Page 1

Photo by Lisa Wilhelm


Give unto others

College and community banking on food drives By Dee Bettencourt can develop when

Have you ever experienced

starvation

the kind of hunger that cupboards are bare, the bank account is nonexistent and food is something you only walk by? Sean Strickland, executive director of the Food Bank of Waterloo Region, admitted Oct. 9 that he has experienced fasting only

through a cleansing process, yet there are local people who confront hunger daily. “One of the challenges we’re facing is that despite an improving economy, poverty is

put turnips in a gas tank,” says Strickland,

Waterloo region,” says Strickland. “Poverty is relative in North America to its affluence. I can’t say we’re starving to death here, whereas in a third-

Jeanette Walker, support worker for Conestoga College’s student services office, agrees it has been slow regarding food

world country, they are. That’s absolute poverty. But one of the reasons we continue

“There has been an increased demand for food. We’re meeting it thus far, but without more donations, we might run

increasing

in

to

have increasing poverty

is

the

referring to the fact that the

operating budget

upon public

is

Food Bank’s

80 per cent dependent

donations.

There

are

over four years. And the waiting list is ten years (to get into a

used to buy food vouchers for Zehrs,” says Walker. “But our box is virtually empty right now.

As

Thanksgiving food winds down, officially

his ninth

drive

ending Oct.

1

4,

Strickland says

remain packed, as “we go exceptionally hard between September through Aeel^Tor the Thanksgiving, Cfirimnas and spring food

his schedule will

drives.”

Although

hampers

provided

for

the

Strickland

drive,

critical the

are only Christmas

says

is

it

Thanksgiving food

drive replenishes the Kitchener

warehouse’s shelves. seems to me each year

“It

more the

it

is

difficult to find a place in

public’s

mind

for a

food

drive,” says Strickland. “These are challenging times; a lot of

issues

are

competing for the

public’s attention

-

Clinton, the

Way. have a goal of 298,000 pounds of food, about a pound

teachers’ strike, the United

We

per person living in Kitchener-

Waterloo, but we are roughly at Conestoga College support worker Jeanette Walker 80,000 pounds. That’s 10 per displays an almost-empty food depository in the cent behind last year’s (level). student services office where she works. (Photo by Dee Bettencourt) “We need cash, too. You can’t

adds that despite a sluggish start to food drive, the K-W commnunity has been recognized officially by the provincial Trillium Foundation as one of the

most caring in all of Canada. “We work hard to build a place and get message out, then leave it up to community to respond.”

the

the

different

short.

unit).”

Strickland, also a City of Waterloo councillor,

this year’s

charity.

of shelter. There hasn’t been a nonprofit unit, not one unit, built in Kitchener in cost

high

them with groceries.”

avenues; sometimes additional funds from the college can be

I

even had

to

buy groceries for

it

over the summer.”

Walker says as a single parent and sole provider of two daughters, there were months she didn’t eat fresh fruit to

make

sure they could. These days she

picks up tuna on sale, or extra spaghetti sauce and puts the nutritious food into the college’s

food depositories. “I’m partial towards students,” says Walker. “I think donations are down as everyone is just swamped. I even forgot Monday was Thanksgiving.” Strickland says the vast majority of people struggle to make ends meet long before they end up on the doorstep of the Food Bank. He says it is a myth they access emergency food every week. “The reality is, they use emergency food just three and a half times a year, in general. People are proud in gpod times and in bad. They go to friends, family or their church before they go to an agency to provide

$ean Bank

Strickland, executive director of the

Food

Waterloo Region, stands in the midst f ooc f rom the Thanksgiving food drive, of

(Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

By Jacqueline Smith

^ •*

Students and faculty from Conestoga College’s social services program spent four hours assisting the local Food Bank on

Both die students and faculty of program began the event by attending a “program day” at the Waterloo campus. The students

Oct. 8.

rejoined

The

program’s

co-ordinator,

Patrice Butts, said every year

T

it is

of their professional development and contribution to part

'

community to assist the Food Bank. “The food drive is huge and this is a way for us to do something the

very practical, veiy hands-on,”

p

m

'4

#

liiiiiiiiii

the

in

the

afternoon

Patrice

Bum,

co-ordinator of

social services program

at

Conestoga mall. “We will spend the next four hours sorting. Students will go outside all over the place doing pickups. At 4 p.m. everyone crawls out of here, you cannot believe how tired you are after you’re lifting cans and other food items,” Butts said before they

of

j

;


Page 3

— SPOKE, Oct.

19,

1998

•kMMestislMre

Dress rehearsal prepares

Opening ceremonies attract 2,000 By Ned Bekavac

T

contestants for real thing By Dee Bettencourt

mid-October sounds of Walter he

Fourteen contestants, a crew of camerapeople, the Walter

TV

Ostanek’s jubilant

polka

Ostanek Band and a crown came together the at 30th Miss

through

echoing

Oktoberfest

downtown Kitchener can mean only one thing: Oktoberfest

Kitchener.

The opening ceremonies of

Jokes and laughter belied the undertone of repeated dance routines, staged runner-up and winner procedures and the serious

the

30th anniversary of Oktoberfest

over 2,000 spectators and participants to Kitchener’s city hall. The gala began at 11:30 a.m. with the sounds of the German marching band, attracted

hostess’s introductions.

Lehman, former Miss of 1994 from California, was hostess for the Staci

Oktoberfest

Gnallschoddn.

Members

As the sun-drenched crowd warmed itself to the festivities

played

and

of Germany,

on

sipped

their

draughts,

Ostanek, a three-time Grammy winner, welcomed them with a riveting Roll

Miss

Out

dress

Oct. 8 at Centre in the Square in

here.

is

Pageant’s

rehearsal, held the afternoon of

the Barrels.

Katy

Oktoberfest,

of

at the

the German marching band Gnallschoddn (Photo By Melanie spencer) opening ceremonies.

second time around and said, had such a wonderful time

Words

1994.

about

who spoke

the

at length

importance

of

Kitchener- Waterloo Oktoberfest.

“This

is

a celebration of

German

and Canadian heritage,” he

said.

Johnson, of Florida, joined local councillors and representatives on stage to roars of approval.

“Community, corporations and government have created a partnership with over 450

The crowd was welcomed by Dr. Von Treskow, council general

volunteers that are the driving force of Oktoberfest.”

Von Treskow said there was no way of living the spirit of

better

Thanksgiving

than

the

Onkel

Hans food-drive. The annual keg-tapping followed, marking the beginning of another 10-days of good music, good beer and good cheer.

Pros!

it. I

“I in

just can’t describe

feel real blessed to

be invited

back.”

Lehman, now a Texas said she

is

CBS

resident,

busy with her career

anchor reporter and is using her time in Kitchener this week as a “working vacation - more vacation than work.” Another previous Miss as a

affiliate

of 1997, Danica Quinn, also participated in the

Oktoberfest

florida native By Lisa Wilhelm

new Miss Oktoberfest

am

looking forward to a wonderful year.”

loved her. The crowd The cameras loved her. The judges loved her. Her name is

Katy Johnson,

Katy Johnson from Florida and on was crowned as the 1998 Miss Oktoberfest at the

Miss Oktoberfest, 1998

Oct. 8, she

Centre in the Square.

The

opened

show

with Walter

favourite Oktoberfest Ostanek, with his familiar polka tunes as the dancers filled the stage with excitement and energy.

14 contestants were then introduced by Miss Oktoberfest Nicole Lehman. Staci 1994,

The

Lehman, who

is

now

a

was Lori Jackson from Texas. Third runner-up was Lynnette Cole from runner-up

Tennesee. Second Jodi-Lynn was from K-W. Alison

McFadden Graham from Mount Brydges finished second.

Johnson said that §he is very happy and excited to win this title and she loves the Canadian very honoured to win this,” said Johnson. “I am looking forward to a wonderful year.” “I

am

the

of

different

shows and fashion charity promoting literacy programs in elementary schools.”

her fourth

Jackson. “I

been

have

spandex-clad

was

in

just did

I

over

10

Miss Texas,

was seventh out of 105,

U.S.A.

I

which

is

very good,” said tlie 25-year-old blonde. “Miss Texas goes on for about a week, but it took me five months of training for it. That fitness

and finding clothing and gowns. It can be costly, but it doesn’t have to be.” Whether all that work is worth on the or not depends it dieting

Quinn was but decidedly in favour of her past

individual,

year’s experiences.

“This

a

is

opportunity

for

wonderful

women

to

develop their self confidence and public-speaking abilities and I think

it

person.

allows you to grow as a an important It is

responsibility

black

not

time of the

Miss Oktoberfest-hopeful Lori

training,

is in

at the

Many of the contestants are experts at beauty contests, said

includes

Guelph where she

competitor,

decided yet

said after the pageant

contestants’ fitnes's routine

to perform their

followed by the talent contest. A friendship, or Gemuetlichkeit, award was given for the

she wants to concentrate on her studies at the University of

The

colours. Five of the contestants

had been picked which talents,

and

change.”

and

styles

responsibilities

with a fitness routine because: “It’s the 30th anniversary of the pageant and it was time for a

parade where the women modeled some extraordinary dresses in an array

my

“Some

of included speaking at)

Kitchener native said,

the

of

(Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

contests.

competition had been replaced

evening gown

routine

the course of the next year, the

community volunteer of five years. She said the swimsuit

is.

fitness

dress rehearsal.

dress rehearsal.

evenly split between American and Canadians, according to pageant Malleck, Melissa

anchor in Texas, repeatedly informed the audience of her love what a and Kitchener for wonderful and hospitable city it

the

Canadian designer who is based in Toronto, and was an integral part of the pageant in crowning the new queen. When asked what the new Miss Oktoberfest will have to do over

year of landscape architecture. The pageant contestants were

weekend

Oktoberfest hopeful, Jackson, participates in

friendliest

Quinn

culture.

Lori

The 21 -year old wore a Ross Mayer gown, designed by the

(modeling

TV

Then came

event.

Miss

to

act

a

as

good-will ambassador for

the

festival.”

from

ranged

singing to tap dancing. All the girls were involved in a fitness routine wearing two-piece

gym

outfits.

McFadden won the

Jodi-Lynn

Kitchener- Waterloo

of talent

award with a jazz routine, the gemutlichkeit (friendliness) award

went

to

Amber

Grabum

of

Calgary, and the fitness award of Cole went to Lynnette

Tennesee. After the

introduction

judges, the air anticipation as

of the

became thick with it came time for the

announcement of the five finalists. After an overview of her year aufwiedersehen fond a and (good-bye) from Danica Quinn from K-W, Miss Oktoberfest 1997, Lehmam revealed the four runners up and the 1998 Miss Oktoberfest. Fourth runner-up

Katy Johnson of Florida, signs autographs after being crowned Miss Oktoberfest, 1998 on Oct. 8. (Photo by Lisa Wilhelm)

Walter Ostanek and his band were on hand Oct. 8 for the dress rehearsal of the Miss Oktoberfest pageant. (Photo by

Dee

Bettencourt)


Page 4

— SPOKE, Oct.

19,

1998

COMMENTARY

Salaries out of proportion to talent level how

Recently, one

of

when

all

Patrick

Ewing of

New

to

National

players.

Basketball

Association season has been put on hold because owners want to

on the money

caps

players are currently making.

Ewing responded

to this lockout

by saying that if the owners were cap on their salaries, the players would not be able to

Sure, I enjoy watching the NBA on television or going down to Toronto to see the Blue Jays but I don’t appreciate having to pay

$40, for a not-so-great seat, just so the owners can afford to keep their current roster.

to put a

survive.

can say to that

I

is,

give

All professional athletes

much

too

doesn’t

out of hand and there is no sympathy here in support of the

present state of his sport.

