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November 30, 1998

Bus won’t stop

here By Jaime Clark Three people showed up for a meeting on Nov. 19, which was scheduled to address the issue of having a bus for Cambridge residents who are students of Eleven College. Conestoga people, who could not attend the meeting, filled out a letter outlining their preferences for pick-up stops and times. That calculates into 14 people interested in the bus service, but in order to make the service work,

the college needed 54 students who would be willing to pre-pay for a bus

visit to

Conestoga Coiiege

" Sue Johanson demon strates: “Guys, you don’t have to buy extra-l^ge si^ conctoins For id. Page see i

'

'

Retired

..

LASA teacher

students called to say they would attend the. meeting, but did not

recovering from stroke

up.

By

Fletcher sent out a survey in

Cambridge

500

October

to

residents

who

teacher.

were completed and returned and 140 of those students said they would be willing to pay

up

to

half

$2 a

suffered in

trip.

survey,” said Fletcher. Toshmar, a private

bus line, agreed to stop at designated pick-up points in Cambridge if 54 students were willing to pay an

$164 per semester. T^e college would also consider

spirits are still quite

who had students refunding already purchased parking passes

mind

almost like the baseball Field of Dreams, where if

you build the field they will come. But there is no bus company that going to offer (a service) unless guaranteed up front,” said

his

that

the right side of his body.

“The students have been

Fletcher.

Rena

good and

sharp.”

it will allow him to and the use of speech regain his

hoping

it’s

great,”

said Hartley.

Feswick,

part-time

a

“They have been very concerned

spends approximately $1,000 a year on student,

is still

Hartley, who has been keeping in contact with Hays’ family, said it will take quite a few months of are they but rehabilitation,

for next semester.

is

.

Hartley. said reversed,” be “Medically, there are still a number of problems, but his

up-front fee of

“It’s

still is Hays, from a stroke he his Cambridge home

on Nov. 13. Law and security administration instructor Susan Hartley said the stroke has caused some paralysis on his right side and he is having some speech problems as a result. some having is “He physiotherapy in hopes that it can

especially this, to response considering the results of the

field in

Bob

recovering

more of a

“I really expected

Lisa Wilhelm

Recently retired law and security

attend Conestoga

About

College.

still

from Cambridge. Jack

Fletcher, director of student and recreation services, said 10 other

show

‘SexperV pays a

said

she

transportation costs. “I’ve spent more on taxis so far than I have on

>arah Wheeler, a second-year

books,” she said.

igned a banner for i

See Bus

.

.

.

Page 2

stroke on Nov.

1

3.

LASA student, is one of many who Bob Hays, a retired LASA instructor who had

and supportive.” recently was who Hays, honoured by the college for 30 years of service to the school,

has requested no visitors at this time.

f

-;


Page 2

— SPOKE, Nov.

30, 1998

VIP Day attracts over 2,000

High school students explore options By Brent Clouthler Over 2,000 high schools students were on hand Nov. 1 8 to take part in Conestoga College’s VIP/CIP

that included a portable CD/stereo

College recruiters Leith believes that VS* Dey bas»

of the

inquiries

system as the grand prize. Cronsberry, who also acts as Conestoga’s on-campus liaison

pet^le

vi^to

officer,

Day.

The visitor information program and college information program allowed local and area high school

one way to catdh a potentiai

students the opportunity to visit

Conestctga College j^sdent.

Conestoga College in order to learn first-hand what Conestoga

just

has to offer.

also provided the

It

students with a chance to speak

with representatives from over 20 different Ontario colleges.

“We had

about 2,500 students this year,’’ said VIP co-ordinator Leisa Cronsberry. “Typically, we’ve had between 2,500 to 3000

Those numbers have been consistent since CIP was added five or six years ago.” students.

Leith believes tfaere*s

more tbaa

VIP Day on Nov. 17 was one of die many techniques Uiat are used to {womote the college by a hard-working !.> stem of people and programs. "There are 50 bi;^ schools in our area, which is Waterloo, Wellington, Perth and Huron

counties,"

Lieth

explains.

"Ihere are 125 schools vi*en you include the surrounding areas. Ff\ very important to realize diat

everyb^y,

m some point, was in is

Whether they come to us directly

asked

after

high school or not, at least chance, to see them

we have a

to evaluate the

here,” It

was

positive.”

most

'•'J'hc

about Leisa Cronsberry,

VIP co-ordinator

important

VIP Day

is

that

campus"

continues.

feel like

the first

group of students, from the Region of Waterloo

Kenneth Centre

at

who

arrived at the

Hunter Recreation 8:45 a.m. and were given E.

appro„.irr>ate\y

V.a3f

heSur variety

to

up by colleges

in

browse

through

displays

set

ar,

a

and

counties arrived at the

fit

a

in‘.

place It

is

absolutely essential in student

recruitment to get people

on

the

campus, both while they are in the process of lotting for a

groups attended two 45-minute seminars to learn more about

Wellington 9:45 a.m. to do

programs available at Conestoga College. Faculty from programs ranging from

displays,

broadcasting

the same.

Following

can

trf

&e mature

contact with

both

specific

IMAGINUS

to

woodworking

<»-

cmirses.."

very quick to credit the

mfotmatioa

that runs the

centre for handling die lion’s

we

^are of such a dautding task. “The infmmation centre is the

student.

not easy," she ctanments. To do so, Leith works through communi^ suj^xMt agencies such as employment centres. It*s

'*We do keep in contact and

with community egetKics. They know to ^nd 4eir people to U8 for admission consulting or have them contact our information centre. We get a lot of mature students thrmigh visit

Admissions conaalting

99 per cent mature

is

their

cewning into

students.

They’re not afraid to call in for information if they have some interest after .seeing our ad in a

pap^, for example.” Leith also maintains a heavy mail campaign that paorootes the college’s continuing educauon courses,

ctmtinuing ethwation calendar goes out to 210,000 ‘‘Our

of

A second group of students from Perth

^Yeah, this is

I

more ways

'.

addition to Conestoga.

Huron,

where

find

is

this

have

“It is really important that

refeiral.

“Tbey^ve been here. They can

VIP Day began with

the recraitntent teano

thing

Leith

Leith

team

those

on

students get to set foot college

about cem-ed (contlmiing education) {x-ograms

'ti

was were

lt,$00 to 4,^)0 of diose

Tlie

a very important tmget group.

“The students were

centre received last yeau^

each year and otter wonderful

a high .school classroom. That

day.

was

quite pleased with the

entire event.

one-stop

shopping

place

for

anyone

looking for any informatitm about a course or a program." she says, “Most of them don’t even have computers. There's only two people that

have an actual PC; the others just have dummy terminals connected to the mainframe. They’re able to handle

comes

in

methods

the info that

all

using mostly manual they write it down

and put it in a binder. Everyday, everyone reads the binder so they’re up-to-date on anything

new

that happens.’’

happy with the admissions and recruitment team has been doing. “In terms of applicaticms, we’ve Overall, Leidi

job

that

is

the

to

questions.

College

were

then

information sessions held after lunch.

walls!

The IMAGINUS Poster

Sale

The

schools.

liaison officers there

also talk about

it, along with the guidance offices. The schools then call in the number of the students

attending.”

Cronsberry is no stranger to VIP Day. She has worked in different compacitites on the event’s organizing committees for the past nine years.

VIP Day followed an information session given on Nov. 17, which allowed parents and the general public to the view the college

displays

offered

the

following day.

“We had 500

people, the largest

past several years.

“We

It’s not alt salesmanship, ihou;^. Not when you've got a great college like

^e

Conestoga"

two

any

ranging

Students were asked to attend two seminars of their choice given by

on your

says

with

a

Algonquin

campuses, Conestoga to

college

from

to Sheridan.

At 2 p.m.,

only started

years ago.

to the recreation centre, and, before leaving, took part in a draw

.

.

about three

it

That, too

is

becoming

well-known.” Next on Cronsberry ’s list is the Cambridge Job Fair for students in Grade 7 and 8. not the same type of event,

a great career awareness experience for them. Different

but

it’s

careers

the students returned

are

represented

in

the

recreation centre and the students

come

more about those

in to learn

careers.”

continued from Page 1

The bus won’t stop here Trevor Topping, a second-year accounting student, said often times he can’t make it to his 8:30 a.m. classes because he has

bus to Fairview Park Mall and transfer. Sometimes the bus at the mall is late, he to get a

1

was the first time I “It co-ordinated VIP,” she said. “We develop brochures and then send them with posters to all the high

for that event,” Cronsberry said.

Most

answer students’

also got feedback

each seminar.”

“It’s

were on hand

“We

she said.

from the workshop leaders to see what kind of numbers they had at

gone up exponendalfy over the

.

Tuesday, December 9:00 am -5:00 pm The Sanctuary

“The students were asked to It was positive. They all said that it was a good experience, that it would help them with their collge choices,” evaluate the day.

said. “It is exhausting, that’s why I thought a service like this would be great.”

Feswick doesn’t understand Kitchener and Cambridge can’t get together and set up some sort of bus program.

why

Fletcher said he thought there might be territorial issues between the two cities and a possible fear that one bus company might take over the other.

“I’m sure there’s nothing stopping the two of them from

getting

This

together.

speculation on

is

my part, but there

may

be concerns that if they doing it somebody’s going to lose,” he said. Fletcher said he is willing to try again to get people interested in the bus service, but he thinks the best time for students to be start

.

