Page 1

Lineups

expected

OSAP

for

receivers By Brent Clouthier As

students begin receiving the

second instalment of their Ontario Student Assistance Program

(OSAP) loans this week, Carol Walsh of Conestoga College’s department has a

financial-aid

m

few words of advice.

“Be

ready

lineups.

for

Especially the first day.”

Gerry Cleaves, centre, Doon Student Association vice-president of student Feud. Four teams participated in the Christmas game last month.

hosts the Family

affairs,

(photo by Melaoie Spencar)

Walsh also suggested that if want to avoid the

students

lineups, they should arrive early.

.can wait and don’t your money straightaway, by

Wednesday

the

lineups

should

have died down. “We’ll be issuing the loans in

Room of the registrar’s between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30

By Dee Bettencourt

the Guild office

first week of January,” Walsh continued. “After that, we’ll be back to our regular hours

p.m. the

up loan

eligible to pick

need

returning

students

that

shows

their SIN.

“No

Conestoga

at

length and will be

renamed

are

compressed-program

the

to

guidelines.

“It’s

said Dietz.

going to take a

little

over

grandfather

the

a

compressed program

year

to

out.”

exceptions,” Walsh

said.

off,

accept journalism students only

our

not

We’re

rule.

We

have to follow

the policies and procedures.”

in

program

the

September and they

look

recruitment.”

have

There will be benefits and drawbacks with respect to the

(»•

Training

co-ordinator.

Walsh explained the amount of second-semester tuition owing will be written on the loan document and the bank will forward the amount to the

a review of journalism programs

college.

“Sometimes the bank makes warned.

she

“For

example, you’re picking up a loan for $3,000 and you owe $900 second-semester tuition;

$3,000 goes into your account,

means

the

didn’t

send your

bottom it,

it’s

decided

line is that

tuition.

you

still

your responsibility.

‘It’s

in

mine,

no

one

print

and journalism-broadcast

so to

.

.

.

are

we were given become a

and said

Page 2

option

three-year

offers

two-year

journalism-print

three-year

option

and

the will

incorporate journal sm-broadcast i

into

its

print curriculum.

“We’ll have a January intake, but there will

be no

1999

May

compressed or accelerated programs as they into the

starts

an for

compressed

program)

that

it

the (the will

introduction

the

to

which time

Journalism

here.

has

always been an anomaly because runs

all

year round.

from semester

to

changes

It

semester and

nobody knows what semester they’re taking

— few understand

this

the program’s design,” she said.

to meet ministry outcomes for a three-year print and journalismbroadcast program, Conestoga

very demanding to operate a program without (summer) shutdown time to make upgrades and Repairs to facilities. Now

January,

The college has chosen

be

it

Dietz said journalism currently

journalism-broadcast,

become

for

college, will

around

(Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

broadcast program or

program,” said Dietz.

The owe

Sharon Dietz

only print, the

program’s journalism’s

operate like every other program

journalism-print and journalism-

1999 intake

OSAP

We

said

“The major benefit

has

three-year

it

anything.’”

See

that

it

journalism programs must be

a

Don’t

the sand

and

six-semester

design,

completed

if

bank messed up and

put your head say,

province

the

programs.

mistakes,”

for

in

separately

it

of people don’t know that program exists. It would increase a lot

present their registration form.

has just

it

what degree That would

is

at.

allow us to advertise

new

students will also need to

post-diploma

our post-diploma program

summers off. “The Ministry of Education and

New

looking at

are

a

program, which would place

will

will

We it

students

course by not offering summers

and

making

calendar which

Sharon Dietz confirmed on Dec. 14 that instead of intakes three

stronger

a

as well, to meet ministry

it,

into

co-ordinator

be

will

design and not be affected by

broadcast.

“That’s a ministry requirement

“There

journalism-broadcast component

these changes at

all,

some changes,

experience

said Dietz.

enrolled will finish their program

On

journalism-print and journalism-

Journalism-print

currently

times a year and compressing the

accountable.

resolutions?

program

print

to present their student card,

their social-insurance card or a

government document

Page 8

the

in

journalist Tony Reinhart

heads for Hollywood

1999.

current five-semester journalism-

afternoon.”

To be

Broadcasting student

Starting September

-

College will become three years

documents,

also

who

Students

of 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., every

On The Record with Page5

are now.”

first

but

learning

“It’s

will offer additional journalism-

we’ll

broadcast courses in September.

other

The

university-stream journal-

ism students, or the accelerated program of three semesters, may

in tandem with programs and facilitate

operate

better operation of the program.”

See Journalism

.

.

.

Page 8


— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 2

19^9

4,

Warm weather

hurting grass, trees

When you

most people that the first 11 months of this year have been warmer than the norm, most would Little

has

tell

you

tell

to

enjoy

it.

is

The weather some benefit

has, however,

Polar Plunge could be cancelled

evident by the grass on

It’s

the

Boulevard from parking If the

water level in the pond

outside

of the cafeteria keeps

poor and the field

itself

very

Normally, the grass could handle the

wear and

tear of a sports team,

through

time

A

and lower (during the summer)

Gerry

having

president of student affairs for the

Doon Student

that there has yet to

is

The

snowfall.