All

life

same amount of

nearly the

Professional sports have gotten

discussing the

strict

has the ability

way

television

but

who

money.

was

The

a doctor

save a person’s

make

the

York

Knicks,

on

who dribbles a knows how to

skate well can rake in millions,

basketball

players of time,

an individual

ball, hits a ball or

best

the

And

money.

it

up!

make is

it

This

lockout

is

a

long

time

coming and perhaps it will give a wake-up call to the current players and the young ones who expect to

money

get a lot of

which purpose

is

out of a

game

for the fans

and

because of players like Ewing and Michael Jordan that young players

not just to

come

to

smarten up they will soon be in

be paid millions of dollars to dribble a ball for about six months out

more trouble; their fans will stop coming to their games. Look what happened to baseball when their

game and expect

into the

of a year. It is hard for

me

to understand

If

fill

their wallets.

the players in the

NBA

don’t

players got greedy.

Unable to properly handle a simple protest ...

Can Canada handle A

five-year

Jean Chretien, pulled out all the stops in an effort to wage a

campaign to get Canada elected to the United

Greece

Nations’

including

Security

Oct.

Canada and

and

the

against

the

Netherlands,

inviting

Canadian troupe. Cirque du

setting for the United

Soleil.

campaign paid The country is serving its fifth term on the council, its first since 1990 off.

Netherlands were awarded the temporary seats

on the council. But one wonders

can set an example for die rest of

Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axwortby said in a Kiteheno:Waterloo Record article that the ecIi n ,s acteowledgment of 2 ?, Canada’s “solid

the world.

peaceful

how

a country in the news for using violence to stop a protest at

Apec summit

The

The Canadian government, and especially Chretien, seat over the

in

Vancouver

®

Nations and the rest of the world,

Can’t

when

It

6V6H disperse a

is

in the hot

summit, the sprayed and

RCMP

on

when

one

the security

from

using

their

fundamental right to freedom of

rowdy

expression

protestors.

voicing

in

their

opinions.

Commissions established

is sitting

council

protestors

pepper-

arrested

Canada

stops to consider that this peaceful country practised violence to stop

peppergate” scandal During last November’s Apec

In the end, the

8,

the'

two vacant

the

msmmmmmmmemmmmmmmimmmtmmmmmtimmmtmmmmaitm

UN What kind of antambassadors to a performance by example Is Canada

Council proved a success.

On

campaign

successful

reputation is tarnished in the eyes

of many Canadians.

position?

it’s

to

have

been

investigate

In

the

order

to

five

up

to

its

international

reputation as a peaceful country and he worthy of

treatment of protestors, as well as to tuscovet discover who gave the order for

a seat on the council, the Canadian government Vnust use

this action.

protest IH a peaceful

Ia light of this scandal, what kind of an example is Canada

the Apec summit incident as a learning experience.

mpnnAr9

setting for the United Nations

In the future, it should try to deal wife internal situations as it would abroad. Only then will Canada

the rest of the world,

and

even

federal government, under

disperse

a

and

when it can’t

protest

in

a

peaceful manner,

die leadership of Prime Minister

ft

truly live

seems rather hypocritical

SPOKE is mainly funded from

Keeping Conestoga College connected

up

to its reputation as

a

peaceful nation.

that

September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

SPOKE is published and News

produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor: Denise Bettencourt; Oktoberfest EditorsrJaime Clark, Melissa Dietrich; Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor: Ned Bekavac; Entertainment Editor: Melanie Spencer; Sports Editor: Neven Mujezinovic; Photo Editor: Sarah

Thomson

Production Manager: Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager: Judy Sankar; Circulation Manager: Lisa Wilhelm; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser:

Dick 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

SPOKE’s

address

is

in SPOKE are not DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

or

Scott.

MS

tain

Word

file

WordPerfect must not constatements and may be accompanied by an

would be

any libellous

helpful. Submissions

illustration (such as a photograph).


— SPOKE, Oct.

Page 5

Survey says.

19,

1998

.

.

Cambridge students would bus By Jaime Clark survey

a

In

thing for the

who

residents

Cambridge

of

attend Conestoga

College, 72 per cent said they would use a bus service from

Cambridge

to

daily basis

if it

business.

Fletcher said.

the students,

Some

came up

questions also

DSA

about whether or not the the college

“We

wanted

to

DSA

that does it? Should it even be the college that does it? Our

or

be in the bus

conclusion was no,” he said.

want services for we want them to have

Fletcher said he then spoke to the people in Kitchener to see what their thinking was. He said it seemed, in his opinion, as though Kitchener was more in favour of having a joint bus service with Cambridge. “It is my opinion that Cambridge isn’t too excited about a joint bus

certainly

a bus service, but should

it

be the

on a

the college

was

DSA to get involved.

They are a very busy council now and you would almost have to hire a full-time person to do it,”

offered, said

Jack Fletcher, director of student and recreation services. Of the 500 surveys that were sent out, about half were completed and 140 of those students said they would be willing to pay up to $2 a

service at this time. Part of that

might be,

Fletcher

said

question

the

who has

Cambridge and Conestoga College came up in January. “I got a phone call from an alderperson in Cambridge who was asking about busing. They deferred it to Cambridge Transit to at,”

he

opinion not

would

larger

the

probably take over the smaller. So there is that whole thing about

of

getting a bus travelling between

look

my

this is

that

fact,

trip.

control,” he said.

Fletcher’s next step

was writing

Mayor Carl Zehr and Cambridge Mayor Jane Kitchener

letters to

Brewer. “Carl Zehr’s response was that ‘we’re

said.

Fletcher said Gary Stockford, the

looking

long-range

the

in

this

at

Jane

planning’.

was

of Cambridge Transit, contacted him and said he was

Brewer’s

interested in bus service to the

with you to get a bus provided,”’

director

college if there

was a need

for

response

instructed

Gary Stockford

‘I’ve

to

work

Fletcher said.

it,

so Fletcher conducted a survey of

Fletcher said, however, that the

Cambridge residents who attend

bigger issue still isn’t solved. He said the college can, in the

the college.

“The bottom was a definite

line

is,

short term, probably provide bus

yes, there

interest in it,”

Toshmar

said.

When

company

service from a

he

as long as

were given back to Cambridge Transit, Fletcher was told they would not

are willing to use

be able to provide the bus service to the college but they had a bus company in mind who would be

in

the

results

willing to do

it

really felt

Toshmar, a private bus

wasn’t a good

well,” said

many

other

services Conestoga College has to

program, the offer, through student services, is up and running for another year. “We’ve had tutoring around for quite awhile and it’s still alive and tutoring

Myma Nicholas,

peer

program is open students in any course who are having trouble and feel they need some extra help. All they need to

The

do

is

tutoring

approach student services

and request a

tutor for a particular

From

course.

a tutor

there,

|

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: DEPRESSION or someone you Here are some signs which might indicate

that

you

experiencing depression: activities; crying a FEELINGS- l° ss °f joy in formerly pleasureable worthlessness; loss of hopelessness; “empty”; lot or feeling emotionally desire; deep sense o warmth towards key people in life; loss of sexual

care about

shame or

is

self-doubt.

PHYSICAL -

.

insomoverwhelming exhaustion and lack of energy, and appetite or the opposite; physical aches .

nia or the opposite; loss of .. pains; digestive problems; headaches. responsibilities or RF.HAVIOR- irritability, withdrawal; neglect of with cope or remember appearance; reduced ability to concentrate, .

.

daily activities.

you symptoms persist, or if their intensity is causing profesassistance with a knowledgeable seek option, an as suicide sider in Student Services available are counsellors sional. On campus, Safety Services doctor are available in Health to

con-

If these

&

(2B02); a nurse and (inside door #3).

October is Depression Awareness Month more about depression by attending a free lecout Find ture, viewing a video (just a brochure at our display table .

or picking up

inside door #2) Courtesy of the Canadian niTV.ST SPF AKERS Mpntal Health Association!! 19 “Demystifying Depression” Monday, October

8:30

-

10:30 a.m.

Room 103

and “Types of Depression, Signs, Symptoms Interventions”

Thursday, October 22

work,” said Fletcher. If the college can get 55 students

2:30

-

4:30 p.m.

assigned to a student.

“We to

nn raiaiHiaiHIHEK3li3li3iaB^ |

would come

to the college a couple of times in the morning and

leave from the college a couple of

times

afternoon,

the

in

said

Fletcher.

“That does resolve a short-term problem in terms of the college, but I personally believe to have the best possible bus service, you have to get Kitchener and Cambridge services coming together,” he said.

To

get things moving, Fletcher

has prepared a letter he is planning to send out to all Cambridge residents

who

attend Conestoga

College.

The purpose of the letter is to inform these students about a meeting Fletcher is planning to hold to find out if there are enough people to get the service going, what pick-up and drop-off times in Cambridge would be best and the best bus stops. The date of the meeting is still undetermined, but Fletchqr hopes take

will

it

place

early

in

November. Students who cannot attend the meeting will be asked to fill out a questionnaire. Also, any students who have paid for parking but decide to use the bus service when it

is

implemented will receive a from the college, said

refund “If

all

that

goes well, we’ll have

a bus service in January,” he said. “I believe it will happen, it’s just a matter of when.”

program a ‘win-win-win' situation services administrator.

the

it can be implemented. The charge would be $164 per semester. The bus

to use the bus service,

Fletcher.

don’t need an awful lot of students using it to make this

Jack Fletcher, director of student and recreation services, works on a letter he is planning to send out to Cambridge residents who <rhoio by Jaime dark) attend Conestoga College.

By^Lisa Wilhelm with

Cambridge and bring students

“We

Tutoring Along

line, will

to the college.

for the student it

enough people

it.

stop at designated pick-up points

government.

“We

called

it

Room 2D01

is

get tutors in

ways,” Nicholas

memo

said. “I sent a

to faculty at the

winter

semester

students

who

a good

many

tutor.

for

end of the a

list

of

they think would be From there, I send a

letter to the students

they’ve been

different

saying that

recommended and

I

go through an interviewing and training process with them.” There are also people who come in and say that they want to be a tutor or students

who

don’t have to

take a required elective for

some

reason and tutor instead.

Nicholas said that most of the tutors are not in it for the money, but to gain satisfaction for helping a classmate in need.

“Most of the tutors are already helping their peers in class, so this is just a more formal way of doing it,” said Nicholas. “It also gives them a chance

to

review their

notes and bring their marks up.

It’s

a win-win-win situation.” Some of the things that are required of the tutors include

group the

tutorials,

labs,

literacy

working working

in

on

computer helpline, being computer coaches and working

the

project which turned out really well.

The program has expanded over the years with additions such as mentors, peer-health educators,

and monitors. At the moment, services

student

is

in

clinic.

“Like everything your first year, hard to predict (how the said work),” will program it’s

Nicholas. “We’re starting on a

with teachers in particular courses right in the classroom.

small scale and will critique

program was It were tutors that established needed, so a person was hired to develop a process and did a pilot

won’t.”

Conestoga’s

began

16

tutoring

years

ago.

the

process of developing a writing

see

what

Last

year,

it

to

work and what

will

there

were

409

one-on-one group tutorials, with 13 groups the first semester and nine the second.


SPOKE, Oct

1998

19,

— Page 6

Designated-driver program encouraged

Oktaberfest RIDING atom without toddent vehicles so far and done one

By Judy Sankar

After midnight, we’ll be

“Designated That’s

message

the

Doug

Sgt.

