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30th Year

— No. 31

Waterloo gets the Net By Dee Bettencourt

A

rockin’

Four and a half years ago, the president and CEO of a leading local supplier of comprehensive Internet access ^nd support options had never even turned on a

good time

computer. at the

Neil Osborne of 54-40 glances crowd during a concert held at the 10. Sept. centre on recreation (Photo by Melanie Spencer)

For related stories

see

Page 9

But

at

Triangle’s

8:30 a.m. on Sept. 10, Golden Tim Kutt officially donated

$30,000 worth of Internet ^services and equipment to Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus before a computer lab full of students, college representatives,

with

along

CKGL and Record reporters.

CTV,

“Four years ago

I

logged on

in

America,

cost so much it was horrible,” said the 31 -year-old Kutt. “Then I borrowed a Toronto company’s service and it cost me nothing. I knew it was the

long distance.

wave of the “I didn’t

It

future.

know

the (Internet) culture, but

Attending the Internet presentation at the Waterloo campus are, from left to right, John Tibbits, president of Conestoga College; Tim Kutt, president and CEO of Golden Triangle; Kevin Milne, compay representative of EMS and Louis Klarke, (Photo by Dee Bettencourt) broker for RE/MAX.

I

my own company.” Mike technician, Computer-services Abraham, was on hand early that Thursday morning in order to set up one of the three labs at the Waterloo campus that Kutt had started a year later with

instance, to train as a legal secretary

have

Golden Triangle’s

enabled for the Internet presentation.

Golden Triangle and Conestoga is

training his staff. “As recently as a

first

corporate client,

month ago, we sold a

house to a couple from Hong Kong through the Internet. It has opened up vistas for us,” he said. “And the service is fantastic. I have no problem getting on 95 per cent of the

strategic.”

Titbits, president

John

you

the attended also Klarke, Louis presentation. Klarke, a real estate broker for RE/MAX, said he uses the service for

“This partnership (between

College)

if

this Internet access.

of Conestoga College

time.”

an “This brings the Waterloo students to full access level of the Doon students, capabiliInternet access as well as e-mail

The

Abraham, who

director of information technology

College, Tony Pimenoff, introduced the student assembly moved to Golden Triangle, saying Kutt had the his business from his basement to campus. Waterloo of floor ground John Tibbits, president of Conestoga services

for

Conestoga

College, remarked on

how

announcements, on-line health, local and weather news via the electronic version of The Record, chat boards, the Canadian 41 telephone directory, classified ads and display boards for advertisers that allow

to

on-line shopping.

Although Pimenoff said, “content of the always king,” a student is questioned what differences in services and level of content exist between America Online (AOL) and Conestoga On Line. Internet

Pimenoff said Golden Triangle was the hours a first company to offer support 24

Mentioning

service day, noting that this is an important a.m. at 3 light the burn “techies” as many

service and

Sixteen people currently work help desks support at Golden offering technical A two-day, interactive and Triangle. self-paced course on Internetology has

also thinks there access at the Internet for may be potential Guelph campus in the future.

ties,” said

Sept. 10 at Waterloo campus. Conestoga On Line, is also offering access

since already been offered with 30 bookings

with

content

responded, “Golden Triangle

is

Why

we just offer a connection. re-invent the wheel? Content is already out there. This keeps prices down.” Converting from American to Canadian adds up to a two-thirds savings the fewestin monthly fees, if one compares hours connection package from Golden Triangle for $9.95 Cdn to a similar package

dollars, this

from AOL at $21 .95 US. Another student, Guljan Kohi, currently taking the 40-week Microsoft application program at Waterloo campus, said she was going to purchase a Golden Triangle

hard the college

package

same

that

day.

has worked over the last decade to establish said a relationship with the community. He and millions have been spent on hardware software to get students job-ready, but that

Internet and I’m going to sign said Kohi. “I have a computer at

to the cost of extending Internet service Waterloo campus was originally prohibitive.

teacher.

“This Triangle

“I really

Golden (between Conestoga College) is

Who

knows,

it

may become

said

he

hopes

if

Conestoga

larger

Line users will have their

site.

is

two megabytes upon sufficient for a mini-

The Conestoga On Line

homepage is at www.conestoga.net. Being user-friendly is a primary goal of

friends and family will sign up or change Golden Triangle at home, as there

Golden Triangle, said Kutt. “The

over to of monies will be a return of 30 per cent coming back to the college for entrance

not that hard I

scholarships.

1

the and was represented by Kevin Milne at cybercollege. a in that said assembly. Milne “You can be trained right at your desk at home or at work.” He said it is possible, for

On

storage of

enrolling, which

their

Education Multi-Media Services (EMS) has been in partnership with Conestoga College and Golden Triangle since Sept.

up today, home. That

I

corporate students,

I’m going to use the

I

own web

than our physical college.” Tibbits

it.

tion, too."

strategic,” said Tibbits. “It will establish another kind of college, and that s a virtual

college.

enjoy

have problems, I can contact my will have an opportunity to search with for a job, e-mail and get in touch people. It’s a chance for lots of socializa-

way

partnership

and

Kutt an online

price,

Waterloo campus stuaent uuijan r\und spoke to a 570 CKGL reporter at the Internet presentation on Sept. 10. (Photo by Dee Bettencourt)

-

it’s

Internet

is

easy. Admittedly, though,

have some geniuses working for me.” said his company has remained Kutt

dedicated to customer service. Account executive Tim Laughlin. who accompanied his boss to the presentation,

agreed and said, “Even the store is right on King Street (in Kitchener), so people can

come

in

and touch Internet."


Page 2

— S!»OkE;

S6pt.^ii,’

1998

Big Sisters recruiting a

There are many benefits of being a Big Sister. It is fulfilling for both volunteer and the child the

huge a is “Fund-raising component of what we do and we often times encourage marketing

involved.

students to lend us a hand,” said case a Batabyal, Dipali

amount of above

all,

It

Rhude,

involves a large

re.sponsibility, trust

liaison

a

officer

a strong commitment to

matched with a child twice. After

if she wanted to make that commitment. She recognized the need for volunteers and decided to join after she knew she had enough time to offer. “I’m responding to a community

completing her time with her first sister, Rhude decided to little

decide

need a

reactivate her volunteer

new

They have

new

home lives. We can helo in bringins some happiness to them,” Rhude said. KitchenerBig Sisters, of tions in their

said

is

(photo by Jaime Clark)

“What you’re doing

Waterloo and area, is United Way organization that has been in the area for approximately

27 years. Big Sisters

trust involves consistency, reliabil-

to their

life

of

the

volunteer

and

longevity of the relationship. “The

notions of people and Big Sisters

we work with have a lot of people who exit their lives very

is

kids that

ing as to

why

Sometimes they

they’re leaving. are set

up for a

lot

of false promises and false hopes.” Batabyal said these children

come

the

perceptions

with

and

something with which to coun-

teract those beliefs.

Rhude has been with her second

sporadically with no kind of warn-

Batabyal said earning the child’s

ity

became a big sister after Rhude shared her experience. It College,

Rhude (left), a liaison officer for training and development at Doon campus and Dipali Batabyal, a caseworker for Big Sisters.

Irene

sister

and you want to earn and trust before you can have a good relationship and have a good time.” .

the

September until April. Joan Schefter, registrar for continuing education at Conestoga

their respect

two major program -

since

school year generally runs from

inviting a complete stranger into

your

commitment

month

role.

becoming a big

the vulunteer.

a non-profit

components

University and college students are required to fulfill an eight-

involves earning the trust of the child so they feel comfortable with

stresses and frustra-

has

there,” said Batabyal.

do,” said Batabyal.

Rhude

sister.

a match because after the year commitment, the friendship can continue and it’s very adaptable as long as the communication is

and we’re so happy when they

outlet.

at the

“That’s the beauty of this kind of

“We don’t always get volunteers who come around a second time,

that children are looking for

friendship, a

big

for

took Irene Rhude two years to

up

discretion of the parents and the

and

training

for three hours. After that

year, meetings are set

development at Conestoga College, has been a big sister for five years and has been

and

be there for the children. It

week

co-ordinator for Big Sisters.

big sister

taken lightly.

where a volunteer meets with their^^ little sister or little buddy once

fund-

and raising program.

match

By Jaime Clark

Deciding to become a volunteer is a choice not to be

new members

match for almost three years. She meets with her little sister once or twice a month to keep in touch.

