Page 1

a

a--. V-,

,

IL.

'iV-'-f

Conestoga College, Kitchener September

,

28, 1998

eftym tfowrse

[john Braga^ the King’s master of arms, and festival fight co-ordinator, jdemonstates the skill necessary to his position at the Medieval Faire in|

|

'Waterloo. Story on

Business student

headlights from the road, turned around to investigate and found

her

generat'bnsmess steoem

at

ConestogaCoHege, was in critical cflBditiaa Ihotsday. at

London

w uiv. Auw«y»u« Walkeiton OPP. sakf Chretier was t,;ennts

driving

home herself from a

doe in

B^ore

Health Sciences Centre after a

’n'

an^^vehidle

vehicle left the road,

accident

that

when

stag

her

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

9,

critically injured In been wearing her seatbelt, was thrown front the vchicte.

%Usa Wilhelm

Page

___ ^ next f2 nOUfS are The

^ CTRlCai. rritioal tne mOSI

a

in

Held,

said

l9Si that

Sehill aaid Chretier's parents

by

Hospital

District

andntlance and

London

was

n»>ved Sciences

later

Bealflj

Ceom.

Thomp«« sd

hretler,

said

the

DeHn Boyale

end over

Karen

week that was soil listed in critical condition, she was doing a iiltle better than when she fim went into hospital. “the next 72 hours are the most critical” said Sdull on Sept 23.

Ctoretier was t^en to Wn^am

and

under mvestigafion. a Conestoga Schtll, College student and fnend of

sulf

said^ last

Chrctier,

Itjoxnpson.

to

went down

lying

accident althtnigh Chretier

who

nottohave

Apassi

jt

Is

allowed at

this

''f.-

time


'

Page 2

— SPOKE, Sept.

28, 1998

College wants to install

DS A for fundings

Principal asks X3%# ]»sfwiA

By Jaime Oiarii

'*

TYm.

He

said

monitors

Conestoga College’s principal appeared before the Doon Student As'.^K'iallon on Sept. 22 to ask for Tmancial support for

two

aimed

projects

a.,a.^a,a.va.l

he would

at

"ftke

emergencies

to see

and in both cafeterias. There wt^d be as few as nine monitors and as many as he

'

said,

DSA '

to

discuss

iU'smIlatidB

;;po^0ii at

possible television

selected

locations

school.

,

"

the

of

'

emergency

oM

messages and Inform

messuages' fmd“tnfdt^

students of class

-[iri]

'i...

[i

after

The of Ore project was tme of DS A’s major concesns with the proposal. O^ry Oeaves, vicepresitfent of $tode®t a0m.ri8, said “blip boards” IHce the <me be more

'

The puip<ysEe of the monitors would be to display emergency of

like to lutve the

weeks.

monitors would be to display

tion ia ntaide avail^te. II

Sun#ys

mill-

new thafl^

use

a year people vM

get used to

McGregor over Isidget by approaiin^ely $4300, but h& ihey are g<^g

it,”

Kristin Murphy,

DSA

m

.

iii]ii-[[

tsEty""

libn^

stands out wilt work, but

lie said he would liave a better idea of the cost wiOrin a couple of

'The purpose of the

any deciriosi&umil mmie informa-

dechkid

“Something

fcarsatsmce.

*

unable to si^ imt ho^. Mc;^3mgor also said he

mini'

but McGre^r ss^ it woultb>'’t be necessary to insrafl ail the m<mi*

at

wiflj the

'Dm

si^ificant

price for the entire pnofect would be aj^oxifflately $10,000

improving serv ices for students.

Gram McGregor met

and

The

'

m postpone

Y

every entrance in the

school, in the library

13,

m

W

^

al

^

TV monitors and hire a library technician

®ome<me

president

l^A

regardless ci

decides to

class'eanceliatton's. '

Cnirendy,

'if

a

class

is,

cancellations.

“They

cancelled,

a notice is posted outside classroom doors but often times they appear too late or are ripped down.

“We

don’t

have the suppojt staff to run around to classrooms,”

asc

elective

At die same meeting, McGregor DSA if feey would be wtlBng to subsidi2» die c«Mt of

inexpensive,’ he said.

Grant McGr00r,' Principal of Conestoga College

was concerned motors*'

vwfli

the

htrtttg,„a

in die Leacnii^

Mcsaa|ps displayed on would limited to^^toit,”

^

mortilrirs

.

Shtdents^ eurr^tly

staff

die

Strong response to Club By Ned Bekavac Club week

this

year has received

groups throughout the

1998-99

school year. TTiere will

be six clubs at the college this year, an increase from

membership

“These groups are

Sign-ups for several in

of

Clubs

10

full-time, fee-paying students in

running their

own

events.

good

standing

at

detMng and

that

ha??dte Ihsra^'

-

was 'I

'

Week

Students should look

for

signs and posters

throughout the school.” Ellen Menage, promotions

potential

assistant

during the week of Sept. 14-19, with club recognition granted to

for

the

1997-98

school

snowboarding. planning to partake in activities such as rafting, and the Out Of

Order Club, a club planning to start its own magazine, are also this

IX.

oiivli o air’d, i n. g

year’s

j

numbers.

minimum,

“Though

the

clubs

are

clubs and groups seeking grants have to apply for funding from the DSA.

run

DSA

provides

for them,”

Menage

Each club or group must then appoint or elect an officer for their

All clubs are given a package

club, and must have goals and objectives which do not conflict with the letters’ patent or constitu-

independently, the

The Adrenaline Club, a club

of

S

OUT OF OKDFR Out of Order

year

featured only the skiing club; this year’s crop features clubs for skiing, drama, rugby, and

part

The Adrenaline Club

Drama/

promotions Student

Doon

Association, said the turnout this year was great, especially considering last year’s low club sign-up turnout.

The

The Sanctuary

Menage,

Ellen assistant

1998-99

for

Skiing

Conestoga

College.

last year.

clubs took place

aceount when

'%JP^A would

those clubs which ha<} a signed

strong response from Conestoga College students interested in participating in various clubs or

one

to take thdr ls«mclsi and dieir prkaihBS into

'

J.e$oufce Centre (LRC).

McGregor said.

DSA

situation

library technician to

woik weekends

really

'

the

asked the

some funds said.

prepared by

Menage

that outlines

Conestoga College club

increased

Along

with

policies.

the

10-name

DSA.

tion of the

According

to the campus clubs’ policy package, the DSA budgets a minimal cost for clubs to get

Board of Directors

only sell what we caift dnnk ourselves

Need a job now? Want

to learn a trade?

We have operational, technical

and support career opportunities for men and

in today’s

Canadian

Wed.

Sept.

4:30 The Other Room

30

pm

(in

The Sanctuary)

placement activity, a fund-raiser or an awareness or promotional event throughout the course of the school year.

At year’s end, clubs must submit a report to be used by future executive

planned to have 0-minute meetings Wednesday to

discuss

For

more

information

contact Jenn

the policies with the respective clubs and groups. She said students who may not

have signed up can still participate in any of the year-round clubs. “These groups are running their

own YOUR PRIDL YOUR FUTURL YOUR MOVE.

members.

Menage

1

drop by your

CanadS

their

an educational event, a career or

Recruiting Centre or call:

- 856-8488 800 www.dnd.ca

built into their

to

To remain in good club standing, clubs must hold two events from the following: a DSA-related event, an inter-cultural event,

Forces. Join our team and learn skills that will last you a lifetime. Share in a proud Canadian tradition. For more information,

1-

mechanism

help finance activities during the year.

I

women

ating

proposal

Meeting

Your Pride. Y9ur Future. Your Move.

started after which clubs are expected to have a revenue-gener-

at the

DSA Office

events. Students should look

for signs

and posters throughout

the school,”

“Because all

Menage

said.

activities are

students.”

open

to


.

.

SPOKE,

Sept. 28,

1998—Page 3

Students unaware of learning problems Many come out of high school

with no idea they have a learning disability

By Judy Sankar

psychologist

registered

an

or

concepts in written form.

