

up today at the DSA Office.

Ticket Information available

at the sO"

the

part-time

recent

novels,

why

element and uncredited cameos

Jackie Brown.

inhabit

curious

Director Soderbergh

is

Typical of the characters that the

it’s

ence.

rapid-fire dialogue sorely lacking

effort,

diamond

film didn’t attract a larger audi-

Pulp Fiction crackle with such originality.

his

Given the body of talent involved

sparked by the same

peppered with the sort of quippy,

While

get

without parking too long in either

of editing, non-linear narrative and flashbacks that made

box-office returns of Clooney’s

things

aside,

bloody for Clooney as another vicious con, played by the

deft use

summer.

Foley, while he roots

Soderbergh,

While

over this

after she escapes, she finds

romp with

Director

direction

you

guys

to the deck.

that

deserves a second look

after

me,” belies

herself fantasizing about a bathtub

matter and treads evenly between

romance and

action,

to

a smouldering sexual trump card

romance

delectable cocktail of

of going

you appeals

real undercurrent of sexual nuance between them when she is later commissioned to track him down.

glossy, violent formula but injects

charged

of Sight is

him to

different

the

themes in Sex, Lies and Videotape, understands Leonard’s subject

Out

“Under

circumstances, do you think me and you...?” Her sarcastic reply

Adapted from the novel by Elmore Leonard and produced by the same team who worked with director Quentin Tarantino on Pulp Fiction, (Danny DeVito,

of his

success

the

that

look on

Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher),

television’s

has catapulted him from relative obscurity to

humour

DSA

Office.


Page 14

— SPOKE, Jan.

18,

1999

ENTERTAINMENT Movie Review

Awakenings with a Patch By Brent Clouthier

Rather,

doctor

a

someone with Patch Adams, Williams,

is

a

man

with a

gift

to

title

in

school

the

The

role of “Patch”

Adams, once again

doctors

shouldn’t

untouchable people

may

plot

to

skimpy

be

and

formulaic

and

the

characters

a

heavy,

some

of too

little

the medical dean and

(i.e.

Adams’ egomaniacal roommate),

proves his worth as a

but the film

dramatic actor,

for

very rewarding

is

who

audiences

don’t

rely

on car chases and explosions

well-deserving of last year’s

Academy award

Adams

who

eventually

dole out

compassionless treatments.

and graduates and

After

trials

opens

his

much

that

of

the

in

title

“Patch” Adams, once

of

proves

again

so

is

dramatic

worth

his

as

a

portraying

the

comedic

talent

in

is

sizeable

his

flex

to

his

usual,

off-the-wall manner.

His demeanour

however,

time around,

more

touch

restrained, although the ads

promote

film

the

audiences

want

used

its

is

it

for

as

a

gag-a-minute laughfest. There are

to

to full

potential.

moments come with only smile

the

Adams

of

soul

style

of

picture

only goal in

man

a

life

their

He leaves the why anybody

mind

right

whose

to ease the

is

suffering of others.

in

would

despise him.

Patch

a

subtle

As with of

is,

at

times,

a

elicits tears,

his wonderful portrayal

Dr.

Oliver Sacks in Awakenings, Williams manages to

instill

humanity with are

Adams

He

a simple

expression

not just with words or glances, but with his entire character.

through plain honesty, painting a

or

frpm Williams.

unabashed

Williams’

audience wondering

this

a

is

embrace,

bares

offbeat

behaviour of Adams, Williams

allowed

characters

well-deserving

actor,

of last year’s Academy award. In

(Internet photo)

people involved.

Robin Williams, role

i^not

it

story

the

with

also

that

in

interest but the

own

free clinic.

very similar

is

Awakenings,

Williams,

be god-like,

that

Adams

Patch to

many tribulations, Adams

belief

his

services

their

the hospital.

runs afoul of the medical dean to

offered

for entertainment.

medical

relatively late in his life,

due

new

a

and over 1,000 doctors

Institute

Robin Williams,

constructing

is

medical centre, the Gesundheit

have

life fulfillment.

Entering

Adams

be

quiet,

comfort the sick through laughter

and

should

and a smile.