Association.

key

bad

this

“As soon

with

temperature increase .in

amount of

the

is

this

on the campus in shambles. “The fields, sports fields in particular, have been affected the most.” said head of physical resources Barry Milner. “We’re looking

work

the

spring

such

as

admits the college, which

numerous trees every year, has also had some other adverse

he

...

v,

have

a

He

“If

’weather.

plunge.

a

simple.”

v kite?

It"s

if

there

is

and record were recorded.

a cold

b.

,

it’s

is

trees

we

is

According

dying. The' pond

thinky.

“we of them

to nurture a lot

by watering them, which we would not normally do.” Not only does this cost the college

extra

money through

,

,

Environment

to

the largest

and heaviest snowfalls

in a while,

but so far none of

it

“I

water expenses, but staff

it

costs

them

hours through an increased

workload. It

has also brought up concern

regarding the annual Polar Bear

Plunge held by the

Doon

Student

Association, as the level of water in the

pond has receded.

“The pond

is

not

water

.runoff

that

spring-

a

fed one,” said Milner.

“It’s fills

and because of the lack of

.

.

.

all it

rain.

would love

type

has

fallen.

planted,” Milner continued,

have had

cost $20.43 for the

Canada^ this winter, whenever it hits, is supposed tp unleash one of

alko a concent for

is

it

5 last ’year:

$18,945.27.

must be

at least waist-high.

The pond

S'l

same number, 3.489 spaces. That means the college saved a total of

a pig contest.”

plunge,, the water level

The

1

winter ’’Mas previous year

“Then, instead of the Polar

Bear Plunge,

average cost of

said the

maintaining a parking space in the

:

.

temperatures

lo.w

-

He

qbph of me

d

be jumping in mud.

:

when two days snow blew

before Christmas, the

that

;

“The pond hundred

is

said that in reference to the

in ..

Cleaves said

...

the couple

“There

of snow right

get. a blast

winter of 1995

:

brought to notice by the

^effects

said.

years ago.”

a fund-raiser for the Heart and

is

Stroke Fou dation

areas;”

“Of

could

Cleaves said in order for a safe

plants

he

year,”

before Christmas like a couple of

top dressing, aerating and over-

seeding to try and replenish these

to

always the opportunity that we

anon has pond for its

issoc

always relied on the

doing some restoration

at

in

f i

word,

“yet.”

“Even though we haven’t had

sign.’ v

is

is

be a

spend money on snow removal yet

a decrease

precipitation,

leaving the fields and other areas

He

as

The mu

1998.

extra heat

the

effect

final

temperatures for each month in

'

the this

brought on by Mother Nature

vice-

Cleaves,

Environment Canada show, there has been an increase in normal

Coupled

to

also saved

maintenance.

according to Milner

from

statistics

it

them the wear and tear on machinery used to perform

you start seeing the drain pipes, where water is supposed to be coming out, it’s a

as

but,

having

not

maintain the land and

decreasing, Conestoga College’s

said

unmanageable.

lot 10.

This allowed the college to save

playing conditions

left

as

was

field

Conestoga College

the field across

decrease, and therefore, lack of

has

whose

farmer,

had

college

the

to

not producing enough hay, used

soccer and baseball fields that the

rain

A

well.

By Melanie Spencer

do they know the weather been playing havoc with

conditions around the campus.

way down.”

the water level

By Rob Himburg

of

same

to see the

savings

this

winter,”

said Milner. “We’ll just have to

wait

and

what

see

Mother

Nature brings.”

continued from Page l

OSAR

Blue Mountain Ski Trip

usually Walsh says the process of loan pick-ups is generally very smooth. “We get a lot of good especially feedback, actually, from students who have been to other institutions. We only get

pick-up

smooth Currently.

Walsh foresees only

problem: students who encounter a nasty surprise when

one

receive

they

their

loan

have

been

entitlement,

“They

could

odd student who thinks this is McDonald’s.” She recalled a time when anything things were but

reassessed and getting less than

smooth.

more money

the

“About

five years ago, before

they built this building,”

“we used

she

have an office in the employee-services building. Students used to line said,

to

would get soaked if the weather was bad, somebody would faint in the heat. Sometimes, diey would up outside;

they

up for three hours and then we would have to say, ‘Sorry, we can’t take any more; we’re line

done.’

In those days,

pretty tough.”

it

was

they

she

expected,”

said,

“That’s due to one of two things; First,

they

may have in die

earned

summer

than

they thought they were going to earn,

and

declare that

they’re

when

asked

to

they pick up

the first portion of their loan,

That could have reduced second entitlement,

their

“Secondly, the ministry did an run with

income-verification

Revenue Canada

in

November

and they checked all parent and student incomes. If anyone earned more than they declared, that money will be deducted from the loan amount.”


Woodworking conference

logo to be displayed at meeting

creates industry contacts By Jacqueline Smith

By Rob Himburg

At the second annual wood processing conference held on Dec. 3 and 4, students and faculty

Internationa!

members along with

the dean

Standardization (ISO 9000) will

and technology, had the opportunity to show the woodworking industry what the college has been doing in the field. The International Value-Added

be holding seminars at die three main,,; campuses of Conestoga

:alenda

That

of trade

“President Tibbits will be there

on,

G

md

Va

>i

1c

,

will play host to the hour-long ]

n

s

itati

an of

e

z

IS

og

:

and slogan, which was designed by graphic-design student Wade Convey.

