Page 1

0

30 th Year

— No. 38

November

9,

1998

New course

Elective

tackles

anxiety By Melissa

A new

Dietrich

elective

deals

that

commonly

with anxieties

faced

by students will be

available at Conestoga College

next semester.

Gregory of student said a group of from public students a speaking group she organized, Carol

services,

helped her realize a course like this

would be beneficial

for all

students.

agreed with

absolutely

“I

these students,” said Gregory. “So I talked with two other

counsellors over the about getting the

summer

Gregory said this course, which is called Anxiety and deal

Performance, will with test speaking public workplace and

specifically

anxiety,

anxiety

Voltsinis during the Oct. (Photo by

30 game

at

Ned Bekavac)

course

together.”

Personal

Conestoga forward Marko Jurisic tackles Centennial’s Louie Conestoga College. See related story on page 1 5.

performance anxiety. She said the elective will be offered to students under

Going up

Tuition fees to increase

Conestoga next year

Block D.

at

This includes students that be in semester two four semester nursing,

By Jaime Clark

will

micro-computer administration and semester three early childhood education. Gregory adds that any other students that are interested in

taking the elective and can it

into

schedules

their

fit

are

eligible.

In the first

course,

two weeks of the

students

will

study

framework understand anxiety and theoretical

being recommended at Conestoga. Also decided upon last year was that 30 per cent of the tuition

means that Conestoga, For roughly $20 million of the $54million budget comes from that basic operating grant.

in the

that

said

for students

experience anxiety in the

ment would

set tuition fees for the

entire college system,

no matter

the school or the program.

Differentiating fees

means

that

an individual college could raise the tuition of any program to any price. “A classic example I always use

is

animation

down

at

Sheridan,

is $8,500. There is almost a guaranteed job at the end of it from the standpoint of

which

I

think

tuition fees could

be

same college by

See Course ... Page 1

admin(istrative) accounting could

their

why

I

don’t

a

see

I

program and

differ

lot

more

is

probably a very

logical expectation

from the stand-

resources?’ That

point of paying tuition fees.”

The government grant given is

to

currently $2,900. In

programs compared

Mullan said

local

protocol

were student I’d be saying, ‘My tuition fees keep going up, “If

administrative operations. different at the

into

A

bursaries.

the college

programs.

or

go

funds.

marketplace demand and typically would have a very high placement rate,” said Mullan, of finance and

from college to college within the same program. business in someone “So

placement workplace, clinical components of

the in increase cent operating grants to the colleges.

be spent on local work-study programs, special needs, clinical and childcare assessments,

performance workplace Workplace perforanxiety. is

set up so individhad the discretion to

Island

per

What

public speaking anxiety and

who

The policy was

have a 10 per cent tuition

was worked out with the DSA where the money would primarily

are test anxiety,

mance anxiety

27.

to

Scotia, Prince

increase across the board and this year, differentiated fees are not

per cent range and allow differentiated fees. In the past, the govern-

Gregory.

The options

made

its

will have

advance,

government policy set up for the 1 999-2000 school year, said Kevin Mullan at the Doon Student Association meeting held on Oct.

and Saskatchewan. The government has said that there will be a maximum of one

aid

week three, students will move to one of the three in

Nova

Mullan said last year, after a fair bit of discussion, a decision was

would

In

chosen

Conestoga.”

financial

decrease anxiety and increase

Edward

Conestoga for fees Tuition College students will go up in the with a accordance in fall

increase

Students will also about the cycle of anxiety and how to set realistic goals to

which they

range from nothing in Quebec to approximately $2,000 in Alberta,

increase tuition fees within a 10

learn

options,

paying a different tuition Mohawk or at Fanshawe,

ual colleges

behavioural components.

comfort in situations promote anxiety.

fee

to

and

cognitive

physiological,

be

1991-92, a $5,402 subsidy was given to the college for delivery of to

$4,346 for

1998-99.

dilemma now, the government grant is

“That’s the big fact that the

dropping far faster than tuition fees are going up,” Mullan said. Across Canada, tuition fees

“We’ve got

to

weigh against

that.

are the increased costs of

The big one that’s sitting background right now is the academic settlement. There’s a lot

delivery?

of valid reasons as to why academic salaries are going up numbers of years without a raise and wanting to keep quality faculty in the classroom. The known salary increases that we’ve got are

well in excess of $1 million for next year,” said Mullan. Mullan said there are a lot of issues running behind the tuition increase including financial need,

direction and the legal of the college. Conestoga’s financial position at the end of the

political

entity

last fiscal

budget,

is

year on a $54-million a total accumulative

operating

surplus

$41,000.

See Tuition

Page 8

of

about


1

Page 2

— SPOKE, Nov.

9,

illliMBH

1998

By Jaime Clark

your non-profit status,’ And from what I understand, there hasn’t been anything done about it,” he said. Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operations, presented the budget, which was prepared by last year’s student executive, and gave copies to die board. During the 1997-98 fiscal year, the DSA planned to bring in $276,274 compared to this year’s proposed revenue of $275, 700. A decrease of $2,934 in gross profits is also planned for this year from $184,464 to $181,530.

you can

lose

in years past,

The Doon Student Association 998-99

will finish

year with a net loss of $19,580, according to the proposed budget presented to the board of directors on the

1

fiscal

Oct. 28.

DSA

Murphy,

Kristin

president,

explained to the board that in order to continue being considered a non-profit

DSA

organization, the

“In

had

to bring their

down.

profits

years

passed,

there

have

been

surpluses of quite

a large amount, of and every year the

$30,000-40,000, auditors have

come

and told us ‘Hey look, you’re a non-profit organization, you shouldn’t be making this money. If you do, in

In

category

the

of

administrative

expenses, most areas see an increase with the new budget. Honourariums for the

DSA president went up $275

from $1,925

Nursing students

while honourariums for the vice-president of student affairs and vice-president of operations went up $300 from $1,500. The DSA did plan to spend less, however, in the areas of meeting expenses and accounting services. In total, $12,720 more is being spent on administrative costs.

Under

the activities category,

cost for Nooners,

to

Subsidies

for

services

offered

to

Conestoga students increased from $32,550 to $36,100. Clubs funding was decreased from $1,900 to $800 while a donation to die peer-tutoring program went up from $2,800 to $3,000. The Walk Safe program and SPOKE will receive the same subsidies as under last year’s budget, $1,500 and $15,000, respectively. In total, planned expenses for the DSA is $201,110, up from last year’s figure of

no major

changes were made with the exception of the cost of the registration package given to students. The proposed cost went from $4,500 to $6,500 and advertising went from $2,300 from $2,500 with an overall increase for the category of $1,400. Proposed entertainment costs decreased in the budget from $ 1 2,225 to $ 1 1 ,600 with the omission of an entertainment assistant honourarium, which was $900. Also, the

link

went up from $8,800

$9,000.

$184,380.

The

DSA

intended last year to have a net of $84.98 compared to the projected $19,580 net loss for this

earning

fiscal year.

breast

self-examinations with fear By Dee Bettencourt Fear

may

“You normally have

examination, Persaud said women should look every month at their breasts in the mirror to see if any

to

many women

stop

from examining their breasts for cancer or from even stopping long enough to discuss the topic, two

push quite hard

to feel

visible

“Look

any lumps.”

third-year nursing students said

Noella Duarte, nursing student

during a breast-awareness seminar they presented.

Their tiny audience of two on Nov. 2 at Conestoga College may

have attested

this (breast self-examination) is.”

Noella Duarte, her partner

at

Monday’s presentation and

“Only 25 per cent of women perform deliberate monthly examinations, which I think is

currently

low,” said Kally Persaud, one of

lump in a woman’s breast that day. “The majority of cancers I have

the presenters.

"When

oncology

in

the

department

at

Memorial Hospital, and nurses stressed

all

I

spent four

(cancer)

in

the

midst

also

of her

clinical

studies at the same hospital, said she had just felt a

Cambridge

seen so far are breast cancers.” Although finding a lump

the doctors

common, most

how

important

discharge from the nipples, an itchy or scaly appearance of the areola

(the

breast.

statement.

days

red skin,

dark

area

circular

around the nipple), or any new veins that have appeared on the

of that

to the truth

changes have occurred. for puckering,

non-cancerous.

are

benign,

During

is

or

self-

If

you previously

felt a

lump and it has grown, that would be a sign, too.”

up a

dummy

breast that had to be ground away at before a myriad of lumps could be felt.

practically

Thanks to regular check-ups, self-examinations and mammography, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer has risen to 87 per cent from below 40 per cent over the last twenty years.

Approximately one

women

will

face

in nine to

1

breast cancer

during the course of their lives.

Beyond viewing, Persaud said she recommends women use a circular method with the pads of

Duarte said it is usually only over the age of 50 who undergo a mammogram every other year, since their dense breast

their

the

tissue or milk-duct tissue begins to

underarms, rib cage, sternum, and upper chest areas. “You normally have to push quite hard to feel any lumps,” she said,

disintegrate with age. Any cancerous spots become more visible in the remaining fatty tissue. An Ontario Breast Screening

encouraging participants

Program Centre can provide a

fingertips

to

check

breasts,

to pick

women

mammogram

without a doctor’s

Both Cambridge (519-740-4999) and Guelph (519-821-7752) offer these referral.

screening programs.

Younger

with

denser breast tissue may sometimes have a mammogram simply to establish a baseline, Duarte said, unless they

symptoms.

There are specific

may

that

risk

contribute

factors to

the

likelihood of getting breast cancer,

women are 50 or have a family history, are smokers, began menstruating before the age of 12 years (which older,

Major music.

in

Think of

it

Duarte

(Photo by

Dee

Bettencourt)

medical cancer is surgery, chemotherapy through intravenous chemical administration (which can cause nonstandard

said

treatment

for

breast

permanent hair loss and fatigue) and radiation (which is a type of localized X-ray that can cause permanent hair loss and sensitive

released

patient needs radiation treatment for five weeks, then they

estrogen

go

weeks

until

Persaud philosophy prevention

it’s

over.

them.” adheres

It’s

to

full

their breasts,”

early) or if they haven’t had any

girls

children (hormones are released during pregnancy which can help prevent breast cancer), they are at

early

greater risk. Other risk factors are

until

obesity or eating a high-fat diet.”

the results.”

she said.