Once someone has recognized

appropriately qualified profession-

March 1997, 10,500

In

students

al,

23 community colleges in Ontario had a disability. Forty-five per cent of those students had a learning enrolled

time

full

Although

at

many

everyone

almost

is

words

many know what it

special-learning disability,

and make an appointment with a

of them don’t really

counsellor.

no

idea that they have a learning

a professional, there

Marian Mainland, co-ordinator of Special Needs and

look for and to exclude.

Learning

The

Opportunities

Canadian

Association’s disabilities

system of identifying students with learning disabilities,” says

achievement.

Mainland,

adding

many

that

realize their individual challenges after the first

round of midterm

the co-ordinator of Special Needs and the * Learning Opportunities project. (Photo by Judy Sankar)

Marian Mainland

is

examinations.

between

the

individual’s

potential

and

learning disabilities. “It’s an issue

elementary and high school,”

she says.

Mainland, who has been working with students with learning disabilities for 20 years, says there is a lack of funding and

Many

with

students

have been grouped with students who are slow learners simply because teachers don’t know what they’re looking for

terms

in

of

a

At Conestoga College, a student

who

has

disabilities, is a student

recognize

learning

specific

the

to

learning

disability.

allow them to spend enough time students

There are four points made

who meets

of

definition

learning

according to the Psychological

disabilities

Canadian

Management committee meets

in its

instruction,

and/or

poor study

neurologically-based-information-

learning disability. If,

however,

a

a

is

skills,

the

the student has trouble with specifically.

Then

no special

student

the student

has trouble doing so in writing, the

is

individual could have a special

“These

learning disability.

individuals.

Other examples

include

poor

work and

the

transferred to

association’s

students

learners,”

mix-up

spelling but sophisticated ideas in

written

is

Needs, where a counsellor’s job is to minimize the impact of the student’s disability. Mainland emphasizes point three Special

can

between the individual’s potential and achievement and they are lifelong conditions manageable with appropriate support and direction. They can only be diagnosed by a

whether a what

determine

tests

disability exists and, second,

poor

express him/herself verbally, but

individuals

test to

bad

average to above-average intelligence; they typically cause a discrepancy in

would then go through IQ determine two things. First,

student

a series of tests including an

(inadequate

history

attehdance), there

with

due to

hearing or physical impairment, cultural differences, emotional or environmental

definition; learning disabilities are

processing difficulties; they occur

is

visual,

academic

Association.

disabilities

resources available to teachers to

discrepancies in their work.

learning

Marian Mainland co-ordinator of Special Needs

A

discrepancy

They are not slow

learners.”

a

discrepancy

disturbances,

Mainland says there are also a lot regarding of misconceptions

cause

typically

bright inctivid-

third

point says that special-learning

that

uals.

Psychological

definition’s

“You wouldn’t think that we’d have that many coming out of high school. We don’t have a good

If

“These are

criteria to

is

project.

with

is

then advised to go to Peer Services

or what to look for. Although special learning disabilities can only be diagnosed by

to col-

disability, says

in

have a special

learning disability, the student

is

come

students

lege out of high school with

the

that a student could

tests.

certainly familiar with the

disability.

Yet

using a battery of

They

she

definition.

bright

are are

not slow citing

says,

the

biggest

the

as

misconception regarding special

ability to learn

learning disabilities.

concepts quickly but can’t explain

for first time this faii

Operational plan focus of ISO meeting By Lisa Wilhelm

information

downward

college community.

The operational plan on how to implement ISO 9000 as a management system was the main focus of the ISO (International Standards Organization) quality

management system

steering

com-

mittee meeting held on Sept. 21 at Services Client Student the

moving on

Jeffrey,

the

chair

of the

committee, began the first fall meeting with a welcome and an introduction of old and new members of the committee. He continued with a discussion on the best day and time for future meetings. It was found that it is almost impossible for all the members to convene at one time

that.”

ISO 9000 Essentials: A Practical Handbook For Implementing the ISO 9000 Standards, Jeffrey

to

make

members

outline

was only

structured for 20

Though

the

resource

is

not trying to

“re-invent the wheel.”

not in

book’s

it

was then turned

Most of

main purpose of the meeting, the ISO management system. Jeffery said his main concern is getting the project up and running.

“We’ve got

to

move

off of

do

and implementing

structure

ISO

‘strategizing’,”

“We need

to

start

community.

EXTRA MONEY? It can be fun! is rewarding! is useful on your resume!

Information

contact Jenn at the

wheel,” but trying to form some-

Drop in to Student Services (2B02) for more information.

sluices

DSA Office ViO-

passing

thing that will benefit the college

.

detailed

Jeffery told the group.

October and let both the college community and the ministry know that the ISO project is on the way.

STILL NEEDING TUTORS IN: GENERAL BUSINESS MECHANICAL TN & TY MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The Sanctuary)

more

Jeffrey said throughout the

If you are a second or third year student and have 80% or better in the course (s) and you would like to tutor, you could qualify

The Other Room

For

As

-It -It

3:30

(in

newsletter.

course of the meeting, the group is not trying to “re-invent the

Rep.

ThiLjrs

and voice-mail extensions and also an update on orientation for new members. Following an outline of the June minutes, Jeffery focused on the

out

The

Would you like to earn some

Meeting

cation listing for e-mail addresses

project.

The committee hopes to get things moving in September or

-

committee membership communi-

first

the committee agreed

to

Eleanor Conlin, chair of special projects and academic research, who updated the group on the

sent

at all,” said Jeffrey.

it.

Attention

according to the college’s

but

newsletter

situation.

DSA Class

are not able

the

The group

guideline that Jeffrey hopes the committee can follow to help get running.

1997,

committee plans to keep everyone informed about the progress that is being made with an annual

out of sync, but I’d rather be two or three months out of sync than

ISO up and

21,

Jeffrey then proceeded to go through a reproduction of the plan following the book’s guidelines,

“We may be two or three months

the college’s

Sept.

reference.

will take

a set

is

On

probably take longer.

it

Approach. project approach

overhead guideline would prove to be a useful tool for future that the

was introducing the ISO

months, Jeffrey said

introduced an overhead from a book entitled The Typical Project

due to conflicting schedules. They eventually decided on Wednesday mornings, when only three of the

have to

After introducing the book The

The

building. Bill

get

the

to

We


Page 4

— SPOKE, Sept. 28, 1998

COMMENTARY

Stifling objectivity limits column ideas here are to this

fill

many

things that can be written

the space of

As

for

Marc McGwire and Sammy Sosa

should not have an opinion about the sur-

both beating the home-run record of Roger Maris, congratulations to them. Steroids or

vey she conducted

not,

ist

week.

Take Back the take place on Sept. 26.

else suggested the

Night march set to

Unfortunately, the reporter

is covering this event and once again has no opinion that should be published.

Now

the challenge for the

to find

is

won’t

column writer

something to write about

interfere

with

the

that

they

stories

reported on.

For

monthly student association meetings that have just started are a good idea to connect Conestoga instance,

the

hitting 62-plus home runs isn’t something everyone can do. There was talk that Sosa was not getting

the

same recognition

he broke the record

reaction It’s

is

typical.

but Americans have a tendency to read prejudice into almost any situation. In regard to school, if the teachers’ strike

averted

education. life

we won’t always be

share

the

same

with

interests.

Interaction with others in fields of study

know nothing about could be experience for

all

a

you

great

involved.

Another issue is having the hunting age being lowered to 12. For this to happen, twelve year olds will have to hunt with a mentor over the age of 8, receive parental 1

both

secondary and be a big relief. It is always in the best interest of students to be in class and to be taught when they are scheduled to, especially at college level is

met.

who

McGuire because

later.

not to say that prejudice doesn’t exist,

college level,

Throughout

as

This was linked to prejudice against black baseball players. Seeing as this took place in the States, this

College students together. Hopefully they will prove useful for all of the associations involved and will leave people informed and provide them with new acquaintances they probably wouldn’t have

people

Si'Her!

especially in the rural community.

Clinton, but this journal-

last

.

into

because of the objectivity that must be shown as a journalist. This column could be written about Bill

Someone

I

and pass a

firearms

.