.

.

introduced to the service would be at the college admissions stage. “I think

it

will fly,

we just have

to get the people interested,”

he

said.

Fletcher thought the lack of

attendance

at the

have been due

meeting might

to its 3:30 p.m.

starting time.

He is willing to schedule another meeting and said he would speak to the DSA about putting

up posters

to advertise

Contact SPOKE with your story ideas Phone: 74S-5366 Fax- 74S-5971 K-niaii: spoke@conestof'ac.on.ca

it.


.

SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

Chaos

— Page 3

— choice or condition ?

Turbulent thoughts clash over on celestial laws Christmas bash By Dee Bettencourt

ByUsaWHhelm

(1642

to

simplistic

on

the

“We have

with

This

Christmas throughout the

year’s

celebrations

Conestoga are rocky with a controversy between the two

1727) ever believed equations of

balls

of

giant clockwork pattern.

student associations conflicting

and architect of physics could never have driven a car, complete

Christmas bashes. The Doon Student Association and die Conestoga Business Student AssocisUion have both

creator

of

calculus

non-predictable with built-in, obsolescence more engrained in the vehicle than even Detroit can allow for, or he might have

changed

his

theory

on

predictability.

An

Taylor Zomer, faculty

member of the electronics technology by a TV show called NOVA on Nov. 17 at Dee

{Photo by

Science: Chaos, borrowed from the University of Waterloo and shown in Room 2A56 at College’s Doon Conestoga campus on Nov. 17. Students heard that engineers around the world now say Newtonian definitions of predictability have been eroded. Current thought is that chaos and instability govern the solar system.

not simply a minor disturbance, but can be a state of acute disorder causing significant problems, such as non-predictable violent vibrations that loosen car

Chaos

is

bolts, aircraft wings, crumple bridges and disengage the solar

panels of satellites orbiting the

A mathematician on NOVA, Henri Poincare, says all the supercomputers on the planet cannot predict these vibrations. Taylor Zomer, a faculty member of the electronics technology

earth.

program, presented the film on nonlinear concepts, saying, “I’m teaching a general education course related to this stuff and I

want

draw more

to

interest to this

area.”

Zomer

says studies in non-linear physics have exploded since the advent of computers.

But chaos remains a complicated and one that affects our lives on a daily, intimate basis in many ways. For instance, NOVA says

attempts to predict the weather linear forecasts will dismally

from

Bettencourt)

showed chaos increasing as which can increased,

fail. It

heat

destructive

in

result

unexpectedly,

hitting

storms causing

devastation in their wake.

The

tiniest

says cardiac units often employ

amplify predication mistakes to such a degree they have been given a name: the butterfly effect. Yet order and chaos can co-exist, as randomness can sometimes be constrained within a boundary of order. NOVA provided an example water constraint. If of this drips slowly from a faucet, it methodically fills an almost balloon-defined shape, then its elastic surface snaps back in a .

non-linear motion to the faucet as the drop falls. This natural,

dynamists

non-linear

help

to

predict the onset of fibrillation of

signature beats.

A

destabilized

change

radically

heart will

by produce

to

behaves dynamically just like the dripping tap, in that extra beats begin to swamp the organ so it can’t recover and it shifts into the erratic behaviour of fibrillation. The chaos of arrhythmia makes it difficult for doctors to not only to but medication, calibrate predict

who

condition in the

what

Just

is

randomness

as

conditions”.

initial

end

in the

it

behind

unpredictably snowball downhill

from

unless the universe is considered to be filled with turbulent fluid.

medicine and biology as well as

destabilized road

.

stu^nt affairs. On a regular basis throughout the year. Cleaves said he receives a list detmling the top 50 most-used drugs, For^-five per cent of Conestoga students use birth control and 15

some universities and northern colleges, our shidents use a lot of birth control,"

to

According control

he

pills

said.

Qeaves, birth one of the

are

driving costs of student drug plans. This year, the DSA cut the of its drug plan by cost eliminating

some

administrative

seen dre

DSA

posters tipped

usiness e to hold

whereas

it

is (the

do

to

DSA’s)

so,”

said

our priority to find out when they hold their events or is it their priority to find out when wc hold ours?” “So,

is it

The^DSA^pab ^

held on

nhi

night will he 3 at Louie’s with a

.

TUTORS CAN HELP

Controlling pregnancy top use for DSA drug to

'

your car, then in watching your universe on wheels fall randomly apart in a non-linear turbulent fashion all over the now

vibration

“When we were compared

said drat

there.

the says universe will never be understood until turbulent fluid is understood. Turbulence is a useful premise in

Conestoga College students are using a lot of birth control pills, said Gerry Cleaves, Doon Student Association vice-president of

Bambrick^^ said that ^ no derogatory post|rs have been put up by him and fhat he has also

motions

DSA,

%

Topping,

Or in layman terms, it could mean ignoring an unexpected

movement.

percent use anti-depressants, said Cleaves. Universities use is 30 per cent for both items, he added.

^

posters and

wrong

at the

elegant

topic

By M^anie Spencer

We

seen the

and the jingles and I really to get involve with d«h\want ^ liat type ^ of conflict,” said

might mean being

wrong place

time, causing events to rapidly and

NOVA

our 4ste.

he knows the

that

is angry. “I’ve

results.

display

computations mathematical revealed an odd structure to their

Topping said

says chaotic motion

Poincare

Put simply,

order

lurking

and we have done a; of promotion to try and get

the -” people out."

Orange, t

first place.

the

their

dieir’s for

tWe

lot

the cause of chaos?

huge

a

b^k J|^tilng for us

DSA^

from the

will suffer

It’s

to

,;it

,thk the

The heart

periodic beating rhythm.

butterfly effect, producing

tap

mt ppvfd

its

a faster flow of water, doubling the dynamics of the water over and over and causing a transition to faster

]

driven

is

events

depends on placement from the start or “sensitive dependence on

random chaos. the But even drips were shown

y

,

we,)S^-signs

phenomenon is driven into chaos by adding extra force or

predicable

of people. '

the sudden cardiac deaths world-

The heart

the

being so close to the universities, they will also get a fair amount

fee

DSA

electrical

of

on Thursday night and the bar

a patient’s heart, the cause of half

wide.

of unnoticed errors

NOVA

climatology. These days,

because

that

“We schedule things year-towaS|. year and make changes, try |!we schedule (dre Biz Bash),^ new venues,” said Bambrick, “Louie’s seems to be the best ,i/Dee.';^10 (at Sammy’s

program, showed a film Conestoga College regarding chaos and the universe.

audience of 17 viewed the show called Strange

said

popularity of Louie’s, especially

#

pre-taped

New

Sambrick said the Biz Bash has been a well-estabBshed tradition and tiiat they will probably get quite a few people. But he also

same dale, neither, knowing until it, was too

p^^night^pn

Stages

business.”

starting out a bit

predictability could rule life like a

Fhe

a good relationship and Sammy's,” Topping said. ”We don’t want diem to be atfected and lose the

TV

show NOVA say that it is a wonder in itself the famous Sir Isaac Newton Scientists

work

and

streamlining

• DROP IN TO STUDENT SERVICES • FILL OUT AN APPLICATION other

things, said Cleaves,

“The easy

would have been

to cut out

fix

birth control pills

^d

cut the

When a half. in student union or anyone decides to cot costs, they say, ‘Let’s cut birth control.’ But when you put a

• BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

• CALL YOUR ASSIGNED TUTOR

costs

plan in action, you want

he

it

used,”

said.

As

it is,

people are on

which means used, added Cleaves. pill,

it

it’s

for the getting

• START WORKING TOGETHER

m

Peer Services Supported by Doon StudftAiKiriahrr


,

Page 4

— SPOKE, Nov.

30, 1998

The end

COMMENTARY

what she had missed ou4on. I then proceeded to ask her what she had done all weekend, never expecting

Lisa Wilhelm

By

had been weeks had I since been back to It

what she had coming to me. She went on to tell me that she had talked to a friend back home for three hours and that most of the conversation consisted of the end

two

my hometown for a visit, so

of the world. Now, that doesn’t bother me in the least, but the way she went on about it and actually worried about it makes me very

after a fulfill-

weekend

ing

in

Bruce County, I

was looking

forward

edgey.

to

coming home on Sunday and

So

question,

Well, a nice relaxing night

for the world to

from what can

I

as far

experienced as you

get.

I came home to an empty house and was alone until my roommate came home from work. We then had a gab session on the events that took place back home and

with

off

start

let’s

enjoying a nice, relaxing night. is

Why worry?

of the world?

the

there really a set date

is

come

an end? Who’s really to know, expect for higher authority. To tell you the truth, it’s nothing that I have ever

my

in

to

down and

entire life sat

thought about.

I

don’t even think

I

would want to know that the world was coming to an end. What

would you do? Where would you go? How would you deal with such a vivid truth? The world would erupt (excuse the pun) in pandemonium. There are going to be riots, robberies, murders; not knowing is going to be a much

Live

would take things as they come and enjoy every moment to its fullest.

your

You

can’t plan the rest of

down

life

to

Ae last detail in why try when

time.