“Many

examine themselves or have a male doctor touch them. But teaching them don’t

is

like

better

they’re

to

than

50 and

waiting afraid

!

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an ounce of is worth a pound of cure. “I think it would be a very good idea to have nurses going in to teach young women in high school to recognize changes in

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the Anti-Hit

to

Hamilton every day for those five

as higher learning.

As Canada s a

they

NOV. 2.

difficult for

said Persaud. “If

means

breast-awareness seminar on

skin in that specific area). “If the

women

are exhibiting other

Nursing students Kally Peraud and Noella Duarte presented a

Wfe only sell what we can’t drink ourselves

of


SPOKE, Nov. 9,

Wired to

1998

— Page 3

retire

Broadcasting technician signing

off

3y Lisa Wilhelm

“He After almost 30 years of service it Conestoga College, Bob Currie, member of the broadcasting i

knows

really

the root of the

and

his stuff

TV

really think that

I

Going

Julie Mintha,

third-year broadcasting student

into his 65th year, Currie

bom

Samia, Ont., on Nov

in

lived in London, Ont., moving to Goderich where went to high school. He got

He

16.

But according to some students and faculty involved in the program right now, it’s going to be

before le

TV

into

repair right after that and

very hard to forget a

nas continued in the field ever

third-year a Mintha, broadcasting student, said everybody in the program knows who Currie is and nobody could ever say anything bad about

“From my experience, he has a

wired a

of patience and takes the time to spend with you and give you lots of ideas,” said Mintha. “He

lot

of the old station,”

lot

after that

when he came

Kitchener to work at

to

CKCO where

really

knows

he was employed for almost 10

think that

years.

TV

Bob

Currie, a

member

academic support staff for the retire at the end of December after

of the

broadcasting program, will almost 30 years Of Service.

really

I

studio.”

Woetelboer,

a

also

(Photo by Lisa Wilhelm)

is

“Everyone who has gone through the program

football

owes so much

said he

a

is

involved with many both on and off campus. “We’ve covered 29 Santa Claus parades in Toronto,” Currie said. “We’ve missed one and that’s only activities,

little

aspect of the program, remembers when you had to run everything by a manual turntable.

Now, he

said

to run for

some even very-well known

seven days

in

their field.

“When

(broadcasting

see

I

graduates). I’m proud of the fact that these students

because the mobile broke down.” He’s also been involved with

up everything by

set

almost 900 students. And a lot of those students have gone on to become successful and

During his years at Conestoga, Currie and his students have been

television

the

in

games

baseball

year, Currie said he has dealt with

straight.

vastly improved,” Currie said.

and

games. Since the start of the program, student admittance was between 26-28. Now, it is around 30-32. With that many students being admitted into the program every

broadcasting co-ordinator

video machines back then, so everything was done live. “We now have digital beta which

who

to Bob.”

Mike Thurnhell,

one thing, they were using records on the radio whereas now they use CDs. There also used to be no

active

covering the Thanksgiving Day parade during Oktoberfest for 28 years as well as Junior A hockey games, ski-doo, beauty pageants,

me,” Currie

even remember

for the future, Currie thinks

that retirement will

him them and CKCO has asked him to wire up a new to volunteer with

radio station they are planning.

technically the smartest

Wortelboer

said.

“He has brought

knowledge and patience to the program and gives people the motivation to learn every aspect of

TV.”

Two

of

“I

Guelph campus.

express ideas and opinions in

adults

Education (GED) is an '

program for

who have been

complete available

high in

all

unable to

school.

is

It

provinces and

territories except for Quebec. “The tests were designed to

measure the ability to understand and reason, rather than a testing of facts and memory,” said Judith Bali, college access and prep

Currie’s

colleagues,

can.”

broadcasting program and Carla administrative Fitzsimmons, assistant, have not only had the privilege of working with the man, but are both graduates of the

the in everyone Although program is happy that Bob is retiring and that he deserves this

program. “Bob’s added

to the

of things,” said Fitzsimmons, who graduated in 1996. “He helped me as a student, side

technical

after is

many

as well as part of staff.”

Thumell, a graduate of 1979, gone

said that Currie has really call

of duty.

years of hard work, he be greatly missed. went the extra mile with the

going

“He

human touch

conclusions,

to,” said

Although Mintha also believes he deserves to retire, she said that his working days are not over. “His days in TV are not finished because I can never see Bob that

sitting still.”

they

said

writing, social studies, science,

require other qualifications is that doesn’t teach people the

the core

the

arts

and

mathematics, according to a the by provided brochure and of Education Ministry Training.

GED

advance math or writing skills.” Bali said Conestoga does not give the exam. People have to go to

Burlington,

London

or

entry.

This

“One guy was company after a

takes

six

re-hired

by

layoff and

his

was

given a higher position.”

The

tests

English

and

are

available

French.

in

Special

testing and accommodations are available to

editions

assist those persons with special

it.”

but require, more qualifications. “The reason why colleges

literature,

in,” said Bali.

GED.

a person can handle any work at the level of a high school graduate or can perform any kind of job that thinks people need a Grade 12,” said Bali. “Employers on a whole are very happy with

of

tests are a battery

in

come

they do the preparation

past student as an example, said people do find jobs after doing the

improve people themselves by doing the GED. “The GED is a great thing to get, simply because it proves that Bali

of high school curriculum areas such as

GED tests

when he didn’t have Fitzsimmons.

students even

month to one year.” The co-ordinator, who uses a

writing.

the other hand, Bali said colleges do recognize the tests,

The

to

college

and

On

studies co-ordinator. five

some

with us, they usually do academic upgrading at the same time for

«««

international testing

do

Mike Thumell, co-ordinator of the

1

school equivalency is being offered at Conestoga College’s

Development

to

forward to retiring, he is having mixed emotions about the idea. “I have spent 30 years of my life here and it’s going to be hard to leave,” Currie said. “I have had many more good times than bad and I hope to still be a friend of the course and come in and help if I

“When

General

want

also

when

A testing program for adult

to

like

Currie said although he’s looking

actually gone. is

He

spend some his house trailer in Tiverton, Ont., with his wife of 38 years and has three grandchildren who he would like to spend time

would also time up at

travelling.”

“He

keep him quite

busy. Roger’s Cable has asked

program

above and beyond the

said.

said program,” Thumell. “He’ll always take the time with you, even if you call him up at home. who has gone “Everyone through the program owes so much to Bob.”

broadcasting

with.

will realize that until he’s

one of the most loved

is

faculty that has ever been in the

going to hurt the program a lot and he doesn’t think that people in the

teacher out of the whole staff,”

broadcasting program. Since Currie started, there have been many technical changes. For

you can computer

and

the root of the

student, said Currie’s leaving

Since that time 30 years ago, Currie has become one of the most well-liked and respected teachers ever to be involved with the

Currie,

is

third-year television broadcasting

the cafeteria.”

more

his stuff

Bob

Rainier

with encounter first His Conestoga came about because there was an immense amount of wiring to be done. “The radio console was set up and needed to be wired,” Currie said. “There also used to be portables that had to be wired to

“He advises you with what you need and

As

him.

said Currie.

is

Bob

television

Barrie.

was

like

Julie

After working as an operator in Woodstock for three years, Currie became chief engineer at 21. He was briefly in London and then went on to do the technical work for what is now the New VR in

It

man

Currie.

since.

“I

is

studio.”

"acuity is retiring.

was

Bob

Judith Bali, college access

and prep studies co-ordinator

However, the Mississauga. college does offer preparation for the test at the Stratford, Guelph,

Cambridge campuses.

and

at the

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

Guelph campUS.

Waterloo

“People can do the preparation with

us.

Usually,

anywhere from to a

this

less than

takes

a month

couple of months, depending

on how confident people are

needs, and physical and or learning disabilities. Persons who have successfully

completed the requirements for Educational General the Development tests in accordance with the Ministry of Education and Training receives an Ontario equivalency school high certificate.


y

— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 4

.

1998

9,

COMMENTARY

Why they play

Outrageous salaries ruining sports N

ticket, regardless

When

pocket-draining prices for food

game being

almost 100 miles per hour. I would be very happy with that

Between owner lockouts, player

kind of salary, especially for a half years work. Wouldn’t you?

It

bothers

seven years,

get in the

what an

played.

astronomical

One

figure.

how

is

a

A

York Lottery would be paid essence,

the

out.

New

York

was awarded to New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza. League

for the National

wildcard playoff spot, was seeking

excess

$12

of

million

This to play a game, that was once considered an American nothing more

now become

who

who

out of

they’re

it

He was able to get and demand more money

salaries

funny

play a fun

so much

for

game

earn

doing so

little.

really

It’s

funny

how

those

is

the

filling

money

enough

pay

to

I

who

any

as they can,

when

ihe

Now,

you pay for amount for a

Remember“ftr *

find -Hx

there’s

merchandise.

the

someone

kids look up to as a hero, the

It is

Why

parking, an absurd

riltafce things

and

pathetic. In time, the sports

world will crumble and this will explode in the faces of these players, and who will suffer then?

to

cheaply.

away

will hold out of a season for an extra few hundred thousand dollars.

be that you could go to event sports relatively

used

far are,

same person who

outrageous salaries. It

you

Just to pay the salary of

making

and

the fans again, of course.

answer is

• .

5oo

pease, Ale

r

^ r

THE

N'AK|F5 OF

for

doing so little, while people in the medical field get paid peanuts, in comparison, for saving human lives. It’s just one of those things that makes you wonder. The issue, however, is a doubleedged sword. The way I see it is if I’m offered a substantial amount of money to play baseball, or any to consider

Then

suffering in the long

seats

of

action

the

and drinks.

an extra $300,000?

who

game earn so much

sport for that matter,

Granted, he has talent and is one of the premier offensive players in the game today, but he is getting paid millions for playing a game

that high,

players.

money-

how those

is

from

run? The fans, of course. Ticket, concession merchandise and prices all go up in an effort to keep

making only $1.5 million

Major League

in

much

will greedily sit out

tfever

play a fun

really

unions to get as

over five years.