Lantz says

police traffic division, wants to

program this Oktoberfest. “Very short,” he admits, “but

when we

stop people

of the road and they are

at the side

adhering to that, especially at this time of year.” Lantz, who has been with the police department for 26

city’s

years and working traffic for 12 years, says that Oktoberfest and

other special occasions are

more

people

to

[impaired driving]

all

times

prevalent

for

drink. “I see

it

is

what he sees

that

drive

Reduce Impaired Everywhere (R.I.D.E) the

appreciated

that

people who with impaired lower amounts of alcohol in their system, just under or just above the legal limit, for example, are braver. “They believe they can still handle a motor vehicle and a lot of times, they are in the worst accidents.” The explanation for that, according to Lantz, is that a highly intoxicated person usually knows he shouldn’t be driving so he slows down. When he hits something, he won’t hit it as hard. A person who is just above the legal limit, however, is usually caught speeding, says Lantz. That

most often

send out to college students. Lantz Driving

in

five.”

Lantz, of the Waterloo regional

operated

to

30 vehicles. By bar-closing time, we’ll be down to one in

one

program.”

driver

test.

down

year around. Obviously, because of the added festhalls, there’s an

person doesn’t realize that he/she

added amount of consumption and there are more people in town so there’s an added feature during Oktoberfest. But it’s all year around,” Lantz said, adding that

reflexes have slowed

in

which was The Intoxilyzer implemented four years ago, is computerized which means it

Mothers

and

Against

his/her

down. When

up

at

Ottawa

St.

will

be more serious.

After 12 years with the traffic division, Lantz has seen countless

prints off readings

and allows for

On

“It can be,” says Lantz, “but you have to think of the good side. I

tests

“We’ve

celebration of friendship

Now

Waterloo Region has five one at main division two in mobile used

given

night

usually runs about six to eight

and

a

been

depressing

or frustrating working such a job?

predecessor, the Borkenstein 900.

within

it

during

any

the Insurance

tests

given time period.

easily avoided. Isn’t

Oktoberfest, a R.I.D.E. program

Intoxilyzers,

the

set

R.I.D.E. programs.

Economical

responsible driving.

A

RIDE check

more

are striving to instill

Company,

this car at the

machines used for alcohol breaththan testing. Costing more $10,000 each, the new Intoxilyzer, is more advanced than its

visible ones, they are not the only

Insurance

branch checks

(Photo By Judy Sankar)

Drunk Driving (M.A.D.D.) got together to pay for two new

R.I.D.E. programs are the most

Recently,

traffic

Kitchener.

Region

any age bracket.” the officers conducting

who

Const. Mike Stotts of the

brokers Association of Waterloo

While

ones

that

tragedies that could have

impaired drivers aren’t just college As he puts it, “any walk life,

and

they hit something, the accident

OPP

students.

of

speeding

is

As the number of cars

know how many

hours, according to Lantz.

don’t

night goes on, the

might save by doing this R.I.D.E. program and, by getting the

that are pulled over for road-side

begin to increase says Lantz.

stopped

close

to

150

lives

message out, it’s the same So I look at the good side.”

I

thing.

and tradition

Oktoberfest symbolizes community togetherness Well,

time of year again. has once again invaded Kitchener-Waterloo. The city is overflowing with excitement and antici-

Oncle Hans and the gang. As you can imagine, my mouth just dropped to the floor. How could anyone not want to participate in Oktoberfest? And as

pation

people

that

it’s

Oktoberfest

for

anniversary

German

30th

the

of

turn,

people are talking about the fun in store for

them. But

how

is

among

the

all

talked to other

and

area

read

this

who

my

has no

this

annual

many

great things

wary of

listening to

waitress’s carrying several sudsy steins, or

popular Oktoberfest fixture Walter Ostanek and dancing to his same three polka songs

partying with friends, missing classes for a

all

but

was

still

night.

But

all

my

apprehensions were put to

I

Oktoberfest

is

was

it

more than

rest

really

Oktoberfest

week and a

is

more then

just

half straight, or seeing

war

who

Sure, it’s definitely a fun part of it. But what about the other stuff? To me, Oktoberfest also symbolizes a

for the next. It is a celebration of friendship, tradition, family events and a whole different culture

time.

and

I

have

made arrangements for all of our friends from back home to come down and share in on the fun and excitement of what’s sure to be another great year.

a reunion of friends who look forward October every year just to come back to Kitchener to see comrades that they haven’t It is

to

seen since the year before.

are

It is the coming together of a city like no other can be proud of. It is the time of the

from K-W if they were going, kind of shook their heads and said they weren’t interested in partaking with

year when K-W has the opportunity to experience and enjoy a whole new culture. So, to all of you who wish you can just

Upon

asking

originally

they

all

my

classmates

who

it

does

outsider,

be made

is

brought into the city for a short period of

my roommates

As an

\o\a^es'V

puller.

evenings over the period of a year preparing

several sudsy steins

this year,

drinking and partying, but to what for Kitchener-Waterloo.

just dirndl-clad

community coming together to keep a 30-year tradition alive. Hundreds of volunteers spending their weekends and

dirndl-clad waitress’s carrying

So

more into this city everyday, someday I’ll be able to. Happy Oktoberfest everyone!!!

years.

the best barrel roller or tug of

attended and saw what about.

after all

it,

the

minute to open your eyes to see how I see it and what you seem to have forgotten over the

Oktoberfest

about

attribute to

it

that

I

my hometown

would proudly and as

I

settle

maybe

local

first

experience. I’d heard so

would be something

interest in this annual funfest, take a

hoopla of

was

the

To everyone reading

goes? Not being born and

festival, last year

from

I

could.

that really

it

raised

week progressed and

newspapers, I learned that many K-W natives could care less about the festival. How unbelievable to an outsider like me who would participate every night if she

the

celebration.

Everywhere you

the

disappear during this great time of fun and celebration, take time to look further then

OR

dcos\on *Vo OK+ofeer£e:^f


j.-VJf

It’s

0

l

•»•>(»

lTf

r

.«|f>

SPOKE,

Oct. 19, 1998

— Page 7

a crime

Students exposed to criminal system By Jacqueline Smith

each week.”

co-ordinator, Patrice Butts.

Students heard of situations and conditions

“Eighty five per cent of all victims of crime are victimized by somebody they know,” said Jo-Anne Hughes, of Citizens Concerned with Crimes Against Children. Hughes was one of four panelists invited to a program held at Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus on Oct. 8 for social service students to share on the theme. Silent Voices.

“This day was set to expose the students to current and contencious issues within the social services field,” said the program’s

of the panelists that

women

rest

are

the victims of the majority of

said there are cases

males are the

victims, but they

do not wish

come

to

how you

enough evidence

from the office of the attorney general; Jacquei Rodden-Yetman, from the Victims Services Program of the Wellington County Police Department, and Lydia Narozniak, Crown attorney from the attorney

the rest of the panelists

panel

the

said

was

chosen because the numbers are breaking grounds in new areas of trying to make change in how victims are handled and

Michelle

to

how

Thompson

the

whole

victim!” said her program,

perceive

it,”

see

jf

there

to court.

she said.

women

the

are

cannot

A

just write

something

out,

of spousal and sexual

cannot assume that

assaults.

there

said

where

cases

but

victims,

the

are

are

males

they

do

come

forward.

wish

not

grudges.”

to

Lydia Narozniak, Crown attorney

“Every male we deal with wanted to withdraw recant (say

people don’t carry

all

Hughes

said.

there,

not have dressed like

Jacquie Rodden-Yetman said the reality

opened 400

files

is

women. “We

and only five were men. One was an elderly.” Lydia Narozniak talked about

the

Crown

attorney.

that the

Crown

job

role

of

She said

attorney’s

to prosecute

is

the

and

not to get a conviction. She said they (Crown attorneys) do not work with the police. “Our role is not to get a conviction. Our job is to see if there is enough evidence to go to court. A witness cannot

something out,

just write

we

cannot assume that carry don’t people grudges.”

The Crown

attorney said

their cases starts in the

provincial court and usually

move

division.

to the general

She said

without a evidence, withdrawn.

that

sufficient

case

is

“We

(Photo by Jaqueline Smith)

I

Narozniak

it,”

said.

her

Hughes

presentation,

said

Canadians are very influenced by what happens in the United States. “We are very influenced by what Oprah puts on TV. Through the Oprah programs and programs

we often hear about children being abducted from stores or in vans.” Hughes said cases like that are rare in Canada. She also made mention of Clifford Olsen, a criminal who abducted, sexually

like that,

asaulted and murdered 1 1 children in British Columbia. “Clifford Olsen, next to Paul Bernardo, is the most known offender that we have in this country. One of the reason is because his crimes are so horrific. Secondly, because it is so rare that this type of crime happens. “Children are victimized, sexually, physically and murdered by people that they know.” Hughes, who co-created her program, said

she

does to

better

a

services.

believes

“One of

be true

is

the

job I

lobbying, a larger

attributes to the States being able to

do a

better job.

“We

are getting better at

it,”

Hughes

said.

She said the community is fortunate to have the quality community policing. It also programs like the Victim and has program, Witness Assistance which is designated by the attorney general’s office to

make

sure that those jobs are

being done.

Hughes

said one of the assistants to her

a Conestoga graduate and that person is doing a better job in educating the next group of professionals. Lydia Noronniak moderated the closure of the meeting. “It amazes me how much care people spend to buy a car or a house. It baffles my mind how much time is spent on raising a kid.” Butts closed the meeting with a quote by Virginia Sitaire: “ The greatest gift we can

program

is

that

give

anyone

is

to

hear

them

and

to

understand them.” After the meeting. Butts said the mere fact were present the four panelists that indicated how strongly they all felt about making change and has an impact on how well the

community supports

the social

probably victim of

services in Kitchener and Waterloo.

believe that

greatly

U.S.

the reasons

strong

Butts said that the program

is

supported

by the community and graduates.

that

strong

lobby

Starting

district attorneys

November, courts seven

peo-

not happen,

cannot do anything about

are usually in court

day.

that, etc.), are the

who create the problem. “When victims say it did

system there.” She said that in the United States,

every held

doesn’t she get out, she should

said

population and more private-sector money,

they have a very

Narozniak also talked about the hours Crown attorneys spend in courts. Patrice Butts, co-ordinator for the social services program, particpated in the Silent Voices program along with

why

ple

In

and that they are under the same government control.

investigations

their stories or

did not happen),” Narozniak

it

tims of a crime or because they have been

who

we

victims of the majority

called as witnesses.

1987, was are involved in a in

go

to

witness

criminal case either because they are vic-

operation

js

how you

Narozniak agreed with that

.

Narozniak also talked about people who say the system “sucks”. She said those who “victim bash”, (she should not have been

began

that the majority of victims are

Students.

work

deal with these

and

people

She

The co-ordinator

designed to help those

Lydia Narozniak, Crown attorney

is

and introduced four of five who talked with the 66 students. The panelists were Michelle Thompson, of Victim and Witness Assistance program panel

which

forward.

role

tQ

breaking ground in terms of

where

that

can get various traumas. “You have to watch

welcomed members of the

Butts, the panel’s moderator,

community responds

She

said

who

to ask questions.

serviced as they enter the system. “It’s

spousal and sexual assaults.

also

attorneys

general’s office.

Naronzniak agreed with the

“Our

not to get _ ... with traumatized people & conviction. Our job IS She

which people in their field of study work with. They were also given the opportunity in

be days

will

are

very

involved

much in

Grad Photos up today the DSA Office

Sign Tickets $40 includes Transportation Tickets at the

DSA

Office

at

^

0 °N


:

SPOKE, Oct.