The requirement is

for volunteers

to fulfill a one-year

commitment

Take on your Future. Let Canada’s Youth Employment

almost

Scheffer

took

decide to

make

become

year

to

a volunteer to

make

sure that she could

a

commitment.

total

Batabyal stressed that commitis one of the most important elements in deciding to become a big sister.«“Commitment is followthrough and you have to follow through on it, for your own self,”

ment

she said.

When Schefter began she was matched with an eight-year-old boy and has maintained a relationship with him for almost four years. He’s a good little guy and he’s a lot of fun,” she said.

Rhude explained

that both she

and Schefter don’t have children or their own, so being a big sister allows them to get involved with young people.

Some

of the activities Schefter

and Rhude do with their matches include going to movies, bowling and playing games. Big Sisters

Strategy help.

also provide volunteers with a cal-

CaU

1

endar of events scheduled by them

800 935-5555

for the children to enjoy.

stressed early

It is

on

that activi-

should be no cost/low cost and there are a number of organiza-

ties

Get work experience and

Get

internship opportunities

through the Canada Student Loans Program.

here at

Get the

home and

abroad.

Get Canada study grants

latest on-line

career planning and labour market information. Find out about youth hiring incentives for employers.

Get tax and interest on student loans.

relief

how the Canada Education Savings Grant assists parents saving for their children’s education. Find out

financial assistance

dependents.

Get tax breaks on RRSP withdrawals if you’re a mature or part-time student.

how

the National Graduate Register helps private companies recruit recent grads for permanent jobj and students for Find out

summer, and co-op

how

the Millennium Scholarship Fund might work for you. Find out

You can also connect with Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy by visiting the Youth Resource Network at www.youth.gc.ca

7

m Youth

Employment Strategy

( f

Strategic

emploi jeunesse

Canada

community

that pro-

vide coupons to Big Sisters to help cut

down on

costs.

Schefter said the relationship she

if

you’re a student with

tions in the

has formed with her little buddy is one of the biggest advantages of sister. “They blow hot and cold, but you can have some

being a big

It’s

jobs.

warm moments

really

with them.

a good time usually.

way

street; it’s

It’s

a two-

not just fun for the

adults the otherwise wouldn’t stay on.” Big Sisters is holding two recruitment programs at the Big Sisters house at 37 Allen St. W., Waterloo. Training sessions will be on Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 9 a.m. to noon on

child

Nov. 21 and 28. Batabyal stressed that big sisters in all ages and cultural back-

come

They

grounds.

have

recently

revised their age criteria by changing the minimum-age requirement from 20 to 18 and there is no

maximum-age

restriction.

volunteers will go through a screening process and fill out a personal application. Potential

will also be trained in the

They

philosophies and and are taught how to any for themselves prepare

Big

Sisters’

goals

may

encounter with'

the child they are

matched with.

situation they

They

are then interviewed by a

caseworker.

This

process

usually

takes

between a month and a half to two months.

^

^


SPOKE, Sept 31, 1998 Page 3

‘This is Just a biip, ’

says coiiege president

Conestoga sponsor suffers TSE loss By Dee Bettencourt

Com Dev based

was contacted with respect

to whether or not contractual charitable donations would

International,

donor

corporate

a Cambridgeof Conestoga

was recently reported in the K-W Record as suffering major financial losses close to $20 million over their last quarter, College,

according to the newspaper, the worst result in its 24-year history.

Com

Dev’s contract with the college annual gifts of $50,000, or $250,000 over a five-year period. This has already been in place for two years. The manufacturer of equipment for space satellites and ground-based wireless communications trades on the Toronto and Montreal Stock Exchanges, under the CDV involves

ticker symbol.

Com Dev more

shares dropped two-thirds, or

than

half

dollars, after releasing

a

billion

poor second-quarter

Conestoga College president, John

Company made

public

high-tech

ating the loss with

job

m

inventory

downs

John

at

Com “Com Dev

Dev’s troubled wireless division in the United Kingdom and New Brunswick. Tibbits says the sense of industr}^

Com

Dev

rebound

will

commitments

that

is

is

from

Dev

company representative

much

Knapp

contacted

Spoke

and

confirmed

this

$100 million

as

Com Dev

honour its financial Conestoga College,” he

who was

to

College’s board.

months ago

in his office for

over

was Keith on Conestoga

president at that time

Ainsworth,

new president of Com Dev’s Space

in contracts to its

Space Group over the next three years. When asked how the link between Com Dev and Conestoga originated, Tibbits says, “I went out and knocked on their door. The

will

Group, Alan Winter, two hours.

at all this will

after printing the financial losses, that

Com Dev

for five years.

with the

no indication

Dev and the college, as well as emerging from the slide on the stock market which Com Dev anticipated occurring. The Record reported on Sept. 10, one will be joining a satellite consortium called SkyBridge. Com Dev hopes the move will bring as

Tibbits says he talked several

this

a blip,” he says. is

Com

said.

downswing. “There

Sept. 16

opinion.

I

He

also

asked for $20,000 a yeai said ‘No, we’ll give you

$50,000 a year for five years.’” Tibbits says that was the first and last time he had had such an experience while on the campaigning trail for the college.

Conestoga graduates get sunny opportunity in Sydney

^

By Melissa

high-spirited

All

inter-company

compefition aimed at iocal businesses and intiastnes, held their 1 5th annual Chtamher Challenge on Sept. 12, at Kinsmen Sports centre, Cambridge. The event started in 1983 with Kitchei^r and Waterloo and has expanded. Three yeafi ago Cambridge, Wod1wi<di atid Etmira ^ined and this year Ouelph joined, said Corporate Challenge opesnatiems

Linda Hart, ‘"the puipose of the event is

Tibbits, college president

write-

Corporate annual event

on

based

cyclical field.”

and

cuts

Chamber

The

a

in

On

Bill

rais^ money for charity Challenge,

company

He says they discussed a continued partnership and relationship between Com

week

cent.”

statements associ-

Corporate Challenge W

would be

“We’re not concerned. They’re a

have

officials

Tibbits,

ByJacgu^lne Smith

It

be affected by Com Dev’s financial trouble. “We’re not concerned. They’re a high-tech company in a cyclical field,” says Tibbits. “It seems to be a result of management issues, mainly in England.”

“This

results in early June.

$50,000 contribution every year. different if they were going bankrupt, but this has to do with competition, research and development and new products coming on the market which may cause a gain or loss of 20 to 30 per affect their

Dietrich

students

of Western Sydney will give the student their degree in one year

welcome

are

attend an information session for a

and their masters in two. Although this meeting is open

chance to go to school

all

to

Sydney,

in

like to focus

The meeting

be held

will

at

at

Conestoga College on Sept. 28, in 2A65, between 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. Students will be able to find out what they can expect of the University of Western Sydney. A guest speaker, Ronald Kelly, consultants who works for in Hamilton and represents the University of Western Sydney,

Room

services.

Parrinder said she hopes to have

enough students opportunity to

a classroom.

questions. Once a student has graduated and college their received

time the University of Western Sydney has approached Conestoga College in this type of exchange program

diploma, going to the University

said Parrinder.

will

KOM

be available to answer any

interested in this

fill

Tliis

is

the

first

to

fm* charity, to do networtdng with die connnnnity,

money

raise"

and to have

and tegm

fan

Here

building ” Ifert said. Over the past 14 years. Hart said the event took place on

Schneider won the top prize for having the lowest tweraSI score in all six events.

Sundays with team registrtdion

^8a,m.

^

^"Because djere said.

15

we changed the day

was a bit of confikt,” M&tt “The teams were down by

«

'

two vohm^rs(Mpo^le)m$ikpart

femades;' live/ males' in

a

series

^

„ '

,

She sajd

^e

were'cgfyeu,

's^fe^pnt,”

saii||Hait,

^r ^bcomm&es:

'

:30

Sept. 30 - 1 :30

am

pm

started

three

Who

who has events,:

e^pment

and:

will

Volunteer Action Centre,

,

&

Colitis

KW

idea or a hobby

yon would like your college eommnnity to know about?

CALL SPOKE AT 748-5366

Foundation of Canada, Big Sisters of KW,

Cancer Action & Support of KW, Core Literacy, Ray of Hope, Meal on Wheels, KW Friendship Group for Seniors,

Breast

Cradlelink, Big Brothers,

KW Sexual Assault Support Centre, KW Right to Life, Alzheimer Society, KW Association for Community Living

CNIB,

Volunteer Experience

Multicultural Centre,

ACCKWA,

HEY READERS!

be there!

YMCA Cross Cultural 8t Community Services, Notre Dome of St. Agatha, Crohn's

Do you have an

the community.