100 participants from Quebec, Columbia, and France, all

of the campuses.

They

will

;

The

British

presentation will also be a chance for the public to ask

whom are currently producers or distributors of secondary wood products, building products that of

ISO

questions of the

The times of

the presentations

steering

committee in relation to their purpose and where they are

use wood. at

unveiling. *

College.

Wood Processing (IVAWP) conference, held at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, had

Also

Organization for

i

v

'

;;

Waterloo.

the conference

trade association

were and government

personnel

involved in policy of increased production of value-added wood

development

products.

and

Investors institutions

financial

producers of secondary products were also present

wood

attended, said

it

in

interest

the

who

everyone area of

own

and the outcome was

positive.

“We had die opportunity to share with die industry what Conestoga College’s role is in the wood industry,”

be

said.

-Ml

Canadian Institute

of Management GRAND VALLEY BRANCH

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

was a broad

that

attended for their

woodworking student Tim Scholman attended a conference in Toronto and helped set up booths for the college. First-year

Mark Bramer, one of Conestoga faculty members conference

Jjk

involved in funding

Bramer, who is also on the planning committee for the program, said the real focus of the conference was networking. “I always find that the networking of the people there is very good. You get to meet others who are doing what you are

doing, and the contacts continue after the conference,” said

Bramer. “1 thought that was really good, seeing all the industry people at work,” said Tim , Scholman, a first-year woodworking student

who

also attended.

Classifieds

Leading The

Way For Over 50 Years

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER

MANAGEMENT

IN

Learn about the CIM program in the Conestoga College Continuing Education Catalogue or

NEW YEAR’S

SPRING BREAK i*nw Wildest* party tours to Cuba, Montreal, Daytona, Quebec. Free trips, discounts, bonuses for grouping organizations. Celebrating 38 years of quality and reliability. Call:

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room 1B49

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www.uniroyalpatravel.com or

Need

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of

MANAGEMENT

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1-800-387-5774 e-mail: office@cim.ca Internet: http://www.cim.ca

Student Bus Pass Sale Doon Campus *

t

Tuesday, January

5>

Wednesday, January <5 O am - 2 p>m. Daily Door #3 Foyer 1

AUBREY HAGAR AWARD

Would you

like to

nominate

a distinguished teacher? For information or nomination forms, contact one of the following committee members: ext.

Stu Hood (Guelph - 824-9390 ext. Tony Kattenhom (Doon ext. 213)

$1 64 for 4 month pass, plus $5 for photo ID card. Call Kitchener Transit at

for the

Lana Lee Hardacre (Doon ECE Susan Hartley (Doon ext. 338)

Unlimited Travel

Questions?

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

741-2525

Andrea Leis

(Stratford

Jane McDonald (Doon Alix McGregor

-

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163)

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ext.

719)

Mark Salmikivi (Doon ext 353) Ted Spicer (Doon ext. 282) Bev Walker (Guelph - 824-9390 Nominations open on January 4, 1 999 Nominations ciose on March 12, 1999

ext.

142)


Letters

Unresolved

‘Groping’

resolutions

proper

for

So, what are

grammar

year

New

your Year’s

smoking,

for

Andrew

response to

Jankowski, the old saying

was “groping the one

I

for”

my

used in

when

my mouth,

as

abhorrent

as

My

point

how

long do they last?

“like” in the vulgar tongue,

if they are,

“So I’m like reading Andrew’s letter,” it seems

Probably only a couple of weeks.

as in:

me

to

would

quotes

Resolutions that are

serve

will

to

Jankowski’s

disambiguate

add

that

deal

make them look better

They it

is

I

still

a good

are often

made

to

maker just

the resolution

of fun to yank on

Andrew’s chain occasionally, and I truly miss the opportunity of doing so on a

many

of

rather silly of the

these

human

could have invented such a

mean

tradition?

Year’s

resolution

anyway?

Although it may be fun to check off the ones that people do accomplish,

it

can also be a big

letdown when they look back a year later and sees the ones they didn’t fulfill.

So when you make your 1999 and then look back

make

the

year ahead better than the one that

might

note

how

New Who

or be a

better person.

argument.

On a personal

made by

people usually include items that

simple use of

the

list

promise made to themselves. What is the real purpose of a

do these resolutions get kept? Or

of the word

proliferation

be more

of not being able to even keep a

Each year, people from around world make this list of promises, which are often ones they intend to keep. But how often

with the

is that

will quit

nasty habits

the

or ungrammatical.

I

will

correct in the next

year.

as vague grammatical

is

It

all their

they want to

consider this practice to be

phraseology,

down

write

I

I

population to go through the stress

and

paper

Please do not presume to

year

promises actually get fulfilled?

people

take a pen and

letter

of Nov. 30. put words in

But,

of year again

I

exactly

is

this

gym,

eating

start

goes on.

that time

It’s

will

I

pleasant with people, and the

1999? In

will start going to a

year

healthier food, this year

res-

olutions

I

this

CARTING ALONG THE GOODS

finished.

end of the year

list

for

at the

to find only a

few

accomplished, don’t get too upset. Just

add them on

to the list for

Some of the most common:

this

next year or just don’t put yourself

20 pounds,

this

through the stress again.

year

I

will lose

daily basis.