Page 8

19,

1998

seminar

Stratford police trainers give

Knowledge arms students By Jason Gennings not every class that

It’s

in the training section

someone

their retraining.

officer in a chokehold. After the

experience,

punches have been blocked and the chokeholds broken, it’s time to continue the security seminar for the law and security students. Students attended the evening seminars on Oct. 7 and 8, taught

England.

at

by Stratford police

officers,

to

Sgt. Albert

Johnson

in

Const.

Rick

20

years

brings

experience.

According to Douglas, the seminar was to give students an idea of what is involved in security and their boundaries. Both the repeatedly

program

to the

policing

obtained

12

co-ordinator

Douglas,

34-years

Senior

work.

Don

Brown came

with

college

prepare themselves for security

co-ordinator for law and security

of the force

give these same sort of seminars to experienced officers as part of

a police officer. Next thing you know, one of your classmates has another

throws a punch

and

officers

the

personal

stressed

safety.

Douglas said

that security

work

year has not been as busy as

(LASA), said the seminar is mandatory for anyone who wishes to do security work. The seminar covered topics like

this

strategies for conflict prevention,

were getting calls to cover dances Kitchener, week in every Cambridge and Waterloo,” said

administration

using

self-defence,

and

radios

notebooks. Participation

included

student

volunteers involved in role-playing to demonstrate self-defence

maneuvers.

Some techniques shown were

the

simple block for stopping a punch,

last year’s.

“The schools were not

This

Police

not the

is

work. “This

Stratford

we

lights in the parks.”

stances are to be maintained while

The

the

Douglas. “The City of Kitchener and the City of Waterloo have asked us to do security for the Christmas

have

them

prepare

time students

first

instruction

received

for

to

security

this

Sgt. Albert

the first time

using

Stratford,”

work

“Last

year

we’ve been

said

Douglas.

we used Waterloo

Brown, left, and Const. Rick Johnson brought some of their experience training veteran classroom so LASA students could learn the essentials of security work.

officers into the

((Photo by Jason Gennings)

Region police but what we are do is develop a trying to partnership with

the different

all

police departments in our area.

It’s

a matter of introducing them into the

is

Service

officers giving the seminar

in

turmoil they are in now, and

stopping someone from pulling at a victim and how appropriate

moving.

work

for security

program so we expand the

opportunities for our students.”

Second- year Stratford

to

go

students

In-Service

Officer

to

the

in

participate

training

refresher course. This February will

be the fourth year Conestoga

students train with the Stratford police, said Douglas.

Students play the role of the bad in the scenarios used to

guys

instruct the officers.

When

asked

about

how

the

officers react to

working with the

students,

Brown

Sgt.

said,

“It

becomes evident very soon those officers

who

to

really inter-

is

ested in policing. These officers

and are trained watching and assessing people.” Douglas said this concern is addressed in the method of are very perceptive

at

selecting students for training.

“We are screening the people so we feel comfortable because

that

the

people

involved

that

in

screening are past police officers

students at the end of the seminars

Hogeveen quickly learns that pulling back from Brown won’t get him to let go. A quick step forward to throw the attacker off balance is all she needs to get free.

used to blueprint changes

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

Michelle

themselves,” said Douglas.

The feedback forms will be

filled out

by

Sgt.

to next year’s seminar.

Brown

said the forms he asked for more role-playing and more hours to cover the seminar material. Sgt.

reviewed

Sgt. Brown, l

left, demonstrates the block necessary to stop a unch coming from Const. Johnson. (Photo by Jason Gennings)

New LASA program may be l

By Jason Gennings After the security seminar held or LASA students on Oct. 8,

was some discussion about ossibly making changes to the •ASA program.

iere

Although the instructors sar went well did express some concern a students’ basic knowledge of his concern was echoed security seminar

ASA co-ordinator Don Dou ’There

is

no

hatsoever in the

law

trai

first year.

hard to talk to the .students about the restrictions on law without having them exposed to it: this is

what

is

going over

their heads,”

said Douglas.

“They don’t have a grasp of the

how

it

applies to

them as

civilians or not

September of

Starting in

year there

LASA

is

a

this

new curriculum for

students

called

police

foundations. Douglas said dtis is the beginning of an attempt to standardize

22

eventually

colleges. This

tion

that

lead

to

all

training

at

college

said. If

2000. “After passing,

(graduates) will

be

then

they

eligible to be

hired by a police department in Ontario,” said Douglas. “It’s like to

pass

nursing

certification.”

Next they’ll give you a card that says you are eligible to be hired within die following two years, he

According

you don’t get hired

in that

recommend

two-year period, you will have to

province,

go back and requalify.

recommend

Douglas said that each police board will still have their tests, which applicants will still have to pay for. “There will also be other testing at has to be done. Physical fitness

testing,

aptitude

testing

and the whole interviewing process, which I understand is nothing less than three hours,” said the

LASA co-ordinator. When we

to

student

the

feedback forms, Douglas said the classes thought it was a very good learning experience for them.

more changes ,

by

May

having

and more practical work building on each scenario. trated session

in for

a provincial certification examinawill

applicants will have to pass

statutes, or a code, or the sections

and

level across the

Other possibilities include more sessions rather than one concen-

get our chance to

revisions

to

would

like

I

to put

back into the

the

to

law training year,” said

first

Douglas.

Other changes coming up may cause the security seminar to be

mandatory

for

kind of security work. “I would mandatory for

ments. do.

It’s

It

a

all

field

place-

doesn’t matter what


,

.

SPOKE,

Oct. 19, 1998

— Page 9

Parking puzzle

Security to

review signs

and monitor

Awards

and

certificates

of

otnplerion were handed out by

traffic in lots By Jason Gennings

scholarship

services is reviewing the flow of

Purchasing

Doon campus and is formulating a proposal to make

Association of Canada, Central

effort

to

at

traffic

some changes.

“We

traffic

directly

the

to

regional

police

by

College’s

ba&piess administration materials management program, is a buyer

the

Management

Rockwell Allen-Bradtey in Cambridge, where Qutpp works at

Ontario District. The scholarship goes to the grade

on

the

said she the

women’s softball team, was caught oJ0f guard by

announcement of her name.

2A56

honoured all' students who successfully completed the Principles of Buying course. “Principles of Buying is one of that

be used

will

fo r education.”

Ken

Qum

-

,

department, Central Ontario a big supporter of

The Scholarship was awarded to her during a ceremony in Room

with the unfamitiarity of

‘The moneyr

-

at all.”

accidents have to do

the

materials

management

Bodendorfer said. “We are involved with subsidizing buying, and awards. We even

program

have student representation on the Central Ontario executive.” Quipp, who was hired

Rockwell first

after

at

completion of her

year at the college, graduates

;

lots.”

Allan Hunter, security supervisor

Greg

m the class.

d like to get a job when I paduate;’ Quipp said. “But the used for will be money education.” Quipp, who recently athlete of the week earned I

“I

think part of the

the

9,

was very much surprised” she said. “I didn't know about this

collision reporting centre.

“I

Oct.

are reviewing the signage

flow to the south of Lots 3, 4, 5, and 6,” said Allan Hunter, security supervisor. Since the beginning of the school year, there have been a number of collisions on or near school property. Hunter said exact numbers are uncertain because some of those were reported

and

Conestoga

from

improve the Doon, security

an

In

traffic situation at

Szrejber,

who works

the main ingredients to the prograin in year two,” said teacher

Paul Knight

in

April 1999. said she hopes to eventually

She

find a job near her Monkton, Ont.

hometown of Keif Qutpp holds a plaque commemorating her scholarship. (Photo By Ned Bekavac)

in

technology for the Region of Waterloo, said the statistics September the concerning traffic

accidents

November

would be

available in

or December.

“I think part of the accidents

Greyhound! Canada

have to do with the unfamiliarity of the lots,” said Hunter. The supervisor also said speed may be a factor in some of the

and that people are the exceeding 15 -kilometre-an-hour speed limit.

collisions

regularly

The proposal is a current by security services and

THIS THANKSGIVING, TRAVEL WITH THE TOP DOG.

project is

still

being formulated, said Hunter. The concern is the traffic flow near the main building by Lots 3, 4,

“It’s

actually

driveway

a

through

very

More value.

narrow

there,”

1:30

said

Low

Hunter. “In one area it is too narrow for two vehicles to pass, so

we

signage, others changes are

anticipated

to

help reduce

student fares.

Climate controlled,

are reviewing that.”

The proposal may be looking at making that one-way traffic along the north side of the lot to keep traffic moving essentially away from the central corridor, he said. This would be a way to keep people from going back to the main road going through there. Some changes have been made to

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running the yield there.” Other work that has

completed

includes

some of the

stop areas.

been improving

“There has been some additional stop lines painted between Lots 2, 3 and 4,” said Hunter. “Lot 2 had a stop sign but it has been enhanced.”

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A iMasitt •mrtHlty tor graphic design student By Dee Bettencourt

more polished, finished

larger,

and professional. We’ve got not Johnston can be found Waterloo’s at nights

Julie

most

off warehouse Oktoberfest Lexington Road, glue gun and decorations in hand. The third-year graphic design

and advertising student from Conestoga College admitted she was tired on the evening of Oct. saying with a smile, “I haven’t

7,

seen

my

float, present to the client

and from

there

we

take aspects

they like and refine the design. Then 1 do the materials costing,

co-ordinate build to

it,”

it

and Tina and

I

says Johnston, referring

classmate Tina Johnston said graphic participating

third-year

Hoonaard, other

21.

design and advertising students are

Tim Wunder, Kam Nong,

John Martz, Adam Peciak, Sabina Kayser, Sean Baker and Julia Maier.

The colourful

floats

fill

ethnic groups such as the Greek Cypriot, Chinese and, of course, five different

German

clubs that parts

different

represent

of

Germany,” says Weiler. She says bands in particular love to

come

K-W’s parade

to

for

the audience participation.

“The bands say the parade is crowded from start to

route

bed since April.”

That may be because six of the in participating floats 32 Kitchener- Waterloo’s Oktoberfest parade Oct. 12 are relying on the 25-year-old artist for an attractive parade entry. “1 draw up market renderings of the

but

sponsors,

corporate

only

the

end, five or six (people) deep. There are more people, over

300,000, attending the parade two hours, than attending the festhalls. They love the

live in

crowds and the crowds interact with them. They want to be here, even though band members just

The Gnallshaddn marching band was

get paid costs.”

Germany.

Weiler

says

parade

the

televised coast to coast.

a

Warner

on

attention

Bros.’

parade day.

“Warner about

Bros,

are

thinking

another

starting

series

similar to the Dinosaur sitcom and are having trouble finding

designers who can design on paper and do three dimensional. The floats show really well that

company has

Schneiders floats. Vice-chairperson of the parade, Jean Weiler, helps oversee the float operations. After seven years on the “bandwagon”, she

In the meantime, Johnston has already been contacted to begin work on next year’s floats.

says the parade has definitely

phone

Grist Mill float;

ot several visitors irom (Photo By Jason Gennings)

Johnston says her publicized name caught media giant

two Oktoberfestbased floats called the Bear and the Horn of Plenty; Food Basics; Communities in Bloom and

are

one

result,

we can do

and

just

is

As

easy to identify: the City of Waterloo’s

warehouse

MSSL.

Johnston

this,” says

Although

American

the

second phone

yet

to

call to

place

a

Johnston,

she says she will pursue that opportunity after graduation.