Since the proper guidelines have been put place, there is no problem with 1 2 year olds hunting. With the increase in childhood obesity, due in part to excessive TV viewing, it’s great that young people have another option to become active,

though,

limits

share

PJcKt IM THe

T6Q

written hunting test to qualify.

column; some are

off

permission,

Ouc

where

at it

students

will

are

paying

for

their

Teachers should have the right to be upset with working conditions and to voice their

concerns to reach a better deal for themselves, but it is always best if an agreement can be reached without interfering with students.

These are the

tidbits

string together; little

of opinion that

thankfully

opinions to write a

full

I

could

had enough column. I

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Denise Bettencourt;

News

Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor:

Ned Bekavac;

Entertainment Editor: Melanie Spencer; Sports Editor: Neven Mujezinovic; Photo Editor: Jason Gennings; Online Editor: Sarah Thomson; Production Manager: Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager: Judy Sankar; Circulation Manager: Lisa Wilhelm; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Dick Scott.

SPOKE’S

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B 1 5, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca address

is

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA logo. SPOKE shall

not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

tain

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE — Sept. 28, 1998

Should men walk

Page 5

in

Take Back the Night? By Brent Clouthier

A

survey was conducted at College asking students if they felt men should be given the right to walk in the Take Back the Night march, a

random

Conestoga

Mike Oxbig, marketing

.

.

.

YES!

which women march to assert their right to walk the streets without fear. As rally in

the

annual rally presently

stands,

men

are invited only to the entertainment provided after the march and candlelight ceremony. Of the students surveyed, all agreed that men should have the right to take part in the entire event. Half expressed the idea that the streets are entirely unsafe, regardless of the person’s sex. The rest of the responses expressed matters of gender politics;

men,

by

in particular, felt slighted

omission.

their

student.

“When I go out at night, I take my big dog O’Hagan, business YES! .

.

first-year

general

.

with me.

But

women’s

issue,”

I

don’t think

added the

it’s

just a

19-year-old

Rawan,

Zally

also

a

19- year-old,

computer programmer analyst echoed Mihit’s thoughts.

first-year

“Women

aren’t the only ones afraid.

It’s

unsafe for both.”

Each woman also stated they knew people who had been assaulted in the Victoria Park both

In

area.

victims

instances,

the

were men and both had been

.

.

.

Wilson, second-year journalism

YES!

political in his response.

not

to

all

walk social

Rawan, first-year computer programmer analyst YES!

Zally

as such.”

Nathan should be

First-year general business student,

Goetz, also

believed that

allowed

men

march,

to

.

.

.

anything

if

for the sake of political correctness.

seems

“It

men

sexist.

They’re saying that

all

are the cause,” said the 20-year-old.

men

“Yes,

should be allowed to walk, that not all men are out

show

to

just

raping

there

women

and

committing

crimes.”

Mike Oxbig, a 24-year-old marketing student agreed.

he

said.

Francine Meyer, a first-year general business student, echoed Goetz’s remarks. “Men and women are both equals. Men should be allowed to march.” she said. business Another first-year general student,

Becky O’Hagan, had

on the

a different

Nathan business

Goetz, .

.

first-year

general

YES!

.

matter.

“Yeah, definitely men should be allowed “If it’s to march,” said the 18-year-old. a man’s wife and child, why shouldn’t he be able to support them, to show that he wants the streets safe for family too.”

An

interesting note to the street survey is

one person of those were aware of the Take Night march and what it

the fact that only

represented

symbolized.

was more

we’re

but

deviants and shouldn’t be lumped together

Back

expressed the same opinion. “Sure, men should be allowed to march,” commented the 40-year-old. “Why not? It’s just as unsafe for a man to walk the street as it is for a woman.” Adam Wilson, a second-year journalism

men

shouldn’t need

Riddell, a second-year electronic student, technology and engineering

student,

Fot

streets,

beaten.

Mike

Adam

women

the

take

Mihit.

student,

that

“It’s just sexist,”

«

not safe for anyone,” said Julia Mihit, a first-year computer programmer analyst “It’s

Becky

“Yes, I think men should be allowed to march,” the 20-year-old said. “I understand the idea that the walk is symbolic,

the

The Take Back the Night march was to take place. Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the clock tower in Victoria Park.

A

candlelight ceremony was to be held at Kitchener City Hall rotunda following the

walk.

Men

were invited

ment provided

to enjoy the entertain-

after the

Francine business

Meyer, .

.

.

first-year

general

YES!

ceremony.

(Photos by Melanie Spencer)

the infcamatio? you need to about your college community.

all

know

Show Monday, September 28 5:00 pm,

COLOUR PHOTOCOPyiNO

The Sanctuary

Tickets,$10 Doon Campus Students $12 non-students

9(

Show

SCANNING

includes

oil

you con

eat spaghetti dinner. Tickets

on Sole at the DSA

STOo

These services are now available at the

DSA Office.

Nominal Fee applies

Warning: Not suitable for easily offended people. Strong language

&

hard core humour throughout.

Office. oON


S

— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 6

a

It's

lair

One

28, 1998

Cobber

go,

year

(translation: It's

asked Sept.

1

“You what “Aussie” slang

1

he could recall from four years spent earnEnglish at the in ing his doctorate University of Sydney, Australia, Conestoga

can’t get these articulation agree-

In fact, she says she

knows of

(the real thing).”

career practitioner degree.

to

Laurier

new

history currently

the

in

UW also shares

an agreement with English and political science programs and Conestoga’s journalism

diploma program. Conlin says out-of-province agreements

making

between Conestoga and University of West Sydney). Sydney (U of five currently Although there are Conestoga alumni from business and engineering programs studying at U of Sydney, McGregor says that a new blanket articulation agreement was arranged on

W

provincial

agreements only with Ontario University of Guelph, Wilfrid University and University of

Waterloo (UW), who offer a collaborative program between the three institutions for a

“marvelous place” called Australia, due to his own history and partly due

tion. including four or five in

exist

Buffalo State University, N.Y.,

at

Northwood

University,

Mich.,

Saginaw

attaining a degree, Conlin says, “Students

opportunity

cul-

“Australia has that whole Eastern connecTaiwan, India

tion as they’re closer to Asia,

and China environments.” McGregor says he has had three or four Sydney’s representatives from U of

W

Valley State, Mich., D’Youville College, Buffalo, N.Y., University of Lethbridge,

and Athabasca University, Alta. She says that several others are under negotiaAlta,

visit

or stay the night in his

assessed the college and

its

home

while they

students.

“They’re happy with the curriculum records. They’re very fulsome. They have made very positive judgements of our stu-

McGregor. of Sydney curriculum

dents’ quality,” says

U

According to

W

also

information,

available

Doon

Australia,

for the university.

fastest

growing

desti-

nation

for

study-

will be officially

year graduates of any program the chance to earn an undergraduate degree in the space

of one year, or a masters degree

McGregor

two

in

years in the subtropical climate of Sydney,

that

Australia’s largest city of 3.5 million peo-

400

Two-year programs

will also

substantial credits and assessed

the

experience of a

be granted

some

students

from

year and offered a convocation so parents

would have the chance to see their children convocate in Toronto.” But Conlin says she thinks Conestoga still has a long way to go on the overall issue of

new

ments

culture,

Opportunity to travel and gain a

“There

broader view of the world.”

leges’

depth

Eleanor Conlin,

Conestoga graduates completing oneyear BA degrees at U of Sydney,

W

campuses in Sydney. “Mainly the agreements were for bachelor of art degrees who went on to get bachelor of education degrees (BEd) as our BEd programs are full up here. There were also a number (of agreements) in nursing.”

W

Australia, are doing well,

Conlin.

(Photo by

says Eleanor Dee

Bettencourt)

McGregor

in

chair,

academic

acatlemic)

and

says that at a recent luncheon in

W

Toronto, the chancellor of U of Sydney said the university has a target of 15 per

versities

own

it

much

And

of

course, there

is

territorial issue

-

admit and prepare

to

the

unitheir

students first,” says Conlin.