Becky Boertien, Doon Student Association’s director of student life, loads a box of donations for the student food Photo by Melanie Spencer bank onto a dolly last month.

Beware^ th&ghost of Christmas past

Mel Taylor

Cartoons bringing

down paper Get

rid

of those cheese

stupid

cartoons.

sister

could

My

little

j

I

And

I

draw

better.

do know what

talking about cause

1

1

am

have a

j

i

copyright on a cartoon so it’s

not like they are hard to

|

draw. -.They, really, bring,

down

the paper.

Shawn Smith

Spoke

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

mainly funded from September

Student Association (DSA). The in

this

\

May by

lo

the

Doon

iews and opinions expressed

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in

the views of

SPOKE

are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Melanie Spencer;

News

Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor: Lisa Wilhelm;

Entertainment Editor: Judy Sankar; Sports Editor: Ned Bckavae; Photo Editors: Denise Bettencourt, Neven Mujezinovic; Multi-media Editor: Jason Gennings; Production Manager: Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager: Sarah Thomson;

DSA

space. Unsolicited submissions

9:30

SPOKE’s

address

is

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4BI5,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@cOnestogac.on.ca

a. m.

rejection

or

Circulation Managers: Rob llimburg, Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Dick Scott.

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

sent to the editor by

Monday. Submissions are subject

to

acceptance or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

MS Word

tain

must be

file

would be

helpful.

Submissions must not con-

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


Reporter still feels

like

— Page 5

SPOKE, Jan. 4, 1999

ENTERTAINMENT a rookie

Journalism graduate went on record By Jacqueline Smith

He

me

Guelph

quit his full-time job in

take

four-month job

the

to

Record.

the

at

He

should focus on what

thought he had done pretty well that summer, and then a contract position came

instead of trying to

up

“It

took

a while before

I

realized that

I

my strengths are, fix my weaknesses,”

to cover

Guelph. “I thought

says Kitchener-Waterloo Record reporter,

natural for the job because

Tony Reinhart.

in there for

Reinhart,

who

College with a journalism diploma, said in frustrated with

little

classmates.

“I

some of

it

as

I

when

With

Two months

1

years’ experience, the 3 1 -year-old

new way to write a story; always new things to try,” he said. If

he were to give advice to a student,

Reinhart said he would encourage him or

before he finished

her not to be swayed by what an editor thinks the story

a job with the

to

start right

His workterm

at the

away, so

I

cover

had to get

Tribune turned into a

the paper. “I took photos, developed, stories, editorials

stuff,” the reporter said,

and

The

Record

the

of

less

wanted to work, but they weren’t Conestoga graduates right out

Tony Reinhart, a Kitchener-Waterloo Record reporter, and a graduate of Conestoga’s journalism program, pauses for the camera minutes before his 7 p.m. workshift on Dec. 14.

as

same group, he had access to the Record’s job postings. Each time a job was posted, he applied for it, and each week the

for

much

he sent clippings from the paper in Guelph to Frank Etherington, who was doing the hiring

then.

He would

unannounced and

tell

think

drop in

also

Etherington

he wanted to work with the Record.

Finally,

how

did

I

that

for

me

he offered

about

a

new ways

time, they

may not accept your much as you do.”

The

of school.”

Because the Record and the Tribune were

same

people

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

interested in

owned by

would want it written. two said it is good

to write a story. At must accept that a copy editor may change it back to traditional news style. “But you have to accept also that writing is a subjective thing and other

leads and try

adding that he had

the

editor

father of

reporters to break out of writing straight

all that

than a year after he started in Guelph. “This I

an editor might have an idea in

it

how an

the paper

was were

get sent out to an

the closest thing to the truth, rather than

made

to write about 10 stories for each edition

and many briefs. He began trying to get into

before he or she goes out

head what the end product is going to be.” The reporter said he would resist this and go about writing the story based on

by the end of the summer of 1988. Because the Tribune was small, he had the opportunity to get a lot of things in wrote

is

“You might

it.

his/her

early.”

full-time job

prints,

do

assignment and before you even go out to

actually an offer for a co-op term, but they

me to

is

there are

only missed the

I

was offered Guelph Tribune. “It was

permission to get out

“There

feels like a rookie.

still

the course, Reinhart said he

wanted

bit

later

employee quit and he was

always a

“The first day I was remember I came down

with mononucleosis. But first day.”

1

said he

they finished.”

the editor of Spoke. start, I

that

offered her job.

During his time in the program, he was supposed to

said,

a part-time

was, but only a

handful were really serious about working in journalism

They

I

of letdown. However, a couple weeks

his

thought everybody was

going to be as into

applied.

years, so

to

it

adding that not getting the job was a

he liked the program, but

an intemiew

was a

I

two

would be a

one of the students was competing against,” Reinhart

gave

graduated from Conestoga

I

had just worked

I

genius thinking

reporter said students

who

are fresh

out of college should be willing to start

“I

below where they want

year.

one of six summer

to

pay your dues

at

to

end up. “You have

smaller papers, unless

you are lucky.”

internships.”