“It

always comes back to you,

the volunteer thing. call

After

my

from Warner Bros.,

I

10 per cent back in

Julie

Johnston

of

Conestoga College’s graphic design and one of the six parade floats she

advertising program works on

helped design and

build.

(Photo by

Dee

Bettencourt)

This bagpiper

was one

of the

many people who provided music

for the parade. (Photo By Jason Gennings)


SPOKE,

Oct. 19, 1998

— Page 11

(Photo By Jason Genningsj

(Photo By

Rob Himburg)

(Photo By Jason Gennings)

Lieber, a duly Michael appointed town crier from Toledo, Ohio.

Karen Kali, 13, prepared to ride the centre’s entry in this year’s parade.

(Photo By Jason Gennings) (Photo By Jason Gennings)

the parade.

Chinese

cultural-

(Photo By Jason Gennings)

By Rob Himburg Among

the major attractions of Thanksgiving Day Parade were the many workers from four

the

radio

local

stations.

employees of

CHYM FM

The and

CKGL

led the parade, standing

by

green shopping carts and buckets, the contents of

their

money

which would go to The Food Bank of Waterloo Region.

And

in the

missed

this

event that observers first

members from

wave, media and

KOOL FM

Oldies 1090 followed the last float, collecting donations from any late arrivals or people who

missed it the first time. Fred Lehman of the food bank said that donations are up from last year’s parade drive. “This year we collected 28,100 pounds of food,” he said. “That’s up from 24,000 pounds last year.

just

Sound

of Music Children From back Ryan Kovarik, Alycia Kehn, Marisa Mcimtrye, middle Aaron Winkler, front Emily Sheppard, Lisa Cameron, Rebbekah Fedolch. (Photo By Jason Gennings)

It

was a good parade.”

Volunteers help collect donations from parade goers on Oct. (Photo By Jason Gennings) 12.


n

<i' 1

:

Page 12

1 --

H

.0

JuO

r

— SPOKE, Oct. .

n ro o SPO m

5f

19,

1998

• ..

.

i

Hockey: Condors last in tournament By Rob Himburg

goaltending of Phil Popp.

Missing seven regular players, the Conestoga College Condors men’s hockey team finished eighth in a tournament held by the the University of Waterloo on

missing

Thanksgiving weekend.

university teams.

Galemo

Coach Ken Galemo

said

the

had his seven been there, it been a totally

said that

players

would

have

different story.

“Most of the players from these teams are recruited,” he said of the

we were

“Also,

playing with

missing players were obviously

three lines and only four or five

very costly to the team.

defencemen, while the other teams had four lines and seven or so defencemen.”

“We went

into the

knowing we had an he

tournament

uphill climb,”

This resulted in a tired Condor

said.

The tourney began with a 9-1 loss to the host team Friday night Columbia Icefield. On the Condors suffered defeat by the same score to the the

at

Saturday,

University of Guelph.

The score could have been worse though, except for the exceptional

team which just could not match the speed and finesse of the university teams, who had the manpower advantage. In the third game, on Sunday, the Condors played a tight defensive

game

in

goaltender

of

front

Anthony Gignac, but ended up

Condor goaltender Guelph’s

final

losing 1-0 to

goal

Queens

Phil

in

a

Popp, consoled by teammates, leans against the goalpost following (Photo by Rob Himburg) tournament loss.

9-1

University, to

Despite the goals scored and against numbers,

Galemo

said his

goaltending was solid.

Gritty defensive effort to preserve 2-2

Most valuable player honours to Mark Sheridan in the first game, Ryan Martin in the second and Ramsey Hanlon in the went

finish in eighth place.

third

game.

In a

game played

overcast

in

and chilling winds, the Condors took the lead at the 15-minute mark when Melanson lobbed the ball over Fanshawe goalkeeper Mandie Marques from skies

Conestoga The women’s soccer team

Condors battled a

short bench and a chilling

wind

hold on to a 2-2 draw Oct. 14

to at

Fanshawe College. The Condors took a 2-0 lead on first-half goals by Karen Melanson and Angela Papazotos before fighting off an offensive surge by the Falcons to preserve the draw.

the

edge of the 18-yard box.

Though Fanshawe of the play

Condors

carried

territorially,

who

it

much

was

capitalized

the

10

minutes later on a brisk counterattack by Angela Papazotos, who

beat Marques from the left side.

The

impressed Jason Snyder, Mark Traynor and Greg Thede, who played very strong defensive games. also

of

play

the

draw

playoff bye

Condors weather storm, earn By Ned Bekavac

Galemo was

with

tie

for the

sealed a first-place finish

Condors

in

the Ontario

Colleges Athletic Association’s West Region, earning them a firstround playoff bye. The Condors finish the regular season undefeated, with 12 points from three wins and three draws, one point ahead of second-place Fanshawe. Though the team surrendered a

two-goal lead in the second half.

Conestoga coach Geoff Johnstone

was delighted with effort

on

the

team’s

this day.

“We were Johnstone

missing three starters,” said.

substitutes, that

no

“With

Because they were playing with

put to

a short bench and would benefit from a draw, Johnstone said he told his team at halftime to resort

bravest displays I’ve seen.”

on several occasions in the second half. Just five minutes in, Fanshawe striker Sarah Keating scored her first of two goals when she tucked the ball by Condor goalkeeper Nancy Tucker after a brilliant individual effort on the

the test

left flank.

But

much

it

said.

the

was one of

The Condors defence was

The Condor defence was

area.

quick to clear any threat. “Defensively, I think we are stronger than anyone,” Johnstone

was Tucker who could

take

of the credit for keeping the

even score-line on this day. “We have the best goalie. She is just so brave and agile,” Johnstone

more defensive game plan. “At halftime, a couple of players were completely out of gas,” he

to a

said.

Johnstone fielded a defensive

4-5-1 system for the second half.

Though opportunities appeared few, the Condors were aided by Melanson ’s surging runs. She not only created opportunities, but

many

The Falcons pressured Condors throughout much of

single-handedly

ball-possession skills.

“She

said.

times

altered the flow of play with her

is

brilliant,

the

way

she

the

shields the ball,” Johnstone said.

the

The Condors now host the winner of the first-round Central West Region playoff next week.

game, earning a series of free kicks from just outside the penalty

Conestoga goalkeeper Nancy Tucker makes a diving save during first half action Fanshawe College. Tucker made several important stops as the Condors earned first place in the (Photo By Ned Bekavac) West Region with a 2-2 draw.

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SPOKE,

Oct. 19, 1998

— Page 13

Conestoga 5, Fleming 2

Men’s hockey beats Fleming in home opener By Sarah Thomson

mental discipline shown

The Conestoga men’s hockey team

started off the season

on the

winning their home opener 5-2 against Sir Sandford Fleming,on the night of Oct. 7 in right skate

crowd of 50

front of a

at the

recreation centre.

The many penalties in were capped

the first

by 10-minute game misconduct

a

period

for

Chad Parker and

Conestoga’s Fleming’s

Crowder. Troy Conestoga ended the period leading Fleming 2-1

Ramsey

Condor

in the

After that they picked

first half.

up.” certainly has to Fleming improve its discipline around the net, said Dunford. They lost some on the power plays. “We are rusty on things in our own end.” a solid Conestoga played

defence,

support

do

yet,

in

system

place.“There to

Galemo.

said

worked well

They

executing they

is still

have

the in

a lot of work

but there are good signs

Condor Kyle Magwood

out there.”

first

is

stopped by Fleming defenceman Greg Coulter on the way to the net

in

the

(Photo By Sarah Thomson)

period.

Hanlon

squeaked one past die crowd of players at the net six minutes into

Have you

the period, with the assistance of

Jason Snyder and Greg Thede. Thede took control of a power play assisted by Paul Brown and Mike Traynor to gain a two-goal

purchased your campus

(fauxtoya

lead.

kit

Fleming got on the board at the end of the first on a power play goal by Rick Murray, assisted by Ken Jones and Nick Myers,

and

cookbook yet?

closing the period at 2rl.

Don’t

have

“I

to give credit to

$8 eacb or 2 for $15

Miss

Conestoga, they have a good, fast team that

Conestoga College

plays disciplined hockey.

United That’s what wins.”

Out!

Way

Campaign Don Dunford Fleming head coach Four minutes into the second, the Condors came through on a power play with Hanlon scoring his second of the night bumping the score to 3-1 Both Traynor and Brown got their second assists of .

October 19 - 30 1

On An

unidsntifiBd

Fleming around.

Condor

finds

it

hard to stay on his feet with

Toonie each

($2)

sale during the campaign.

Watch

for sales locations.

(Photo By Sarah Thomson)

the night.

Going

into the third,

Fleming

scored off the top with a goal by

DSA

presents

Darly Fenlton shortening the gap to 3-2.

Free Neoner

Condor Kyle Boulton assisted Parker and Chris King stretched the lead to two goals.

by

With only

12.5

seconds

left

Featuring

Parker scored on Flemings empty

rounding out the scoring for a 5-2 final for the Condors. interview, post-game In a Don Fleming’s head coach Dunford said, his team is about two weeks behind schedule. This

netter,

second game of the “I’m not using that as an

their

is

season.

excuse but

we

are rusty.”

Fleming had stayed out of the penalty box they would have said played a better game,

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Sean Cullen

If

Dunford. “I

have

to

give

credit

to

Conestoga, they have a good, fast team disciplined that plays hockey. That’s what wins,” said Dunford.

head coach Ken spoke about the discipline of his team. “A weakness of the team was the lack of Conestoga

Galemo

also

Thursday, Oct. 22

11:30

am

The Sanctuary


Athletes

Conestoga Condors outclass Lambton Lions

ifie

Best Jotnf

Week Oct. 3-9

of the

n TSwrt

The above business gives Tshirts and $15 gift certifi-

for

cates to these athletes.

STACIE ARSENAULT You have

to

wonder what

superior in every aspect of the game that the 5-0 result was

angle to cheekily deflect the ball Lambton ’s outstretched past

good one for Lambton. Even Stephanie DenHaan, who is usually commited to staying

goalkeeper.

actually a

the

might have been had Condors’ striker Karen Melanson had a good day. As it was Melanson had a terrible day, but ended up scoring two goals in Conestoga’s 5-0 annihilation of Lambdon on Oct 8 in the Condors’ fifth league game of the Ontario Colleges score

closer to her

own

goal than the

scored a brilliant

opposition’s

which Condors’ coach Geoff Johnstone described as, ’Twenty-one players standing around and watching, and only Steph moving.”

goal,

regret the

They

countless

tried to threaten the

Condors

1

goal, but

were forced

standing.

such a game that Condors’ keeper Nancy Tucker should have brought a good book with her to give her something to

was

to

soon

the

area

ball

years

DAN MIHELIC

back,

until finally their

strikers in

appeared to be

another time zone

from

it

first

place of

The Condors are the West Region, leaping over

two goals were scored by Angela Papazotos, of which the second was a fine piece of marksmanship. Papazotos ran on to a low cross and stuck her foot just at the right

The

players back, until finally their strikers appeared to be in another

time zone from their midfield.

were so

other

Clair in the teams

tie

against St. Clair

and he had a

“HAT TRICK”

Lambton

teams 5

in the

-

1

against

victory.

Fansbawe, defeated 5-3 at St. Clair. As with the men’s team, the women only need a draw away to Panshawe to get a bye in the first round of the playoffs.

$5

that

Condors’ goal, but soon were forced to throw more and more

in

Mihelic had a strong week up front for the Condors scoring 1 goal against

it

St.

in first

Woodworking

year

Men’s Soccer Team

scoring.

Johnstone expects a victory in game. His hopes should be boosted by the long-awaited

their midfield.

tried to threaten the

The Condor women

.