A large ty

want

college

too

offering

research and educational services breadth.

ious

program, says McGregor. This is a unique study-abroad opportunity for Conestoga students, according to Eleanor Conlin, chair, academic research and educational services for the college. She worked with McGregor to help send the five students to U of Sydney and says they are doing very well in their studies.

agree-

currently

is always a question about (col-

Ontario attended var-

program by

number of

articulation

existence.

reports

year

last

W

Sydney brought McGregor says, “U of some of their senior academics up here this

ing the low

abroad students from North America, Europe and Asia.

near future, wiU allow third-

cent international enrolment.

“Students benefit having the

campus, is

students

to

(Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

articulation, consider-

through the continuing education office

ordinator of articulation and external links

The agreement, which

Grant McGregor confirmed Sept. 14 diploma holders can get a degree in one year in Australia.

that three-year

graphic design, education, health sciences and international studies departments either

on

ple.

new

and gain a

broader view of the world.

Sept. 10 after talking with Paul Abela, co-

in the

travel

to

;

W

signed

Great Britain.

In addition to the benefit of saving time

ture,

affiliates

in the

BA

university.”

Grant McGregor, a former Commonwealth exchange scholar who graduated in 1970, offers this example: “Duke me (give me a handshake) digger (comrade) dinke-di

partly

good thing, mate)

benefit having the experience of a

articulation

says he has remained interested

really

ments everywhere with Ontario colleges,” says Conlin. “It’s because you can’t get a perfect match, course by course, at every

College’s principal laughs.

McGregor

a

Australia nets a

in

By Dee Bettencourt When

.

number of students with

universi-

education are coming to college now and is time for college students to be recog-

nized

when moving on

to university, Conlin

says.

“Students should

know

the value of hav-

ing a degree in pursuing their careers.”

her life In Australia By Oe© Bettencourt

When to leave

One

who

of five Conestoga College graduates

how she made arrangements Canada and temporarily emigrate

asked

I hstHte dte accent,” writes^pikskwelL “Onr first weekend checking out jobs in the

lo Australia, Blackwell replied that she relied on educational crnisultants Ron and Sue Kelly of Consultants of

travelled to die land of *‘Oz” this

KOM

September to complete a one-year undergr^uate degree at University of West Sydney, Australia, has sent e-mail describ-

Hamilton to

vn

flayjk

with the school of her

liaise

C.ia

choice.

rain tll»i

'

ing her experiences.

-

'

.

-

4

April-Dawn Blackwell, 24, graduated from business administratitHi nmiagement studies in 1997 from Conestoga before also

and confirmation pa^rs was prdrlematic as

obtaining a human resources certificate in 1998. She is studying for her bachelor of

could n<« obtain her student visa

until

paperwork was completed. After paying $1,864 Cdn at Dravel Cuts for her ticket, flying into a time zone 14

W

College graduate^fnends wrote diey foui^ a home.

bedrooms; two bathrooms,

\

garage- for ^storag^ an outdoor swimming pc^l, a gym, a security entrance and only 1

minutes walking to

U

W

of Sydney and central downtown, they pay $ J ,020 Cdn po* mondi, plus utilities and (ciepbone hook-up. Deposits arc required as well. Only the clc^s dryer and dishwasher were provided; they bought a fridge and washing

machihe and have no TV, Houses don’t Conte with central hearing, despite cool stsyenings.;;:

;

.

“Surprises (or unexpected facts about - diey have dollar store.s here and

Australia)

every business

W

^

BA*.

'5

4

''Zt, u

^

submitted)

st6

'' '

"

Mhtinuttri wagd i$ almosi

^'hctef and waitresses are^generi^l fipped. She says studenls ttte allow work 20 hours per week whtile in sc which can rise to 40 hours per week d holidays, ff you

'pj,

^'c^iestanrant

for a

'^eap

;srii|.

-

closed by 5:30 p.m. and We are a

is

the streets are virtually deserted.

half-hour train ride frean Sydney and

more

like

I

am on

only exception

is

it

feels

the train to Toronto.

the

palm

trees

The

and people

i

visa,!

^ys

following gradui;

wofIcMseems to be 8 much

n

wtuk

can wttek 364

here,

Blackwell

sa>

l^annata camt ^ newly "'located under construi^^ having been a psyche

cm

'

Mudenf from Conestoga College, is attend&i£ U of Sydney to obtain her

mere is

,eui|ii®Bsuy«-ana

much monoy.

the

commer«i; marketing, at U of Sydney, and w«ne the following to Spoke readers: “Getting here seemted to be dte i^y part, hours ahead, being dn^^ off at fhe wrong from my point of view.^The hard part was (apartment) with tte wrong host, leaving the 'fecurity of I pay cheqtw e^otyf tog at firist baud, that pasifing rickets week front work,>mily and friends,;*. $90 and driving on the wrong side of the '4 toad, Blackwell and her four Conestoga;;

;

what

Blackwell wrote that the mterrclated com- .'.xte<iite^y^anate-m^t^ bination of the “uni" (university) applica/^''.^r^orts tfaa^ gr<x»rics^,^';r^y tion. course approval, transcripts, pottfolio mesre

'

Ap^Dmn Biadcwell, an arriculation

1

ave^e, aldtou^^^ust

a bar is to ’*Shottt you a u. which means you buy a t^le drinks an atre slang in

'l-Dmvn Blackwell

*

rite

\rdculmimistu4^ per semest^.

It

Hew

hur^1^ %nj ''

to wri'te that

OSAP.'’OSAPi$ for both yem and

rite petite you leave in chaige of yemr affairs at home. Each' one 0

she writes,

%; Otan

us has had problems with

<ter

aj^Jic^cma,

My parents have spent hcatrs with the bank and

that stupid

The below

number you have to caJi**

Australian dollar trades just slightly

Canadian dollar. University and college administrators often point out that American tuition costs, given the exchange rate, are similar to rite

Australian costs. Nmt-accredited, fulllength Canadian degree programs would also add up to a similar tuition cost in the long run.

order to help fund her expenses, Blackwell works at a local tavern as a bartender. Blackwell says popular street-theIn

seem

to

hmig

feel like “aygles”,

^mther

togeriier

or loners,

“I go out ^fter^eJasa evi^ week with <»e group of (Australian) pet^le for lunch, ^They taking me to rite hoi^ races and

are going to tea^dt

She

says

me how to *hidy board,*”

to get (rugby/fobtball)ticketsalwell, ..she.-/ ho|»'s.i?

“fooly**

Blackweri ccaicludes: “My ove a great learning experience, comes to working, we’ll see. do) a stint in Mew Zealand and com^' - it’s

May^

(to

A«stralia)/Otib

seems to be a

§m*Wf heipy

^


5 SPOKE,

— Page

Sept. 28, 1998

7

Big changes

ATS complex

at

By Jacqueline Smith

began

The ATS Engineering Complex has been given a

look.

Michelin

1997,

In

new

donated

$1 million to the college for a

wing

new

were

complex. Construction

at the

in July

1

997 and finished

in

January of this year. This summer, donations from Rockwell were used in remodeling labs, classrooms and offices. A hydraulics and a robotic lab set up,

and the robotics and

automation group which used to be at the Woodworking Centre

was

transferred into the

ATS com-

plex.

“New equipment the, shop

providing

up

is

many

is in

place and

and

running,

opportunities for

students to do hands-on practical said Gerry Nafzinger, a

work,”

apprentices, concerning one of the

Tony Piazza, an electrical intermediate apprentices student, works on D.C. motors as teacher Gerry Nafzinger looks on at the

new

ATS

teacher of electrical intermediate labs.

“Like

many

local businesses,

engineering complex.

(Photo By Jacqueline Smith)

we

have a significant demand for properly trained people to support

our continued success in world markets,” said Klaus Woerner, president and chief executive of

officer

ATS,

the

in

new

Conestoga College guide to training and developement “By responding to what skills are required by employers and providing students with the training necthose develop to essary capabilities. Conestoga is helping graduates find good high its quality jobs and

Carol laquinta, from the training and developement department, shares a look at the college’s guide to training and developement (Photo By Jacqueline Smith) with student Scott Galbraith.

it’s

Cdnestoea

helping local

Oktdberfest Night Queensmount Arena Thursday,

October

1

businesses, like ATS, to fill their needs. I think that’s a winning strategy for everybody.”