Schoenberg’s rock-solid performance By Sarah Thomson

handful of people are listen mg. Raised in an artistic family that

who were listening, Schoenberg, with her

For those Jessica

acoustic guitar, played a talented

and interactive performance, that showed her stage presence, during a set which included original material and a -cover piece by Tori Amos and Gole Porter. The show in the Sanctuary .

,

Dec, 10, featured contests and giveaways for T-shirts, and Jessica Schoenberg Band CDs. To win a CD, students had to write down the 12 days of Christmas. One person braved the stage to sing Happy Birthday

Schoenberg to a fellow student. Schoenberg also read the crowd a Christmas story. The musician, who has been singing and playing guitar for 15

who

is an actress and a father drama professor, it is no Wonder that Schoenberg picked up on

forming the Jessica Schoenberg Band in April 1995. Its album. Tiniest of Bones was ^produced independently by Dale Penner, who has worked on Holly

music and performing

McNarland's

includes

a

brother

plays

who who is a

professional guitar, a mother

live.

She describes

herself as

being “really comfortable but

solo,”

the

setting

ottered a challenge.

said

is

it

a

She

learning

described the lunch-hour

crowd as

noisy. “It’s hard.

The

Christmas and I’m sure you’ve got exams,” said Schoenberg. She describes herself as being “really comfortable solo,” but the lights are up,

Jessica Schoenberg, a Toronto musician, entertains students in the Sanctuary last month. (Photo by Sarah Thomson)

experience to maintain

handful

of

people are

She a learning experience to maintain your focus while only a

the cut.

Now

Schoenberg has gone full She has been solo since March. She hasn’t turned back to her folk roots, but has combined

circle.

the acoustic guitar with a harder

sound like a cross between Alanis Morrisette and Melissa Etheridge.

The 29-year-old musician

listening.

in

it’s

She started out in Edmonton and was known as the acoustic-

who played a 1994 Edmonton

guitar-toting fblkie

setting offered a challenge.

showcase

Folk Festival.

is

Jessica

sound, and lyrics and vocals that

your focus while only a

said

it

Stuff.

Schoenberg Band went on to win the Demo Derby in August 1997. They beat out three groups from the American East Coast in the finals and 500 other groups that didn’t make

The

with

years,

having a jam session with Blue Rodeo and decided to go rock,

at the

After the festival, she ended up

of

process

the

is

recording

her solo CD. She is currently in negotiations with a small record

company

in

New

goes well, the in the

summer.

independently in February.

it

York, and if

CD If

will it

will

all

he out

is

released

be

in stores


— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 6

4,

1999

ENTERTAINMENT Good time singing

Upcoming Intramural Games

Buddy Guy has

Hockey

Ice

Tuesday January 5

pm

4:30

By Jason Gennlngs

make

Individuals vs. Misfits When Buddy Guy came to town, fans heard blues so good, you could smell it.

Wednesday January 6 4:30 pm Chiefs vs. Space Cowboys 5:30

pm

Misfits vs. Galley’s

“If you don’t like the blues, you’re in the wrong place,” said

Guy during his Guy rolled

Dec. 10 concert. into Lulu’s to perform some of the guitar work that has inspired Jimi Hendrix and

Triumph

Hockey

Ball

the blues

Eric Clapton.

Tuesday January 12 4:00 pm Bearded Clams vs. Wolves

Local bluesman opened the show while there was

4:50 pm S.O.B.’s vs. Blades 5:30 pm Dinamo vs. Bearded Clams

door. first

When

Mel Brown at

still

he started with his

song, things were a

little

band warmed up the playing was tighter and more loose, but as the

Thursday January 14 4:00 pm S.O.B.’s vs. Galt Hornets 4:50 Enforcers vs. Wolves 5:30 pm Dinamo vs. Bearded Clams

precise.

up with lead

pedal with cranked up speakers

guitar.

Watching Brown perform, it’s quickly apparent he enjoys what he does, and that has allowed him to

become good

at

similar to skilful playing.

into their ears.

At about

it.

he finished his act the Lulu’s crowd responded with applause and lined up to buy his latest

with

He

easy place to

fill.

it

This

is

is

courtesy

not an

until

of

enjoys the typical blues

strut his skill.

ah excuse to

The band gave him

a simple bass line just so he could

crowd

into

it

left

the stage.

a showman. He uses high-energy guitar work and

some good good vocals, Cunningham.

is

onstage

flair

hold

to

audience’s attention.

the

Guy interact-

ed with the crowd during his first song, getting a room full of

place in a blues review.

sound, moving from progression to progression all as

for.

By

he

Guy

a young,

Unfortunately, they were out of

Brown

known

didn’t ease the

either.

three-person band with

and

Stratocaster,

opening with Got My Mojo Working, he revved up the fans and didn’t let them down

the

He was sandwiched been two top guitar acts, and

Guy came on

p.m.

1

black

playing he’s

time

feature act

harmony

1

his

complete with white polka dots and jumped into the fast, precise

CD.