1st

student, leads the

game, but

fortunately for the Condors, as

a

Mihelic,

The match was marred by an injury Trisha Yates picked up in

not as serious

OCAA Batting Champion

for

appeared to be.

intention of playing a defensive

They

of the penalty

crossing

Seneca and 3 for 3 against Mohawk. Arsenault is on pace to become this

Melansen to score her second. It was a piece of skill worthy of the ones usually seen on highlights of

was

throw

more and more players

do between the goalposts to fight the boredom she must have felt during much ofthe contest Lambton, to its credit, did not come to Conestoga with the match..

before

the last minutes of the

failed to she convert, as she could have easily goalseorers’ her improved

opportunities

It

she ran with the ball and turned a Lambton defender inside out on

international soccer matches.

Athletic Association.

But Melanson will miss and penalty

The best move of the match came from Daniela Sirio when

the edge

a 2nd year Occupational Therapist student and plays Short Stop on the’ Varsity Softball Team was outstanding at bat going 2 for 2 against

Arsenault,

return of injured midfielder. Heather Heimpel. With HeimpeTs class, Yates’

aggression and Sirio’s exciting runs, the Conestoga midfield looks ready to battle it out with the best teams in Ontario.

Gotta get a message out?

Three

I uc

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Why Our

not

spend $5 and

rates are reasonable

item

in

SPOKE?

and we reach as many as

5,000 readers weekly. Classified

Movie Night

sell that

ads (up

to

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students for only $5 ($10 for non-students) which

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reader about the wonders of that old

Give us a (Cash up front; deadline

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The SPOKE — Keeping you connected

Sanctuary

p°N

i^


A rolling good time

local groups have a barrel of fun By Neven Mujezinovic he

enthusiastic crowd.

20th

annual Great Barrel Race, organized

by the Twin City Jaycees for the 20th time, took place on King Street, just north of William Street, on Oct. 10 as a part of the Oktoberfest festivities.

There

were

20

participating

teams; three women’s, eight co-ed

and nine men’s. The rules of the contest were fairly

Each four-person a 100-pound across approximately 50

simple.

team had barrel

to

roll

metres in the fastest possible time.

The teams were broken up

in

twos, so each pair rolled the barrel

Teams were cheered on by the who did not seem to

spectators,

who won,

care

wanted

but rather just

enjoy

to

the

mood. The new Miss Oktoberfest ‘98, Katy Johnson, graced the event with her presence and posed for festive

snapshots with eager fans.

Jim Bowman, a member of the Spass ‘n Spiel team, asked a friend who took the photo of the team with Johnson, to make sure he received a print. “I’ve got to

work, or said

show

they’ll

it

to the

guys

at

never believe me,”

Bowman laughing.

The

team raced three times. The total times were then added up and four teams with the best scores advanced on to the semi-final

races, which were held under beautiful sunny conditions, provided plenty of entertainment for the crowd. In one race, the O.W. Sports team left the Waterloo Councillors’ team so far behind

round.

that

for half the distance.

In the qualifying rounds, each

women’s event

the winner team with the best total time, as there were only three

In the

was

the

teams.

The races were watched by an

it

for the

was a crowd

perfect opportunity

Spectators watch as Jim Bowman and Monica Mennie of the Spass down King Street in Waterloo on Oct. 1 0.

Spiel

‘n’

team

their barrel

roll

(photo by Neven Mujezinovlc)

to take a jab at their

elected representatives.

you guys are so slow on your job, it’s a wonder anything gets done in this city,” yelled one of the “If

jocose spectators.

The most

thrilling race

was

the

M&M

men’s final in which the Meatshops team beat out the O.W. Sports team by a few inches. Winners in the co-ed and women’s category were the Yellow Pages teams. All participants received coupons for a free jug of beer and a free Oktoberfest sausage-on-a-bun.

The winning teams had $100 donated to United Way on their behalf. “It

100-pound small

rolling

and though

barrels

even

children,

divided by large bails of hay, could

was a

great

way

to

spend the

be regarded as a

morning,” said spectator Stuart Hatesohl, who along with his wife

concern.

Michelle,

smoothly.

is

visiting relatives in

Luckily

Kitchener from North Carolina.

bit of a safety

everything

The crowd and

proceeded

the participants,

“We had a ball,” added Hatesohl.

as

The event was well organized,

appeared to be having a great time throughout the event.

although

proximity

the

of

well

as

organizers,

the

all

Heauehoel

Teams from North America pull rope under sunny skies By Jaime Clark

wished all the teams well. Onkel Hans made an appearance later in the day and was available

Men’s and women’s teams from southwestern Ontario and the United States participated in the

to

pose for pictures with children.

The

women’s

catch-weight

Oktoberfest

Tug of War tournament held at Bingemans on

division (no upper-weight restric-

Oct. 10, in accordance with the

beating Simcoe in both matches.

Canadian Tug of War Association. Wayne Messecar, organizer of the

event,

said

it

was hard

The Bluewater

to

“One good thing we can expect,” he said in an interview on Oct. 9, “is good weather.”

place.

And good weather they got. The men’s and women’s teams tugged

There was also a pull-off between Ellice and Zorra for fourth and fifth places.

the 33.53-metre rope their hardest

Team

all

They responded by digging their feet into die ground and leaning back. With the blow of a whistle, the tournament was under way. The women’s team from the U.S. started off well winning both their matches against Simcoe, while the American men’s team lost both of theirs to

Bluewater.

The teams pulled one match then

began

Both teams to continued dominate the catch-weight division and eventually had a pull-off to break a tie for first

for the event.

ready.

ladies also

with a win against Zorra in 34 seconds.

determine the turnout of spectators

day under sunny skies. Admission to the event was free, but a donation to the United Way was encouraged. The tournament began around noon with the women’s 560- and men’s 680-kilogram division. The judge raised his arms signaling the beginning of the matches and asked each team if they were

began with Team U.S.A.

tions)

USA finished in first place

with 17 points, Bluewater had 16, and Zorra finished third with 11 points. Fourth place

went

to Ellice

with 10 points, Brantford had 6, Simcoe had three and Delhi finished with zero points for that

The men’s Bluewater team heaved and hoed tug of war divison. switched sides and play another against the same opponent. The men’s Bluewater team continued to dominate in this division beating teams from Simcoe, Delhi, Zorra and Ellice. They finished first in the 680-kg division with 15 points, the U.S. .team came in second with 12 points, Zorra came in third with 9 points followed by Ellice, Simcoe

their

way

to

a

first-place finish in the the

(Photo by Jajme

A and Simcoe B.

Brantford

Points were awarded according to wins.

matches

When

a team

won

both

same team was awarded

against

opponent, that

680-kilogram

the

and

Delhi

fourth and fifth. best time

Team

C ark) |

came

in

U.S.A.’s

was nine seconds against

Simcoe.

A

In the men’s 720-kg division, Bluewater once again took first place with 15 points followed by Team U.S.A. in second with 10 and South East Hope finished third

with

short intermission signalled

men’s 720-kg

three points.

the beginning of the

560 kg division. Team U.S.A. came out on top with 12 points followed by Bluewater with 9 points, third place went to Simcoe with four points and

and the

women’s catch-weight

divisions,

and the

In the ladies

division.

arrival of

Miss

9

points.

awarded

fourth

points, Zorra

Nissouri was with 4

place

had 3 and Ellice

finished with 2 points. In the men’s catch-weight

Oktoberfest, Katy Johnson.

division,

Miss Oktoberfest waved to the crowd of around 200 people and

after

a

Simcoe took first place two-match win against

Bluewater.


Page

16— SPOKE, Oct.

Conestoga

5,

19, 1998

SPORTS

Lambton

Condors win

1

ready to battle Falcons

easily, get

By Neven Mujezinovic The Condors men’s soccer team entrenched the

itself in first

West Region by

Lambdon 5-1

at

that they

would get back on

track.

threads a pass Conestoga’s 5-1 win over Lambton.

to

Sherifali

a

teammate during

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

game

than a league

game. The Condors were more concerned with not getting any more injuries than with the margin of victory, something they could sit atop the table with four points to spare over second-placed Fanshawe, who have one game in hand.

afford as they

for coach

he scored. Last year’s top most

The question was by how many goals the Condors would win. Paul McQuade, Goals by Dwayne Bell and three by Dan Mihelic to the lone goal scored by

of the games due to a demanding work schedule and while the team

Lambdon answered

an outstanding game in defence and Derhan Sherifali’s tireless running

in

a

the playoffs.

Johnstone said he would that his

fact that

The Condors dominated both halves and outplayed

Fanshawe. play were to Conestoga only needed a tie from that game to remain in first place and get a bye in the first round of

and

evident almost from kick-off, and the winner was never in doubt.

that question.

The Condors were to travel to London on Oct. 15 where they

of

return

the

played well.

game

Bell to the lineup and the

class

once again proved they and the whole team

lethal

this

Dwayne

in

were

Geoff

was

The difference

Derhan

strikers

Condors went up the game seemed more like

The best news Johnstone was

the

winning

"miss than to actually put into the

an exhibition

in

Athletic Colleges Ontario Association action. Even the pouring rain which persisted throughout the 90 minutes could not dampen the Condors’ resolve to prove the hiccup against St. Clair was temporary

and

tunities for his

3-0,

obliterating

home on Oct. 7

created a great

numerous chances, some harder to net. After the

place in

number of opporteammates. The

mediocre Lambdon team, creating

as a first playoff

team would go

treat

game

for the

win.

“Our teams don’t know how

to

play just for a tie. It’s too risky a business. We’ll go out, play our

goalscorer. Bell has missed

formation, play our

stuff.

I’ll tell

has done great without him, it was an be would he evident

them how important the game is and then we’ll go for the win,”

immense

said Johnstone.

asset for the playoffs.

Marko

Condor

had

Jurasic

have

Shamon

Joe

optimistic.

“We

was

win.

will

We

to.”

Condor women triumphant

We only sell what we By Rob Himburg

carft drink ourselves

coach major

The next bat, the Condors loaded the bases with two out and

maintained our intensity

full count on Julie Reitzel. The next pitch was up and away for ball four and thatforced the

intensity,

according

Yvonne Broome, was

to the

a

An overcast, cold and windy evening could not deter the Conestoga College women’s

key

team in their effort against Seneca on Oct. 8. Even thought the Condors were out-hit by their counterparts 4-3,

through to the last out in the game ” she said. “That elevated our game a notch.” the

Condors were

managed to pull out a 1-0 win in a game featuring great

mentally into die

game through

softball

they

efforts

from the pitchers on both

side8 it also marked Condors have ever beaten Seneca

the first time the

Ontario Colleges Athletic Association league play. Led by the fantastic effort of in

Dana Rooney on

the

mound,

the

Condors maintained a positive attitude through die entire game. Maintaining

that

level

of

to victory.

“We level

It

from the warmups

was

clear

right

only run of the

across the

Broome was

also

^pressed

with the performance of her team at the plate against such a s g

their solid defence,

which turned

pitcher.

two double

One of them

“She

plays.

game

plate,

.

is

likely

the

pitcher we’ll see,” said

prevented a Seneca run. Seneca had runners at second and third when they attempted a

<j^ke$t

Broome

of Wadsworth, whothe Condors will meet again onuct 13. The Condors close out the

suicide-squeeze play. The ball was fielded and the out made at

season with a trio of games. against Seneca, Durham, and

first.

Wadsworth, and prevent her from

Loyajg. Broome considers ttese tough games but said, it will be good preparation for the

scoring.

championships.