My

roommate then when on

to

peace and tranquility. This friend Aat my roommate was talking to knows a guy who has started to save a bottle of water a day so he’ll be ready for the big

her sane is the fact that the Bible has already declared doomsday and that it didn’t happen then, so

But why would you want to do that? If the end of Ae world is coming and you’re going to die anyway, what would be the need for all the planning and necessities. There isn’t a need as far as I’m concerned. If I did know that there was few

people.

me left to live, I

into a meteorite that

headed straight for the world. People have to remember that most movies are made for entertainment’s sake and not to believe everything you see and hear.

explain that the only thing keeping

precious hours for

bomb

nuclear

you know you haven’t as much

few hours are ones of

event.

I’ve ever seen. But it’s just a movie. Bruce Willis and a group of redneck oil drillers are not about to launch into space to drill a

today’s society, so

better decision in the long run, so that the last

life

maybe maybe I

it it

won’t happen now. Or won’t happen ever,

is

So, here’s

is that

many people who much too seriously.

there are too

take things

Contributing factors to the water bottle guy’s fears was that he just

saw the movie Armageddon. I have seen that movie and think that it’s one of the best movies that

theory. Just forget

we know we do have

that

planet.

this

think the problem today

my

about the end of the world and when it’s coming. Enjoy the time

Live

left in

every

year,

month, day, hour, moment as if it were your last. Because if you don’t, you’ll eventually look back on your life and regret it. So get out there and do what you want because you only live once and you’ll never get a second chance at the life you’re living now.

few

Wbiie

i

SP(HCE*S of ‘liko** kt

to

him

Ac w«wd

A In

istaie

^

of

Nov. 9,

T<Vt«k6lc<'

JO mat by 0ot psttmg

way,”

qtimatl^

A*-

‘ft

CUis&otm

Hitnrian

was not th© only charact©r

By Rob Himburg Just off,

to

start

everyone

knows

is

you mention »U.:. the name tLeon White, chances are you won’t

sport.

know who

a

just

form of sports

struck

entertainment

character

right?

It is

like

sports in such a

way

that

the

participants

sign

home when he of

the

said, “the

Hitman

was

destroyed,

Rob Himburg

contracts

and need

it it

watched the Bret Hart documentary. Hitman Hart, Wrestling With Shadows, and it I

that

wrestling

ran can maVr make or break you, just like any other wrestlinatrue about wrestling;

remain in top physical condition for what they do, day in and day out. It is also entertainment, as matches are set up and choreographed between the two fighters. But one thing remains to

caught in a limbo between good and bad.” The event, where World Wrestling Federation owner Vince McMahon screwed Hart from his

home always go down in title

in

his

country,

will

history as the

biggest screw-job ever. But Bret Hart, you are not alone in the

destroyed character department. To a normal person on the street.

if if

it is. If I say the name (Big Van) Vader, chances are you

will,

you

if

have

tuned

into

j--.

also

destroyed

Vader ’s character as he was totally misused and went from being the “Rocky Mountain monster” to the most expensive jobber in the

WWF.

McMahon

former

turned the three-time World

Championship Wrestling champion into a creampuff. The Vader who destroyed all who faced him m was having a difficult time against opponents who, three years ago, he would have

WCW

.

‘destroyod’ ^ breach of contract. They are currently negotiating for a match at an upcoming pay-per-view. Don’t confuse yourselves, this is not an act and the hatred between these two is real.

career.

wrestling in the past five years.

McMahon

j

destroyed in seconds. Unlike the Hitman, Vader has left the continent to go and compete in Japan in an attempt to resurrect his

McMahon

however,

isn’t

the

only one destroying careers. One needs to look at Eric Bischoff of

World Championship Wrestling. The executive vice-president, who is using Ted Turner’s money to attempt to build a winner, just like the Atlanta Braves.

He

is

trying to get rid of one of,

watch his

son in a state amateur wrestling event and Bischoff cited him for

the next time

you sit down, what former wrestler Tom Prichard said on a recent edition of Hard Copy. “Some real fights break out

some

in the locker

room and

real fights take place in the

ring.”

So

if

not the, greatest performer of all time in Ric Flair. Flair missed on television appearance to

So

listen to

this just drives

that there is

home

the point

more going on behind

the scenes than a simple script, there are personal feelings and

reputations

take

to

into

consideration as well.

SPOKE is mainly funded

from September

to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in SPOKE are not DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor; Melanie Spencer;

News Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor; Lisa WilhelmEntertainment Edkor: Judy Sankar; Sports Editor: Ned Bekavac; Photo Editors: Denise Bettencourt, Neven Mujezinovic; Multi-media Editor: Jason Gennings; Production Manager: Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager; Sarah ThomsonCirculation Managers: Rob Himburg, Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Dick Scott. SPOKE’S address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

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logo.

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tain

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photograph).


SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

Streeter: Will Dr.

Death video help

Kevorkian’s

movement?

right-to-die

move may

On Nov. 22, 1998 the television show 60 Minutes broadcast a tape of Jack Kevorkian helping a Detroit man die. The Sunday night program on CBS featured an interview between Mike Wallace and Kevorkian discussing the tape. According to an Associated Press article carried in the K-W Record on Nov. 23, Kevorkian submitted a tape, recorded in September, to 60 Minutes showing him injecting Thomas Youk, who suffered frorn Lou Gehrig’s disease. This was part of Kevorkian’s challenge charge him.

to

authorities

A similar article in the National Post,

to

said

even right-to-death activists believe the tape does little to advance their cause. The article quotes Wayne Sumner, a professor of

movement because left put

services

Shelly Speir, environmental engineering (Photo by Jason Gennings) student.

movement?” While most

,

the

“It’s.going to push everything forward, big

“Death usually isn’t an issue you talk about with students or kids, but you have 60 Minutes orchestrating this little death thing.”

had not seen the view to able

said

Conestoga College

security

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

Story ideas? Contact

it

he didn’t think Hagan, Brian if

it

a

construction

either undecided, or they concluded that the

would hinder the right-to-die movement. A common point raised was that

broadcast would not affect the either way.

The

sit

know

if

it

would hurt

were

movement it

or not,”

said Brian Tedford, a 19-year-old robotics student. “It

would force

the issue and

make

people talk about it.” Kevorkian’s videotape is only the second time a doctor-assisted suicide has been

shown nationally in the United States. According to the National Post article of Nov. 23, the previous broadcast was in 1994 on ABC’s Primetime Live. They showed segments of a Dutch program called Death

Recreation and leisure student Alana Shular, 20, also said people don’t want to see that on TV. The point was echoed by Shelly Speir, 23: “It’s comfortable to

three remaining people surveyed

“I don’t

face to the abstract issue

Brian Tedford, robotics student. (Photo by Jason Gennings)

people, or 55 per cent, said the television

television.”

Tribe,

would have would help him,”

“I don’t think (Kevorkian)

right-to-die

of the right to die would move many undecided people against it. “Once people see this, a lot of people will object to it,” said 27-year-old nursing student Michelle Judge. “People will get really upset. It shouldn’t be shown on

services.

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

right-to-die

the

were program, they photographs taken from the broadcast. Six

human

student.

time,” he said.

death

John

help

engineering student.

putting a

Alana Shular, recreation and leisure

movement.

done participants

but the reality of seeing

would

broadcast

Conestoga College were

help

said,

thought the broadcast of the assisted suicide would help the right to death movement. Conestoga business student Ron Hoppe, 26, said life is worth fighting for, but the

“Do you think the televised death of Thomas Youk, as he was injected by Jack will

detail.

someone die will alter opinions. Only two of the 11 people surveyed

asked:

Kevorkian,

much

one thing to talk about an issue, John Tribe of Conestoga College security It’s

legalized.” at

this sort of death is best of sight, and the broadcast would be

giving too

philosophy at the University of Toronto, “This sets the debate back and discredits suicide being for assisted that case

Eleven people

cause

his

kill

your house and say, ‘OK if someone wants to die, help them out,’ but I don’t want to know about it, and I especially don’t want to see it on TV.” Even though Andrew Bingeman, 23, believes in the right to die, he said the televising of a death will hinder the

By Jason Gennings

Brian Hagan, construction engineering (Photo by Jason Gennings) student.

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

on Request.

in

SPOKE:

Phone: 748-5366

Children’s

Fax: 748-5971

spokc@ conestogac .on.ca

Wish T re

DECK TEE EAELS WITE AEEHNI SWEETS THE CLOSEST GUESS WINS YOU THE TREATS! Sponsored by:

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— Page 5

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DSA

November 20

Office


Page 6

— SPOKE, Nov.

30, 1998

Doon

security eyeing up additionai video cameras By Rob Himburg Conestoga students beware, you are being watched and likely do not even know it. Presently, the

two

cameras in operation already and according supervisor of

security services, the college is

.

looking into the possibility of

“We

presently looking at

more

installing

cameras

in

high-value areas,” said Hunter.

“The recreation centre is being looked at and we’re going to audit the campus for more suitable

Doon. “We have had a few problems

some

Mohamoud Hassan

back and

between the Bookstore and the

forth

points to the monitor that flips Internet lab.

(Photo by Rob Himburg) in

and people staying past the curfew limits. “But the cameras are there to prevent problems, to act as a deterrent and a method of safety.” thefts

who

Boc^tore and dte other is at die end of the nursing wing, in front of room 1D17, Dispatches will he made from the main securiQr

The college, in the past, has placed the two cameras in two of the busiest areas.