The Sanctuary

i

^

pfflftkdpa8ts:T6fe;oyem^^

was J,M. ^iB^lddrv wi% dse SiJt in lowest tiirm

1

1

b^me the (^aiktin three:

<mnhe committee another 3p|rs'^rthat

of enjoyabie |*ys!cal '

Frizes

^ about seven years ago

in

Wed.

had a committee, Ai^an Hart of computer sjpetrt^^'was one of the games

aap^issirins,

'

events There were 'only instead of ei^t and two were.not phyaR!!al,said]^ Teams cpn#d»g of ^ five

your opportunity to get

Volunteer Feir

,

Alumni Associah^'one team. Events chair, L^neipp:tof of recruitment and

regisnntimi time to noon.

is

involved

{Photo by datsqurilne Smith)

ye^, ifite event was changed to S^rday along with This

to

would

on first-year students Conestoga College, said Karen Parrinder of co-op/employment

Australia.

ehairperston,

students, the university

looks great on a resume! qOH

sro^

%


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 4

21, 1998

COMMENTARY

Starr report downloaded decided

if

did

I

Starr did a

same

the

favouritism, and

No

I

think

it

report.

He

could

at

claim

this

system and a has access to the report. (I bet Starr never considered that porn blockers in Internet programs probably won’t bat an eye at little report

I

where

sites

this

know

reaction

individual courthouses, but

jumps

out.

ever heard.

I’ve

Watergate served

jail

time. but.

full

pardon by

Gerald Ford. faces charges of acts that con-

grounds for impeachment. Five times under oath, (Bill, a hint: if you have your pants open and she is "stimulating” you. it’s probably a sexual relationship); stitute

lied

report

someday

in

The problem is that he didn’t just admit it. The public would probably have blown it But nooooo, he had to hide it, lie about and obstruct justice. These seem be the same sort of charges government

off.

in court

it

are

also

on the Net, I

haven’t

All

we

week he

But not without some severe editing. The narrative portions of the report read

bad movie. The “juicy bits” are few and far between. Nothing I’d like to see young teens reading, but I don’t think John Travolta’s movie Primary Colours missed out on anything by not having this report. What about the key players in the report? There are few worth mentioning, unless you live and breath American politics. Bill Clinton: I lost respect for this guy long before I read the report. I thought he like plot to a

his

is

to

will finish specifically apologizing

everyone in America, each one by name.

The Clinton Family: The that

down and read the paperback form? Maybe.

for.

Clinton

mantra-like apologies, and given another

mentions the

sit

bosses

from

hear

the Starr report.

people

mob

attorneys convict

first

report hardly

family other than the fact

s

home

run

number

that is referred to

world as a

62 sailed over the left field fence at Busch Stadium last week.

label is that the

the

I

wonWonder what you

couldn’t help but der.

ask? Let

me

tell

a

report says that

banned from many

and by many organizations, but is not one of them. So what’s the problem with that? Legally accessible and legal in the sport, no

1-

major-league baseball

it

does, there’s a

comes along with

controversy. That tag

is

on

it

known way

it’s

as to

Cooperstown, N.Y. and the Baseball Hall of Fame via the bat of St. Louis Cardinal slug-

Mark McGwire. McGwire has been

also

problem, right?

stories, cartoons

made

ger

scrutinized for his use

of Androstenndione, a muscle-building drug

numerous publications since

the record-breaking homer, there have been

against

and unfair comparisons

McGwire.

one recent issue of the Toronto Sun following the home run, there was a In fact, in

who

believed that a leader of

was a really nice guy who would one day make her his new wife.

When

it all

started, the 21 -year-old intern

and the 48-year-old president didn’t even complete their sexual acts, because Clinton

cartoon.

It

Baseball

depicted a father and a son

Fame and the McGwire display

of

Hall

pointing! out a

father. In the display,

at the

kid to

is

his

however, instead of

was

a bottle

labelled steroids.

This just really struck

me

as an inappropri-

ate picture. It’s giving people the

idea and

is

totally ruining the

McGwire and

spoiling his

wrong

image of

moment

in the

Suppose the artist of this picture had accomplished something as big as McGwire’s feat and some small, insignificant speck of controversy arose and the same thing happenned to him or her. Some people take this for granted, but you have to put yourself in that person’s shoes.

would

the artist react,

knowing

How

that there

Keeping Conestoga College connected SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor; Denise Bettencourt; News Editor: Jaime Clark; Student Life Editor: Ned Bekavac; Entertainment Editor: Melanie Spencer; Sports Editor: Neven Mujezinovic; Photo Editor: Jason Gennings; Online Editor: Sarah Thomson; Production Manager; Melissa Dietrich; Advertising Manager; Judy Sankar; Circulation Manager; Lisa Wilhelm; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Advisor: Dick Scott. address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

their

underwear, continued with sex acts where neither got fully undressed (in case of interruption), and ended with lies, and more lies.

Hopefully by now, Lewinsky has learned should treat the lady he is in

how someone

love with. Anything else is not love, it’s being used. There are other comments from staff and

least she

the free world

had

long intimate conversation. The affair started with her flashing her

have access to the Internet. There are details no daughter should know about her father. Monica Lewinsky: Monica, oh Monica. This is one person you laugh at one minute and then feel sorry for the next. The report reads like the diary of a poor little delusional girl

after their

first

affair

was an

People

seemed

noticed

to

me

to think this

office joke.

Lewinsky always

that

be where she shouldn’t be, but

always seemed

Shame

to the President.

at

be carrying files this wasn’t part of

to

her job. In the end, should everyone rush to download this report? I think not. The press is doing a good job going through it and digging out the stuff that may be useful. Sometimes, they’ll give you the “juicy” stuff too, but don’t worry about what you are missing. It’s nothing but the story of one of the most pathetic romances I’ve ever heard.

credit

could be a nation

pounce on

Now

full

of lions waiting to

this detail?

that the majority of the

McGwire

buzz has passed, Chicago Cubs star Sammy Sosa, who has also broken the record, is going to have to deal with the media. He has admitted

using

to

Creatine,

legal

a

muscle-mass increasing substance, and the herb ginseng for an energy boost before games. What will happen then? Perhaps the media will find something negative about ginseng and Creatine. These players are just like us in the sense that they’re trying to

accomplishment lifetime feat.

positives

of

make

a living.

like theirs is a

So ease

once

An in a

off and write the

because

it,

they

surely

outnumber the negatives.

SPOKE is mainly funded from

SPOKE’s

was only

secret service that leads

sun.

That’s apparently not the case to most of the media. In

it

some of the “encounters” between Lewinsky and Bill Clinton occurred while Hillary was out of town, or even out of the country. As for Chelsea, I hope she doesn’t

the bat or ball used in the feat, is

sports, ?>

major sport does not happen often, and when tag that

drug can be purchased over drug stores across the

at

The substance

year-old record in any

little

counter

continent.

you.

The breaking of

by some in the medical The problem with this

steroid.

her well enough to trust

sixth sexual encounter that they

Drugs aside, give McGwire some A

know

said he didn’t her.

The

band.

seen any yet with the sordid detail of Will

of course. Tricky Nicky got a

he

British

although

if

tion of justice. In the end, half of the people

now

Court

for

Columbia

most pathetic romances

information into the media; tales of senior aids, massive abuse of power, and obstruc-

Clinton

Supreme

available

of the

did his job as president fairly well, and he isn’t the first president to be a naughty hus-

to

deal.

nothing but the story of one

It’S

in

the Internet

rulings

documents level were freely available during Nixon’s Watergate? There was the slow release of

in

it’s

is

This report is a summary of raunchy details, political maneuvering, sex, lies and... well. I’m sure Lewinsky is part that

these sorts of high-

involved

should any home?

in

Imaginary future trials, or present reports, an invasion of privacy? This sort of documentation is available

a lot of

been leaked from time to time, but this open release of documentation is amazing. Can you imagine

Of/f«

to ask yourself,

information be available

the report has

public

documents of

courts

future

working on a movie

available.)

is

Yes,

to

world?

documents to present them With an average computer couple simple clicks, anyone

these high-level

news

Will

Of course you have

set a precedent.

this

kids going to the

president

change their approach knowing that documents of their actions could be in every household in the

big newspaper had to win access to

to the public.

the

as

lawyers seemed to play to the cameras in the courtroom as much as to the judge and jury.

whole world

No one

time.

ilnings

of in-your-face

.sort

to the

it

and he

any court case be available on the Net? The O.J. Simpson trial was a media circus and

l-Jason

David Kendall asked for an advanced copy of the Starr was turned down.