Wes Cunningham filled the between Mel Brown and

is

Some

audience members stuffed napkins

When

8:30 p.m.

a line at the

it

mojo workin’

his

Sorry guys, but this was a crowd

longtime fans shouting die lyrics

for blues, with

90 per cent over 35, and not here to listen to a band that thinks combining a wawa

to their favourites.

Guy paced the stage, working both sides of the room, keeping the energy level high. Throughout the concert, he explored the full range of the Stratocaster with

whammy

Healthwise

1

W.0EK8USW

cord to work the strings.

He

with you.”

The Party

are at a party with a friend.

The majority of people

There were some songs in tribute

are smoking.

Y our friend tells you that she is having problems breathing and you help her with her inhaler.

minutes

You

notice that she takes her inhaler again, five

How

is

is

Smoke)

Mel Brown, and

Asthma begins by a stimulus

Thurs. Jan. 7

12:30

pm

The

him, and in

Sanctuary

Liberated

(e.g.

narrow and

fill

came

“I

This makes breathing a challenge.

convinced

come is the treatment for Asthma? The best treatment for asthma is remove the source that causes the attack (pets, smoke, dust...). When removing the causative agent doesn’t work, the doctor may prescribe

common

Ventolin, Atrovent, and Beclovent are the most

inhalers.

Ventolin and Atrovent open up the airways, making breathing Beclovent decreases swelling in your lungs.

much

easier.

Being

and observing patients’ take their medications, the majority of people who own an inhaler use their

in the hospital

often noted that

inhaler improperly.

medication

is

When

an inhaler

not getting where

it

is

is

Notice to January Intake Students

1

.

to use

Remove

skill.

Canada and you

to

me

probably could

I

the blues

Guy gave

came

to town,

his listeners their

all

money’s worth.

Classifieds

it is

used wrong, that means that the

suppose to go to be therapeutic and to

DSA Drug

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH

Plan

stop the inflammation process.

How

object to

here to play,” said Guy.

When

to

inhalers.

an inhaler properly: the cap from the mouthpiece, and shake

Breathe out slowly, try to get all of the air out of the lungs. Place the inhaler directly infront of the mouth. Approximately 2 finger width infront of the lips. Begin to breathe in slowly with your mouth wide 2.

Opting out deadline is Friday, January 1 5, 1 999

5 days/40

hr.

(June 2-6 Guelph)

TESOL teacher cert, (or

course

by correspondence) 1,000s of jobs available

NOW.

Free info, pack.

3.

Toll-free:

1-888-279-2941

open. At the same time press the canister down. 4. Continue to keep inhaling. This brings the spray deep into your lungs. Try to hold your breath for as long as you can. 5. Remove the inhaler away from your mouth and breathe out gently. 6. Wait 30 seconds between each inhalation. These simple step might just save a friend’s life.

Family Opt

deadline is Friday January 1 5, 1 999 In

Do you

have questions about a prescription drug problem or concern? E-mail us at healthwise(q).conestoea. on. ca

SPRING BREAK Florida,

Mexico,

More information available at the DSA Office

etc.

Best

Hotels, Parties, Prices

Book early and save!! Earn money + free trips!

Campus Reps/

TashaDeJong Semester 5 Nursing

is

music lovers of any

genre can respect his

up with mucus.

What

women may

his lyrics, but

our inflammatory response. This caused difficult and painful breathing, a cough and wheezing. This is all due to the bronchial start to

modem blues, Guy

second only to B. B. King.

that triggers

tubes that are found in your lungs

like kids playing

bounced the music back and forth. At the end. Brown held the crowd as Guy exited. Guy rules Chicago blues like his mentor Muddy Waters did before catch, they

In

an inflammatory disease.

does Asthma effect our bodies?

a

Wells,

Near the end he was joined by

air,

Asthma? Asthma

Junior

late

longtime stage partner with Guy.

return to your friend you notice that she is coughing and hear wheezing. You come to the realization that your friend is in respiratory distress. It is time to get your friend some emergency attention right now, pronto! Despite the new advance in technology and research done about asthma, the number of incidents and mortality rate has increased over the past twenty years.

What

the

to

When you

later.

gasping for

did teasers imitating legends

of blues and rock, and after he fished the crowd in, he’d stop. “I’m just showing you I can play it all,” he said. ”l’m just messin’

ASTHMA You

one-handed,

drinking while he played, even using his teeth and his electric -X;

Scenario:

bar work and stage playing

tricks:

Organizations

wanted Inter-Campus Programs 1-800-327-6013

www.icpt.com


9 SPOKE, Jan.

SPORTS

Condors discover sense By Neven Mujezinovic

Condors were going per

Maybe season

it’s

because the hockey

in full swing, or

is

maybe

because the Condors felt like they should be on top of the table instead of Ridgeview Homes, but the game between these two teams on Dec. 10 produced higher levels of testosterone than the bull run in Pamplona. it’s

In the end, the Condors lost the

game

one in whose net it waj to put

net,

After that irat

team

effort

and some

[oalkeeping by Stephanie

two

thrashings

of

teams in the games, the. ran across a tough nut to crack. The Nights team was orderly and physically well-prepared. They came ready to give the Condors a run fo nd they did, k inferior

of

.

setback, the

The half ended with the Condors -leading the Nights 2-1, and that is low it would stay for the rest of the game. This fact

to

experiment with r MW. >ro i;nt

i

out of

the

game

started.