The

ball

was

then tossed

home

to nail the runner, pitcher Debbie

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SPOKE,

Oct. 19, 1998

— Page

1/

New magazine to be launched

Out of Order to showcase creative talent of Conestoga By Brent Clouthier

that are here to learn the job of

writing, not necessarily the job of

Randolph Ulch wants things to get Out of Order at Conestoga College. That’s the

name of

the

magazine

the first-year journalism student

would

like to start publishing.

journalism,” Ulch says.

“That’s

one of the reasons I came here, to learn the job of writing so that I can turn out publications.” Ulch wants the magazine to be seen as a companion piece to the-

came up with the name the last couple weeks of high school,” “I

Ulch remembers. “I just walked into the computer room and saw a computer with an ‘Out of Order’ sign on it. Something just clicked in the back of my head.” Ulch says the purpose of the magazine is to showcase literary talent.

It

“The ultimate purpose

Out

Order

of

to

is

of

have

something run alongside

SPOKE;

it’s

for

people

will feature short stories,

commentary

poems,

and

illustrations.

Working through the DSA, Ulch featured the magazine idea during club sign-up night a few weeks Several people who were ago. interested in working on the magazine signed on.

that are here to learn the

good

he explains, showcased anywhere and you never see or hear from them again. “The ultimate purpose of Out of Order is to have something run alongside

SPOKE;

necessarily the job of journalism.” Randolph Ulch

for people

SPOKE,

not direct competition.

“I’m impressed with the work they do at SPOKE, especially the last couple of issues. But you can only go so far with it and then it’s newspaper anymore. not a SPOKE is a newspaper; it’s here for journalism students to learn

how

to

want

work

for a newspaper.

I

something for

to provide

everyone,” says Ulch.

The magazine

will be

more of an

who find that courses do not

outlet for people their respective

give

them

enough

creative

“I

who

journalism course

was

talking to

said

the

that

news

drills the

into you to the point where they haven’t had a creative thought in two years.” The magazine hopes to receive funding from the DSA, whom Ulch says, are impressed with the idea. He specifically set Out of Order up as a club so he could receive some form of funding from the association. Ulch plans to have the first issue out before

process

beginning Ulch says as he indicates a few pages of the magazine. “There’s been so much school work, I haven’t had the chance to sit down with everyone yet and find out who wants to do what. Basically, though, I just have to submit a proposal to the DSA now.” ultimately lofty He has far, its still in the

I

aspirations for

would

'/EftVICE#

COLOUR PHOTOCOPYING

* SCANNING -pN

These services are now available at the

DSA Office.

facts,

K ^ov

Nominal Fee applies.

Out of Order.

it to be a provincial magazine, where you could go around to local high schools, etc., and get them to hand things into you. I’m getting a friend in the computer department to set up a web page too, so I can download the stuff onto there. You need to be published somewhere,” Ulch says, “and a free-based magazine like Out of Order would work.” If anyone has any questions forthcoming concerning the

like to

27

Tarot Card Readings

10:30

am

-

pm

12:30

make

“I’ve only been here a month, so

submissions. E-mail

can’t say for sure, but I’ve only

to shatterforcel@hotmail.ca.

all

TXies. Oct.

inquiries

Jeff

& Tessa - Second

12:30

Get the

SJ0

like

magazine or would

flexibility.

Randolph Ulch (Photo by Sarah Thomson)

he says.

someone

“I

i*

niches that people could

stages,”

it

it’s

fill,”

“So

job of writing, not

stuff,”

“but they don’t get

many

Christmas.

“There’s a lot of people here that write

journalism course the seen focusing on only a small portion of the print media. There are so

then get the vax

Wed.

Sight

pm

Oct. 28,

1

am

1:30

Pumpkin Carving Contest Howling Contest

B Vaccine

Hepatitis

Ep

pm

Thurs. Oct. 29, 1:00

Blockbuster’s

Clinic

;

Movie of the Week'

Fri.

Tues. Oct.

20

am

pm

1

The Other

0

-

Room

Oct. 30, 11:30

am

Apple Bobbing Contest Witch’s

2 -The Sanctuary

Brew

COSTUME

Contest

More information -available at the DSA Office ~o°

Hepatitis

B

virus can KILL

you

N

%

sr

.


9 *

*•

SPOKE,

*

Oct. 19, 1998

i**¥

Cooking up a storm

Waterloo students cook breakfast for pubirc By Jacqueline Smith Conestoga College students at campus had 8,000 to 10,000 Kitchener and Waterloo residents eating out of their hands the Waterloo

pancake breakfast at annual Waterloo Town Square. The event kicked off at 7:30 a.m. and finished

A

at

11:30 a.m.

of 100 employers and volunteers from the 10 sponsors, total

College, Conestoga the manoevered successfully

Oct. 10.

with

Students and faculty of the food and beverage program prepared pancakes and sausages for the 17th

event.

Dave

Playfair,

the promotions

for CHYM FM and headed the event with the help of Lisa Burtt of Waterloo Town Square and Tyrone Miller, and food from Conestoga’s

director

CKGL

beverage management program. Some of the other sponsors were Nescafe,

who

supplied the coffee.

Aunt Jemima who supplied the syrup. Pillars, Maple Lane Dairy, and Zehrs. Playfair said that without the the participation

college’s

would not happen. “The food and beverage program

breakfast

key to

the

is

this event. If they are

not cooking their

back

there,

we

little

brains out

are in big trouble,”

Playfair said.

College president John Tibbits he really appreciated the

said

faculty and the students for their

all

hard work.

“I think

it

tremendous,

is

it

is

good for the college. It gives us good exposure in the community.” The program’s coordinator, Beth Esenbergs, agreed with Playfair that the focus of the morning food and beverage management team.

needed

“They

someone

to

tickets for the Oktoberfest breakfest held

on Oct.

the pancakes are nice, light, and

Town Square.

(Photo By Jacqueline Smith)

fluffy.

So they

Esenbergs

a benefactor

non-perishable items for the

Bank. Residents of

Food

all

food.

Other than a hot breakfast, those at the event enjoyed The Hornets, a band of three who helped to put heat in the cold

who were

“They

Take a

train ride in a ’50s-style

Oktoberfest add music and sausage-on-a-bun and the you’ve got wunderbar: streamliner,

The

p.m.

2

ran

also

train

Thanksgiving weekend moving people from Waterloo to St. Jacobs Farmer’s Market. Part of the festive spirit of the

Express

Bavarian

Bavarian Express.

Aboard Band

The train bounced over the Columbia Street crossing as Janet sales Dawson-Brock, railway manager, made her way back to

music,

the Oktoberfest car.

Sonny

polkas

and

All

the

is

playing

German

even

Old

Macdonald.

As

the

about

train

15

moved along

at

mph, band members

once,” said Dawson-Brock. “Blitwe’re in the Oktoberfest calendar this year, and that has really

Sinclair, guitar, and Marian Borowicz, accordion, moved up and down the Oktoberfest car playing to the seated customers as people clap and some even get up

helped us.”

to dance.

She said that on Oct. 13 there were about 60 people on the train and about 25 on Oct. 14. The sales manager attributed some of draw to the Oktoberfest the

“Next year we hope to have words to the songs so that people

“Last year

we went

out empty

sausages offered this year. The Waterloo-St. Jacobs Railway ran as the Bavarian' Express Oct.

and 15 and headed to Elmira and back after leaving Waterloo at 11:30 a.m. and again 13,

14,

can

sing

Dawson-Brock about

Ken

in

along,”

said

she

moved

as

her Oktoberfest costume.

volunteer Kerwin, a trainman for the railway^said he enjoyed the Bavarian express. In between his dancing with other members of the crew, he paused to speak of the visitors on the train.

are here every year

and

it

tickets

check at 6:20 in the morning. They have great stamina, they played

tickets

for

a

really

long

said

time,”

of

is

that

and

1

0

at

hand out Waterloo

enjoy

Shawn McEwen,

a

1991 graduate of Conestoga’s broadcasting program. Lorena Mojoodi, a Kitchener resident, said she thinks the event

I

you have to go for you do not have the

you cannot

certain

sit at

“I love

it, it’s

great.

It is

Frederikson of

good Lynda

a

service,” said

CHYM FM.

“The food was

great,

we both

agreed that it is better organized,” said an area resident, Roger Molnar. Molnar said he thinks the breakfast

is

a

tremendous get

I

like

community event for people to out and show their support

do not

like

Oktoberfest and Thanksgiving.”

going backwards. “We come here every year,

is

What

if

places,” Mojoodi.

community

“It is just great, I really

myself,” said

the breakfast.

morning.

today

takes quite a band to do a sound

This party is on the at

and Valerie Cole

Playfair.

ages could be seen with cans, boxes and a whole other variety of non-perishable

By Jason Gennings

(left)

called the experts,”

The Food Bank was

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

George Michael

said.

of the breakfast, and although there was no charge, residents bring to encouraged were

Conestoga College president John Tibbits helps out during the 1 7th annual pancake breakfast on Oct. 1 0 in Waterloo.

CHYM FM

prepare the breakfast on site to make sure the sausages are hot and

for

move

There have been people from and Germany, England newly-weds from France, he said. “We were dancin’ and having a ball,” said Kerwin. Also on board was his wife Kay Kerwin. She had recently become a volunteer on the train and was along for the ride with her sister and her niece. “It’s nice, but they need more publicity though,” she said.

When asked about running the Bavarian Express during business hours,

Dawson-Brock

said

the

daytime runs work

“We did a pub night for the and Waterloo, of University Wilfrid Laurier and we had two people on board,” Dawson-Brock said. “We turned around and came back.”

Conductor Bruce said there

is

a

locomotive at each end of the train to run forwards and backwards along the track Waterloo-St.Jacobs Railway owns between Waterloo

and Elmira.

Janet Dawson-Brock dances with trainman Ken Kerwin while Marian Borowicz, of the All Aboard Band, plays Oktoberfest (Photo By Jason Gennings) music in the background.


Page 19

— SPOKE, Oct.

19,

1998

ENTERTAINMENT

CD Review

Movie Review

Departure from darker days;

Chan and Tucker

new future for Depeche Mode

provide non-stop laughs By Judy Sankar

may

Without giving away any

be.

more of

By Melanie Spencer There was a time when many critics and fans had written off

Depeche Mode. After

all,

Dave

Gahan’s much publicized heroin addiction and overdose, and the departure of long-time member Alan Wilder over strained relations with other band members, would have been enough to destroy any other band. But not Depeche Mode. Now a three-piece, consisting of Gahan, Martin Gore and Andrew Fletcher, they have cleaned up their act and

enjoy today.

as he sings about his confusion:

The Singles 86 > 98 opens with haunting Stripped, which originally appeared on 1986’s Black Celebration. It also features many of Depeche

“There’s a thousand reasons/ Why I shouldn’t spend my time with you/ For every reason not to be

the

Mode’s biggest

hits,

including

Strangelove, and the guitar-driven

and I Feel You. The dark and atmospheric Barrel of a Gun, which can be interpreted as a chronicle of Gahan’s darker days, represents the band latest material. tracks. Personal Jesus

can think of two/ To keep me hanging on/ Feeling nothing’s wrong/ Inside your heaven.” This love song is a fitting touch here/

I

to this collection of songs.

Unfortunately, tracks,

Little

of place.

The there’s

vocal

stylings

also

>98

a strong collection of

is

showcasing

Depeche Mode’s musical abilities. Fans can only hope Depeche Mode will continue to build on its

and

captures this

is

and

no reason these two tracks

material

incredibly

Gore’s beautifully captivating, andsometimes mysterious, lyrics.