Ken

dors 4

people

to testify;

In the future, will the court

I

Instead

voo?hc.K

faithfully execute the laws.

one overwhelming reason: Because could. Bill Clinton’s lawyer

maneuver, and gave

duty

constitutional

research,

There was

it.

ootinrlry.

also influenced others to lie under oath. his fufill not he did Furthermore,

was

it

journalistic

but

maneuvering, or refusing

haven’t

voyeurism, or

curiosity,

whole

three times he tried to obstruct justice by

the Starr

I

4o

<x

Web

hits the I report.

So/v>e people

September

to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

DSA

logo.

SPOKE shall

not be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the

must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an space. Unsolicited submissions

illusu-ation (such as

a photograph).


SPOKE,

Sept. 21, 1998

Page 5

fornicate, falsify...future?

Flirt, falter,

Do you

think

Clinton should be

impeached? John

Olinski,

management

Soak Xiong, first-year business YES! management studies

business

first-year

YES!

studies

Story and photos by Sarah

Some

Thomson

were of the opinion that lot for America and should continue as president, and that his private life should remain private. “He should not be impeached because his perstudents

Clinton has done a

“Should Clinton be impeached?” A survey done at Conestoga College on Sept. 14. led to mixed results. Four people thought he should be impeached, and six said he shouldn’t. Some claimed that his behavior was immoral both in perjury and in his affair with Lewinsky.

life is his personal life.” said Keith Vogelsang, a first-year electronics engineering

sonal

technology student.

John Olinski, a first-year business management student, said he should be impeached because what he did was immoral. “Presidents should have morals

nothing else,”

if

“He has done a

said Olinski.

“Yes, I think he should be impeached because he

Robyn Michaud,

Robyn Michaud,

YES!

computer administration

America, and has improved

should be setting a good their said example,” moral

micro-

first-year

a

first-

Vogelsang also said, “He has done a lot for America, and has improved their economy. Without him they would be screwed. He should leave on his will and not lot for be forced to leave." Barb White, a Roaster’s

economy. Without him

they would be screwed.”

microcomputer

year

Keith Volelsang

administration student.

man

one

only

everyone makes mistakes at

some time

“It’s

my

said

mistakes,”

Xiong,

it’s

handle his

life

position.”

in first-year business

YES!

marketing

Twist

'n’

Aaron Smerek, a

offers gifts, grab bags and Florida trip to the

ftg

Doon

nooS Week of WelcoTrte was Energy Radio's Twist

for three trips to

Beach,

Fla.,

Daytona

on spring

break, courtesy of

place on Sept, 10.

from

graduate

broadcasting

Conestoga College, Energy 104 to Doon campus

week with a funTwister. of game filled The station travelled to college '

and university campuses acrovs sdufbwestem Ontario with for

indents to pardcipate m< Prizes were given to students

who

participated.

Prizes

bags

irtcladed

draw for Daytona Beach,

wa.s also a trips to

he

be

shouldn’t

his sexual

Ana

Sajfert,

a

semester-two journalism

isn’t

think he should because

showing the world his good leadership

said Niki Axt. a first-year business marketing student. “He is not proving he can handle his life posiskills,

tion,” said Axt.

Christine

Fountain,

a

first-year

computer administration student,

said.

micro-

“No.

I

don’t think he should be. 1 think they are making too much of a big deal out of it.

Mark

on spring break, courtesy eakaway Tours.

The names

fmm

all

uuiversifies

colleges

atrf

who parUcipated in

the Energy activities. Patty Stokes, DSA’s enterfainment manager, said the activity went over really well, with many' students coming and

going

over

due

lunch

which was when the

was held.'' “It was a little

all

you con

on Sale at the DSA Office,

Tickets

hour,

,/ chilly

eat spaghetti dinner.

activity

out But crtherwtse, tt wa.s a good time" said SuAes of the Week of Wel-

comeeve&t

includes

be drawn

will

the

first-year

Patterson,

business marketing

Monday, September 28 The Sanctuary Show

for

orientation

activities

YES

the

bat.”

Breakaway Tours.

brought

different

off

n

Woodhouse*

Cfaerie

right

semester-two

NO!

..

I

Frosh, which took

"n’

lied

Sajfert,

journalism

S S H YF* M OSHOW

There was also a draw Student

have

Ana

private

shouldn’t

Lee Tony The Ultimate

Frost!

Travelling radio station

wnheim

first-year

everybody,” said electronics engineering technology student. to

business

he

1

management.

he

first-year

But

student.

makes Soak

thing in the past,” said Mark Patterson, a firstyear marketing student. law, “It doesn’t matter who he is, he broke the should be put in jail. The law should apply

Axt,

his

with

life.

said

Niki Axt

“No, because we all mistakes, it could be anybody. I’m sure everyone has done some-

Niki

wants

he But misconduct. should be impeached for misconduct, political

not proving he can

human

everyone

and

is

morals, but he

only

is

“He

in their lives.

not right, and

against

do what he

impeached for

and

“He has

said,

the right to

He

Others said that Clinton is

employee

Warning: Not suitable for easily offended people. Strong language

&

hard core humour throughout.


I

Page 6

— SPOKE, Sept. 21

,

1998

Canada’s largest career

coming By Dee Bettencourt

Bingemans centre

to

Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Gamble; Procter Board; Raytheon Canada Ltd.; Spar

&

Two hundred business

and

twenty-one

representatives

are

heading your way and they want to

meet with you Sept. 29 between at a.m. and 3:30 p.m. 10 Bingemans Conference Centre on

Aerospace Ltd.; various banks and many more.

“Companies can see

Victoria Street, Kitchener.

Canada’s

largest

joint

many

potential candi-

university/college career fair will

play host to companies such as:

Budd Canada

Company

Com Dev

Inc.;

Ltd.; Cantel

AT &

in T;

one

The

Dow Canada; Chemical; Future Shop; General Mills Canada, Inc.; Honda of Canada Manufacturing; Imperial Manulife Financial; 011 Ltd.; of

Mary

Correctional

Wright,

co-op and student employment

A

complete

list

obtained

at

student

of participating

career-fair organizations can be

employment

Mary Wright, manager of student employment, co-op education and alumni services, says a career fair is different than a job fair in that career fairs focus on promoting, not recruiting.

That said, in the last few years, Wright says, "The career-fair participants have been in a highrecruit

from Ontario and a fairly large comes from this region,” says Wright. “But some are coming from the United States, Quebec and Alberta.” Wright says the majority of companies are eager to come to this fair and often attend many career and job fairs to see who’s core

services.

mode.” is

co-ordinated by

Conestoga College, University of Guelph, University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier University. Last year it drew 168 companies over just 2,000 and students, of whom 340 were from Conestoga College, says Wright. "Companies are primarily drawn

She advises students pick up the Employer Guidebook, available Sept. 23, from the

free

employment

student

guidebook types

of

career

available

and

indicates

who

mends

3,

participants

participating career-fair

companies

dates under one

roof and in one

Mary

day,” she says.

prior to the fair

Wright,

by

co-op and student employment

utilizing

“It’s cost effec-

and provides an

is

it

opportunity

to

with

talk

on a more

individually

important

they also bring their resumes on that Tuesday.

Wright encourages students

informal basis.”

who has been on

steering

event for the

this

utilize

the

resume-critiquing

to

free

service

her

four years, says she thinks this

office provides in order to help

good opportunity for students do information interviewing for

present the student in the best light

last is

this

book. She feels

them

committees for

do on

research

in

a high-recruit mode.”

potential candi-

for

graduat-

particular,

have been

can see many

to

can

ing students, in

“The career-fair

“Companies

Wright,

typically

student

the

Wright recom-

1999.

people

brief

opportunities also

be held

Feb.

tive

a

description of each organization,

The next job on

The

office.

offers

contact in the company.

out there. fair will

The career fair

day.”

Space Group; Contact

Singapore; Service

dates under one roof and

Campbell Soup

fair

a

themselves regarding the organi-

possible for the career

Admission and bus

fair.

fare will be

free with student identification.

zations.