One

is in

the Internet lab in

2A11-3 and

the other

is

room

in the

Bookstore.

When

asked about any other

possible locations for additional

cameras other than the recreation centre. Hunter replied with a chuckle, “You don’t have to worry about the washrooms.”

itself

A

trmning

Here,

a

is

sil|)eiyisor

security,”

from

for

the

24.

basics of the program

tihe

program, answered any and notified them (volunteers) of the rules and expectations,” Hunter said, “They were also informed of the process of properly writing a

questions

how

report,

-for

The program

px>0sa^$ volunteer

itself offers

V

the program is in demand.

and

“But we're still ]nm fuU^ ws^cai^ltilL use" some more

a

and

security around the camjms after hours and according to Hunter,

,

law'^

document

better perception of safety

students

s«:urity, odware fi’ora businesKS,

to

information and how to cope with absence from a shift”

said

tibeir asrvittes.

from^

session

was held Nov.

“We talked about the reason of

of security services

^Man Hunter. Hui^ also said diat

the

die

cars.

and

near

were discussed.

of efforts and Jdeas from the Doon Student ^Association and Conestoga College security. The paid volunteers of the program do more than just escort students and staff to their “It’sfmore sets of eyes

is

office.”

volunteers

program

safety

“One

Hunter.

decide to stay after class until fte black of nig^it rolls in.

The

rise at

the past,” he said in reference to

have two units, one at each end of the main buikiittg,” said to

collaboration

Security guard

come to, we’ie going

Conestoga College students can now test assured that Aete will be no problems for diose

Nov. 25.

locations.”

Hunter continued by saying that the installation of these cameras does not mean that crime is on the

“Instead of having one post for

As students walk to their cars from the college, they will not be alone since the Walk Safe program recently started upon

few more.

are

light

students to

'r

surveillance

getting a

*

By Rdb HimbUiH

,

Doon campus has

to Allan Hunter,

from the

'

"

has been lots of he said. “Not only from students, but from staff as “TTiere

interest,”

Ite saiil

^

well.”

He aisOTMted diat it is a great ^ So to staff and students, if you way for sted^ts to make a few^do not feel comfort^le walking bucks, are

v'e.

I

of

the*

don’t take any unnecessary chances and go to so it is a convenient job for the security office and get a pair f^friem.” of Walk Safe volunteers to ^ The program has started a little escort you to your vehicle. late Ais year, Imt akmg wiA Ae . --Walk Safe’s hours of operation date have^come a couple of/ are,. 6:45o.m.- 10: 45D.m. from extra

"alone,

residence,

Ptecise f-tetp to re-stooie TViem. The class that brings

Cl»aUe«“®

most items by will

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Drop

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MARKS THE

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carrots, potatoes)

Spoke wants

only sell we caift diink ourselves

hear from you! For comments or story ideas, let us know. to

Call us at: 748-5366

Fax: 748-5971 Or contact us by email: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Join us on

December 2

in the sanctuary to

hear

at

12:30 p.m.

Kim

Pate,

executive director of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies, as she speaks about

women and

violence. This event is co-sponsored by the and the Social Services program

Women’s Resource Group


SPOKE, Nov. 30,

Alarms are not enough

to

guarantee security

Maintaining safety By Rob Himburg

minds

go out and spend a fortune on a deadbolt,” Hallman said.” But then they go and put it in a softwood doorframe. One good, solid ^ick and the door will crash open.

go on

of burglars

in the

home

and

When you buy

invaders.

No

a deadbolt, look

They go

no fort too strong. When the time comes, and if they really want to, a criminal can make their way into a house

for secure strike plates.

with the simplest methods.

themselves.”

The latest rash came on the weekend of Nov. 14-15 when a

including the slidjng glass door,

person

is safe,

frame and when the kicked, it won’t budge and

right into the

door is any kickers

triangle

shows

the

is

complete,”

said

Under the stealth of night, burglars take to the streets in search of unweary careless and do not know the basics of home safety and crime prevention.

than

better

nothing.”

home owners who (Photo by

Bars on basement windows are a fairly

good method

and security

as well. “In

is

the engraving and

shop where they tend to use their identification.” This applies

the interest of fire safety,” said

recording of property around the

own

Hallman. “Don’t weld them to the window, hinge them from the is an inside so that there

house that criminals would likely take. “Serial numbers should be written down and recorded,” Hallman said. “Thieves tend to

not only to

emergency

The

exit.”

final step in

home

take the items straight to a

safety

pawn

home

out with any

insurance claims.

“Every year or two, take the numbers down and videotape your

Rob Himburg)

house,” said Hallman. “Then take the tape over to a friend’s house.”

Hallman can be seen on show Daytime

invasions, but for

fires as well. It helps

are

the

on Rogers Cable 20. He uses that time to explain methods of security and to answer questions. television

verticie,

EreutMMnKl

“All three of these aspects are in order for

“a

said

also

still

criminal desire.

needed

covered,

also

but he

end,

broomstick

the aspects

other

the

injure

likely

which should have bars placed on

of criminal ability and criminal opportunity can be controlled through some fairly simple measures. Consequences can be very costly if they are not dealt with. The burglars themselves control

will

were

Basics

slew of break-ins occurred in Waterloo Region. The K-W Record printed a total of 44 home invasions that took place on that weekend. These intruders can be, however, certain dissuaded through methods of home security and a simple diagram known as the Triangle of Crime.

The

home

your

in

deadbolts. “People

Night has fallen over Waterloo Region. As lights go out in some residences, others

— Page 7

1998

a crime to be

Ron

Const.

of the Community Relations branch of the Waterloo

Hallman

MEET THE TOP DOG.

Regional Police in an interview. Hallman also continued by saying that when people think

home

they have secured Aeir

when

disaster

seems to

is

strike.

“When a home is secured like Fort Knox, people tend to forget about the garage attached to the house,” he said. “Robbers will use anything they can find in there to break the door connecting the garage to the house. Therefore, a garage with an electronic opener is your best bet.” He went on and said that timed

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Page 8

— SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

Technology upgrades complete

Plaque commorates ATS completion ceremony, Peric said the knowledge-based economy needs numbers of increasing ever well-prepared men and women who can face the challenges of high technology and global the

By Jacqueline Smith

A

plaque presentation ceremony the completion of the ATS Engineering Complex was held to

mark

in

the

building’s

lounge

on

competition.

Nov. 23. John Sawicki, public affairs officer for the Conestoga College, did the welcome and introductions for the 1 5-minute ceremony.

About 25 guests were Cambridge

“It

a

five-year

infrastructure

welcome

in

is

modem

place

generations

future

to

of

In his speech, Tibbits thanked everyone for coming and said the only way Canada will succeed as a country is if it competes globally, and the only way to do

period,

donated $ 1 million to Campaign Conestoga to enhance and expand technology

trough

that is

training.

and

unveiled Tibbits plaque on behalf of the Canada/Ontario Infrastructure Works program. After the unveiling of the plaque, which will be on public display Peric

the

education. In recognition of the donation,

former Detwieler Electrical the was renamed Centre ATS Engineering Complex. There was also a $820,000 was funded project, which Canada/Ontario under the

like

students,” said Peric.

ATS

the

institutions

sector to ensure that a

MP,

those involved in the project.

Over

with

Conestoga College and the private

Janko Peric. Students and faculty Conestoga were present, of the college’s board as well as members and college president John Tibbits, who congratulated

Cambridge-based

work

post- secondary

present,

including

see

to

gratifying

is

governments

Cambridge

MP

Janko Peric and Astrid Woerner-Kropp, daughter of Klaus Woerner, shook hands plaque on Nov. 23 in the ATS lounge at Conestoga’s Doon campus.

after the unveiling of the

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

Infrastructure

Works

program,

where the federal and provincial

governments

road bod

covered the balance. In a news release

each contributed while the college

$240,335,

yw

tie

^

pstodent

issued

Co^Qege ^nuqnng ^

<

-

They also

one person

contact them bye-mail clinic.

-

people^^o® want

to

qmt

.....Their, goal? is, to incfbase awareness of the bannhd effects ,of smoking, said MacPhee^ ^

..

ATS

building,

I ,

''''TTTie

.’'fact

Womama^

guests

v

^1,'

The group hands out pan^teta *^vice on withdrawal, aich as taking deep breadis and drinking water as ways to take one’s mind off of smdcing...

t. :

.

sodli fas

daS?i.s3R«d(ittg;

Mi^t die

p The' 2S>year-old, along with _ "f ditok a lot of people don”! st»deat> joPaoacI; want to ipiitfqryigicaiaieas^

§

the

complex.

at

duo^K^had only two or people drop in, ^dMacPhoe. '

® Conestoga

in

were invited for refreshments and self-guided tours of the

to

wommif

obtained:-- fram-:^^ Asscwialton, saidMtot£ ,

*1110

duo

Other

will ccaittoue

io^i^

Room between

aind 2:30 p.m.

lip.t^ For those'

want to attend^ Iwt are una|3^ they can be reached by e^ail^'

60583994@coaestogac.Q4.c&w

The Doon Student

Association’s Children’s Wish Tree, displayed in the Sanctuary, has 27 children registered to recieve gifts. Only three names have been chosen. Photo by Melanie Spencer

Have any entertainment

story

Ideas?