It

wouldn’t be a “friendly” game, even though teammate Paul Mouradian plays his indoor soccer for

Ridgeview

Homes.

.

The

Every challenge was tough,

but ultimately, always first

after that, sparks

half and soon

began

to fly.

the

process.

He

retaliated,

punching his opponent and then all hell broke loose. There was complete pandemonium for about 30 seconds in which Condor Dwayne Bell demonstrated to the world he is more than an excellent soccer player, by showing he could hold his

own

in wrestling

and boxing as well.

When the

the spirits

referee

calmed down,

ejected Krauter and

Ridgeview player who

threw the first punch, which did not go over well with Johnstone.

Ridgeview took advantage of their

five-minute,

going

two-man

In the second half,

Shamon

was

Condor Joe

red-carded

for

throwing the ball at the referee. Ridgeway scored two more goals;* but then the Condors started playing with great determination and pulled to within one on goals by Paul McQuade # and Shaun Samuels.

The Condors applied the presand it was only the bravado of the Ridgeview Homes keeper that kept them out. When the ref blew the final whistle, the felt Condors sure

disappointed for not at least but could also feel proud of their, all-round effort. Had there been no ejections, it might have been a different story. equalizing,

What is

important

now

is

that they

learn their lesson at keeping their

cool

-and

draw

on

their

rediscovered sense of team unity.

waste. victory

The

keeps

toga Alumni, Jari.

whom

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was

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advantage and made the score 2-0. Derhan Sherifali pulled one back from the penalty spot and the first half ended with the Condors

chances

in

information

KITCHENER

Dan

Krauter tussled for the ball with a Ridgeway player and got punched in

of unity

trailing 2-1.

fair.

Ridgeview took the lead 10 minutes into the

— Page 7

f

f

WE OFFER THE MOST

110

challenge hard for every loose ball.

Bell, which, in all fairness,

it.”

The tension was obvious even before

it

would

1999

NEED HELP WITH YOUR HEALTH? resulted

play on

league

in

more good came

players ejected,

can large!) be attributed to Den Hahn’s bi lliant goalkeeping, She made save after save to ondors in the match. Condors wer*

re

in&mt

.

scoring fine goals,

front

4-3,

ejected.

Condors dug in and turned the score around with Angela Papazotos and Beth Taylor both

up

cored an own goal, after she miskicked the ball. Melanson, who usually plays forward, was playing on defence because Condors’

and had three players There was, however, some good that came out of it. Condors’ coach Geoff Johnstone said the team was so pumped after the game and proud of the way they played and stuck together. “They became more of a team. So even though it is bad to get your

no matter

to give

They

cent.

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GUELPH

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Page 8

— SPOKE, Jan.

4,

1999

student

Booming business

Sky’s the

heading for Hollywood

limit for

enterprising student

By Lisa Wilhelm When

going on a co-op term for program at Conestoga College, most students can

any

By Ned Bekavac

be

expected to stay close Kitchener-Waterloo and the surrounding -area. But there are to

When we

last

Mike Brown, to

be the

checked in with

some

the sky appeared

Computer Shop (TLC). a that Brown co-owns, was

extra 2,

Ned Bekavac)

(Photo by

opportunities are out there.’”

Brown, who will graduate from Conestoga College in May 1 999,

co-worker

said he spends about 15 hours

Payrnan Khanlari, the 25-yearold has become co-owner of

per week on

Skybridge

he was

to

move

this side project.

In the meantime, the business-

much of his time, he said. “Though we plan to stay for Christmas, we’re

telephone plans.

the street in about a

long-distance

half,”

“We (Brown

is

and Khanlari) hire and

he said. The

month and

His job a lasts

new

location little

train

about twice the size of the

current

sales people to find businesses,

site.

“Business has been phenome-

such as hotels, that use long

nal,”

them to convert Metronet,” he said.

distance to get their lines to

the

store to a bigger location across

Communications,' a company in

here

moving

Brown

getting a customers.”

Though they do most of their work out of TLC’s Waterloo

“We

said.

of

lot

are

return

location, Skybridge also has a

TLC has upped its payroll by one person since August, and is taking on a co-op student from

Toronto-based office.

St.

started

It all

co-workers

when two of for

the

“Two guys

Metronet came to ‘You don’t know what kind of

said he expects to be

with both companies five years

Little

know from me and said,

I

Brown

his

Computer Shop presented Brown with the idea.

David’s high school.

down

dues in selling though,’’ said.

my

the road. “I’ve paid

“I’d

financial

like

to

Brown

get

planning

into

and

knew from day one

His family

is

very excited about

Van Beek

his decision.

“My

I

was

five,”

said.

at

Fox

Sports,

which

four months, will entail a bit of everything. He said

be working in the newsroom and on mobiles, which involves going out into the field and he’ll

covering various events. Van Beek said Fox covers the Los Angeles Kings, Lakers and Dodgers,

Anaheim Angels and Mighty Ducks and NCAA basketball games, and that one of his jobs will include covering these well-known teams. So far, Van Beek is going the farthest of all his classmates, and although he’s very excited, the

Thumell said

said his

parents have been

all

said he

is

CBC,

all

the applicants

and

was one of the people who screened him,” said Thumell. “I I

.