Women’s group plans busy year By Sarah Thomson

is being planned for March Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus dining room. The evening of women’s poetry and song featuring two local female artists will be held to celebrate International Women’s Day. Proceeds will be donated to women’s shel-

dinner

9,at

The Women’s Resource Group met at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday Sept. 10, for a one-hour meeting to discuss the year’s

events. Five

women

upcoming

attended the

meeting held in room 2A01 Single and Sexy, a comedy troupe of Waterloo students that was booked to perform in the Sanctuary on Sept. was 17, discussed

at the

Sept. 10, the

meeting. Later on

Women’s Resource

Group cancelled

their

contract

he gets

«*(. " T

Id

a review of the financial resources of the group and a discussion about hiring a student. the group plans to

an unfortunate occurrence and there were misunderstandings

hire will be responsible for taking

on both sides,” said Kim Radigan who was organizing the event. Next month is Breast Health Month and the group is working on scheduling Ann Quinn- Wallace to talk about breast health. The presentation will be near the end of October, depending on Quinn-

week. They will be required to attend one meeting a month and will be paid a gratuity at the end of the semester for their work.

“It’s

It

Other topics discussed at the meeting included advertising for women’s issues around the school,

The student

with Single and Sexy.

h

ters.

Day

National

of

Remembrance

and Action on Violence Against Women (Dec. 6) is being recognized by the

Women’s Resource Group speaker.

Kim

Pate,

with a executive

of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry director

Societies,

will speak in the Sanctuary on Dec. 2. The Elizabeth Fry Society works to develop and maintain policies,

programs and services for women who have come into, or who are at risk of

coming

into conflict with

the law.

To end Women’s

out

the

UpoMiiiiijg*''., 'i-

Events

Wallace’s schedule.

The

minutes, and help with awareness

school

year.

Voices, an evening of entertainment and a gourmet


SPOKE,

Sept. 21, 1998

Page 7

Candlelight ceremony and march

Women

set to take back the night invited to attend fliis part of the evening. The entertainment will

^

Hhe

6:30

will start

the Vietoria

g.t

Park clock tower attd will end there approximately 45 iniuufes

entertainment

Back

ceremony. follow at

will

Kitchener City Hall.

the

Men

are

be

by

provided

local

$isgers-‘songwri|ers Pat Skinner

and

according 'to Heather Calder, a two-year organizer with the K-W Take Back the Night Committee.

The

Victoria Park in Kitchener

was

chosen over last ycurS location. Seagram Park in Waterloo, 'Ilie new starting and ending point was chosen for several reasons.

*

fOT

After

standard

to set the

now,”

right

“We’re just trying

Conestoga College

is

putting

it

to educate our-

whole

the

ISO

The

passes, the college will be

one of the few educational tutes to bear the

the

Standards

International

certification,

called

ISO

9000, will require the steering committee to agree upon a set series of procedures for all college activities and duties, such as calling in sick and orientation

insti-

mark of

Organization (ISO). Bill Jeffrey of health sciences

be the chair of the ISO steering committee, a group comprised of management, staff, support staff and students who will decide over the next few months what policies and procedures Conestoga will need to either replace or up-grade in

ISO

certification,

the

steering

committee will also introduce Total

Quality

Management,

a

that will constantly re-

evalAate the set procedures and

make any

necessary improvethem. This will be done to ensure that each time the college is reassessed by ISO, it will

ments

to

receive re-certification.

also possible 1o join the

a candlelight

circulai

route

making

travel

«r.

Mid

lillle

not

For

it.

preter will be

The

college

of the

few

be one

will

...

to

bear

the mark of ISO.

for

certification.

new

faculty.

Walter Boettger, president of Conestoga’s faculty union sits on

After implementing the entire system, the committee must then

committee said that the reason for having all four interest groups the represented on committee was to ensure that

prove to external auditors that the program is being followed. If Conestoga College passes that stage, it will then be ready to apply for ISO certification, explained Boettger. Once Conestoga has attained

the

each division was involved in the decision-making process. “We’re still in the infancy stage

will

Men are

raider.

sale at the event.

invited to

This includes reduced-price Tshirts from last

attend this part ^

is

the evening.

which is another good reason to

——

inarch there.

Women

with physical difficul* and the deaf will be accom

on

merchandise

.....

year, T-shirts this year, »i-.i..i«.iiii

.

from

posters

and backpacks.

If you arc interested in helping with the event, the committee is looking for women

modated at tlie march. Women iftiiiiipiliiWipKiili who would like to participate, but marshal on the march. Marshals can not walk the whole distance, walk on the outside of the women have the option of using ahemaand make sure that the pace is

make

help

Conestoga

College operate more efficiently in the future.

“Textbook ordering is a good example,” said Boettger. “Each faculty member does it a different way. With ISO 9000 in place, there will be one standard procedure that everyone will follow. It will alleviate a lot of problems.” As Boettger motions towards

rate

in

CaNESTDGA Oktoberfest Night

several thick binders containing Conestoga College’s policies

and procedures that the steering committee will have to wade through, the reality of

ISO

Queensmount Arena

is still

Thursday,

in the distance.

The lowes't daytime Canada.

October

1

Tickets

Only

Friends

As

Call

FREE! on Sale today the DSA Office!

Tickets

at

Age

• • • • • •

of Majority Required

Purchase a ticket FrieneJs anci Family

can

call

Pay just one low monthly

you FREE!

Canada and the

anywhere

Call

any time, any day of the week.

Great International Flexible

for a chance to

Flat Rate.

Call

in

on

hand.

at

'Ibere will also be

not safe at night, of

ties

but

the deaf, an inter-

Kitchener City Half,

s>mi»>iieaii.v

Park

foHow

for a

while,

complete

taSd v.*,t ceremony, entetfainPark allows for a merit will

march

Boettger believes that ISO 9000

will

order to acquire

ISO

program

process.”

itself to the test.

If

about

selves

Boettger.

said

i.s

__

Ma^ Ann Ept.

Vicioria

By Brent Clouthier

It

^

location of

arrangements easi-

Conestoga College

five transportation tJiat is provid-

a AAolson Can Stereo!

U.S.

rates.

payment options

Win

On

display at the

DSA

Office

for students.

oOH

MOLSON MTS NetCom. NB Tel. •Taxes extra. Certain restrictions may apply. Unavailabte in regions not served by Bell. BCTEL, TELUS Communications Inc., Inc. Corrmunlcattons Inc., island Telecom Inc. or MT&T. London Telecom Network Inc. is a subsidiary of The London Telecom Group

NEWTEL

(M

sro^


Page 8

— SPOKE, Sept.

21, 1998

Waterloo hosts faculty reunion Sept.

By Jaime Clark members, it has been 25 years or more since they For some

had

last

staff

teacher, helped

many

an

in

organizing the

reunion by putting together a list of about 160 names. She greeted most of the faculty as they made

seen their colleagues. But

the faculty reunion for

gave

13,

opportunity to visit and reminisce. Anne Sinden, a former business

Conestoga

College’s Waterloo campus, held

their

way

and was number she knew.

to the cafeteria

surprised at the

"Fve recognized almost every one of them,” she said. Most of the teachers, both past and present, stood around in small groups talking and laughing while

enjoying hors d’oeuvres and drinks. Others browsed through photo albums that provided a pictorial history of the

Sam McElrea, now

campus. a business

math teacher at Doon campus, had taught at Waterloo for 30 years. He said he was looking forward to seeing his former colleagues. It has been almost 25 years since he had last seen most of the people

who came

to the reunion.

McElrea recommended

talking

Charles Rushton, the original administrator at Waterloo and a

to

“founding father” of Conestoga College. “Without him, the place never would have been here,” he said.

Rushton said the training began Waterloo Collegiate Institute over 30 years ago with four them of ‘‘Most programs. (students) had less than a Grade 1 education and you had to be unemployed before you could be selected for one of these courses. Once we got through one semester, two semesters and they got Jobs. It Just grew like Topsy.” In 1967 the Waterloo campus at

Grant McGregor, principal of Conestoga College, takes a look through a pictorial history of Conestoga’s Waterloo Campus prepared by Karl Fox, of Doon industrial training. (Photo by jaime ciark)

was built for Manpower retraining programs and the number of students eventually grew to 1 ,600 in 34 different programs. heartbreaking was a “It experience if you were in it from the beginning because the college

Charles Rushton (sitting), founder of Conestoga College, and his wife Beula, share some history of the college with reunion (Photo by Jamie Clark) participant Andy Claw.

(Doon)

really didn’t

have any love

for these short-term or one-year programs,” said Rushton, who also

taught orientation.

now dean of applied Doon, was hired in 1968 by the co-ordinate to Rushton Joe Martin,

arts at

English

(ESL)

as

second-language Waterloo. at

a

program

Martin said he worked with a lot of the people who turned out for the reunion, but it had been a while since he had seen some of them.

work still some come to

“Some college,

Tribe arrived

at

the college in

working for the May contracted security company, and found most of the lost property in security was piled on one set of while

about 380 abandoned lockers had their locks cut off. This scenario happened 50 more times this semester. Now full of security has a room students’ belongings, and they would like to return them. While most of the property Last

spring,

comes

from

the

lockers, the trouble this a

domino

effect, said

security

.services

shelves.