Tickets

Only

$S on Sale tO(day the DSA Office!

Tickets

at John Trelemans, a robotics automation teacher hydraulics lab

in

the

ATS

at

Conestoga College, looks

Waiting

for parking

list

ffee

“We go down Alt available poking decals have been sold and security services has started a waiting list,

Allan Hunter, security said services supervisor. “Wc arc continuing to monitor die parking

situation

and as

become available we con* people on the list,” said

them a

tag,

and offer wherever a tag the

list

happens to be available. If they want to wait for a specific lot, they wilt go to dte bottom of the

IS if

they have a special needs,

spots

otherwise

tact

serve

tt*s first

come

first

Hunter.

17 people who were on the waiting list Sept. 15, there are only 50 people left waiting for

Of the

parking

The

1

'iupervisor

portion of those

campus and the Hunter said more spaces should

patrolling

open up,

may hay|| may now

“Some

<tecals.

said

that

a

wainng would

purchased

want

to use

at the

equipment

in

the

Age

of Majority Required

(Photo By Jacqueline smith)

engineering complex.

,

So, that win

decals

np space,”

Purchase a ticket before

said Hunter.

Ihere are other ways the

Tues. Oct. 13

lots

will thin out as school contin-

for a chance to

a considerable number without decals, but ticketing has begun and this will open spac®8,” said John Tribe,

“There

are

a

Mo Ison

Win

Can Stereo!

security services.

In the meantime security has been asking students to make sure they park in their assigned

On

display at the

DSA

Office pN

lots.

Hunter said cars without decals could pay to park at the meter.s or After 4 in paid lots 3 and 1 1 p,m„ parking IS available m any .

STO,


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 8

Woman

28, 1998

tops medallion design contest

Graphics student wins provincial competition which they marked on. Although this contest wasn’t one into special projects

By Lisa Wilhelm

get

F to

or most, post-sec-

of

ondary education

decided

is

it

a great opportunity

something

in

and hope

they enjoy

day find a job

one

most

come

symbolized what was being given for. The design features a that

This was the case for a

cial flower.

stu-

dent at Conestoga College.

for the

Young Volunteers of Ontario

recognition

launched

“When I

program,

set

to

be

Jolene MacDonald, 22, holds up her award-winning medallion, designed for the Young Volunteers of Ontario recognition program.

me

(Photo by Lisa Wilhelm)

this fall.

the lady called to

had won.

speechless,”

tell

was stunned and said MacDonald. I

sunk

The

was open

contest

it was first MacDonald and her

post-secondary level;

to enter,

introduced to

own

classmates at the beginning of

“It still hasn’t

in.”

Ontario design students

to at

all

the

draw-

Each trillium contains which stands for vol-

The medals will be struck in silver, with colours added. The only thing that was changed from her original design was the colour and she was given the

medallion-design competition for the

line

dition of a head.

ate of Bluevale collegiate institute

won $2,500

medal

unteer, plus a frontal, stylized ren-

Jolene MacDonald, 22, a gradu-

Waterloo,

the

ing of a trillium, Ontario’s provinthe letter V,

in

were peo-

With the design she went with, she incorporated different things

which

graphics

the rest because in the

ple.

as quite a surprise.

third-year

all

original creations, there

some

of

give

try.

then

rewards for their extra efforts,

MacDonald

to

MacDonald. “I liked it the best because it was different.” She said she liked this idea better

For a

in.

are

there

few,

that to

a

projects,

“I worked on roughs for about a day and finally decided on the last one that I had created,” said

enhance their knowl-

edge

those

second year. They were told what it was and that if they wished

their

it

was

to be

done on

MacDonald

said that

when

these

teachers sometimes make them

Fanshawe College

in

London

Conestoga’s highly regarded graphic’s design program, which she said offers opting

for

more business-oriented jobs

after

graduation. She said the program is

quite a challenge.

said she would like working on her own

MacDonald

medal would be cast with. She

within the next 10 years. Upon graduation, she would like

chose

silver.

MacDonald it

said the design will

was a big honour

to

win the

“Basically, I

feel

I

can’t even explain

about

this,”

said

MacDonald. MacDonald’s love for art began when she was a child. She said that art has always been her life and that it’s just “what I do.” She studied fine arts for one year

because she and

to start in advertising

likes the idea of designing ads

logos.

As

award.

how

Studying in the Sun

at

before

to see herself

be a great portfolio piece and that

contests are offered in her class,

medallion design.

opportunity to decide what the

their

time.

award-winning

MacDonald’S

for theawjird

money?

what to do Macdonald said. “I’ll probably save it and hopefully be able to buy a car after graduation.” “I haven’t decided

with

it

yet,”

Earlier

this

MacDonald

year,

won

a T-shirt design competition associated with the Waterloo and

Area Quilt Festival.

eOT ANf story IDEAS? Email us

at:

spoke@conestogac.on .ca

SiteeT Vsiit Attend the Country’s Largest University/College

Career Fair Tuesday, September 29

10:00

am

-

3:30

pm

Bingemans Conference Centre Victoria Street, Kitchener

• Free Admission

& Transportation

with Student

I.D.

Employer

lists,

bus schedules

and information available

in

the

Student Employment Office •

Co-Sponsors: Conestoga College University of Guelph University of Wate.doo Wilfrid Laurier University

First-year electrical engineering student Jeff Lesic organizes some of his notes while enjoying the nice weather on Sept. 1 4. (Photo by Jason Gennings)

University of

Waterloo

UNIVERSITY 0^GUELPH

Conestoga College

^


SPOKE, Sept 28, 1998

T^irt 4mj

— Page 9

yJtf^UrlQQ Tt^rlt

Chris ‘Coyote’ Fletcher plays with a drum circle from Marcell school of drum. (Photo by Jason Gennings)

Jerry

Penner works on a piece

of the

many types

of chain mail, one displayed, and used, at the

Medival Faire.

By Judy Sankar

two

finalists

who would It was a grand time for all who attended the first annual Royal Medieval Faire in Waterloo Park on Sept. 19. Wizards, bandits and royalty roamed the land in elaborate costumes. Children ran, sweat beading down their foreheads, as they played game after game, trying to get 15 ribbons. If they were determined enough to get 15 ribbons, they would be knighted by King Bertram of Mearth and Queen Charlotte in a special cereihony at the end of the day. Adults wandered from tent to tent, looking at the marvels from a time period that had passed

Co-directors Karen Lucas and D.J. Carroll got the idea to hold

a fair when they attended the Pow Wow, a fair held in Waterloo Park last year. “We both came to the Pow Wow last year. I’m not sure how we went from Pow Wow to Medieval but we are both involved in medieval things so

we

decided to organize an

event,” said Lucas.

from all over the K-W area to participate in the faire, which was a year and a half in the making. The actors came from a wide range of people including students, musicians, artists, computer programmers and teachers. Even the mayor of Waterloo, Joan Lucas

of three previous battles would fight to determine take the hand of the king’s daughter, Princesss

Pamela. The crowd gathered as the event was about to take wide with

place. Children sat around the fighting circle, eyes

excitement.

“Are those

real

and

Carroll

people

got

McKinnon made an appearance

opening ceremony. was the final day The biggest event of the tournament and royal wedding held at around 3:30 p.m. The at the

swords?” yelled one child from the audience.

“Of course they are real swords,” bellowed King Bertram. Amidst a complex plot full of treachery, magical spells, and romance resembling a Shakespeare and alas, a victor emerges.

the

monk

crowd the two are wed. When groom and says, “You may now kiss the groom kisses fte princess passionately.

the cheers of the

turns to the

bride,” with a dip the

Afterwards, a Ceili (a medieval dance) is held. Three musicians played music while the actors mingled with children and adults, teaching them the art of this dance.