The most puzzling thing is that he wants to stay with the White Sox, but just for more money. It just shows the selfishness of some

hungry.

It’s

is

numbers are

the

And who

who’s fault is it? It’s a combination between the owners and the players. The owners are ridiculous to pay them that much in the first place and the players, who are encouraged by their

Baseball.

than a gathering

pool for the greedy and

the result of

Albert Belle of

is

Chicago White Sox, who

three

a

season.

pastime, which has

example of

what

So,

simply because of a clause in the contract that said he would be allowed out if he is not in the top

Piazza, a driving force in the

in

the

salaries

currently in a $55-million contract

some lucky

It

tie

clear

such a contract

a

is

it

Lottery, but not to

Mets’

way of

how

ridiculous.

New

citizen.

to see

and player holdouts, the entire sporting world is becoming

prize in the

In

me

have fun

strikes

would think that

how

a year instead of $ 1 .8 million. It is so stupid it makes me laugh.

that children are taught to at.

dollars over

defenceman or

risk being hit by a white bullet travelling 60 feet at

inety-one million

THE' OTHER flSnWWS »N

SPF\Z€ uh-nj

dOlNl SLEldN

would have

it.

For a million bucks a season. I’d go toe to toe with a 300-pound NFL lineman, get pounded into the boards by a 240-pound NHL

J

\a

ifiiri t

war T life

war

he

between

In an

pro-choice and pro-

News,

shows no sign of

article

August 1994

Buffalo 26 in the Kitchener-Waterloo Record, letter to the

part of which appeared in an Oct.

to

protect

innocent

the

murdered, the same way

to protect us. Whoever shot the shot protected the children,” he said in the

as

another

Slepian wrote: “Please don’t feign suiprise,

tragedy

has

resulted

dismay and certainly not innocence when a more volatile and less restrained member of the group decides to read ... by

same

shooting an abortion provider.”

Slepian’s only crime

the

abortion

debate. Unfortunately,

no winners in this battle - only losers.

there are

On

Melanie

He was

Spencer

Oct.

Dr. 23, Slepian, a

right. It really shouldn’t

come

52-year-old obstetrician and gynecologist

who performed

hospitals

abortions,

sniper in his Buffalo

He was

was

killed

by a

home.

the fifth victim of abortion sniper

Canada and New York in the last four years. He was also the first fatality from these attacks. It seemed as though Slepian was aware of the dangers he faced by agreeing to attacks in

is

actually support this violent

act.

Rev. Donald Spitz, founder of Pro-Life Virginia,

commented on

as Christians

was

to

perform a

women. For

he was tried, convicted and punished by die sniper. The result is that a father will never see his children accomplish their goals and a husband will never grow old with his this,

was to

perform a legal medical

procedure

for

women.

wife.

As

well, diere

women can

turn

is

one

when

less doctor to

whom

they are considering

abortions.

truly terrifying is the fact that

some people

not.

legal medical procedure for

perform them.

What

that individual consider their safety?

Slepian’s only crime

article;

where abortions are performed or outside the homes of the doctors who

“We

perform the legal medical procedure.

Did

Probably

as

a surprise that these senseless tragedies occur. After all, it’s not uncommon to see pro-life protestors picketing outside

Barnett

What about the children who were in the house when he or she fired that fatal shot?

being

someone

ending

from

from

we would want

the action.

have a responsibility

The people who

hard to believe that someone can hold such a narrow view of murder. In

the

’90s,

it’s

most from

this

who must carry on without their loved one, and the many women who looked upon him as a defender of a woman’s right to

seems odd that Spitz claims to value life, but in the same breath states die sniper was protecting children. It

choose.

SPOKE is mainly funded from

Keeping Conestoga College connected

suffer

senseless violence are Slepian’s family,

September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not in this

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Melanie Spencer;

News

Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Entertainment Editor: Judy Sankar; Sports Editor: Ned Bekavac; Photo Editors: Denise Bettencourt, Neven Mujezinovic; Multi-media Editor: Jason Gainings; Production Manager: Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager: Sarah Thomson;

Circulation Managers:

Rob Himburg,

SPOKE’s

address

is

Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Dick Scott. 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the

must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or space. Unsolicited submissions

rejection

or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

tain

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


.

SPOKE, Nov. 9, 1998

— Page S

Tampon dispensers inadequate

Washrooms unprepared

women’s monthly needs

for

By Dee Bettencourt There

something missing in

is

women’s washrooms on Conestoga College’s Doon

some of

the

campus.

women’s main

seven

of Out washrooms

tested

and

when The

sanitary

napkins

janitor initials

fed a quarter per product. washroom four other

stuff zilch. It

This could be a frustrating and costly experience for women, especially if repeated regularly. It can also, however, illuminate the existence of a sort of female fraternity dedicated to the shared

yet dreaded monthly exodus of fluid.

For

one

instance,

feinale

student lost her quarter in the lower level washroom dispenser the elevator while attempting

by

purchase a this during product sanitary was promptly but analysis, rescued by a stranger, Darlene Jarvis, who offered one of her own to

unsuccessfully

tampons. never “I

them

trust

(the

dispensers) in general. I always have tampons on my person. I hate a predicament where they’re empty or not being able to help someone out as I just did,” said the third-year accounting

being

left in

student.

LASA

the course of visiting the

During washrooms, seven

one

in

seemed inadequate space-wise. It was also not stocked

particular

products for the students and faculty who use it

with

sanitary

women’s third-floor The washroom in the B wing has only two stalls, yet can service over 210

women security

student,

admitting

women

when questioned

washroom

floor

closest to student

and located directly beside the housekeeping services services

department;

the

washroom 2C8

in the

nursing wing and washroom 1D12 in the business wing which is also, unfortunately, subject to waiting lines.

washroom

visit

that

men

than

do.

Healthwise

said the third-floor men’s

He

BREAST HEALTH

facilities.”

Lori

a third-year

Illingworth,

to

who

Breast disorders represent a significant health concern in the breast structure can detect

women. Lumps or changes

is one in nine chance that a woman be diagnosed with a malignant breast disorder before menopause and then one in eight chance after menopause. Risk factors include being female, age 55 years or

will

declined

HAS YOUR

pregnancy

I

program, she will 44 days of flow from of her program through to

uses three tampons during day while on campus, that

at

after

1

2 years or younger, onset

age 55 years or older,

first full

term

age 30, family history, obesity, and exposure

to ionizing radiation. It is

crucial, breast

lumps be detected early and

diagnosed promptly. Current guidelines accepted by the

American cancer society, the National cancer institute and the American college of Radiology regarding breast surveillance

LOST ITS TASTE

1

student will require

over, onset of menstruation at age

of menopause

If she

include health maintenance practices such as breast self

examinations, clinical breast examinations, and routine

mammography. By age 20 you should be doing

432 tampons

breast self-

examinations monthly. Using the pads of your fingers you

altogether.

should closely examine each breast looking and feeling for any

be difficult to be this to prepared degree, especially as the female cycle is not always predictable and a personal supply of sanitary products may be at one end of the

may

lumps, hard knots, thickening of the breast tissue, dimpling of

completely

campus while

the

woman

is

the skin or any changes in the breasts.

motion, so that the entire are

BUY

since the bookstore does

member

A

TRADE

if

Association

Doon

WE OFFER THE MOST Student

(DSA) was not

USED CD

sure

their office generally offers

condoms, stored in a bucket on the main DSA desk, but not tampons. Vicky Lichty of the DSA, said, “It’s not even discussed as an issue. I always have a problem getting tampons at the bathroom beside the elevator on this level.”

,

KITCHENER

893-2464

mammography

for

women

,.,9

WATERLOO 884-7376

415

at risk

should

-2 years

and an

mammogram

consists of a x-ray technique used to visualize the

internal structure

^

1

Which

By techniques

required.

screening

annual

CDS THE AREA’S LARGEST SELECTION OF USED

replied

professional should do a clinical

be done between the ages of 40 and 49 every

know why, but would gladly donate an extra from her the

down Any changes in the

of 20 and 40 and every year thereafter.

she did not

supply,

examined.

examination of the breast every three years between the ages

SELL

the

bookstore did not carry these essential products despite selling items such as gum, clothing and Tylenol, a staff

is

care professional.

A trained

why

the entire

breasts should be taken seriously and looked at by a health

at

These dispensers are the sole source of sanitary products on not stock them, either. When questioned

Examine

breast using small circular motions in a spiral or up and

another.

why

although

are

more time per

also require

building has a shortage of toilet

graduation.

Even

time

member Susan

said

for

of the

women 50

years of age or older.

breasts.

it

following the current health maintenance will increase early detection

will

enhance survival rates

By:

Mandy Mahon,

and treatment, which

FOR YOUR USED COS

OUTLET Hp.sple?

Hoad

23 Wellington

Semester 5 Nursing student

Rcifl.i

F

CAMBRIDGE GUELPH 622-7774 823-5341

Do you have

if

having a hot and heavy date with your calendar, you may be best advised to visit only the following washrooms: the main

you

washroom was

faculty

was

Jankowski said he suspects this bathroom has to service the most people for its size and location,

(BRT) and

radio and television

print journalism programs. Journalism instructor Andrew

sufficient

experience

own

at the

the study

not repeated several times. Ladies, bearing this in mind,

year to accommodate access for handicapped users, she felt the

daily from the law and (LASA), broadcasting,

said he thought should be more organized

campus

compromised since

third-floor

bathroom has a similar problem, although it does offer 50 per cent more capacity with two stalls plus a urinal. “In fact, the whole

three-year

It

has can be

male and female washrooms were made smaller last

Third-year students Lori Illingworth (left) and Jennifer Cross hold a tampon which was not obtainable at the washroom closest to (Photo by Dee Bettencourt) their program.

tampons and pads to deal with what is, after all, usually a monthly occurrence. But if a four-day length of period chosen as an arbitrarily is example, and that woman is in a

the

it

coming out of the garbage.”

should be said that

Hartley

identification,

the start

But

it.

breast disorders. There

One male

and bring

should also be said that the this of accuracy investigation might be somewhat It

statistical

noted to be clean, but devoid of feminine hygiene products.

unreliable.”

women

on

of this study, the

(the dispensers) are

“They

pad.

the

within five or 10 minutes since it’s been ‘cleaned’ and initialed and there’s toilet paper on the floor and

and dispensed

quarters

the

condemned

its

addressed solely to female readers who need to purchase a tampon or

Jennifer

student,

further

just too

angled walls. “It was obviously designed by a man, a small man.” Please consider the question in be to title paragraph’s this

washroom on the third floor. “The bathroom always

dispensers, or 57 per cent, simply ate

cramped, given

Cross,

building on Oct. 29, only three washroom dispensers offered

tampons

women’s washroom was

on the third floor, agreed with Jankowski and said, “Somehow two toilets are not enough. Also, if you’re having a crisis, and the machine doesn’t spit out a tampon at you, it’s a little awkward.” Another third-year television and broadcasting

the

in

BRT student whose program is run

questions about a health problem or concern!