Now in

items from lockers are held,

a secure location, but Tribe said

he would prefer

if

the location

was

not generally known.

“Lockers are a problem because some students leave this year and

they think they’ll have the same locker next year, so they leave their locks

on

,”

said Tribe.

While some of

the

hundreds of

cut lockss have had their contents

claimed, security

still

has to deal

up

with piles of contents.

“Cut lockers are kept separate from general lost and found because

such

is

it

massive

a

undertaking,” said Tribe.

The belongings are kept for about a year to allow the owners time to claim them. After that, seized books will be donated to the DSA for future book sales, and the remainder of

abandoned

summer

the

college

functions but a few I haven’t seen for 25 years,” said Martin.

Seize(d locker possessions piling By Jason Gennings

at

the property will

is

go

to a general

may

Tribe said there

A1 Hunter,

sale.

supervisor.

such sale this

be one

fall.

lost

and found items

locker, but they

work under a

different system.

and find a nearby locker that is unlocked,” said Hunter. "That locker has obviously been assigned to

When

are

someone The

up.

General

"(Students) have been assigned a

go to that locker a lock on it, so they select

explained

that

the

trouble will lessen

come

when and by whom.

students

After

college.

items are

lockers, each locker corresponding

and month. If the owner can remember roughly when the item was

lost, the

search

is

limited

one or two lockers. Keys and disks are stored in the security office, because they are found and claimed fairly quickly. to

"High-ticket

mans

to the

the

the

the office to storage

to a year

Security,

at

while,

a

moved from

but

services

found,

said Tribe.

is run by sometimes two people are assigned the same locker. If an honest mistake has been made, security replaces the lock, said John Tribe, former site super-

security

is

“Unclaimed items are returned to months to a year,”

The locker system

and now a new addition

where the item

the finder in six

locker," said Hunter.

Wackenhut

a

report contains informa-

continuing

on their assigned locker. "We’re trying to save the students students the time and he expense of having their locks cut off and things removed from their

visor with

The

tion like

to security if they find a lock

computer

in

filled x)ut

is

supervisor

when

turned

and they are held in the office for a few days to allow owners time to pick them report

else."

security

articles

Security guard John Tribe stands locks cut

off.

among some

said Tribe, of the belongings taken from lockers

which had

their

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

items

like

walk-

are claimed pretty quickly,”

who

served Brantford

Police Service for 29 years before

coming

to the college.


SPO^^Sept^l,

ENTERTAINMENT

''I;

wa&

1998 Page 9

tift^ss^ye^ n^ore ^Bipressive

^

54*40 'concert, held

'

believe liiatSiey

nt*-

area band

to’ be

bye,' r^i^ bt^’;B^tenw|:;,to

tbb atbinsj'

0f’;^ti$lc#

P'

teen

Diva also

pertofm^,‘’^^re''"'s''^'’’"fe^^

waiting'''

foe

«&W everyone wbat ''M Ste mee sigbt of ^e'

eead^,,to

'1^!^

'Vij-^;’K|''\

Wowd Wgan

ff'ii

'

from screaTnmg and cheering You' ’|teif^^4^i^"^nTd feave" ngvi^^df^ed'di^^if stage^ -Ihe ’i>^ "'was the -spAi^, people- whoibkl; band

independent

'’”

minute

'

set

,

.

'"

.

^perfcHoaed various songs off' 'tbetr '''be^ tJa^'an We'earUen

How and Steer as''' a new song/Althongh die band’s' sound is a btt harder rock seecKid album.

well as

Photos counter clockwise from top to bottom: Phil Compareltl, guitarist for 54-40 assists in background vocals; Damn the Diva, a Vancouver band, were the first to perform at

the

dtan

their,

tonr counterparts, their

Keith concert; of the Waltons

couple of die songs that followed, like Favourite 45 mid Gravy, wete

from

Hie new

was

die band.

of.

made some dreams asreahty^hon be held the microphoneiootrtefga. few fans in the fronrsrow®;|hose few people lead Osbotne'dntosthe next song, Ocean; ''Pearl,-, by

Secondly, eveiy one

one

Imd

''

'J'''

Neii Osborne,, tte lead, singer,

the

there with

tihe

having the oppormfiity;ste«piard‘

reasonable explanations. Firstly, the band is, for the most part,

unheard

as they

trouble hiding' their exeitementsat

a Smile was

scatg 1/2

overall

Body^saifersiwere

weres^teked crowd by' security guards, some of wbosweresbaving

hy die thus as well, crowd -wasn’t overwhelmed hy Drnnu die Oiva. Of course, there are two

but

Me Not

plentiful

well received

ground vocals; Neil Osborne and Brad Merritt of 54-40 perform Since When, the first single from the new album Since When.

band belted®o®?sonf song including Steila, I Oo Blind, Assohoiic and®fev^;?Mi^

after

Love

also crowd-pleasere.

plays guitar and sings back-

In a^wtrtof red, blpe:andvpn%ile lights, the

Armed together had many heads bo|^mg 60 the beat A fust song.

Nakonechny

,

mind

bellowing die begimtingse&itbm^ the tnicropbone BurmpsaSince Next np was the ’Waltons at 10 When,, the newest p,m. By the time they took the aJhiiin Since ^When^syourfMnh stage, a few more people bad need a mic to airived fehlomibly late. Many of They sang almost as- loud as you may recognize the name., 'Osborne. That^s tecanse.a,'fe;W'"jears ago, it seemed tike it wusgtobssoon in

but rS get to that later.

.

'

to be exact, the Waltonis bursted onto the scene widi tfaetr Trakter If debut album, Llk five

My

'

'

betlT^rire on the

right trae^lt'

whs

%r,

fbaf song- in. kicked' Waltons

dtat the,

’off their, pesfOMnance with. ’What followed was a series of soUgs from their

when 5A40begaii pla>mg

th« U>,f

tune o» ihc mght. AhJtough they returned for an encore, the tans

Uanmedton^r. -But Oshofnegave. his audiente something to- look forwMfe4b tbohgh. Me said 54-40sp!puM renun in about a month or tw:b:a;nd '

.


I

— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 10

21, 1998

ENTERTAINMENT

after two-year

Waltons back

as an example, he says

By Judy Sankar

relationship

sometimes.” Influenced

phases.

Jason Plumb, left to right, Todd Lumley, Sean Bryson, Keith Nakonechny and Warner Music photo by Steven Carty. are currently on tour to support their newest album, Empire Hotel.

1993.

Plumb.

should get out, but there’s nothing

album as a whole takes the listener on a journey of sorts. “If you listen to just one song off

better to

across on stage from the music than if it were playing from a

of the record, you’re only getting part of the story, part of the mood, a part of what we have to say in

Some

Plumb

collection

Waltons have returned 10 songs on an bearing album entitled Empire Hotel. “We’re older now and more experienced

is

a a

not

songs,

of

go away to,” he says. “It’s like the devil you know is better than the devil you don’t know. people are just suckers for

Plumb

also said the interpreta-

song is essentially up to the listener. Using Beats The Hell

Rockers 54-40 weather changes with new album By Melanie Spencer

wtiuld enjoy

wasn’t meant to be, I guess,” says Brad Merritt, bassist

<nit that

Canadian rockers, 54-40. He’s referring to their Sept, 6

that’s

making and

would be proud of and “It

that.

for

area.

is

for

“It

the-

$r-

power supply was

be

j

;

name

the

OH the

that's not

what

wet so the PA company refused to turn the power on, which was a good thing,” he^says with a

of vanity

community. Available every

such thing as an

'

there’s ajbit

Would you like to earn some

p^^'^apd^a

are willing to get

peqple

by 'em

less

happen ’^ and it probably^ won’t,” he says. The odds of making it are akin to'' the lottery, g be says. 4 But if they are preimred to go,^

Brad Merritt,

54~40’s bassist

0

>.

Wh^'

.

translate' into

the band’s^ much'’ anticipated ^aieir current albupv Since Rece|vin^^ heavy ro|ation on The ^ success^south,jOf 'jihe border, :

,

-

y

'

thinks this will be the

them

the

name of your band on th%

But

that’s not

c

anyway.t"

surprised’ surprises us at

;

A'

As for what the future holds for

thb^Unit^" States and Europe'' '^^uext year,’^ where there is already

e^ed

54-40, Meirtrt isn’t completely sure. The bano set a 10-record

But^ Merritt^ becomes^ more ^ it comes to.<?

k

meEow,

dkcdssii^ S4-^’s success. “I we’re good, for starters, OSid I think also we've gotten too,” he says. “I think are two i things, which atse; possU>lyyoverlooked,’Vhe

yfiiihk:

title track is

'

limit when they started and dtey only have two left to do, says Merritt, After that they will sit down and decide what to

do.