Robin

starring

one of those

unassuming movies that leaves you feeling like you’ve discovered You didn’t realty a small gem. know it was there, but you’re quite happy you found it. Patch Adams is based on the true story of Hunter “Patch”

Adams,

a heart

comedy

of

in

the

still

a

Adams

a

fragile

that reassures audiences

thought

that

few human beings

there left in

the medical profession.

very sad and tragic film, 'but most of the film’s touching, tender

1

2345

few fun moments in the film with Williams at his maniacal a

best, but

it is

in the film’s quieter

moments, however,

that Williams

really shines.

His imcanny talent of creating (Internet photo)

m

warm,

slightly

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622-7774 823-5341


SPOKE, Jan.

ENTERTAINMENT

1999

18,

— Page 15

CD review

Faculty soundtrack gets the grade By

Eileen Diniz

‘The soundtrack rounds out with several

original

Columbia

Records/ Sony has put together a

Records

tunes by

some

of the hottest artists in alternative

fantastic soundtrack for the

new

Dimension thriller, The

sci-fi

teen

music

fright

film

take on Alice Cooper’s School’s

Sheryl

presents youth-gone-wild heroes

and Creeds’ rendition of Alice Cooper’s I’m Eighteen. The soimdtrack rounds out with

Garbage,

This

Films

late-season

and alien instructors who have something more lethal in mind than detention. year,

last

is

Out,

several original tunes

The soundtrack, released 22

today.”

Faculty.

Dec. compiled using

some of today’s biggest acts and some up-and-coming hard-hitting

the hottest artists

in

It seems the dozen acts on the album were just itching to record some cool, teen-angst tunes, either

the Offspring,

Generation.

Overall the Faculty soundtrack definitely a

Tracks include Stay Young by all

by by

Stabbing Westward, It’s Over Now by Neve and Helpless by D

alternative

music today. Oasis, the Kids Aren’t

groups.

by some of

Medication Haunting Me

Crow,

is

winner and gets the

grade.

Right by

Resuscitation by

1

2345

an original or a classic rock cover^

The most

cut

striking

It'S

both

is

of Another Brick in the Wall, by Class of ‘99, an alt-rock

ReflUj) ifKtthot

parts

M

out....

pWi]ftt]eF«St'

Doon Student Assoclol

super-group fronted by Alice in Chains’ Layne Staley.

The Rage

rest

of the band includes

Machine

Against

the

Tom

Morello,

guitarist

Janes Addiction

former

drummer Stephen

SRcifilfg

and Porno for Pyros’ Martyn Le Noble on bass. Perkins

Wed. Feb. 3

Their version of Another Brick in the Wall, is even darker and moodier than the original by

The underpinning makes Pink

Floyd.

WC

6:30 Recreation Centre

industrial

the already

more

timeless tune sound a bit

WINTER CAMP OUT

pm - 7:30 pm

THUR/DAY, FEBRUARY 4 1999

‘90s.

,

The recording of The Wall marks the first time Pink Floyd has sanctioned a remake of their song for a

motion

Sign

also features other

interpretations of adolescent

rock and

roll

anthems including,

Shawn Mullins’ cover of David

up at the DSA

Office.

asked to collect All proceeds will be donated to R.O.O.F. Reaching our Outdoor Friends. All

picture.

The Faculty

new

y

Free Admissfen

participants are

pledges

for

the event.

Doon Student

Bowie’s Changes, Soul Asylum’s

^ K4

Canadian Institute

Leading The

OF Management GRAND VALLEY BRANCH

8% alc./vol

Way For Over 50 Years

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN

clear bottles

MANAGEMENT

Learn about the

Association

CIM program

in

1

2 packs

the Conestoga College

Continuing Education Catalogue

NEW^at

or

Contact: Mr. Jay Moszynski in

room 1B49

@ Doon Campus

1-519-748-5220 ext 492 or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE

of

MANAGEMENT

National Office

1-800-387-5774 e-mail: office@cim.ca Internet: http://www.cim.ca

WARNING CONSUME

IN

MODERATION. THIS BEER

8% ALC. VOL. WHICH

IS

IS

NEARLY TWICE AS

MUCH ALCOHOL AS REGULAR

BEERS.


Page 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Jan.

18,

1999

du Maurier

Arts

Supporting 215 cultural organizations across Canada during the 1998-99 season


Digital Edition - January 18, 1999