E-mail us a heathwise@conestogac.on.ca


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 6

9,

1998

Success By Sarah Thomson

as

of psychic you

internalize

it,

it

will

Levitation, telepathy,

things

table

tilting,

and

to get

Ouija

happen.

For the table levitation they

try

show

someone who has tried the board and has been

successful with

it,

said Evason.

left

a

,

in the air

even

him

was a

it

So obviously

really powerful

experience.”

Evason. The worst thing

someone against

want to be up He said it doesn’t add to the

that doesn’t really there.

separated, and also with the watch

when she

we

your hands

together intertwined and trying to

index

"

fingers

visualized the watch she*

couldn’t open her eyes, so he that she would be a natural fingertip test

tests for

are

try to figure

They do use some

how

it

illusion in

shows. A lot of what happens with the audience in the telepathy, or second-sight segment with Tessa identifying audience members, is stuff they don’t know about. This also

at the levitation.

The

did and

out happened,” said Evason.

knew

visualization

their

and the watch susceptibility

a hypnosis show.

Second Sight wasn’t doing a hypnosis show but Evason said, some of the methods are the same. The show uses the power of suggestion, the theory that as long

did

and

try to figure

how

out

it

happened.” Jeff Evason,

psychic

get

is to

his or her will

show, so they try not to get skeptics or, even worse, cynics. “Skeptics are one thing, and it’s healthy to be skeptical, but a cynic is very disruptive and we don’t want that. So we encourage people to be skeptical, and we encourage people to look at yvhat

your

we

to

they look for smiling faces, said

their

and interactive, upbeat, humourous show. One of the most memorable highlights of the show was the levitation of an audience member. Evason said, “The levitation person was really good.” She was successful with a trick

keep

look at what

Those are two examples of what they chose when they need specific people, for the most part

Husband and wife psychic duo,

that involves clasping

“We encourage people

after

the next sentence.

Jeff and Tessa Evason, delighted

with

up for

Sanctuary, Oct. 27.

audience

hand remained I was on to

said Evason. “His

bewildered

crowd guessing what was really going on in Second Sight’s Psychic Vaudeville show at the

the

They got a great response from the audience. The guy they picked was great with the table levitation,

were just some of the

that

not an illusion

Chad, left, a volunteer from the audience, helps Jeff Evason with a table levitation as part of the Second Sight Show. (Photo by Sarah Thomson)

They what

leave what

and

is illusion

not up to the audience to decide. But, Evason did hint that is

anyone can do the table levitation home, with a card table and

at

four people touching fingertips and the table will move all over the place but into the

it

will not rise

up

air.

“That

a clue to where the

is

comes

in,” said Evason. of Jeff and Tessa’s performances are held at corporate functions and private events but they will be making a few television appearances soon. On Nov. 13, they will be on

illusion

Most

Weekday

includes the date that magically wrote itself on the chalkboard, but

Women’s NBC’s the World’s Greatest Magic V on Nov. 25, and Grand Illusions - The Story of Magic on Dec. 22, on

a lot of the stuff

Discovery Canada.

not illusion.

is

on

the

Television Network,

Buyer beware

Second Sight performers By Sarah Thomson

The Evasons, who have been performing together since 1983, have many insights about the

Second Sight performers Jeff and Tessa Evason don’t like to refer to themselves as psychics because

psychic line business as discussed in an interview after their show

they don’t encourage people to use

Oct. 27, in the Sanctuary.

1-900 psychic

lines.

“I

hope

that at least people are

getting

out of

phone psychics

criticize

some entertainment value

because they sure aren’t getting any help out of it. There’s no way,” said Jeff Evason, referring to 1-900 lines. It’s like putting your money into a slot machine. If they are getting it

entertainment value out of

OK.

If

weekend they win, the casino

same

the

it

that’s

they seriously go every “I

are not going to is

with

going to win. psychics,

It’s

ple are getting

some

entertainment value out of

Evason.

Regarding

the

credibility

good psychics out

time to Party!!

that at least peo-

said

of

psychics, 99 per cent are not real, said Evason, adding that there are

It's

hope

there.

it

because they sure

aren’t getting

Evason

who go to psychic such as the Psychic Expo in Toronto, can walk up and down and his wife,

of

it.

any help out

There’s no way,”

fairs

the

rows and

tell

One

are good.

Jeff Evason,

which psychics

psychic

in seven

people are really good, said Evason.

He

says

Conestoga College Night

you search on the

if

1-900 psychic numbers you will find information about all their inner workings and Internet

for

find out that anyone can for

buy a line about $600 an hour and set

says he

knows

that his wife

is

and that she has helped many people and guided them. She’s not a scam artist, but how could she ever have the time to sit at a

phone and answer them

all

the

minute rate. The profits are split 50/50 between the company and the owner of the line, and the company is

commercials and

responsible for providing bodies

length of time. “It’s awful,” said

their per

to

man

people

the

on

phones the

line

and for

keep five

minutes.

“These psychics, they are not they take a one day course, which probably lasts an hour, on how to keep people on the line. At the end of five minutes, they have done their job at that point. They can do whatever they want, but you have already got the charge on your bill,” said Evason. The Evasons have been approached three or four times by companies, one of them being Bell Canada. “We don’t want to do it because we think it is very psychics,

509 Wilson Ave., Kitchener EAT, DRINK & BE AN ASTOR 4$#

He

intuitive

negative for people to be sucked into this sort of thing and to lose money,” says Evason.

time? The people that have approached them wanted them to give their name to the line, do sell

them

the

Evason. “I don’t believe in it because I’ve read so many stories in newspapers about people. One story I read last month was about a person that was in debt $70,000 US to the psychic lines. People are calling and losing their house,

everything, they are addicted.”

“That person has a mental problem but there is a lot of people who have a mental illness that are calling for someone to talk to. They have lost it, they have lost all sorts of self-control calling up these lines,” said Evason.

There

no one policing saying, a minute this person can’t call.” Those lines are open to anybody that has a phone, now is

“Hey wait

that

is

Evason.

their

credit

card,

says


1

SPOKE, Nov. 9,

ENTERTAINMENT

1998

— Page 7

CD Review

Pras headed

and Wyclef Jean on their solo projects. The album title exquisite-

By Judy Sankar Ghetto Superstar. Unless you’ve been living under a rock in recent months, this phrase is familiar. What’s more is that the song Ghetto Superstar has

been a success the world over. If you are one of the millions who helped this song soar to the top of the charts, get ready because that song was just a taste of what Prakazrel “Pras” Michel has to

Pras proves that he

as

is

Hill

Jean on

and Wyclef

The song, however,

Ghetto Supastar (the album)

is

most recent release by

a

former Fugee. In case you’ve forgotten, the Fugees exploded onto the rap/hip hop scene in 1993, creating a turning point in the history of the genre.

he is as Pras proves musically inclined as Lauryn Hill that

And then

projects.

18-track

so

album Ghetto

and Pras’ Supastar means that Pras hasn’t Brooklyn upbringing his left behind. He does, however, know exactly where he is headed. life

far.

F

losing

a

it

bands,

member

October

quartet 1997,

opportunity

to

than makes up for this slow start. UP is a blend of electrifying

heavy rotation on many radio stations, is a haunting song about a person who works the night

kind./

wondering what he was saying. While Airportman is difficult to listen to, one shouldn’t write-off it. of because album the

drink/

marks R.E.M. The 14 tracks, produced by Pat McCarthy and the band, offer a more experimental sound for the band, including the use of synthesizers and drum loops to

build on their sounds of the past. The album opens with the

and mellow dark extremely with Keeping Airportman.

murmur.

If

it

weren’t

on the

liner

the

receiving

so

are

listener

(ly

visualize the scene.

far,

the stellar track on

can

UP

is

most powerful songs ever written by the band, it deals with the stifling effects of society’s need

notes of the sleeve (a first for the band), the listener would still be

a

for the lyrics printed

By

lyrics

Stipe’s

descriptive actu

currently

released,

Automatic for the People. One wonders if Stipe is really an himself on to referring imaginary person as he sings “Now my suspicions on the rise/ have known, I have known your

similar to

more than

Daysleeper,

shift.

how

single

first

Walk Unafraid. Perhaps one of the

reinvent

new

string

beautiful

The

songs on 1992’s

tradition. Stipe’s vocals are barely

the debut of the

and

people’s imaginations can give rise to suspicious thoughts, is

in

themselves.

UP

Hill

and

Jean’s

solo

projects,

defeats one myth.

A

group

stronger

isn’t

when

it

necessarily

stands together.

In the case of the Fugees, Hill, Jean and Pras can stand on their

own just fine.

1

UP with

Child from Green.

and it an

Mike Peter Buck made Stipe,

with Ghetto Supastar. The release of this album in conjunction with

is

Unfortunately, it gives listeners a false impression of the album. Thankfully, what follows more

arrangements. Suspicion, a song about

Michael

Mills

from the solo albums released by Pras’ former partners. Hill and Jean. amongst the three Relative artists, Jean takes on more of a reggae/pop sound on Carnival. On The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, Hill takes on a soulful, melodic vibe. Pras, on the other hand, has found a place in different

can keep guitars

R.E.M. When drummer Bill Berry left the Athens, Georgia,

Ultimately, Pras has proven himself a successful solo artist

2345

there were three

would But not

them.