'

doftsp’t

mega-dome. what it’s, about

side;"’w playing the

into that

admits

Canada,

through everydting, Merritt says something will happen. ‘‘It may "I not be limousmes and jets with ;

^

,

to break

kww; nothing'

EXTRA MONEY?

to

"

adds, ‘'You

Monday.

^

thinking dtat somethhig is going

But that hasn’t dantj^f^ the Vancouver hold's enfhuaa^^^/'And that may

,1..,

the information you need know about your college all

only been

sistic port}ott'’^»%e11, that

it’s 'about

faugh.

who

to '•

Merritt’s quick

“In music

anyway.’

all

For

overni^fsaece^Sc continues,

$ld6. Of playing"'"!

mega-dome. But

the

,

...

firmly

to point oat that he’s

“There's

\

imagine doing anything else. With that said, he heads off to relax before his performance.

Read Spoke!

offing', 'and coming'

He

want to do.

"years.

band

of

'''

being a Walton, Plumb says been a way of life for

to

making a living exclusively ffom music for the last six and a ha^

limousines and jets with

#

says,

may

not

it,”

On

that it’s just

Expand your mind

says the only get people should reason involved in the music inda^ is because that’s die only thingthey

“Don’t do

a point in time, and is

comes any up

it

advice for bands, Merritt

turned

exactly

what Since When

When

really

“That was unfortunatei says Merritt, who has been with the band since its inception 16 years, ago, “but weather sometimes does that The whole roof of the stage was tom off,” Every bit of gear was completely soaked.'^he,

-

it’s

record

'

the

because a severe storm hit

the

It’s

,-\

we

us,”

Grand Bend Motorplex, which was cancelled

“And

way.

that

stereo.

the past 10 years and he couldn’t

punishment.” tion of a

of songs.”

The song Beats The Hell demon-

month.

this

also says the record

this collection

songwriting,” says

at

Plumb, who turns 30

weren’t.

collection of singles because the

After the disappointment of the

gifts

was major,

live is

up record.”

the

what we enjoy the most about music. We’ve always been a live band first,” says Plumb, adding that more energy comes

strates one of the stories or mentioned. Plumb emotions “Sometimes people get stuck in relationships where they feel they

""Empire Hotel has been the most

album, the band took two years off during which they had the chance to live semi-normal lives, says

Now

1995 the Waltons released a second album. Cock’s Crow. They were now a part of the Warner -•Music Canada family and, while In

at

fans and

XTC,” he says. Switching topics. Plumb explains the band’s attraction to playing live. “The thought of getting out and supporting the record live is always attractive because playing

The Waltons, from

Plumb says the album’s failure was due to too much production.

concert

“We were KISS

real pop;

Trakter, a collection of

Crow

artists

punk phase with Dead Kennedys. DOA, and then Pink Floyd. Then

demos, on an independent label in 1992. They enjoyed nationwide success with songs like Colder Than You. They won a Juno award, two Casby awards and a Campus Entertainment award in

record label

various

then there was the Pink Floyd phase. Actually, there was the

The Waltons, consisting of Sean Bryson (vocals, drums), Todd Lumley (vocals, keyboards, accordion). Keith Nakonechny (vocals, bass) and Jason Plumb (vocals, acou^tic/electric guitar), formed in Saskatchewan in 1987. The band released its first album,

new

by

including the Beatles and Kiss, Plumb says the band went through

says.

the sales of Cock’s

between a man and a

“It could be a lot of things. It could be about a job, a boss mistreating you in some way. I don’t like to be too obvious

forward to releasing this record for quite some time now." he

their

it’s not abusive

an

woman.

venues on the band’s current tour with 54-40 and Damn the Diva. He lights up a DuMaurier before discussing the band’s return from a two-year break. "It’s been really refreshing. We've been looking

My

about

necessarily

Jason Plumb of the Waltons sits cross-legged in a back room of the recreation centre, one of the

Lik

break

Bur devoted ,

fans, take heart.

-

It can be fun! It is rewarding! It is useful on your resume!

If you are a second or third year student and have 80 % or better in the course (s) and you would like to tutor, you could qualify. STILL NEEDING TUTORS IN: GENERAL BUSINESS MECHANICAL TN. & TY MANAGEMENT STUDIES

Drop in to Student Services (2B02) for more information

riBPeer

Merritt thinks they will continue

beyond still

that.

“As long

as we’re

excited about the music,

then I think there’ll

still

be a

1

m

Services »^fatKiti,DoenaniKtAMmJcmor


SPOKE,

Damn

Devilish 1

By Melanie Spencer and Judy Sankar

“The opened

“There are going to be some who really connect with it

people

and that’s the awesome thing because it’s like you’re a music fan and you start creating it and you’re able to give something back to the people that means something to them,” says Kevin MacKenzie, lead singer of Damn the Diva, about the songs on their second album. Flow and Steer. Although MacKenzie and Jerry Wong are the founding members of the Vancouver-based independent band, Pat Steward, drummer, and Doug Elliott, bassist, of the Odds, another Vancouver-based

for the

move

will

to

Odds

in

the

Diva

November They had

about a year ago. another thing come up and they asked Doug to play with them.

drummer left,” says Steward of the Odds on how

Then

the

and himself collaborated to form the current line-up of Damn Elliott

the Diva.

some people who connect with

it

really

and

that’s

Steward will return to the Odds to work on another album, says MacKenzie, who's been composing since the while Elliott and

Now

want

switches to performing. Influenced

feeling from.”

the success in the East that they

by

have in the West. Writing songs and performing them have always come easily to MacKenzie, although he worked hard to improve his vocal abilities during his childhood. “I was running around the house singing and my mom was saying, ‘You

Humperdink

MacKenzie

everything

from

Making

Englebert

thru Kiss to

was

the

awesome

“My

thing...”

Kevin MacKenzie

The duo met

at

music school

in

Vancouver, where they began writing songs together. “About a year and a half later, we got Damn the Diva going and we’ve had it going for just over north

first

singing

lesson

sound

was

it

Plummer and

Steward

“Edel weiiiiisssss

is

in heat.’”

bellows,

itself to

a certain

at the

who has that moment when they really

about someone

turn to. That’s the kind of record

in

off. heading an inspiring piece of advice to everyone. “1 recommend that people just try a

check.

Before

offers

creative outlet, that they just give

themselves that opportunity and not put too many blocks in front of them because everybody can be creative and offer something.”

connect with it and it means a lot to them,” he says. “It takes you somewhere and it’s something you

!

that

time shows that between serious conversation and bouts of laughter, an hour has passed and Damn the Diva has yet to do its sound-

glance

MacKenzie

movie

the

in

kind of dictates

A

Kevin MacKenzie

first

get

a connection with the

somewhere

a cat

we made

extent.”

saying, ‘You

like

think

Odds. That’s sort of why 1 like performing with them,” he says. “These guys just sort of write songs and say, ‘Well, that’s the song, that’s how it should go’ and

house singing and my

Edelweiss from Sound of Music,” he says before bursting into the first verse of that very song. By the bridge. Steward joins in, singing soprano purposely out of tune. Just before the crescendo, stands up and MacKenzie Christopher just like poses

I

people

Diva, as Elliott explains. “I think these guys are sort of like the

running around the

mom was

that

audience through music isn’t the only reason Steward and Elliott decided to work with Damn the

Roger

by other artists, it is essential that the band keeps its own identity. “Music is such an awesome thing. For example. Favourite 45

“I

to

record

a

Whitaker, the band stresses that, while it is good to be influenced

enrolling in singing

make and

Following a few moments of uncontrolled laughter, the topic

lessons.

New

York. There they will tour with various well-established bands,

MacKenzie.

with the release of their current album, they are striving to emulate

sound like a cat in heat.’” A combination of his mother’s complaining and his relentless in resulted music, love of

“There are going to be

band, have joined them until the end of their current tour with 54-40. At that time. Wong and

MacKenzie

Damn

original

Page 11

the Diva delights fans five years,” says

age of nine.