Call the entertainment editor at 748-5366 or e-inaii her at

spoke@conestogac,on,ca.

|

P^3py

M^Ph^„;^v and Dana Mmtz, fourth-semester nursing

they put into their drop-in, quit-smokirig

clinic,

students, get credit fcHr fee tio^i located In the Sanctuary’s Other Roorih (Riqtoby J^y


SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

— Page 9

Grub crawling the night away By Sarah Thomson By t^ing changing

DSA

it

a traditional idea and to suit their needs the

created

the

first

ever,

Conestoga Grub Crawl as part of Alcohol Awareness Week. Starting with the idea of a

crawl, they used the

same basic

ingredients; forty people,

The

difference

pub

was

one bus.

that

visited seven restaurants

they

and had

all

the food they could eat for $10.

On

Nov. 18, the 40 grub crawlers

hit the road.

The first stop of the night was Crabby Joe’s were the group ate flaming cheese. Gerry Cleaves, DSA vice-president, said he was surprised that they didn’t have to play any ice breaker games. The groups, which were broken into four teams, all interacted with each other from the start, which Cleaves said was great. The next stop on the tour was

Musselini’s where the crowd ate oysters and marshmallows. Eating

marshmallows were part of the chubby buimy contest in which participants tried to fit as

marshmallows

in their

many

mouth as

was renamed Auto, in reference to the Simpsons, was brought into the festivities and crowned with a shirt of his own. The group that was getting full picked away at the The

call

at

Kelsey’s

words

when the grub crawlers

While at Kelsey’s they held a limbo contest in a little comer of the room. The group took Casey’s at Fairview Park Mall by storm. arrived.

Spontaneous cheering contests broke out among die teams, where the louder was better. Another highlight of the evening at Casey’s was the group shot that was taken posing with the Buffalo head protmding from the wall. The bus driver for the night, Mike, who

system

assigned

to

the

at

different activities of the night.

Conestoga

the

crowd

at

Jack

Night

Astor’s.

obviously something went wrong. There was no where to sit except for a table of four that had recently been

The waitress said that they were unable to reserve a spot for 40 people. Some people cleared.

sitting at the bar wondered what was going on and most chuckled

when one of

the participants, of

the grub crawl, explained that they

were visiting bars as part of an Alcohol Awareness Week activity. Cleaves said ground mles were set with the

40 people when they

started the trip that there wouldn’t

be any excessive drinking. By the fourth restaurant of the night. Cleaves said no one was getting drunk because they were only at each restaurant for an hour, so the

maximum anyone was drinking was one drink per hour. After

and yelled to the grub crawlers, “Conestoga were leaving!” Although there was a general

the

point

After prizes were given out, the

Grub Crawler’s joined

Moose

to

chubby

pronounce

being able to

best cheer, the loudest team, and the best team overall based on the

of the moose beckoned

partygoers Winooski’s, but the

bunny. A buffet of French fries, Caesar salad, nachos and cheese and brownies and cake was set up

still

and messy shirts. To round out the night, prizes were given to the teams with the

potato tornado they were served.

about 10 minutes of confusion at Moose Winooski’s Cleaves stood up on a barstool,

they could while

was dumped milkshakes,

result

Forty students, pictured at Casey’s Assocation’s first Grub Crawl.

in

Fairview Park Mall, participated

in

Doon Student

the

(pnoto by Judy sankar)

feeling of disappoint at not getting to have Moose Winooski’s wings,

many agreed full to eat

The

that they

were top

anyway.

of the night crawl was Gatsby’s Diner, were Conestoga took over the adjacent Shenigan’s Lounge. At Gatsby’s the four teams participated in a milkshake-eating contest. One blindfolded person had to stand behind their partner, and use the partner’s limp arms to spoonfeed them a milkshake; the last official stop

for the

gmb

Sankar

Ji>dy

i

RaXY Radio’s Check It Out Disc Jo^ey &rvices TWcycle Oiallenge ’98 was held at Conestoga’s Doon campus Nov. 19.

Third-year

broadcasting

students Jeremy Gull and Sean

MacDonald oiganized the event it live on RQXY

and hosted radio.

“Sean and

have been pretty

I

doing Kttle promotions and contests over the successful

in

“We wanted to that we could

year,” said Gull.

do something big

get a lot of people into and this

was the best way Students

who

to

do it.”

raced competed

for gift certificates firom

Out Disc Jockey

Check It

Services, third

prize $25, second prize $50, first

and

During the half-time show, Joe Poloni, a management studies chewed the lid off of a pop can.

student,

(Photo by Judy Sankar)

prize $325.

Although only half of the 60 students

up

who

originally signed

for the event

the competition,

were actually

many

A

at

joined at

crowd gathered, filling any seat where the races could be seen. To

the

event.

prepare

large

the

for

race,

competitors geared up with helmets mounted aitd the children’s tricycles.

As

the whistles

btew for each

race, students eirupted in bouts of

laughter as die competitors rode fiigure-ei^t shape# Those who touched the pilons

a

suffered

automatic

ification.

Those who

tipped

over

pedaled their

g<^;

way

disqualfell

off or

up

a

to the finish

line.

The challenge featured a show f# which a television nmnitOr w^ Set up so that half-time

Rhonda Brodhagen

being spoonfed by her partner milkshake-eating contest held at Gatsby’s Diner. is

in

the

(Photo by Sarah Thomson)

students in the room could remain seated while the show took place just behind the DJ

Out Disc Jockey

booth.

and

During tire show, two students, David Becker and Joel Poloni smashed pop cans with their heads while students cheered loudly. The big pa-t of the show

certificate!

came when a Poloni bit the lid pop can. Both the hosts and

off a

the audience waited about a minute while the student chewed his way around the can and finally pulled off the lid. it

high in the

air

applauded his

Moments resumed

He held

and the audience

studies student

won second

received

witmer

WJien all the Students had competed, Mike Cymbron of nianagernem Studies placed third and received a $25 gift certificate for Oieck It witit the playoffs.

$50

a

prize gift

The

grand prize marketing student

a

nicknamed “Handsome” Jeff Thornton by Gull and MacDonald, had the best time of 1475 seconds. “Overall, I was very pleased with

the

way

MacDonald.

it

went,”

said

was the biggest radio giveaway ever in Conestoga College history. The turnout was very impressive." .A.lUiougti the

the challenge

Seng

management

a

feat.

later,

Services.

Ghalensouk,

good response,

become

"This

event received a it

is

cnlikely ihai

annual event, and .said Cull. Both Gull MacDonald, however, said they it

will

.'m

who appreciated everyone helped make the event possible.


Ask the

‘sexpert’

Sue Johansen blows sex myths away After the students had received

By Judy Sankar

male and female Johanson jumped right

their lesson in

genitalia,

“Give I’ll

into the subject of sex.

me the hand job and

During

use that,” sex expert

said

Sue Johanson

were the

real

the

what she

truths

about

and

masturbation

like

subjects

hand-

said,

of

part

this

discussion, Johanson told

penis-size.

have to have a schlong to be a good

“You

ing the clip-on microphone

don’t

12-inch

back

visited Johanson Although Conestoga as part of AIDS Awareness Week, she spent only a brief moment on the subject,

hand-held

the

taking

lover,” she said.

and

student

a

to

microphone instead. written question from the audience during her lecture in the Sanctuary Nov. 24. (Photo by Judy sankar)

Show visited Conestoga’s Doon Campus to give a lecture on

research

sex Nov. 24.

was

Johanson

before

walls in anticipation of Johanson’s

thunderous by Welcomed applause and cheers, the Toronto

presentation.

native got right

game

scheduled to take the stage, the Sanctuary’s seats all filled up. Students sat on the floor, leaned on

and stood against

tables

your

things:

“I want to talk about chlamydia,” Johanson said. “Chlamydia is

Healthwise

skin-to-skin contact.”

Students sat quietly and listened

picture of female genitalia

they were taught sex education?” Johanson asked. No

Empty buckets that had been passed around the audience during

teenagers-only

first

Johanson then gave a lesson on male and female anatomy. “How in this

room

actually

when

time you thought about your drug consumption? then Never touch narcotics you say. That’s great but there are more to drugs effects your simply narcotics. A drug is a chemical; synthetic or natural, that experience. Drugs physical function or your mental state (behavior and/or without your first range from caffeine to heroin. So can you get out of bed of Java? cigarette of the day, or leave the house with out that cup

Our

society 's answer to a lot of problems

or potion. Trouble sleeping take a

Too much

stress.

we

realize that

.

In fact

.

pill.

is

to take a pill,

Can’t stay awake

in class take

take these pills so frequently that

we

are taking them.

A great example

emergency room or walk in clinic. have been taking do you even think

is

powder

when you go

we

a

pill.

don’t

to the

one

room raised their hand was not surprised.

in the

received

was

She

essentials.

the

to the

answered

Johanson

the

all

bare

questions in the bins touching on many different subjects including

the

premature

described

sadomasochism,

picture of the female reproductive

ejaculation, sexual positions

system that most students are familar with as “a big moose coming out of the bush.”

anal sex.

and

In an interview with SPOKE following her lecture, Johanson

to

remember when taking drugs

is

them properly. It doesn’t matter if the drug is what you brand name, a prescription of insulin or a bottle of gin. Be aware of are putting into your body.