At the end of the day, many children had become lords and winning 15 ribbons. Their parents were proud of them and seemed pleased with the day that resulted from the $5 admission fee. The mayor was pleased as well, and she looks ladies after

forward to next year’s

“My their

faire,

says Carroll.

was the kids; The look of amazement on faces and Ae wonder in their eyes as they wandered favourite part

at wizards and witches and all the people in costumes,” says Carroll, who also looks forward to next year.

around looking

After four battles in the ring at the centre of the festival, 'the finalists duel for the hand of Princess Pamela, and everything that goes with it. (Photo by Judy sankar)

I

play, the battle tj^es place

Princess Pamela, dressed in a beautiful white dress, meets her

new mate. To

long ago.

(Photo by Judy Sankar)

Kate Gregg demonstrates balloon art at the.faire where she made swords, hats and animals for children.

(Photo by Judy Sankar)


.

Page

10— SPOKE, Sept. 28,

1998

Vote won’t rock the boat

Final stretch of union Canadian Information Processing Society Conestoga College Student Chapter

By Dee Bettencourt

C.I.P/s October dinner meeting:

Topic:

the of stretch agreement is underway for 259 full- and partial-load teachers at Conestoga College.

The

Guest Speaker Norbert Mika talks about Visual Studios 6.0. Microsoft's newest

development tools

final

ratification

Advance

voting

ratification

union office, 1B50-2, on Sept. 22 and the rest of the votes will be submitted Sept. 23 in front of Doon’s Door 3. Walter Boettger, Local 237 union

occurred

Date: October 19, 1998

For more details contact C.I.P.S. Conestoga College

in

the

president for the college, says, “If

Chapter by:

the vote goes over

E-mail

(

www.ciDScc@sentex.net)

,

then

Phone 748-5220(ext.602)

,

under way

ratification

Presents:

Office 1D14-B(see posted

it

50 per

cent,

On

Sept.

will be accepted.

24 we’ll know here by about 5 p.m. and provincially by about 7

office hours)

p.m.”

A

strike

May

21

mandate was accepted over stumbling blocks

such as increases to teacher workload, the reclassification of positions, pay increases and job security in the format of retraining

Buffalo Bills Sun. Nov. vs.

if

were achieved for the union after negotiating union-management teams reached a tentative contract agreement in Toronto during the early hours of Aug. 28. According to the union office, academic salary schedules for

1

Miami Dolphins

full-time professors, counsellors

Tickets available

and

with or without transportation

Details

and

conditions

available at the

positions are eliminated.

All objectives but job security

librarians

range

from

the

instructors

start

at

(effective

cast her ballot, as did others in the

$27,572

date of ratification), $28,124 (effective Sept. 1 999) and remain at that figure to

of ratification), to $38,

date of ratification), which rises to

tive Sept. 1,

828 (effec1999) and remain at

$47,748 (effective Sept. 1, 1999). This number does not change on 2000. If accepted, the Sept. 1 collective agreement will not expire until Aug. 3 1 2001

schedules

for

member

moving

of

level

instructors earn $46,811 (effective

salary

Health Sciences faculty

a

Marlene Zister took advantage of the early voting on Wednesday to

minimum

range from $38,067 (effective date

The

Sale Thurs. Oct. at the DSA Office

full-time

(effective Sept.

annually.

On

(Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

lowest step-level three to the highest step level of 20. academic salaries Step-three

$38,828 (effective Sept. 1, 2000). Step-20 salaries peak at $72,158

DSA Office

Walter Boettger, union president of Local 237 for Conestoga College, accepts a ballot from a faculty member on Sept. 22.

1

,

1

Top-level

full-time

10,

,

,

nursing faculty

who

on Thursdays for

2000).

leave

campus

clinical off-site

teaching.

“I’m on the road. I’m visiting hospitals Thursdays,” says Zister. It is

unlikely that the vote will

have a surprise ending, predicts Boettger.

“There’s no way be turned down.”

this thing will

1

Three Euck Tuesday COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: ROOMMATES

Movie Night

Sharing living space with a stranger, or even a friend, can be quite different from living with your family. Things as simple as how long you stay in the

shower or where to keep the potato chips can cause tensions betweeP people who aren’t used to living together. So how can you ease the transition from family life to living with a roommate?

One way some ground

luesdoy,

X-Files

to avoid conflicts is to establish

rules.

For instance, does

nuts if the dirty dishes are

still

it

drive

you

in the sink the next

morning? Or do you have a “high dirt tolerance” that will have your roommate gnashing her teeth by the end of September? Some areas to discuss

m I

Ttie Movie

food

common

areas

costs: shared? designated fridge

space?

quiet hours for morning, study time and

at

night

^uest policy Living with a roommate

isn’t all

about rules

and compromises, but it’ll be much easier to set guidelines now, before you start getting on each other’s nerves.

PI

6

pm

Ihe SanctuQiy

include:

space: private versus

8:00

O'ct.

Admission only $3 for students $6 for fiuests Free 600 ml bottle -pf

Coke

8c

Free popcon;


SPOKE, Sept. 28,

1998 Page 11

Department meeting generates decision

Journalism students agree to semi-formal banquet By Melissa

Dietrich

MOVIG of the

advising the faculty, the dean, and chair of communication

the

The decision to have a semiformal awards banquet for the

on how programs should operate, so that it meets the needs

was

of the students, in the sense that they will graduate with the skills

department

journalism decided by

students

during

studies

a

department meeting on Sept. 22. Journalism co-ordinator Sharon Dietz said to students that the

becoming a student representative

banquet would take place regardless of what was decided during

responsibilities in

who

of the

PAC

are interested in

can pick an outline of

Room 4B07-A.

The only question to was how formal they

Students are also required to write an essay detailing why they would

wanted it to be. “We need some kind of commitment from the students and we need some kind of ownership on your part,” she said. In past years, the banquet has taken place in such places as the Golf Steakhouse in Kitchener. The banquets usually included a dinner, a guest speaker and a

be an appropriate choice. Dietz also mentioned that, on Oct. 28 at 1:30 p.m., there will be a PAC tour of the journalism program. The members of the PAC will visit classrooms to observe students in computer labs, photo labs and those working on Spoke. During the meeting the Sept. 25 deadline for award submissions was extended to Oct. 2.

the meeting.

the students

dance.

tues. sept, 29 11:50 pra pON %

needed for a job, said Dietz. Students

Journalism program co-ordinator,

Sharon

Dietz, talks to stu-

dents at a meeting on Sept. 22. (Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

Week src,

<3

in

tbe

O

sanctuarzy

The

concern with having a similar banquet this year was the time and effort it takes to organize such a big event.

Dietz said to students that Joe Martin, dean of communication studies

for

Conestoga College, want faculty to be

said he did not

by the organization of awards banquet for the first two months of the semester.

Take on your Future.

distracted the

Once

students voted in favour of

Let Canada’s Youth Employment

a semi-formal banquet, a group of

approximately 20 students volunteered to organize the event. Students who were not at the department meeting, but are interested in helping with the banquet can attend a Sept. 28 meeting at 4:30 in Room 4B14. Dietz also introduced journalism faculty

although Heather

meeting.

the

at

was

she

not

And, there.

was

Bortolussi,

Strategy help. Call 1 Get work experience and

Get

internship opportunities here at home and abroad.

through the Canada Student Loans Program.

Get the latest on-line career planning and labour market information.

Get Canada study grants you’re a student with

introduced as the program administrator.

Something new addressed at the meeting was a faculty advisory, which has been set up to assist journalism students with either

academic or personal problems. The advisory will consist of a member of faculty for every day of the week. Dietz said the purpose of the advisory is to keep the lines of

communication open between faculty and students. “If you have a non-academic concern, don’t hesitate to

come

800 935-5555 how the Canada Education Savings Grant assists parents saving for their children’s education. Find out

financial assistance

if

dependents.

Find out about youth hiring incentives for employers.

Get tax breaks on RRSP withdrawals if you’re a mature or part-time student.

Get tax and interest on student loans.

Find out

relief

how the Millennium Scholarship Fund might work for you.

You can also connect with Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy by visiting the Youth Resource Network at www.youth.gc.ca

and see us,” she said. A listing of the days each faculty member is available, and the time and room where they can be reached will be posted on bulletin boards around the department, said Dietz.