Kenny

Rogers duet. The sound of Ghetto Supastar

more

after 17 years

destroy

Stream, a Dolly Parton and

Amazing Grace).

religion to just having fun.

are

modified, the chorus of the single taken from Islands in the is

doesn’t flaunt his riches or his high lifestyle. He addresses

By Melanie Spencer

some

songs

thrown into the ever-building pile of such sampled tunes like Puff Daddy’s I’ll Be Missing You. Ghetto Superstar, the single, is another song off the album that samples an old tune. Although the slightly been have words

He

subjects that his listeners are

original

find

Pras addresses everything from the benefits of hard work and determination to the importance of

since

irritation

slight'

otherwise

R.E.M. proves or

a

It’s

ly describes the

Hallelujah and

tracks that samples older songs.

their solo

you’ll

is,

yourself dancing to every song tracks religious the (except

one of the

is

That

catchy.

girlfriend to a mother.

offer.

the

between, and has therein created his own unique sound. All songs on Ghetto Supastar are

Blue Angel (possibly the best song on the album), for example, is about women who are strong and good. It’s about women who can be

likely to identify with.

supportive during a relationship and can be anyone from a

musically inclined as

Lauryn

Ghetto Supastaidom

for

many

Please

make me

for conformity.

It

times

energy, as Stipe sings passionately: “How can I be/ what I want to

be? / when all I want to do is strip away/ these stilled constraints/ and crush this charade/ shred this sad

masquerade.” these songs, and others on album, it is evident that necessity breeds invention. By

From

the

Berry’s

using

departure

begins with an

eerie-sounding guitar riff, which gives way to bursts of electrifying

1

2345

don’t talk, don’t up another

think/ order

let

me

let

imagination

"tHt FVIIIIEST IKViE tF THE

drive.”

tEUK."

Similarly, the stark You’re in the

Air

is

reminiscent of The

Wrong

w ant mb aai wry atvaxrf $ fife

fW vi imw Jiw fwwi* $tp

UP

is

string

a blend

of electrifying guitars

and

beautiful

m

**

*Mttw<rtli mnI cttaliy hysfcmatt Cmmtm ttas *t l*r N*tT

arrangements. “«*• 'Aitmtal

•# tut

it****,

m **&«

>! ni lIHrl

f*sr

« 9

something about

mary Tuesday, November 1C §:€C pm. The Sanctuary

$3 students

as

a

R.E.M. have produced a solid effort, which could become one of the best albums of 1998. catalyst for change,

$6 guests


.

Page 8

— SPOKE, Nov.

9,

Concert review

It’s

.

1998

.

.

Sloanly Rock

You’ve Done Wrong or playing the sombre Bells On and I Can Feel It, the audience was with them all the way. Murphy even replaced Scott and sang lead on Twice Removed’s Before I Do. Unfortunately, third-rate sound left the audience in the back half of the venue

By Ned Bekavac For a band with four consecutive gold albums and a songwriting ability miles ahead of its Canadian competition, Sloan certainly deserved better.

Organizers who moved their Oct. 29 Guelph gig from the sold-out Peter Clark Hall to the more spacious University of Guelph athletic complex may have forgotten that gymnasiums are for bouncing

struggling to pick out the band’s finer quirks.

Ferguson’s I Wanna Thank You was an mess; piano chimes echoed badly through the venue while Ferguson struggled

utter

sound. Dreadful sound and a youngish crowd gave this show a high school battle of the balls, not

to keep his microphone from giving out on him. Closing its set with the arena-rocker Money City Maniacs, complete with red

bands-like feel.

Not

that the

From

1

,500 in attendence minded.

Ferguson,

particular,

She Says What She Means,

Halifax-born

the

and all, Sloan, and Murphy in had the audience ignore the awful acoustics for a chance to dance the night away. One brave fellow even mounted the sirens

the minute they took the stage with

their latest hit.

Andrew

Patrick

Pentland,

Scott and Chris

Roll

’n’

Jay

Murphy

echoing the from drones “Slllooaaaaannn” boisterous crowd. Murphy even partook in

side-stage speakers.

the chants himself.

the

showered

were

with

As

What followed was

a near two-hour love had Sloan playing a whopping 24 tracks from its four-album catalogue. Whether he was calling fans onto stage, leading throwing out water bottles, hand-clap sessions, or doing his patented David Lee Roth-like scissor-kicks, bassist Murphy was the centre of attention. But with four songwriters each sharing lead affair that

Guelph.

(Photo by

Bassist Chris Murphy strikes another (Photo by Ned Bekavac) rock Star pose.

Ned Bekavac)

mounted the piano for Suppose They Close The Door and Sinking Ships from Sloan’s

Navy

He

was more than the Chris Murphy Show. It was the lanky Scott who carried the show musically. Scott not only kept beat

latest release.

with his torrid pounding of the drums, he

have a more mature, moodier

vocal duties, this

the “Sloan” chants rang again through

Murphy returned alone and had crowd sing Deeper Than Beauty, a gem from its sophomore effort, Twice Removed, recognized by Chart magazine as the best Canadian album of all time. Scott returned to the traps and the band churned out a five-minute jam session that included The Bird Is The Word while Scott screamed into the microphone like a mad man. the facility,

Blues.

gave the show a great change of

they

It

Though Pentland hid

then took

in the

much of

the performance, the rest of the

band was

in its usual

Murphy manned

it

the skins. Scott’s tunes

spread.

Lines

them;

is

this

type

playfulness and

shadows for

400 Metres, On The Horizon, and People Of The Sky while

centre stage and guitared

feel to

improvisation, of musicianship that makes Sloan live shows a refreshing change. And with it, they collected their $50 winners check and two hours of free studio

pace.

goofy good mood; and Whether belting out the hits The

You Amend, Coax Me, Everything

time.

Week festivities ...

Fright

Slashing pumpkins By Melissa

Dietrich

Conestoga College students had good time as they took

a howling part

in

contest

pumpkin

the

down

in the

carving

Sanctuary on

Oct. 28.

The event was Fright

Week

part of the

DSA’s

celebrations that also

included a howling contest, apple bobbing contest and a costum contest.

With

Scary pumpkins pumpkin decorated by members of the DSA, it was a eight

entered, plus a

big

Adorned

in

tattoos, Bit

Naked gave a stunning performance

at the Metropolis Nightclub in Kitchener Oct. 29. (Photo by Judy Sankar)

decision

for

ROXY

radio

announcers to pick the winner. Finally, after minutes of inspecting each pumpkin and judging them on scariness, gueyness and the technology used

by the carvers, they decided.

Steve Coleman (left) and Nick Rac, programmer/analyst students, pose with Pilsbury Doughboy.”

First

place

was won by Vic

Espiritu, a first-year general arts

student.

With his pumpkin called

Tuition hikes Help Us Grow a Brighter Future Support the fight against

We only sell what we can’t drink ourselves

Huntington disease.

Phone toll free, Huntington Society of Canada 1-800-998-7398

their

year computer pumpkin, ‘the

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

Espiritu

won

prizes

including a flashlight and a Roots t-shirt.

it’,” he said. Cleaves explained that a forum was held last year when tuition

ignore

.

.

Huntington's

Amaryllis

Killer,

first

continued from page 1

went up, but there was little communication within die colfees

Gerry Cleaves, DSA vice-president of student affairs, said that forums should be held for the students.

“The student forums, you have to hold them, just to give them the chance. You have to hold them to say, ‘We put it out there, it

was

the students’ decision to

lege so only a small students

number of

showed up.

“Personally, 10 per cent doesn’t bother me. I think there’s too many students out there that it

does bother but they don’t say anything until after it’s alread done,” he said.


)

SPOKE, Nov. 9, 1998

— Page 9

Gourmet delight

Six-course fundraiser a success with various kinds of wine. The portion of the campaign was a

By Jacqueline Smith

first

A gourmet dinner for the food management beverage and program at Conestoga College was held at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel on Nov. 2. The evening, which included an awards program, started at 7 p.m. It was die second initiative of a fundraising campaign expected to raise $25,000 for equipment upgrades at the Waterloo campus kitchen and dining area. Those who bought the $55 ticket were served a six-course meal “Certainly,

aware has

I

that

the

think

you are

Conestoga highest

job

rate

the

$250-value coupon book, which are being sold for $25 each. Two hundred and twenty people filled the Grand Ballroom that was donated to the college for the evening. Chefs from eight of Kitchener and Waterloo’s top restaurants, along with Tyrone Miller, the program’s chef, and some of the students participated in the occasion.

College president John Tibbits, opened the evening by welcoming everyone and introducing the

master of ceremonies,

CKGL’s

Neil Aitchison, the

graduate

of the college’s program.

in

broadcasting

Four students were awarded for their

leadership

character,

placement

first

and

professional

qualities,

promise

their ability to get along with

CKGL personality and Conestoga College broadcasting program’s first graduate, was cermony for the gourmet dinner on Nov. 2. In background from left is Jennifer Melles, Too Russo’s Restaurant; James McLean, Benjamin’s chef; and Tyrone Miller, Conestoga’s food and beverage management program chef. Neil Aitchison,

the master of

others.

province...”

John

Tibbits,

Conestoga College president

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

The food, wines and decorations were donated. Reflections, a band of eight lead by Henry Currie, a K-W Record reporter, provided the evenings entertainment while

CHYM, CKGL

and the Record

did the media promotions. Scott Hergott was awarded the Canadian Hospitality Foundation Merit award for $500. Michelle Miller was awarded the Food and Beverage Management Advisory Committee Award for $100. Ian Challenger received the Four

Points Hotel Scholarship for $500. Wanda ‘Tremblatt received the

Garland Group Scholarship, and Melvin Pyke was awarded the Region of Waterloo Culinary Association Award of $250. In his closing speech, Tibbits

and everyone who participated and donated their talents, efforts,, time, energy and gave

appreciation

his

recognition

to

professionalism.

“As

I

said at the beginning of the

way

evening, the only

that our

colleges can really be successful in

day and age

this

is

through

full

co-operation and partnership from the

community.”

Tibbits

said

that

without the

partnership and support from the

community, Conestoga could not operate at the very highest level that

it

would

the Waterloo Regional Culinary Association. Pyke received the $250 award on Nov. 2, at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel, for demonstrating leadership and initiative Melvin

in

Pyke,

recipient

of

the kitchen laboratory setting.