‘I

don’t want to be here!”

weather

and discouraged

college. Counsellors see

Is it

I

it

over with your

health care team?

to

me

if

i

dose am I taking, is it Doubling the recommended doses of many over the counter drugs but risky practice for

many

is

a

people

What tiihe should < be taking this drug? Some drugs work better if taken first thing

in the

morning.

drive a car or

who want

student’s

is

life.

Jobs are elusive. Contact

is lost

are

on the drug.

to school

I

reactions with certain drugs.

drug? I be taking anything else with this drugs must be taken with or without food or another drug to reduce

Should

side effects.

the counter medication or alcohol.

is

in

in

energy

may

entitled to a “personal”

5 nursing.

you have any questions

feel free to

healthwise@conestogac.on.ca

e-mail

absence

now and

indicate treatable

loss.

Everyone

post-graduate

then.

find they can get through with a

plan for completing

their education.

Submitted by Student Services

little

and

Syracuse

of

University

human

sexuality

from University of Michigan.

“You don’t have to have a 2-inch schlong to be a lover.”

Sue Johanson

As

well as being a published

opening

author,

birth-control

the

first

in

North

clinic

America and hosting The Sunday Night Sex Show, Johanson visits both colleges and prisons giving lectures on sex. Although she has accomplished all this, Johanson is not done yet. “I would like to, believe it not, go back to university,” she says, “and take training on how to deal with guys who abuse their partner either

physically

or

sexually.”

like to

those

or

work with

who commit

Inevitably, a conversation with

Sue Johanson turns to sex. With all her expertise, Johanson offers this thought on the most important thing about having sex.

is

These and many other solutions have been explored by students with We are here to listen and help when you have run out of

Most

in

education

American

Her

“My safer

support or leave with a

intial

sex

thought would be no, because if

but,

you’ve got good communications,

a counsellor. ideas.

nurse

incest.

Student Services.

sudden decline

include

includes teaching sex from the

She says she’d

-Ask for help from faculty or classmates. -Seek temporary shelter if home has become untenable. Community

A

Her

it.

Winnipeg and a counselling and communications graduate from

rapists

-Request a leave of absence (Health Sciences).

-Take off a day or two to deal with grief or personal

If

it

illness.

Shane Grace, Semester

minimal and

-Considering transferring to another program within your school. -Confront a peer or faculty with whom you are having difficulty.

-See your doctor.

reveal

registered

a

being

to

credentials

Johanson says she would have to go to the U.S. to train because the courses are not offered in Canada.

works.

resources are listed the use of any psychotropic drugs, be they caffeine, over

Be responsible with

seems a monu-

all.

-Apply for Peer Tutoring. The cost to the student

Many

who

with school friends

This is not a “carry on at all costs” message. Rather, know the costs and consider all alternatives carefully. Consider options other than withdrawal from a program: -Drop a course which is not salvageable and pick it up later. Consult your instructor before conceding defeat. -Pick up a failed course through Continuing Education evening or

than lose

refuses

Canadian

out and hope to return

-Negotiate with the program chair for partial load. Better to save a few

take this drug safely with? Foods and other drugs can often times interfere with or cause dangerous

What can

she

leaving

summer classes.

drug have? go to sleep if when you

side effects will this

Can you

But

more of herself.

by workload and

consider

mental task.

stop taking this drug?

approved by the manufacturer?

What

What

students

marks,

form a natural community of support. Returning

What will happen

common

many

students, exhausted

borderline

“out there” any better? Quitting does not solve a financial shortfall or make the course work any easier the next time. Leaving causes other problems. A sudden void is created in the later.

like;

taking this substance? for medical or recreational reasons? Have you talked

Many by

little

Johanson was bom in Toronto but her age remains a mystery as

good

to use

an over the counter medication

Why am

revealed a

1

to say Tylenol or the Birth Control pill?

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: QUITTING

Ask yourself some questions

(Photo by Judy Sankar)

When they ask you what medication you

The most important thing

in

male anatomy.

University of Toronto.

stage filled.

She said that the sex education that most of the students in that

room

had returned

the lecture,

but Johanson

give a lesson

Sue Johanson

of

chlamydia. More alarmingly, a case that goes untreated can cause sterility in males and females. After demonstrating how to use a a properly, condom question/answer period took place.

saw a

...n’s the last

symptoms

no

are

there

birth-control clinic in 1970.

many people

..

Johanson informed them that

as

North

up

set

transmitted through nude, genital

said

sexuality,”

who

is

transmitted diseases.

down to the task at subject: how little

hand. Her first we know about our bodies. “We totally neglect to tell you about one of the most important

Johanson, America’s

currently

that

to done being determine whether HIV and AIDS can be transmitted through oral sex. Johanson, did not, however, ignore the subject of sexually

Sue Johanson answers a

Sex

Shortly

students

telling

The host of The Sunday Night

then

you

will

automatically

practise safe sex. I’d say being in

goodloving, intimate, an communications relationship. That would be it.”


SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

Old

skills find

new

application

Former student as By Grace Kaill-Guido Special to

photography to three-dimensional work when he realized sculpture

SPOKE

was Former

Conestoga

journalism

College

student

Scott

McNichol has changed his medium. McNichol revealed his new sculpture. Girls of Summer: The Secret, during a recent weekend open house at Doon School of Fine Arts. McNichol says he changed from print and

his

best

medium

of

expression.

He

University of Guelph. currently

is

working

residence

the

artist-in-

in

a studio

artist-in-residence

behind Homer Watson House, where the Doon school is located.

He of

McNichol, a graduate of Eastwood collegiate institution in Kitchener, attended Conestoga College in 1988, then went on to study philosophy and visuals arts at the

teaches art classes for students

ages in the basement of the museum, and funds an art program all

there

children

fo.r

during

the

summer. He also teaches art continuing education programs Conestoga College.

in at

Creation of the bronze sculpture of the “girls” was done in several stages: a chicken wire and

styrofoam framework gave the basic shape, and the desired form was sculpted in clay over the frame.

A

was taken from the in which the final bronze sculpture was cast. During the open house, McNichol was sanding areas of the bronze surface that came from the casting casting

clay to

make molds

smoothly finished than he

less

desired.

The

simplification

attention

of

form,

on

the gesture: the girls

The event, more than the forms, is what McNichol is depicting. His works portray the five W’s are sharing a secret.

newest sculpture,

Homer Watson Museum, where he

is

Girls in

to students at the

His

studio

smaller

Doon

school.

displays

several

and photos taken for works completed or in progress, such as a dynamic' sculptures

plaster bust of a

woman

entitled,

The

uses light and dark of black and white photographs to help him determine the three-dimensional modeling of artist

areas

subjects.

McNichol

invites visitors

form

the college to his studio in

Doon

Village, just a

beings with realism, showing them in progress and in the

satisfying

He

few blocks from the

says,

“It

always

is

when teachers and peers

take an interest work.”

in

former students’

’was the flight

Lff^se

of

photographic

areas of his work: preparing drawings for a subject he will sculpt, and teaching photography

campus.

I

uses

learned at Conestoga in two

stressed in print journalism and report events in the lives of human

environments where they occur.

baclward

McNichol skills

Allison in Spring.

surface detail and texture in this sculpture all focus viewer

Scott McNichol puts finishing touches on his

— Page 11

Chme

Summer: The Secret, in the at Doon School

artist-in-residence

of Fine Art.

(Photo by Grace Kaill-Guido)

ating play

i ‘trapps’ audience

By Judy Sankar

to say the least

Kitchener- Waterloo Musical i^oducfioitfi celebrated ftoductions anniversary with the production of die Sound df

to

The

theatre

was y<mn$ and old jg^bended ^w.Nforoeats-btfcaetteair^^ went up, silent^ and awat^ to be ^ptivated by the ^

oo

for district

1

so too.

rei

.*i*

It

Kim Jamieson. Jamieson, a native oif Mcmcton, N.B., graduated from Sheridan College's

piogram years ago. Her perfonnanu- in the Sound

^

hoUers.^^

<

2

there

lukb l6

is

no cover charge

Cjmi

/l^6ls6nC(iin$U^{jt

^

Sheppaord seemed to tire audience, especially with dieir

^ IDteree^^houm after that silence] ifdi qy^ dreafre, dre imdience

duets and songs with the children. The seven Von Trapp children tobk the stage, pleasing everyone

showed

with a certain charisma that can cmly be <d)served, not described. review of KWMP's* die 'Sound of Music would not be complete without the menuon of

tmtmL

Olhif'Jh'ms

Twaieevmai

as

inoblems of Maria, played by

the

school

ea^'fbn stage at die end of die play dtei^i^s^'' was louder thim Jiy

of 16 years. She __1

put.

English-as-

of Capt. Geoig pia>ed by ,,

p%

by

played

Simply

children,

Centre in tibe S^are Nov.' 19~2Z " Directed and dMueographed by Brian HiH, the hosted an array of characters.