The meeting also discussed the Program Advisory Committee (PAC), which consists of a group of journalists

who work

in the

industry, she said.

The

PAC

All

Truth

& No Bull Read Spoke

is

responsible

for

Find out how the National Graduate Register helps private companies recruit recent grads for permanent jobs and students for summer, and co-op jobs.

Youth

Employment Strategy

77 Strategic f f

emploi jeunesse


G Page 12

r*

— SPOKE, Sept

28, 1998

Students offered By Melissa Student

and stress exams management, there is something

Dietrich

services

final

offering

is

Magazine

to

said

every student.

all that is

show up to

of the students

November. Joan Magazine, who has been a

no registration is scheduled; needed. One of the workshops offered to students is the mature-student drop-in, and Magazine said it has

workshops

counsellor in student services for

19 years, said there

is

no fee

to

workshops or groups. time on workshops management and preparing for attend the

become

With

students

is

to

at the

an

the

beyond a two-hour

something get-together.

chance to share some and laughs,” said

“It is a

required

in October, starting running through to the middle of

students

c

can apply

that

workshops for Conestoga College

workshops

fall

issues, solutions,

Magazine.

time they are

opportunity

“It is

a chance

some

to

share

issues, solutions,

and laughs.”

for

who want to participate

in

Joan Magazine, student services

GENERAL INFORMATION SESSION Thursday, October '

IF

1st,

Some years there have been mature- student groups getting together and forming a club or government through the Doon Student Association, said

1998

-you missed your class session

Magazine.

word-problem The tests workshop is one of the newest

-you forgot “how to” over the

available to students this year, she

summer

said.

-you always wanted to

were

Come

afraid to

know

but

ask

observed

students

for the study-skills help

and have found that many have troubles with word problems,” said Magazine. essay-writing skills The workshop is also a new choice for

Resource Centre

to the Learning

“We’ve coming in

students, said Magazine.

on Thursday, October learn about the

1st,

1998,

4-5PM

to

LRC and how to access

“We

have, in the last couple of

years, been focusing

language skills,” she In

addition

on English

said.

to

seven

the

workshops offered, there are two

the various databases.

Joan Magazine of studeni services looks at the list of workshops be offered to students beginning in October.

that will

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

groups available.

However, unlike the workshops, and test-anxiety

the self-esteem

the meeting Magazine.

be

to

held,

said

groups involve several meetings with the students.

The self-esteem group runs

for

two-hour with weeks, meetings each week. The test-anxiety group runs for two-hour weeks, with four meetings scheduled per week. five

EreuhauncI Canada4f

THIS THANKSGIVING, TRAVEL WITH THE TOP DOG.

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All of the workshops and groups

run

are

by

from said Magazine.

counsellors

student services,

Counsellors are also responsible

house? Has

it

There is a list posted outside student services with dates and times for the

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Depending on when you catch

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SPOKE,

ENTERTAINMENT

Sept. 28, 1998

Page 13

Wfe only sell vsiiat we Colder Than Yon and In the

Meandme,

diejr

calft diink ourselves

returned to the

Beer

is

a time'

So

has been astounding.

tradition in the

course,

Lett family.

family itself

is

And that, of

just within the

Well, actually the cases at hand.

hundreds of years

The

Lett family

would

and dozens of

like to

generations. Sure,

of beer with you.

the Lett family has

Their love of beer

share their love

produced way more

and some of the

than

hordes of Paddy's

its

share of

statesmen, war

and men of the

cloth.

They've also had the thief.

real pride of the Lett family has

brewing

tradition.

A tradition typified by the legendary Irish Red created by

Red

Red which they haven't had the You no longer have to be a member of the

odd poet and even a horse

its

Lett, the

creator of Irish

opportunity to drink themselves.

tycoons, doctors,

always been

Ueorge Henry

Irish

heroes, business

But the

Red

And now to the case at hand.

which goes back

continues with

the popularity of Paddy's Irish

honoured

A tradition

This theme

far,

the family patriarch and

Lett family to enjoy this fabulous beer.

Ydu needn't even be

Irish.

The only prerequisite

is

a genuine

love of genuine beer. So, consider yourself part of the family.

master brewer George Henry Lett in the

1800s. one person stays, it

comes down

to being

Consequendy,

it

was with no small

amount of family pride

that Patrick

Lett decided to recreate this leg'

endary brew in order to slake the family thirst

and continue the

family brewing tradition. Set In a Icnid bar. the song deals wdt die sub^t of people who are

nn^le

to take a bint.

Many

wonoen can probably relate to b«ng hit on by a person who doesn't comprehend that you’re not imere^d. Plumb’s voice js full of contempt as be sings.

To

duplicate this family masterpiece

right here in

Canada he

commissioned the

skilled craft

brewers at the Trafalgar Brewing

Company. The end Irish

result

Red, considered by

is

Paddy's

many

to

be the gold standard of beer.

There are no colouring agents or artificial additives.

Wien all

and dc®e, it is unld»ly the Waltons will ever is said

The

extraordinary taste and unique

amber colour

is

special carastan

the result of a

malt roasted more

slowly than ordinary malts.

Wfe cmly sdl viliat we caift dtitik ourselves


4 14— Spoke, Sept. 28,

Page

1998

Soccer Condors overcome adversity in Windsor The Coodor soccer teams had overcome maoy adversities as they traveled to Windsor on

to play die whole game without being able to rest, caved in to the pressure and let in the equalizing goal five minutes from time. The result stayed tied

$ep4. 19 to play St. Clair College

at 1-1.

by Neven Mujeztnovic

had

to

in their first

Ica^e games of

the

season.

and the were available for the women and 12 for the men, meant a valiant elSfort from ^dl would be needed. In the end a win and a tie sbonld be ample consolation for the Condors' brave emfeavoyrs. Angela Popadakos put the women’s team in the lead- and it looked like the Condors were on hijurtes, sendiog-offs

fact that only 11 players

their

way to victory in the season

c^ner. Bat about 20 minutes from time, forward Karen Melanson

was

sent off

fen*

protesting to the

referee.

Geoff

coach Cemdors’ Johnstone said the offence deserved a yellow card, not a red one.

He

also said the call

of

indicative

refereeing

on

whkh

was

biased had been going the

of

quality

The women, who once again

the

refereeing

remand ctmsiant.

Condors pitcher Dana Rooney lets loose on the mound Durham. Durham won the game 7-3.

The Condors pulled ahead widi a goal hy Andre Pereira. Once Conestoga

a

again,

in

OCAA women’s

Contdors record

to 1-1 after suffering

Predrag Comenov got an earful from Jt^nshme. The Cond<»s managed to hold on to the lead and start their league season with a 1-0 win away from home. Jcbnstone said he was really both teams’ with pleased

By Rob Himburg

performances,

It’s

was a good,

“It

Good

solid effort.

autumn again. That means

that the air is cooler, the leaves are

fighting spirit from both

nnder

Durham

7-3 loss to and of course, it’s time for the softball season once again at falling,

difficult

conditions.”

Conestoga.

in the field

Athletic Ontario College Association League season, savouring victory in one contest and tasting the sourness of defeat

Unfortunately, for the Condors, a

in another.

leading them to a 7-3 victory.

ladies

began

their

Mohawk

Stacie Arsenault,

who had

four

including a double, to go along with her four runs batted in. Keri Quipp added two hits and

hits,

three

Memory Workshop

RBI while Heather Babcock RBI to the cause.

contributed two

Also

in were Cassy Smith and Dana with one RBI each.

chipping

Chilton,

Amy

Rooney Rooney

also held the

hits

Sept. 29, Oct.

pm

4:30

-

1

,

Oct.

7:30

1

In

the

pm

against

Broome Durham

Memory

$40

Dove, holds the world record

will

cut study time

scoring

defense

in

dearly as

Durham

five

them

cost

ran rampant,

unanswered

The Condors offense was Carrie Cruickshanks

runs,

led by

who had two

runs batted in and Lori Walden,

who added two

and an RBI. had two hits.

hits

Julie Reitzel also

Durham was propelled to victory by Joanna Van Dyke and Stacey Taylor who each had a hit and two RBIs. Also chipping in with single RBIs were Amanda Jeffrey, Stacey Taylor, who also had two

the

hits

runs, six of

intensely

at the plate

and

hits.

them earned, on

She whiffed

six

six

and allowed

four free passes.