.

.

and

was

it

progression

The Value of Learning

opened that surprise box found my life's beginthe special books that had inspired me throughout high school, college and university. The Ministry of Education has explored the need for a more general education. “Do we really need a plumber who has read I

I

ask. Retrieving

my

copy of Hamlet plus books such as Le Petit Prince and Roman Mytholog y. I was struck by how much these pages have influenced my life. To be or not to be? To read or not to read?

I

chose

to read

and today cherish what

I

hopes

definitely

get a job out of

he’ll

But, he said

this.

even

if he doesn’t, “Fox won’t look so bad on a resume.”

continued from Page 1

Journalism program changing to include broadcasting courses Dietz said to

it

will benefit students

have summers

will

off, since

they

be able to earn money for

students are taking 30 hours per

week and

a demanding

that’s

new workload

workload. The

will

school, yet also return to college

be 20 hours per week,” said Dietz.

with students from their previous

“We are looking at more hours devoted to writing in courses that

semester.

In

the

current set-up,

he’s also nervous.

courses are not always available

already exist, and hopefully more

suppose there’s a level of nervousness with any big move, but it’s going to be cool to be so far away. It’ll definitely be a life

for each semester, but she said that

writing practice.”

“I

problem

will

be eliminated in the

new program’s

design.

“In the compressed program.

As

for drawbacks, Dietz

with only one intake,

said

students

all

“They

will graduate in June.

will

same

at the

else

in

journalism across the province

is

looking for jobs.”

there

be positive and

will

negative aspects to the upcoming

changes.

Although

Wilhelm

learned.

When

students complain about having to read beyond their immediate discipline, wonder if they are missing out. Jobs, money and a diploma/certificate alone do not a person make. In answer to the question about the well read plumber, say "yes". While talking with my plumber recently about theories of learning, asked where he had obtained his certificate. was glad he answered "Conestoga". Read broadly and if it touches you, hold on to that book. Years from now, you may find memories in some old box and be glad. I

said

six

semesters should give students

more time

and earn money

to learn

all

Hamlet?" skeptics

logical

of this placement, but the experience he’ll get is going to add to an already good resume.

feel I

nings:

a

Semester-five, compressedprogram journalism students Lisa Wilhelm and Jaime Clark also

Thanks, Dad. That extra box you slipped in when packed up the Christmas gifts was the best gift. My father was cleaning out the basement and probably realized I'd never volunteer to take my old school books.

When

the

would go

he

that

have to look for jobs time as everyone

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

at

out

somewhere interesting.” Thumell said he doesn’t know if Van Beek is going to get a job out

Van Beek

screen

he was not

co-op in California. “Last year, he did work with

student.

“We

that

when he found Van Beek had taken

initiative to

very

a great

he had the

surprised

that

supportive.

years,

that

right stuff.”

mother has asked him only once why he couldn’t have done something closer to home.

three

has been flourishing since

Skybridge Telecom operates in conjunction with Metronet

experience.”

play-by-play instead.”

Van Beek

its

(Photo by Lisa Wilhelm)

“I’m a big sports fan. When we were little, we would play hockey on a tennis court, but I would always do the

broadcasting since

Little

program and the Computer Shop occupy

West,

They have been very helpful and patient and like any other parent, they just want the best for me.” Mike Thumell, co-ordinator of the broadcasting program and one of Van Beek’s teachers for the past

said he’s very anxious to go. “I’ve known I wanted to be in

marketing

September conception.

for California

Van Beek, who has already worked on the Gemini Awards with CBC, New Year’s Eve at Niagara Falls with BBS, Molson Leaf Hockey with Global and the annual Mother’s Day TV telethon,

distance telephone service that

long-

raui van Beek, a third-year broadcasting student, was to leave on Jan. 2 for his co-op placement at Fox Sports

to California,

only blocks away from Sunset Boulevard, to start his co-op placement at Fox Sports West.

MiKe brown

belt.

specializing

the

only going the extra mile, but an few thousand miles. On Jan.

store

another notch to his business

a

take

Third-year television-broadcasting student Paul Van Beek is not

Now, as the shop, located 380 King St. N., Waterloo, plans to relocate to a more spacious building, Brown has added

Telecom,

who

go the extra mile, friends and family

behind.

to celebrate its first anniversary.

with

to

leaving their

Brown, a third-year businessmarketing student at Conestoga College, was featured in the July 20 edition of Spoke as 1116 Little

Teamed

students

initiative

limit.

for tuition, she added:

have liked

job, but I’m glad

I

got

done with, too.” Clark expressed opinion.

would

“I

have had a summer

to

“I think

it

over and

a

it’s

similar

good

it

will

be spread out over three years as it gives more time to learn. It’s

jammed

now and

right

then we’re

pushed out the door. But

I

am

I

I

I

glad to get over and done with, too.

“However, deterred

if

I it

course, because

program to

to

would have been was a three-year I

expect a college

be shorter.

spend three years

would have chosen

If I

wanted

(in school), I

university.”

Digital Edition - January 04, 1999  
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