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

like to.

think you are aware Conestoga has the highest job placement rate in the province at “Certainly,

I

that

93 per

cent.

And

it is

partnerships

that really help us.”

Movie of

the

Week

Thurs. Nov. 12

12:30 In

The Reflections, lead by Harry Currie, centre, donated their time and effort at the fundraising dinner for (Photo by Jacqueline Smith the college’s food and beverage management program on Nov. 2.

Sanctuary

pm


Page 10

— SPOKE, Nov.

r 9,

SPOKE 30 YEARS

p

1998

/ Keeping Conestoga connected By Sarah Thomson

and

The

following four pages

Little

Puckers Get Screwed for a story about

was a headline

the approached and department journalism pleaded with it to take over Spoke. much trepidation, the With journalism faculty changed its program to include the production of Spoke, said Andrew Jankowski, former journalism co-ordinator.

Association)

minor hockey. Spoke is broke due to unforeseen budget problems was the headline story in ’71. A Spoke benefit concert and coffeehouse were held

are dedicated to celebrating the 30th anniversary of

SPOKE, and

enjoy reading smut.” The new decade was to offer a new management plan for Spoke. In 1980 the DSA (Doon Student

woman, another showed five staff members mooning for the camera,

the people

to raise funds for the paper.

Throughout the ’70s there was a

that have been involved

with

it

constant staff turnover.

over the years.

1972.

“Spoke bashing

He

success

a sport that has never lacked participants or enthusiastic spectators,” wrote is

or

failure

between

communication

the

Students thought the conservastyle of the paper Toombs established was dull, leaving Paul

follows the adage, the more things change the more things stay the

same. Since Conestoga College opened in January 1967 there has always been a student newspaper.

when journalism took

department the Spoke, changed its program length and format to include one two-month period working on Spoke. In 1988, the program changed to allow students to work on Spoke for

with

rests

1981,

over

“The paper’s

wrote,

divisions.”

Jeannette Cantin, 1996 editor. Now in its 30th year, the paper

The Conestoga News

By

One of the many editors to resign was Lowry Toombs, an editor in

experience.

learning

at

is

the

held up for criticism, they wouldn’t

make-up artist, reporting CFL game and completing a

1987

shoot at African Lion These experiences showed

Safari.

Coates,

who

wrote,

“We

are not

truly a ‘student newspaper.’

much

as

we would

like to

a “student newspaper.”

almost six months.

Robertson, an editor in ’72, to come to the conclusion, “Students

like Christina Jonas, ’83 editor,

editorial

working on Spoke was a great

Spoke

As

produce

A member

of the journalism faculty makes decisions;

all

therefore.

staff are restricted.

reviewing Spoke, told him his column “was good enough to run

any paper.”

DSA

number of

the

group

a

of

president,

are funding a paper

what

the

DSA members

unfair reporting of the

felt

was

student

association since January.

was

The dispute continued, and ’92 the

who

felt their

in

DSA reviewed its contract

with Spoke, an $18,000 a year

But

subsidy, paid in monthly installments, in exchange for advertising

and no editorial power. The DSA wanted to make the paper more accountable to the student popula-

Star comedian

Wayne article.

two

nowith a united, papers censorship policy. In 1972, the

in the ’70s editions

Jim Carrey was featured on the front page tape a demo for Johnny Carson.

of Spoke was minimal. One issue included a photo of a topless

New elective course to

start in the fail

.

.

.

Gregory said there is a lot that students can learn about anxi-

ing and positive mental rehearsal

eties.

practical skills to

techniques.

And

lastly,

employ

important to them.” “It is a win-win situation for everybody,” said Gregory. While in the specific part of the

and

unique goals outcomes.

Gregory

things. Firstly, how to identify and alter self-defeating thoughts

enrolment

to utilize relaxation, focus-

10

through

work on

16,

individual

projects that will both meet their

program, students will learn three

and mistaken beliefs. Secondly,

skills.

students will

said is

the

course

the

limited

to

when he

Conestoga College

visited

two ways.

It

wanted

to

require the newspaper to allow

students to be involved directly in the paper. The other suggestion was to provide

non-journalism

to

Photo By Sarah Thomson

weekly coverage on a regional page for all Conestoga campuses. The DSA also felt Spoke should have a member of the DSA on its editorial board. For the third year, DSA in ’93 was still upset with the funding of Spoke.

It

decided

it

cont’d from pg.i and students a chance to get to

said.

Students

who

are interested in

this elective

services.

Room

know each “It will

give students a chance

what area they particwant to address,” she said.

to identify ularly

other.

Counsellors will be going around to the eligible programs to inform students further about the course and answer any questions over the next two months.

the program.

students.

“We would

1982,

officially enroll the student into

management weeks In

is

in

30

same time allows them work on something which

to

Spoke

class

dents the format to do that and at

she said. “This course gives stu-

of

can go to student 2B02, to set up a brief meeting with one of the course teachers, which are Carol Gregory, Joan Magazine and Barbara Kraler. At the meeting students will find out more about the course, choose their option and receive a course entry form to sign. The form will then be forwarded to the Academic Support Office to

enhance their effectiveness performance through test taking, developing and delivering oral presentations, conflict and assertiveness

“Anxieties are well learned and it takes time to unlearn them,”

tion in

ca m pus

on

started program Interchange, a newspaper aimed at surrounding communities the

journalism

Conestoga. Censorship

that

John Lassel, said, and being stabbed in the back by the newspaper we fund” because of

“We

together

the

Gilberds, supervisor,

security

satisfaction,

their

the

part.

1970

Bob

featuring

journalism students formed a policy committee in February ’91. In April of the same year, the

an

March

by

’90s

the

started

Finding

It is

most

Trevers said, in a Concern

how

writing confidence in His columns was boosted when a Globe and Mail representative,

students reading Spoke wasn’t to

in irregular sizes until

out,” student

Beacon Herald, and

the Ontario Farmer.

quota.

underground paper. Concern. The underground paper was a “nice change from the crap

the

the Stratford

awaking from a nightmare to find were ticketing each other to meet their summer

work was censored by Spoke

In

Reid. This training lead to his present position as a columnist for

that security guards

established in October 1969.

Spoke puts

a

writing a weekly column, said

retract

Issues, of the paper in the ’60s contained poetry, music reviews and short news pieces. The paper

started

was

Spoke

would not talk to the paper because of a cartoon it would not

student association.

1970, students

on

fighting. Physical resources staff

opened up the region. In the beginning, Spoke had an by COR staff paid editorial

in

Working

Spoke

Conestoga

come

he wasn’t able from staff in on

if

to get the stories

in

that

started to

was a

favorable experience, especially

symbol of a democratic counthe spokes of the wheel represent the lines of communication

in the ’70s, for the

Reid,

it

journalism having the department running the paper. This issue was addressed in an 1985 editorial by Rosemary

from

try;

current tabloid format

was a

time.

the

(Council of Representatives)

Bob

also felt

on him

reflection

retired

also connected to the

He

editor.

said

her the diversity in journalism. Some problems on Spoke arose

per, originates from the wheel as

Spoke

challenge,

on a photo

Spoke, as a name for a newspa-

the

criticize his peers’ writing

big

April 1968.

was printed

judge so readily. Learning how to constructively

theatre

started in

within the college as a whole.

if

work

Hamilton Spectator, and teaches

The by followed February Conestoga Doomed News, which continued until Spoke started in

wagon

Coates also pointed out that other students had their class

journalism part-time at Conestoga. Interesting stories she covered included a business feature on a

tive

For some budding journalists

Jonas

employed

currently

like 10 students in

each of the specific areas.” she

Gregory said the meeting ahead of time will give the counsellors

Carol Gregory of student services describes the new elective that Photo By Melissa Dietrich begins next semester.


^

r

;

K

SO YEARS

the “journalism department takes itself far

made assurances about “We’re not out

his paper:

pete with Spoke.

to

com-

voyeur interested in forming with unusual people?

It’s like

(Connoisseur).”

one word Heather

is

If

so,

you need

Ibbotson, an editor in ’92, uses a lot

project

It

everyone

organized,

but

1998

— Page ir*

new

relationships

PORNOGRAPHY.

and she

enjoyed the pressure although

Jankowski,

9,

her Spoke was an ambitious

get

to

everything

Andrew

Nov.

describe

to

experience.

was a

\

Are you Are you

comparing the New York Times (Spoke) and People magazine Challenge,

SPOKE,

Do you lead a hum-drum existence? Do you have an unnatural love for animals?

too seriously.”

Stewart

TC

SPOKE

lot

it

of responsibility.

Ibbotson, who works for the Brantford Expositor, credits her classmates for their hard work and enthusiasm. The equality among

former

journalism co-ordinator Photo Submitted

them

them

allowed

work

to

together smoothly.

would pay $17,500

for the year,

Spoke’s technological evolve-

with plans to review

its

spending.

ment over 30 years has been a challenge. The process evolved from typewritten copy, to typesetting and manual paste-up to full pagination, on computers

DSA pub manager Dave McQuillan said, “My personal opinion is to yank everything and our own paper.” Fred Harris, then chair of student

start

Spoke

services, said in a

The two printers Spoke has used Fairway Press, and currently The Cambridge Reporter. Technological upgrades have had total savings of at least 20 per

was your

creation, not the college.”

Jankowski, involved in Spoke and the DSA for 12 years, said, “I don’t believe that,

if

cent over the years.

was producing

DSA returned

to its role as publisher,

it

so at the cost for which

paper,

producing the

’90s

a

now

it

cost

Jankowski offers his comments

We can

about Spoke since 1981. He says, “I think Spoke, the way it has been run, has done a really good job. It’s a real newspaper. I don’t know if there was a single worst hour.”

first-rate

had an under-

ground newspaper, Connoisseur, in ’92.

When COR

the paper

today the DSA pays Spoke a subsidy of approximately $15,000 a year.

getting a first-rate newspaper.”