The album

86

compilation

passionate

album

the

chronologically

should be treated any differently. But with that aside, The Singles

collection left off, the 21 tracks on

Gahan’s

of

rest

Tthe release of The Singles 86 > 98 only reinforces that. Picking up where the last singles

illustrates

which

15,

and Everything Counts, the live version taken from 101, seem out

presented

two-disc

two was

last

released as a single only in France,

returned to their roots.

this

the

The

only

new song

in

this

the haunting

love

success in the future.

m *2 & &

Jackie Chan’s renowned martial

and Chris Tucker’s

talents

arts

Han

(Tzi

Ma)

is

sent to

considers that

words, Carter has to babysit Lee. At first, both Lee and Carter are

himself in a drug-induced state to

hostile

international

success

they

title

The

shown.

is

having trouble saying

words in Chinese and another in which Chan has the same problem but with English, are just as funny as the rest of the

movie.

When you walk

of

out

the

you will be not only happy that you spent your money well. You will have a smile on your theatre,

ache

rock style, and finally to the combination of the two styles that have helped them achieve the

the movie, a series

are

three

FBI decides to assign an LAPD officer, James Carter (Chris Tucker), to keep Lee occupied

When I Lose

Chan movies. Rush over when it’s

all

isn’t really

Tucker

face.

song. Only

hilarious.

outtakes, including one in which

anything but

from a synthesizer band to a full-blown

with

outtakes

happy when Han requests the help of his good friend, Det. Lee. The

British band’s progression

movie

this

At the end of of

unsurpassed collection of Chinese art so he holds Soo Young ransom. The Federal Bureau of is

the fact that

over.

America

is

The

As Hour

on a U.S. diplomatic mission. Han’s daughter, Soo Young (Julia Hsu) is kidnapped by one of Hong Kong’s biggest crimelords, Juntao. Juntao wants revenge on Han for confiscating $500 million in drugs, weapons and an

Investigation (FBI)

it is

Elizabeth Pena and Chris Penn also appear in this film, Pena as an LAPD bomb expert and Penn as a convict in jail.

proved to be a good combination in New Line Cinema’s Rush Hour. Directed by Brett Ratner, this action-comedy takes place in the Los Angeles. The two characters are brought together when the Chinese Consul for Hong Kong,

collection

Myself.

makes

mouth has

fast-talking, smart-ass

the plot,

Carter and Lee are so opposite that

You

might even have an your stomach muscles.

just

in

of of of c#

until the case is solved. In other

seems ironic when one Gahan had to lose

towards each other as Carter thinks he can solve this case on his own and Lee knows

find his true self.

There’s desperation in his voice

#####

he is being distracted from saving Soo Young. that

Somewhere between Lee hanging off a street sign and Tucker telling a restauranteur in Chinatown that he’s a “punk and

# e# # e#

two become friends

bitch,” the allies.

Some have

labelled this

the funniest of the year and

movie it

mmm

just

We only sell what we

much

at this point.

can’t drink ourselves

Chris Tucker,

Chan

comedy, Rush

Buffalo Bills Sun. Nov. vs.

star

left,

and Jackie

the Hour.

in

action-

(Photo by B. Marshak/ New Line Cinema Productions Inc.)

1

Miami Dolphins

interested in the various seminars

$ 15

Hamilton

will

come alive

as the

Tickets available

fourth annual Hamilton Music Scene ’98 kicks off four days of

with or without transportation

mpsic and seminars for fans and musicians on Oct, 21,

Goo

The

Goo

Dolls

kick-start the event

Details

and

conditions

available at the

will

Oct, 21

k concert at Copps Coliseum. Tickets for this show with

'

DSA Office p° N

On

on

Sale Thurs. Oct. at the DSA Office

SrOo

This ticket is also a festival which gets an

pass,

individual

1

into four

participating clubs

nights at

and the

Little

an J

Rock

V Roll High School opens

Career Day on Oet. 23 at Copps. These seminars, from i p.m. to 4 p.rn. t offer an insider’s view of the business, exploring with

various

topics

including

publicity.

Speakers include concert promoters and record executives. A Battle of the Bands will be held from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. following the seminars. Members

of the industry will help choose the hottest local act from

interested in a record

deal will

want

R Forum

to

to attend the

High School are $10 la advance and

A&

be held on Oct. 24 at Copps. From p.m. to 4 p.m., 1

&

and repertoire (A R) representatives will be on hand to telJ people what they are looking for, how to deliver it, and answer artist

questions,

Speakers include Polygram

R

representative

A&

Bryan Potvin,

lead guitarist and vocalist for the

defunct prairie Northern Pikes.

The

rockers.

Admission

$20,

Hamil Tickets for Rock'n'Roll

Besides concerts, people will be

at the door,

Anyone

offered.

, it

and performers, (9O5)S0f5OOO, seminars

is -

the call


Re-opening

Official

Henna Choir Boys

Centre in the Square celebrates Woerner donation By Melanie Spencer Centre in the Square celebrated its official re-opening Oct. 4. The event was also a celebration of a donation made by the Woerner family. 1

choral conducting at the Hochschule fur

world-renowned Vienna Choir Boys accompanied by the Chorus Viennensis and the Vienna Chamber Orchestra performed at the Centre in the

Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr, who is a member of the centres board of directors,

of

Square

The

the Centre in the Square in January.

The donation went towards the renovation of the Raffi Armenian theatre. comfortable” seats replaced Hoag, chairman

the old ones, said Valerie

have

at the event.

been

held

better

time

The Woemers were introduced

to the

a

at

in British

purpose was to sing during church services Imperial Chapel. Over five

soprano and the

alto

centuries, the choir has not only

become

a part of Austria’s heritage, but also

Columbia

identified

who

donated $50 million to the University of British Columbia. I felt like a cheapskate,” he joked. Klaus, who came to Canada in 1960 and moved to Kitchener in 1974, said he felt a deep

Musik

amongst figures

Haydn and

like

Mozart,

Schubert.

All three groups were conducted by

Agnes Grossmann,

the artistic director

of the Vienna Choir Boys. Grossman, who is the first female conductor in the

in

Vienna. In 1981, she was a and choir director at

visiting professor

Ottawa University. Following in die footsteps of father Ferdinand Grossmann, who was art director of the coir for a total of twenty

Agnes has been with the boys for about two years. Yet, she has been hailed all over the world as a passionate and talented musician. years,

Among

choir’s

the

I,

in

man

celebrated

at the

Established in 1498 by Imperial decree of the Habsburg Empoeror Maximilian

audience and Klaus took the podium. “I read about a

Kitchener Oct. 14.

boys

anniversary

Oktoberfest.

-

in

their 500th Centre performing before an audience of various ages.

The mayor thanked the Woemers for their donation. “The bar has been raised,” he said of the Woerner ’s donation to local philanthropy. The mayor also said that the event couldn’t spoke

choir’s history, studied orchestral and

Austria’s

Hoag.

Automation Tooling Systems (ATS), donated an unprecedented $5 million to

New “more

By Judy Sankar

of the board of directors. The theatre also houses new banners, curtains and a fresh coat of paint. The renovation was the first of several renovations that the Centre will undergo over the next few years, said

Kitchener’s

Anna and Klaus Woerner, owners

captivate audience

many

her

Golden Cross of

successes

is

the

Vienna and of the Year Award in

the City of

Canada’s Woman the Arts and Culture. At about 10 minutes past eight, the orchestra, the chorus and the choir took the stage followed by Grossman. The thunderous applause that followed each song showed that these performers are as

welcomed here

as they are in the rest

of the world.

affinity for Kitchener.

Although Klaus said to

make

the donation,

fortable

with

all

was

it

his pleasure

he seemed uncom-

the

attention.

He

repeatedly asked the presenters and the audience to stop making such a big deal

out of his

act.

speech was followed by the unveiling of an artpiece that Klaus’

Anna and Klaus Woerner stand front of the artwork that

commemorates

in

commemo-

the

in

Grant, general

manager of the centre, unveiled the piece, which will remain at the centre as a

rates their $5-million donation to the

Centre

the donation. Together,

Woemers and Jamie

the Square. (Photo by Melanie Spencer)

The Chorus Viennensis (back row), the Vienna Choir Boys (middle), the Vienna Chamber Orchestra and conductor, Agnes Grossmann, performed

reminder of the Woemers’ generosity.

Oct.

By Ned Bekavac

“My come

For

first-year

Conestoga College

Mike Offak, Oktoberfest has become Rocktoberfest. student

Offak, a general metal machining student,

makes

Oktoberfest

the rounds each

as

bassist

and

keyboardist of “Zlatne Kljucevi,” a familial quartet of musicians

which

been

has

rocking

teachers understand into

school

tired,”

why

I

Mike

said.

Their

1

998 Oktoberfest schedule

resembles that of an international rock brigade: 10 days, more than 25 performances. Golden Keys is a yearly staple at the

Club

in Kitchener.

Schwaben

1

4

at the

They recently played the K-W Oktoberfest Thanksgiving Day Parade and a gig at Knob Hill Farms with three-time Grammy winner Walter Ostanek. It is

who

Ostanek himself, Eric is

responsible

for

me

the Square.

(Photo by Melanie Spencer)

speech four years ago,” Eric said. is the most positive person I’ve met. I asked him how he always kept himself in a good mood during these grinding dates.”

their

Not

a motivational

in

“He

said,

continued endurance and success.

“Walter gave

Centre

“We

Offaks mind. wouldn’t be doing this

that the

if

we

didn’t like the music,” Eric said.

the

we’d play until 5 a.m.” The Offaks, who are of both and German descent, have not limited themselves to playing just the 10-day Croatian

Oktoberfest circuit.

“We

first

and the Swiss.”

“We get mhybe one Saturday off through the whole year,” Mike said.

alone.”

The Golden Keys, whose

stage,

Offak

joined by his

is

seen

and

come

their father, Joe.

Kljucevi

(Croatian

for

how

effort

group

is

1999

The band is also planning a European tour for the year 2000

to play.

.

and Mike look forward to Oktoberfest as the climax of

Eric recalls his playing,

their year.

initial

when he’d

days of

travel with his

soccer teammates to tournaments. While his teammates ran off to the arcades at night, Eric said he stayed back at the hotel and played music for the parents.

what keeps us

going. It’s the enthusiasm of the cro#i,” Eric said. “There is'this really good buzz going around which starts at the opening ceremonies.” He said the 10-day grind of Oktoberfest allowed him to take the week off work.

the

release.

Joe, guitar,

is

nine-year

circle;

scheduled for a February

Since then, Eric, the Keys’ accordion player; Heidi, trumpet;

“Oktoberfest

their full

recording an album, tentatively

“Golden Keys,”) was formed in 1989 by Joe Offak, who taught his three children

initial

gigs were played for free, have

brother Eric, 25; sister Heidi, 23,

Zlatne

play various ethnic circuits

Slovenians, Germans, Austrians

Oktoberfest gig was downtown Kitchener, at the big tent,” the 19-year-old Offak said. “We played three times yesterday

On

crowd that keeps us crowd is pumped,

going. If the

throughout the year,” Eric said. “We’ve played weddings for

Oktoberfest circuit for nine years.

“Our

the

“It’s

“In high school, there

“Zlante Kljucevi” members Mike Offak, with sister Heidi, father Joe yearly staple at K-W Oktoberfest.

and brother

Eric,

have become a

(Photo by Forde studios)

was no way

my I

friends said

would

still

doing this,” Eric said. “But I can really see myself doing this in 10 years.”

be

still

Digital Edition - October 19, 1998  
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