Her

ged throughout the play, whether she wt^ singing to h<^r(.oif in tbn abbey or speaking

^

7fs

"pleasure

Hie Sound of Music was not only mnazing, if did die justice as a 50di anniversary

A

At the Door

by

Hit FIR

diunderously,

each p«^otmor fDfom Maria to the Nazi ajE^Iaudfng

Advance

^•shiHsAHimn * prizes eligible

fa Dooi Campus Students Only

KWMP

,

pDodiredtHL

"*

VIP

entrance

for

Conestoga College Students before 1 0

pm


,

Fage 12

— SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

ENTERTAINMENT

Perak packs a melody

pumped

Local artist

and his audience during any of

By Ned Bekavac

was when he became Pete by consumed Townsend’s Let My Love Close The Door that local

It

Mark

singer/songwriter

Perak knew. a sucker

“I’m

a

for

good

melody,” Perak A presence on the KitchenerWaterloo music scene for five years, Perak is currently in mental-preparation mode for his sophomore release, the follow-up says.

debut. well-received his Waiting To Look You In The Eye. “Fm really itching to record.” to

Perak says. “But

I

don’t want to

record for the sake of recording. I have great songs, now it’s about

making a great record.” The 28-year-old Perak, who has opened for household Canadian acts Sandbox, The New Meanies, is Headstones, the and finding

anticipating

the

right

people and the right sound for his follow-up LP. His debut, a poignant and confident collection of catchy, acoustic rockers splashed widr rotating

guitar,

electric

and vocals background harmonica, has local scril^s comparing Perak’s musiciTnfbcSi to R.E.M and Neil Young. Waiting, always feel-good, at times melancholy, represents dte refreshing enthusiasm and spirit of Perak’s personality; witness

and

witty

the

playful

between-song banter between he

‘That

was

great,”

actually people

saying

‘I

December 1997

its

issue,

this

finally

the old guitar his brother never

based vocal

used.

Stipe:

solid

magazine, a Torontonational piblication, draws comparisons to Michael “Perak’s solo effort is a combination of strong

vocals and heartfelt lyrics set to a serenading guitar. At times, his singing style mirrors R.E.M’s Michael Stipe, especially on the first track.”

towering CD collection, he wouldn’t appear to

A

peek

at Perak’s

“Ihe Verve, R.E.M, Neil Young, and anything by Perry them have of all Farrell, something in common: they’re in nature, but can withstand a heavier dynamic,” Perak says. written all “Ihey’ve acoustic

good songs. We’ve

consistently

heard catchy songs, but if diey don’t have staying power, what all

are They?”

Perak

wet

first

in

got his music boots second year of

his

university.

He

says he wanted to different, other

sometihing

try

“I played all original material, to a very listening audience,” he

method

said. “I learned the strong

“I took vocal lessons for ttuee or four months, to get the voice out.” Perak says he had already written phrases and ditties of

poetry

that

just

iKeded

ifiitiuinenStlo^^

A

of Waterloo University graduate, Perak’s initial musical

was in Grade 6, when he was overtaken by die melodies of twitch

me somewhere

where nothing outside music takes me.”

Perak eventually

sought die

dynamic of playing wifli a hmd, and fronted Jacob’s Room, a rocking quartet that released a six-song cassette in 1995. Though things did not ultimately work out with Room, Perak chalks it up to learning.

After a three-month tour of Canada earlier in the year, Perak playing weekly currently is Tbesday night gigs at the Walper Pnb. He plays periodical shows in Toronto, Windsor and much of the Tri-City area.

Dec.

Dave

in Toronto

with friend/musician Tolley supporting him on 19,

He is booked at Joe’s in nights Wednesday

percussion. for

February. Perak’s enthusiasm heightens when he discusses his tour of

western Canada earlier this year. He made an appearance on an

Edmonton

breakfast television

with:

“Tonight,

the street in

morning, you were great.’”

Perak, after appearing on an

Edmonton breakfast television program

we have Blue

saw you

Edmonton saying

this

to

T

morning, you Were

great.’”

approached by

Grapes of Wrath drummer Chris Hooper in Vancouver about collaborating.

Perak gets especially

\

show

introduced the

the host

Rodeo, Moist, Holly McNarlmid and Mark Perak.” “That was great,” Perak says. “There were actually people on

Edmonton

Conestoga College

is.

was hooked.”

Local smger/songwriter Mart< Perak belts out a tune at the Walper Pub in Kitchener. Perak plays the Walper every Tuesday (Photo fay Ned Bekavac) night.

program, and got tingles when

the Beatles. “It took

“I

He plays Holy Joe’s

than sports.

street In

college.

of communication that music

mind.

good

He taught himself with the aid of a chord chart and, of course, the sounds of R.E.M., Neil Young and Farrell’s Jane’s Addiction. His first gig was in 1992 at St. Paul’s, a University of Waterloo

He was even

really has

in his

and vocal prowess, Perak found it in him to pick up

CHART

Perak says. ‘There were

on the

saw you

In

Though always confident lyrical

his live shows.

album

for next

thrilled

//

CORRECTION NOTICE

\

SPOKE

something

In

the

Nov. the

16

edition

article

when he AD,

discusses Anything

At

vrith its soulful ‘the

sun will

won’t

sleep’

but

rise,

I

things for Perak

may

just be" in

bloom.

chorus, getting played back-tOr back with Nirvana’s Aneurysm CFDX 99.3, a major on

Vancouver radio

station.

It’s this boyish enthusiasm and energy that keeps Perak’s music

and

attitude fresh

and

uplifting.

He calls Waiting To Look You In The Eye

his Bleach.

energy

and

With such

refreshing

spirit

Waiting To Look You In The Eye - 12-song solo CD (1997) Committed - Jacob’s Room

6-song band cassette release (1995) Let Yourself

Go

-

4-song solo

cassette release (1994)

filtered through his music, great

DRINKING EDUCATION AWAY

of

entitled.

The driving force behind the host, which appeared on Page

crow

following corrections are recognized. Neil Aitchison is on the board of directors for the

7, the

Drayton Theatre.

In addition,

Aitchison was preparing for his

4 p.m. show.

STORY IDEAS? Call

we reached our

goal of

$ 30 , 000 !

Thanks to all the people who porticipoled in and donated to our United Way Campaign.

SPOKE and ask for

the entertainment editor at:

748-5366

or e-mail us

at:

During Alcohol Awareness Week, Nov. 1 6 to 20, this display was set up in the Sanctuary to illustrate the cost of beer.

Photo by Melanie Spencer

spoke@conestogac.on.ca


^OKE, Nov. 30, 1998 — Page 13

SPORTS A lifetime in sports

Assistant coach marks 20 years at Conestoga By Neven Mujezinovic

years.

coaching and academic career.

“I decided, after I

The thing

you first about Duane Shadd, the men’s soccer team assistant coach, is that

my life. I like

he

applied

that strikes

such a likeable fellow, a feeling that is only reinforced the more you get to know him. “It’s really hard to express. I is

mean there’s many ways in which Duane is simply my best fi"iend. It’s

as easy as that,” says soccer

head coach Geoff Johnstone.

“We are very different in many ways. He is a country boy and I’m a city boy. The closer to downtown, the happier I am, the farther away, the happier he is. But despite all those differences, I think we both found a kindred spirit very early on.” Shadd has recently been honoured for 20 years of service at

blew up the lab

life.

Northwest University of Michigan. It was she who started him off in sports. His father, quite

and

I

wanted to

Waterloo, transferring

to

do

for the rest of

‘people things’, so

University

the

was

and up

here

actually

play

to

basketball,” said Shadd.

That year, 1972, University of Waterloo won the national championships, but they did it without the services of Shadd. In the summer he injured his knee, and realizing he could not give his 100 per cent contribution, Shadd decided not to try out for the team at all. Rather, he stuck to the books, and has never regretted it.

Despite these somewhat humble excel

in

Shadd managed

to

especially

in

sports,

He played for his high school team and then for St. Clair College, where he studied basketball.

chemical technology. After graduating from St. Clair, Shadd moved to Europe for a couple of

children, daughter Crystal, 23,

and

sons Shaun, 20, and Kenen, 15, are all heavily involved in sports. In the last four years, Shadd has also

become a fulUtime

member

faculty

in the general education

department.

Shadd joined coaching

team

the soccer

staff for several reasons.

to try something new, and soccer was a sport Shadd

knew almost nofliing about. Also, what drew him to soccer was the

had. Baseball

what made him stay so long were his newfound love toward the sport and the fact that he got along so well with

until

it

got

too cold to feel your

hands and then you’d put

relate to.

Finally,

Johnstone.

and play hockey

until

Johnstone says Shadd brings a tremendous amount to the soccer team. On a technical level, he can spot if a player is tired even before

it

thawed

out.”

knows

the player

Duane Shadd about his beginnings in sports.

in

He wanted

respect referees used to get from players, something Shadd could

“You played what you had,” says

beginnings,

CPR

He

has coached basketball, baseball, track and field and touch football, mostly with minor sports, as his three aid.

first

“You played what you

a good ball player himself, fine-tuned his son’s baseball skills.

out”

I

of

at

Shadd. “Baseball until it got too cold to, feel your hands and then you’d put on your hockey gloves and play hockey until it thawed

fitness

what

on your hockey gloves

His mother was captain of the basketball and field-hockey teams

YMCA-certified

instructor is also certified in

the college. Eighteen of those have

been associated with the men’s soccer team, but sport has always been an integral part of Shadd ’s

The

once, that chemistry wasn’t really

only sell vdhat we carft drank ouisdtYes

it

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and

Shadd was hired as an equipment technician by Conestoga College. Soon after that, he became an athletics University,

officer.