While

Recently, a new club has been assembled on campus, dedicated to the propagation and production of pornography. You may just be the person we re looking for. We require people, who like you, have unusual needs and offbeat talents. If you are really prepared for new, stimulating associations, leave your name and phone number with any member of the Spoke staff. You will be contacted as soon as possible.

$30,000;

could do it is

and

are

potentially very beneficial to the it

Photoshop

QuarkXPress.

“Spoke is a publication that is very valuable to the student body and

DSA. Remember,

Adobe

using

article,

Craig Stewart, a journalism it because he said

student, started

fill

Your need

l

nP p p WwL

m

| R

*

m

m

PORNOGRAPHY REVIVAL INSTITUTE OF CONESTOGA COLLEGE was the first advertisement that ran in Spoke for the Pornography Revival Institute of Conestoga College, on Nov. 23, 1970. An ad that ran after this one actually had a topless woman. Later issues of Spoke reveal the club was a sham was the ads ran as a prank by a Spoke staffer.

This

Photo By Sarah Thomson

Bottom: The

Spoke

first

edition

of

the Doomed published March

called

News was 15, 1968.

Photo By Sarah Thomson Left: Various copies of Spoke from the ‘60s to the ‘90s.

Photo By Sarah Thomson

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CONESTOGA COLLEGE

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YOUR EXECUTIVE*.

LIBRARY as a body, have put their

Steph: »>.«»

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can only say wtll da Mf iob I

Christina Jonas, former editor of Spoke, holds a copy of the paper she edited. Jonas is now a journalism teacher at

Conestoga. Photo By Sarah Thomson

.


r

Page 12

— SPOKE, Nov.

9,

1998

30 YEARS

Journalism teacher still a student at heart By Melissa

Dietrich

father rest

two

of the third floor at Conestoga College. The many shelves are neatly packed with old volumes of

became At age 1 8 he got

sits

a small stereo that

is

temporar-

Below, a computer ily silent. hums, awaiting its keys to be

To the left is a clean, wooden desk and rows of filing tapped.

ensuring

cabinets,

who

will

if

monk. He

describes his uncle as “a

very

was this influenced him so much

saintly

uncle that

man.”

It

age 12 he wanted to become a monk. His uncle, however, changed his mind.

he decided

When

at

from the war, the family left Poland and moved to Canada. Jankowski’s his father returned

been

Jankowski

his pilot’s licence

and

in the air force.

me

man who may have a short fuse, but who is also a conscientious man, and

is

genuinely a good,

strong and self-disciplined person.

Make no

mistake, Jankowski

who

is

admits to telling people what he honestly thinks of them. Besides his wife Carol, Jankowski also lives with his two also a person

don’t want to

into photography.

Once

Mark, 21 and Adam, 19. After working as an editor at a Montreal paper, Jankowski decidsons,

ed

teaching. “I had been

to start

essentially teaching while editor at

thought I would start teaching at a

the paper, so

attempt to

I

was not what

school,” he says. “It

I wasn’t I had expected it to be. prepared for a lot of the things I would run into,” remembers

Jankowski. Nevertheless, he has spent 26 years

at

the

college,

and was

of the journalism program for 1 3 and half years until co-ordinator

OUR 1999-2000 PROGRAM CALENDAR

handing over the job this fall. Jankowski will be retiring from Conestoga College in two years because of one reason only: he

be

will

65 years

He

old.

a

much

it

will continue to

is

is

his advice to ensure personal

success.

Laid back and relaxed, his feet on a desk and arms supporting his neck, Jankowski is asked what makes him feel happy

resting

he

or proud.

Finding out about family accomplishments and students who have

Young’s response was “so what, wife

tells

who met him

me

that

too.”

achieved things in their careers

in

after school,

was

his response.

But the thing that makes him the most proud is that “I still feel like I’m learning, and I think this

good way

really

a

is

to

1995, before

suspect that were there.”

Conestoga College Bookstore

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on arm,

get

through life because I’m still developing (even though I’m in my 60s) and I’m still finding things about myself that I didn’t

coming to the college. Not only has Jankowski been a teacher to her, he has also become

Experience Post-graduate Program Excellence!

some

things to happen by themselves,”

According to Young, they must have snored rather loudly during the night because few animals were to be found the next day. Another friendship Jankowski has developed at Conestoga is with a student Casey Johnson,

JOIN

and

of his former students have had, he does feel proud of those students. “You can’t sit back and expect

snores.

my

it

responsible for the success

before turning in the first night, Jankowski confessed to Young that

work on

the years to

During Jankowski’s years at the befriended has he colleagues and students. One of the colleagues is photography instructor Roger Young. Young’s fondest memory was when he, Jankowski, and Young’s brother went camping together three years ago. The group was up in the Bruce Peninsula to take photographs of wildlife. Just

him

plane

come. His most pleasant memories of his years at Conestoga have to do with the students he has had. Although he does not feel totally

was “too

college

wife told

modem

continue to fly other planes during

extra work.”

that his

three-person,

called a Zenith, and believes he

relieved at being replaced as the

co-ordinator because

photojoumalist,

a

Jankowski has not been able to spend time taking pictures like he used to. He has also just discovered a talent for woodworking. This is something that he enjoys a great deal and looks forward to doing. He will also be working on

Andrew Jankowski has been faculty supervisor of SPOKE (Photo by Sarah Thomson) many times Over the past 1 5 years.

SHERIDAN CALL FOR

I

Now that he can write what he wants to, he admits that he enjoys it more. He also plans to start back

Jerry Frank, a journalism teacher

met his wife, Carol, of 28 years who was working at the same paper during their work term. Carol describes her husband as a

to write, but

write that any more,” he says.

planes.

University. There, he

make

he will be even busier. “I always wrote what other people wanted

Even today flying continues to be a hobby of his. Over the years Jankowski has even owned several

methodical approach you have to take while flying, I think Andrew takes with everything he does,” says Frank. After his years in the air force, Carleton attended Jankowski

her

but believes that during retirement

and, later during his long-standing experience with flying, spent time as an air cadet

helping

there

important decisions for her future. Jankowski will miss teaching,

interested in flying planes.

be retiring

he had any heroes growing up, Jankowski remembers his Uncle Leon, who was a asked

teens

early

his

In

College, remembers flying with him once. “The same type of

the war.

When

brothers,

and friend of his from Conestoga

from Conestoga College in two years after 28 years of teaching journalism, began his life in Warsaw, Poland, 63 years ago. Between the ages of four and 13, Jankowski had to learn to live without his father who had left for

her mentor in life, says Johnson. She also looks at him as like a father figure, someone who has

while the

office

the

belongs to a teacher.

Jankowski,

in 1943,

of the family, including his came over in 1948.

Andrew Jankowski’s office sits way up in the tiny, stuffy corridors

Journalism Quarterly and photography books. Among the books

"

went first

(additional letter*

name

on nrrerae

(t

grad year

are extra)

DEPOSIT OF 60% DUE AT TIME OF ORDER


1

.

Page 13

— SPOKE, Nov.

9,

1998

YEARS

30

Nov. 16

-

20

Euchre, Chess, Pool, Fooseball,

Air Former journalism co-ordinator Bob

Trotter enjoys

a book

TOURNAMENTS at Chapters, his favorite bookstore. (Photo by Brent Clouthier)

Sign

DSA

Active after the fact

chapters after retirement by Brent Clouthier

with Keanu Reeves.

His business card says it all: Freelance writer, editor,

Kitchener- Waterloo Record for

syndicated

Conestoga

He was

speaker,

guest

on

media

seminars

writing, etc.

Bob lives

Trotter

is is

man of many adding another

a

chapter to his story.

The retired former co-ordinator of Conestoga College’s journalism department now finds himself as a part-time bookseller at Chapters bookstore in Waterloo. exercise for

was

member

a

By

his

own admission

Trotter

feels that he, along with associates

Andrew Murphy

Jankowski and Rae were instrumental in turning the journalism program into the county’s most respected. “Shortly

after

also

I

pens

another

Gray Matter, a look at growing

entitled

light-hearted

current trimester system,” Trotter

remembers.

“Here

$30-million

faculty

was

a

was

that

Trotter sees his current job at Chapters as a logical and natural

progression.

“I’m a voracious reader. Words my life,” he says. “Besides, it helps to make the car payments.” are

More value. Low student fares. Climate controlled,

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Why

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should we?”

Trotter recalled that he started

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“We had

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Trotter

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from

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six-hour shift.”

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my numb

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.

— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 14

9,

1998

SPORTS

Undefeated season continues

Condors

sting Seneca, win 5-3 Hanlon into the net while a Seneca defenceman was busy trying to get him away from the

By Jason Gennings The Conestoga Condors stand

front of the net.

undefeated in regular season hockey play after a 5-3 victory

over the Seneca Sting in a

game

Seneca

home

were stopped by Gignac. Condor Kyle Magwood did

Oct. 28.

OCAA

league game Their third of the season was won, despite

quick snap at Seneca’s goal, but was stopped cold by Sting goalie Colin March. The third period featured great shots and blocks by both teams. The Seneca Sting surged near the end of the third and Paul Smith drove home his second goal

second period.

Conestoga blasted out of the gates with three goals in the first period to get a lead they would not

give up.

Three minutes into the first, the went to goal first game’s Conestoga’s Ryan Martin. Six minutes later Mike Traynor added a goal for the Condors to make it 2-0. Near the end of the first period Darren Dillon solidified the lead, making it 3-0. Some rough play at the end of the opening period led to a brief

making

teams, Conestoga had 57 minutes,

Chris King, left, of the Conestoga Condors is busy earning some of the 19 penalty minutes he was (Photo by Jason Gennings) awarded against Seneca in Men’s Hockey action on Oct. 28.

two opened with a so couple of players from each team period

penalty box.

period

rallied

with

a

in

the

quick

the final score 5-3.

Penalties were heavy for both

tussle after the first period buzzer,

Seneca

his

best to return the favour with a

suffering heavy penalties in the

in the

rallied with a series of

shots on the Conestoga net that

pressure on the Conestoga goalie

the

During

tying the game.

Conestoga net during the power play, and there were some great saves by Gignac.

received

Seneca pressed hard during the second period and kept the

second goal by

Halfway

forward Paul Smith, who scored 29 seconds after the puck was dropped. About 10 minutes later, the Sting’s Chris Coburn scored and Seneca was within one goal of

through

second

the

Anthony Gignac. Despite a two-man power play, Seneca was

period there were

some scraps

between

and

unable to score again.

a flood of penalty calls.