$1 5 for students

conning to Conestoga College!

program he

collapse

Registration only

,

the greatest nnemory.

lead going into the final inning.

for the Condors, allowing seven

game of

College.

and aggressively

for

to a slim 3-2

called, a “very strong”

second the

The Condors played

Dave Farrow Guinness World

out-hitting

Condors came up what coach Yvonne

while fanning seven.

season,

by

They held on

8-6.

and Jessica Tait who scored two mns as well. Picking up the win for Durham was Sharon Taylor, who allowed three earned runs on eight hits. She walked two and struck out three. Dana Rooney took the loss

Mohawk

offense at bay, allowing Just four

3

Durham

With five returning players and a bunch of new faces, the Conestoga Women Condors began their

season by College by a score of 13-3. They were paced by

is

falls

another

afterwards,

Shortly

Condor saw red. This time, the dismissal was justified, and

The

for

Rob Himburg)

(Photo by

Jcbnstone.

thrashing

Record Holder

softball action against

player,

Zlatko Lakoseljac, was sent off with 20 miuutes remaining, for next to nothing, according to

teams

game.

all

The msm’s game followed ^most an identical scenario. The

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SPOKE,

SPORTS

Sept. 28, 1998

—Page

15

Condor men win in nail-biter finish By Neven Mujezinovic

Dan Krauter dashed up

tain

comer It

was

porarily abandoning his sweeper’s

the fifth minute of injury

and Fanshawe College mounted a last desperate attack. From a comer kick, a Fanshawe

position, and

time

Condors’ goalkeeper Bill Johnson

1

it

1-0 for the

equalize; the Conestoga Condors determined to hold on to a victory. Sometimes this resolve

stood his ground and the ball rebounded off him. The referee then blew the final whistle. The Condors men’s soccer team held on for dear life and managed

a

made

Condors. The second half saw two extremely determined teams. The Fanshawe Falcons were resolved

player connected with the ball, but

to protect

for a

30th minute, tem-

in the

to

happy with the

I’m

result.”

league on Sept.22. It

Conestoga

sionally well-played soccer,

Joe Shamon

went too

and

far

and the referee had

his hands full, having to dish out

half offered only occa-

first

striker

and

halves

marred by over-aggressiveness from both teams.

The

yellow cards and one red

five

it

game was over. Fanshawe kept pushing

before the

scrappy affair with both teams snuggling to find any kind of flow. The Condors lobked like the only side capable of scoring, while Fanshawe ’s attack never seriously threatened the Condors’ defence. The first real chance came about 10 minutes after a free kick by Paul Mouradian Conestoga’s sailed just over the crossbar. Conestoga strikers kept pressuring Fanshawe, but it was not to be their day. As if sensing this, cap-

equalizer and had the Condors

boxed up

in their

for an

own half for long

periods in the second half but a .combination of great defending by the Condors and bad luck by Fanshawe kept the score 1 -0. ,

The Condors had

several excel-

lent chances to score, nevertheless.

As Fanshawe threw more and more men into the attack, large gaps formed in their defence. The Condors’ speedy strikers exploited these gaps with lightning counter-

great opportunities

to score but

was

good opportunity By Rob Himburg

According

8-0.

Durham College played host to a four-team women’s softball tour-

reflect the

when Fanshawe was playing

half,

very well and pushing for the equalizer, all the defenders held their ground and had an outstand-

Conestoga’s midfield was a bit disappointing against Fanshawe.

There was very

ative department. This was partly due to the fact that Fanshawe is a good team and the midfield had to adopt a more defensive role to try

Durham,

taking what

it’s

ating chances for themselves, but

was

there

we

learned and apply-

Syracuse, N.Y.

despite missing a few players,

The format was a simple roundrobin with the third- and fourthplace teams playing off and the firstand second-place teahi's

Broome suggested

it.”

Happy with

was an opportunity

“It

to test

and weaknesses.”

ing records of 1-2.

by a score of

number of runs scored for and against, with the ^ighest number winning. The claimed second spot by and went on to face

this virtue

while Loyalist and Rochester faced off in the other game.

The

down

final

the

finals

game saw Durham

shut

Condors by a score of

Men’s Soccer: St. Clair

on Oct.

3 p.m.

Men’s Hockey: Fleming on Oct. 7, 7s30 p.m.

Women’s Softball: Seneca on Oct.

8,

5 p.m.

is

your opportunity to get

involved

in

the community.

MW

Wed. 1

1

;30

Seiet.

am

-

1

30

:30 p>nn

The Sanctuar'y

wimiing. .

gamering a won-lost record of 3-0. The other three teams battled to a tie for second place, all hav-

applies to the

Fanshawe on Sept. 29» 5 p.m St. Clair on Oct. 3, 1 p.m.

Conestoga striker Joe Shamon Conestoga needs to spread the ball out more and use the whole field. He said both teams had their chances to score and the game really could have gone either way. “As long as we won, I’m happy with the result,” said Shamon. Fanshawe coach Anthony Camacho said he was disappointed with the result. He thought his team deserved at least a tie on the

that there was more emphasis on other areas than

players at various positions,” she

It

Women’s Soccer:

between

said

the team’s finish,

doing the same. The host team walked through the opposition in the round robin,

through the plus-minus rule.

interplay

little

them.

just a matter of

ing

was broken, though,

UPCOMING HOME GAMES

loose balls and cre-

was a well-played

it

Now

and loyalist. It also featured a team that came from the host team,

Pacheco

game.

game.

than that

Association

Phil

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

ward off their persistent attacks. The strikers looked dangerous

the score did not

College

softball league,

Condor player Dwayne Bell chests the ball down as of Fanshawe gets ready to challenge him.

to

Here

errors played a major role. Other

the

in

simple as that,” said Camacho.

Can-Am tournament featured two other teams from the Ontario

in

cohesion

little

was basically a 2-0 game,’’ said Broome. “Just like the league game where Durham defeated us,

the

Durham

not

“It

nament on the weekend of Sept. 19-20. Aside from the Condors,

(Condors

did

pressured,

buckle. Especially in the second

Condor coach,

to

Yvonne Broome,

tie

be

just not to

The Condors’ defence, though seriously

for testing players

The

it

their day.

strength of their second-half performance. “My guys have to learn to put the ball into the back of the net. It is as

Softball tourney

women’s

Joe

Shamon all had

when chasing

came mostly from the Condors. The rest of the time it was a

Athletics

Dan

their play, particularly in the cre-

was a game marked by two different

Samuels,

McQuade and

Mihelic, Paul

ing game.

we won,

“As long as

-0 lead to record their

second straight win in the Ontario Colleges Athletics Association

distinctly

Shaun

attacks.

said. “It’s also

ate

them on

En won

games

game

Rochester, 6-3, before playing the final.

Third year player, Kerri Quip pitched the final game, allowing

only four

but as the errors mounted in the final inning, so did the

lead.

As

in their pre-

vious league game, the Condors

had

five hits, outdoing their oppo-

nent in that category, but they couldn’t

Crohn's

manage any mns.

&

Colitis

KW

Foundation of Canada,

ACCKWA,

Big Sisters of KW,

Cancer Action & Support of KW, Core Literacy, Ray of Hope, Meal on Wheels, KW Friendship Group for Seniors, Cradlelink, Big Brothers,

CNIB,

Volunteer Experience

Multicultural Centre,

Breast

hits,

Durham

be there!

YMCA Cross Cultural & Community Services, Notre Dame of St. Agatha,

against Loyalist

12-7. They dropped Durham, 11-4, and

to

will

Volunteer Action Centre,

a chance to evalu-

their various strengths

route to the final, Conestoga their

Who

KW Sexual

Assault Support Centre,

KW Right to Life, Alzheimer Society, KW Association for Community Living

looks great on a resume! pON

sro^


Page 16

— SPOKE, Sept.

28, 1998

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