Since joining Conestoga College,

Shadd has had a

rich

and varied

Career Placement Centre;

Financial Aid Office;

• French Deportment;

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himself.

“When Duane

says ‘this guy is just about done,’ I’ve learned to just act upon it immediately,” says Johnstone. Shadd’s basketball background is

Anci the Early

because the dynamics of the two sports are similar, and he has more input in the training and conditioning of players. But most of all, according to Johnstone, it is Shadd’s personality

biggest

that

asset

is

to

by the

far

Draw winners

BircJ

are...

JoQH Magoziiie

especially useful for indoor soccer,

earned a BA in Recreation Administration at the University of Waterloo and a diploma in Business Administration at Wilfrid Laurier

Having

for further inlormalm see your:

Language

Many thanks to all our

contributors

the

Gift Certificate, Pioneer Park

Pharmacy

Wendy Speifelberg United Way T-Shirt & Mug Pot Caldwell 1 2 Carnations from Blossoms

Just for

You

Andy Clew Gift Certificate, Jack Astors

team.

Everybody on the team likes him and enjoys his upbeat, uptempo and approachable nature says Johnstone.

and

Carol Trotter Dried Flower

Swag & Garland, Continuing

Education

congratulations to the

Nnnqr Roszell 3 Month Pass to

the Rec Centre

Mike McClements Alumni Association Watch

winners!

Debbie Frank-MncDonnld Mini Clip-on

Lamp from

the Faculty Union

Carolyn Dudgeon

One

box of Diskettes from the Faculty Union

Doreen McCormick

A

Clip-on

Lamp from

the Faculty Union

Barb Augustine

A 999 Day 1

Conestoga College rm

Planner from the Faculty Union

Susan Johnstone A Gooseneck Desk Lamp from

the Faculty

Union

If

you have any ideas

concerning sports stories or features call SPOKE Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 Duane Shadd, men’s soccer team assistant coach, has Conestoga College.

at

recently

been honoured

20

years’ service (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic) for

E-mail:

spoke@conestogac.on.ca


Page 14

— SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

SPORTS

Men’s indoor soccer

Condors

19 against a Steaua side that just wouldn’t give up. The Condors took the lead four

By Never) Mujezinovic Condors men’s indoor team ended up on the

The soccer

of a 5-4 score

wrong community league side

suffer another defeat

times and four times they were caught. Finally, in the dying

in

minutes

action on Nov.

of

the

game

Steaua

to pull one ahead and the Condors were unable to respond. Condors’ coach Geoff Johnstone said his team was missing a few

managed

key players, especially defenders. “Also, some of the players have obviously not adjusted to playing indoor soccer yet,” said Johnstone. The Condors’ goals were scored

by Dan Krauter, Dan Mihelic and two by Dwayne Bell. This result means the Condors have been leapfrogged by Steaua in the standings. They are currentnine-team league

ly seventh in the

with three points.

The Condors played more as a team than in their last game, which is something they can build upon.

Wed. Dec. 2

They deserved

showed

down

Ov^'i

draw, but

great determination in not

Even though they were

giving up.

tickets

at least a

ran out of steam towards the end of the game. Their opponents

most of

for

the

game, they

earned the points. “We can score goals, but like

$40

sieve,”

a

we summed

leak

Zlatko Lakoseljac closes

up

in

on a Steaua player

Johnstone.

in

indoor league

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

action.

WOMAN’S OPPORTUNITY AWARD funded by

-oo"*

On sale at the DSA Office

‘Have an .opinion about

^

SOROPTIMIST FOUNDATION OF CANADA

DO YOU LIVE IN THE CAMBRIDGE OR GUELPH AREA? ARE YOU A MATURE WOMAN HOPING TO RE-ENTER THE JOB MARKET?

.an article m

SPOKE?

date

Fine

Art

ARE YOU HEAD OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD OR HAVE A FAMILY DEPENDENT UPON YOU?

ARE YOU ENROLLED IN A VOCATIONAL OR TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM?

Dec. 1.1^98 Fantasy

AWARD

I

Studem Lponge

Giant-Sized Posters

hours

15

spoke J @conestogac.on. ca or drop it off in 4B15.

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

OR

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day

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Frames

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& Hangers 4

ideas? »-Film

Contact Ned, the sports editor, at

Photography The Conestoga College Student Food Share Program

lOOOsoF Posters

THE

fljVIAGINUS

needs to re-stock its shelves. Donations of nonyour support perishable foods are required. Please show located are bins off by donating to our program. Drop Sanctuary. The and in Student Services, Main Cafeteria,

748-5366 or E-mail him at

spoke@ conestogac.on.ca.

Huntington's

Thank you

Can

for your support.

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Support the Service co-ordinated by

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DSA and

Student Services

Phone toll free, Huntington Society of Canada 1-800-998-7398


SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

SPORTS

— Page 15 4

Best offence

is

a good defence

Conestoga’s Gignac By Jason Gennings

game, and they

Condor goalie Anthony Gignac hockey at the age of five,

Coming from

that,

Condor

to starting position as the

while playing with his older brothers behind their Cambridge

netminder has taken about 17 years. He said it’s rare that he ever wants to play another position. “When I see our players aren’t playing so good, I do,” he said. This year’s Condors lineup has a lot of new blood, and that inexperience has led to some unnecessary penalties. “That just ticks me off. It’s supposed to be a team sport, so

said

that

because

he

wasn’t as fast as his brothers, they

him

put

in net.

He

has been there

ever since.

The family moved snow from front yard

and melted

it

to maJce a

homemade

rink.

“A that

T-stick melts it

is

nice and

in the

the

back

the ice, so

all

flat. It

was

pretty

nice,” said Gignac.

Now

a

is

third-year

general-

business student, Gignac said that

when he began more

why would they take

serious play,

he stuck to the net. “I played house league for one

is

one of the lowest

the

in the

Gignac said he enjoys his work as goalie because he’s always in

He said he plays the puck much for his coaches’

the play.

a

little

too

liking, but

it

keeps him in the

game a little more. “Let’s call

it

When

negative.

he plays Galemo.

it

a concern, not a he plays the puck

very

well,”

controlling

penalties.

their

“Playing too aggressively is a negative thing, and (Gignac) has been caught a couple times doing said

that,”

said

coach

goal-tending

Mark Hayward. “On

league for penalty minutes.

the positive

side, he’s been able to move the puck up while the other team was busy with a line change.” Hayward also said that Gignac is an upbeat individual and one of the better goalies he has coached. “He reads the play and anticipates what will happen,” said Hayward. Galemo said Gignac is very

technical, very square to the puck.

Positive attitude

Often the power plays make Gignac work harder in the net, but he said the team is making some progress

team

on

efforts

a penalty that

uncalled for?” said Gignac.

real

making

is

always,” said Gignac.

Head coach Ken Galemo said

the backyard rink

started

home. Gignac

“The team

said, ‘you’re the

goalie for the team,”’ he said.

a keeper

is

Technically

goalie is very words, he doesn’t have to make a lot of dramatic saves because he is very the

solid, in other

Gignac said that his strengths are that he always looks at things in a positive way, and he has strong communication skills on the ice.

technically strong.

The head coach also said, “(Gignac) is very good on his

He keeps

himself right facing the angle of attack at all times. He is never out of position. He is very quick to get into angles.

position, face

Galemo

on

to the shooter.”

Gignac

said

is

very

coachable, takes criticism well and

good practice goalie. He comes out hard at practice, and a lot of times you can get players that don’t particularly enjoy practice. Anthony would be

Galemo. hockey doesn’t

the exception,” said that

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

The hockey schedule is known a month or two in advance, and forewarned, he gets together with small business study group before the deadline, and before his next game. He also works at a local accounting firm. “Hopefully something can come his

out of Gignac.

As

works hard. “He’s a very

Gignac said

Anthony Gignac: Condor goalie

really interfere with his schooling

when he uses his time management. “Nothing should interfere with your schooling,” he said. “I just book around it.”

that

afterwards,”

for hockey, he

go as

would

said

like to

he can take it. “I’ve always looked at hockey as something to do as fun,” he said. “Have fun, you always play better when you have fun.” His philosophy in the net is to play a reactive game, and he says his defensive team as one of the see

it

far as

best in the league.

“The be

first

mine,

someone

shot after

else

is

guaranteed to hopefully

that is

there,”

said

Gignac.

Canadian Institute Anthony Gignac started

his time in the

crease

1

8 years ago

OF Management

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

GRAND VALLEY BRANCH

No high In Leading The

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Qdndors Oa

the sttength

Boultoa, ^

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Movie of

of goals

the

the

CoBd(»s laea^s hockey ibta ite itot of

Arena; ik

ejthi*

the <3hio

The

'

Week

Thurs. DEC. 3

12:30 In hje'

Way For Over 50 Years

The Sanctuary

pm

IN

MANAGEMENT

Learn about the CIM program in the Conestoga College Continuing Education Catalogue or

Contact: Mr. Jay Moszynski in

room

1

B49

@ Doon Campus

1-519-748-5220 ext 492 or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE

of

MANAGEMENT

National Office

1-800-387-5774 e-mail: officetgcim.ca Internet: http://www.cim.ca


i^age 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Nov. 30, 1998

rw

du Maurier

Arts

Supporting 215 cultural organizations across Canada during the 1998-99 season


Digital Edition - November 30, 1998