All of the action

was near

the players,

outburst

the

it

opened Seneca and

minutes,

four

including a Conestoga 29, two-minute bench minor. Conestoga player Chris King nursed a cut on his chin while serving a couple minutes for slashing and five minutes for

elbowing, but the real hurt came 10-minute two the with to handed misconducts Conestoga’s Kyle Boulton and

Mike Traynor. Things got hot as the crowd yelled out their opinion of referee Philip Olinski.

was hard to keep track as there seemed to be more people in the box than on the ice. The third period opened and the showed what they Condors learned from period two with a quick goal by Darren Dillon, making the score 4 -2. Conestoga’s final goal was a smooth deflection by Ramsey At one point

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

BljgfgEBIBlBlBJaaBiBMaBMBMBMBlBlBIBMBIBBlBIBlBiaiBiaiBIBJafafaiBiaiBlBfBlBIBia

it

and Seneca 48. “We wanted to come out with a lot of discipline and a lot of

Ken Galemo, head coach of Condors varsity hockey. “We had a great first period because we stayed out of the penalty box, and were able to go with our three or four lines, and keep throwing fresh legs at physical play,” said

them.”

He

said he

was

less pleased with

the second period,

where Seneca

scored twice.

“We

simply gave up.

skating,”

Galemo

We stopped

said.

“As soon

we

got into penalty trouble I lost some of my key players.” Francesco Bazzocchi,, head as

coach of the Sting, said winning this game would have been nice. “We would have been 2-1 instead of 1-2,” he said. “No one likes to lose

The Sting

two games

in a

row.”

will not see action

again until Nov. 1 1 “That gives us the opportunity to

go back, regroup and work on some things,” he said. Condors now play a couple of away games, and return home Nov. 25 when they host the

Humber Hawks.

Ideas for Sports?

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: GRIEF You

can’t stop crying,

numb. All of these loss in our lives

you

feel angry,

you

Let Spoke know! feel

feelings are normal reactions to

—a

reaction

we

call grief.

Grief

does not only have to be a result of losing a loved one to death; we grieve any kind of loss: the

breakup of a relationship, the loss of good health or even the loss of a dream to reach a certain goal. Although these feelings are natural, it sometimes helps to talk them over with a counsellor as part of the healing process. Writing your thoughts in a journal, reading books about grief, and talking friends can also help.

to

If

come

out

you have a

later,

friend

Ned Bekavac By phone: 748-5366

Most of all, give yourself

permission to grieve. Feelings left bottled up will only

Contact Our Sports Editor

delaying the healing process.

who

is

grieving, don’t

worry

By

fax:

748-5971

about saying the wrong thing to them. Just be there, be a good listener or remind them how much

you care with a

card, a

hug or some time

together.

Submitted by: Student Services

Or e-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

One

of

many

28 game.

tussles between

Seneca and Conestoga

at the Oct.

(Photo by Jason Gennings)


SPOKE,

SPORTS

Nov.

9,

1998

— Page 15

Mihelic nets two goals in victory

Condors capture soccer bronze By Neven Mujezinovic

Mouradian.

Conestoga College picked up the bronze medal in the Ontario

Mouradian conceded that the was a deserved one, even though the Condors could have and should have won.

Colleges

semi-final loss

Association

Athletic

Championships

by beating Durham College 2-0 on Oct. 3 1 in

He

Kitchener.

Condors converted their chances. Geoff Conestoga coach Johnstone, who coaches men’s and women’s soccer, said he probably enjoyed coaching this year more than any other. “Having two teams who were

Dan Mihelic scored a goal in each half to give the Condors a deserved victory. The Condors were missing four key players due to suspension or Paul injury: McQuade, Paul Mouradian, Derhan Sherifali and

Dwayne

Conestoga was able to rebound from Oct. 30th ’s heartbreaking

Durham made the

semi-final loss better than

from

theirs,

and

that

look a calm and confident bunch prior to their bronze medal match against Durham. got two goals from Dan Mihelic in their 2-0 victory. (Photo By Neven Mujezinovic)

Mihelic ’s second came in the He broke free on the edge of the penalty area when a

“But full credit to Conestoga. I thought they played well. They got their two goals prior to all this

deep cross sailed perfectly

thing (bad refereeing) happening,

67th minute.

difference.

The game was

a hard-fought and both teams took turns in dominating the play. Overall, Durham was the better team in the first half, while Conestoga played

Fractionally

head.

battle

to the ball,

The late stages of the game were marred by the expulsion of two

in the 44th

minute from a free-kick 20 metres out. Mihelic was fouled and took the kick himself. He curved the ball around the wall with great

.

Bambino added he did

not

repeat

Durham

felt

their

excellent

performance

semi-final

against

game was

played in a sporting spirit overall. Durham coach Stan Bambino

today and that’s unfortunate. I think they have to learn, as in life,

was not up to of a bronze medal

you must continue and do the best you can all the way through and they certainly didn’t play to

players for protesting the

ref’s decisions, but the

came

so congratulations to them,” said

Bambino.

Humber, in which they narrowly lost on penalties. “They weren’t up for the game

Durham

day.

goal

the

Mihelic lobbed the ball out of the keeper’s reach into the empty net.

Once again it was the Condors’ power up front that carried the first

to his

beating

oncoming goalkeeper

better in the second.

The

said the refereeing

the

calibre

that

hit

game. He thought both teams played hard, but fair, and the

their expectations.”

the inside of the left-hand post and ricocheted into the net.

refereeing in the last part of the game was very poor.

Goalscorer Mihelic was named an All-Star forward in the

precision.

The

swerved,

ball

ceremony

He

ball past goalkeeper Bill

collecting

after

Hollywood

could

not

have

written a better script. In

a

dazzling

sudden-death

semi-final match that for

spectators

at

was a treat Conestoga it was the

College on Oct. 30, Centennial College Colts who had one last trick up their sleeve.

Down

three times throughout the

match, the Colts fought back on three

occasions

Conestoga

to

all

stun

the

4-3

in

Condors

extra-time.

While the match looked destined for penalty kicks, Colt

Kareem

Reynolds scored his second goal of the game when he tucked the

a

Johnson

cross

bar

rebound just four minutes from the end of extra-time. It was retribution for Reynolds, who was nearly ejected from the game in the 63rd minute. “I was just frustrated,” the Colt midfield-

er

of

being

game,

time sending the

game

to extra

time.

With

seven

regulation,

minutes

the

left

Colts’

in

Gary

Johnston knotting the score at three from a corner kick. The

into the penalty spot area, floated

in

my team.”

When Zack Lakoseljac

gave the Condors the lead just 1 1 minutes from time on a brilliant header from the left side, it looked like the Condors were on their way to a 3-2 victory.

a shot on goal that eluded Condor goalkeeper Bill Johnson.

Conestoga coach Geoff Johnstone said the game was lost in set plays.

“We

set pieces,”

he

game “Which

lost this

said.

in is

where we usually win.” The Condors took the early lead in the seventh minute when

Dwayne

Bell buried a loose ball

into the

bottom

left

comer from

the edge of the 18-yard box.

The Colts tied it up 12 minutes when Chris Sinopoli chased a

later

ball that rebounded off the post. Johnson made a fine save, but was beaten by Sinopoli ’s second strike. The Condors 2-1 halftime lead

came courtesy of a Paul McQuade header in the 38th minute. But it was the ghost of Reynold’s that would come back to haunt the Condors. One minute after the incident, Reynolds jumped above the Condor defenders and headed home a beauty in the bottom left comer, levelling the score at two. Again, it was the dangerous set pieces that were the Condor’s

near-ejection

Conestoga’s Dan Mihelic eludes a Centennial defender in OCAA The Condors led three times in the match, but lost 4-3 in extra time. (Photo By Ned Bekavac)

semi-final action Oct. 30.

undoing.

it

how the Condors allowed Centenial to catch up could not explain three times.

“What can you do? We’ll be back next year, for sure,” said a confident Mihelic.

Team

the

said

it

In

final

of

the

OCAA

was a good season despite

Centennial 2-0, making Humber top dog in Ontario. Humber will represent Ontario in British

was a great trip, from start to The guys came along well together. Unfortunately, it had to “It

finish.

finish with a bronze. Hopefully

go

for gold next year,” said

send the game into extra Johnson had to lunge to his to deflect a tough Reynolds

to play to

header over the

bar.

In the end, the

Columbia

on Nov. teams wished Humber

at the nationals

4-7. All the

good luck in bringing the trophy back to Ontario.

national

extra time

in

The Condors got a brilliant save from Johnson with three minutes

left

the

Championship, Humber defeated

not finishing on top.

we’ll

and leam, with greater proportion who were willing to do that than any before, so I had a lot of fun coaching.” Johnstone said the men’s season was tremendous and a great springboard, because nine of the 16 men were rookies. He also said if the men’s team can acquire some mental toughness from the women’s and leam to put the opposing team away after establishing dominance, next year should be even better. of players on both teams

co-captain Paul Mouradian

time.

just did the best I could to

“We were down I

had done twice

Colts battled back, this

the

attempting to strike player.

like they

Condors left the front post unmarked and Johnston, who had until then lofted all his comers

said

help

warned for a Conestoga

But just

earlier, the

after the final.

was really hard to get motivated for the third-place game after expecting to play in the final. Mihelic said Conestoga should have won the semi-final match. He said

Conestoga bedeviled by Colts By Ned Bekavac

was deserved because

willing to work, apply themselves

The Condors The Condors

Nevertheless,

Bell.

also thought the bronze-medal

victory

Condors ran out

of weapons.

Mouradian was red-cared

in the

second extra time frame

after

questioning the official.

“It was a close game,” coach Johnstone said. “It could have gone either way.” Johnstone said he was unhappy with the

officiating.

Though the seesaw thriller left Conestoga on the wrong side of the score-line, the team had little time to dwell on the loss as it had to prepare for its bronze medal match against Durham.


Page 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Nov.

9,

1998

Digital Edition - November 09, 1998