Sept. 21, 1998

I

CD REVIEW

Celebrity Skin Gone are

marks new

direction for Hoie But by far, the stellar track on the album is Dying. Dealing with desire, it’s a very emotional and confessional song, which hits the listener like a ton of bricks. The vocals

the days of

rage and uncontrolled raw energy. Hole’s

are barely audible at times, reinforcing her desperation. Petal, the closing track, contrasts with

an extremely mellow

back with a vengeance,

Celebrity Skin.

but this time they’ve

with despair.

matured and refined

album,

their sound.

about maturity in her writing. While Celebrity Skin is a change in direction for the band. Hole has produced a solid effort, which could very well become

It’s

track dealing with death and overflowing

From

these songs, and the others on the the that evident it’s

turbulent times in Love’s life have brought

By Melanie Spencer

one of the best records of 1998.

^ ^ Celebrity Skin, the

bad

girl

new album from

the

of punk, Courtney Lx)ve, and her and co-founder

RATiNO SYSTEM

partners in crime, guitarist

of the band Eric Erlandson, bassist Melissa

Die for tills.

Auf des Maur and drummer Patty Schemel, is filled with pop overtones. This may be the result

of the band’s collaboration with

Smashing Pumpkins’ Billy Corgan, who helped write five of the 12 songs on the album, including the

You’re not cool if you don’t have this.

title-track.

Produced by Michael Beinhom, known for work on Soundgarden’s Superunknown and Soul Asylum’s Grave Dancer’s Union,

his

album opens with Celebrity Skin, the The raw energy and driving dmm beat provides the perfect backdrop

the

Somethlitg to pass the time with.

first single.

for this revealing look at the

dark side of

Hollywood.

Love sings with

despair,

“Oh look

at

my

might have been/ My never was/ My name’s forgotten.”

face/

My name

name

is

Ironically,

is

Love

made

a

successful

very world with the movie. The People vs. Larry Flint. After the beautiful ballad, Malibu, the transition into this

album gets a kick-start with Reasons to Be r Beautiful. The driving guitars and drums reinforce Love’s sarcastic overtones and

make

it reminiscent of their last effort. Live Through This. One begins to wonder if this is about her relationship with her late husband, Kurt Cobain, who committed suicide. She sings with regret about a man

Hole, from left to right, Melissa Auf der Maur, Courtney Love and Eric Erlandson are back with Celebrity Skin, the follow-up to Live Through This. Geffen Records photo by Regan Cameron.

body and soul. end of the song, the music fades At into the background as Love’s voice drops to a whisper brimming with sadness as she sings: “Hey you were right/ Named a star for your eyes/ Did you freeze did you weep/ Turn to gold, baby, sleep/ Hey honey mine/ 1 was there all the time/ And

who

is

sick in his

the

I

weep

at

your

feet/

And

it

rains

and

rains.”

Another autobiographical moment comes during Northern Star, a song that could have appeared on a Smashing Pumpkins’ record. TTte strings

compliment the widow’s

angry, impassioned vocals as she declares,

“No

loneliness,

no misery

is

worth you.”


At Waterloo campus

to raise $25,000

Program expects received media coverage from the

By Jacqueline Smith "We

are

working

become

to

Record. Waterloo

Kitchener-Waterloo CKCO-TV. and the

the

ism of the industry shall depend

“Today

to let the

is

fundraising

Conestoga College president. John Tibbits at a fundraising campaign meeting on Sept. 14. at the Four

According to a press release from the College food and program, Conestoga beverage

campaign.” said Paula Stanghetta.

Points Sheraton Hotel.

College

"We cannot be the best unle.ss we have your support." Tibbits said to the program advisory committee,

entering

members. fundraising campaign

which consist of

The

is

is

20 anniversary. The event is being coordinated by program Esenbergs. Beth it's

Kelly

manager of

the Black Forest Inn.

Inc..

raise

.$2.5.000

is

for

expected

to

equipment

showcasing the combined talents

responsive to the financial needs beverage and food the of management program. They must

of eight of the areas top rated chefs. The event is being coordi-

industry

behind, support and

move

CKGL

the

initiatives,

assist

which towards

programs

fundraising

Jacques

by chefs Jean Chapius of the Four Points Hotel, and Tyrone Miller from Conestoga nated

College.

The dinner

self-sufficiency.

Such support will prove to be a sound investment decision upon which the health and professional-

Conestoga College, was master of ceremony at the meeting, which

the

must become more

release also states that

fundraising

Neil Aitchison. a 570 personality and a past graduate of

recruits.

for

is

positions

expected to raise

$10,000 and will include entertainment by “Reflections” and an awards ceremony recognizing the

for

the

in

service

food

are involved in the

and

dinner

this

“I

am

we have

making sure

interested in

quality graduates to refine

them and get to senior management positions,” said Scott Durst, owner of the Black Forest Inn and also a graduate of Conestoga College.

“From

point of

industry

the

we want

a

good

We

need

we have been successful is because we believe that management skills

view,

develop from a sound foundation of the understanding of’ food excellent and preparation customer service,” Esenbergs said. “Not only do our students study the traditional business course

industry,” Brubacher said.

such as computers, accounting, marketing and human resources management, but they also learn through the practical experience of

although

the reasons

room

operating the licenced dining

located at the Waterloo campus.” are there said Esenbergs

who own

graduates

own

their

fund

raising campaign.

example

set

to

for students.

qualified

bodies

to

the

fill

“The majority of our students

come from Waterloo, Wellington and the surrounding counties, and after graduation most begin their career

in

establishments,

local

relocate

others

to

Greece, Jamaica, Bermuda, British Columbia and Alberta,”

Esenbergs said. “Conestoga graduates have made the food and in their mark Aitchison industry,” beverage said.

Condor teams end

warns students about smoking

pre-season with wins

aad 5 Doors non-smoking enlmcfeft. I

By Neven Mujezinovic on Sept.

games

may

against

women’s

having sM

men’s and won teams

14, both the

soccer

Redeemer

College

in

Ancaster.

men

The

thumped

their

opponents 5-0. Dan Krauter, Paul Mouradian, Davit Heu each scored once, while Dan Mihelic scored twice.

Condors’ coach Geoff Johnstone men could easily have their as more, five scored opponents were a much weaker team than Conestoga. Still he was very impressed by the Condors’ excellent combination play and said the

cutting passes in attack.

The women’s team won flrst-yea«'

accounSng ^i^ent Adam ftfte Arena P«r« caught lighting tip,

^rapbics stucints Maii< Ptoch, riglit; Anil Sbrahim, left.pind Jason Jones, lower,

seconehyear early childhood education

^ke

was scored by Lisa Hawco. The women’s Redeemer team was a good one and gave the

goal

In their final pre-season

"Please use only those entrances: approved f«r smoking. Failure to do so result in

and

“One of

as local benefactors, the hospitali-

rally

upgrades for the Waterloo campus kitchen and dining areas.

SecHirity

new

initiative

graduates

management

two

in fact

gourniet

industry.

establishments.

The second

and

program coordinator

preparing hospitality

dinner

two-for-one

will be a gourmet dinner evening (Black Tie dinner),

ty

Kitchener.

The campaign

success in the hospitality industry. Potential employers will benefit

specials and discounted hotel stays local popular many from

The press

C'onestogo. and Paula Stanghetta. president of Paula Stanghetta and

Associates

contain

participate in co-op, hire graduates

Beth Esenbergs. Esenbergs said the first students enrolled in food and beverage management in 1978 and since program has been the then

dining coupon books have been printed to raise in excess of

basic fundamentals required for

access to

Brubacher.

dinner,” said

The fundraising program is a two-part event. Three thousand

dedicated hospitality professionals. These young graduates are well trained and equipped with the

from lower training costs and easy

^

coordinator.

the

$15,000 for the program. The coupon books are being sold by the Conestoga College Waterloo campus’s food and beverage dining room for $15. The coupons

chosen field of are who and

their

employment

being launched in conjunction with the college’s food and bevercelebrating

local

the

hospitality industry with graduates

?>5

age management program which

provides

about

general managers, chefs, and food service supervisors. Now they

second year students will also be helping to prepare and serve the gourmet

community

know

restaurants, are regional managers,

of participating students

from the program. "The first and

states the article.

Chronicle.

best college in the province." said

efforts

c

1

-0.

The

women a better test said Johnstone. Though dressing only players, which meant they had 1 1 no substitutes and thus could not Condors

Condors women

get any rest, the

actually got stronger as the

game

went on. The defence was once again rock-solid and the whole team played well. The next games will be played Sept. 19 in Windsor when both the men and women will meet St. Clair College in their first league fixtures of the season.

The Condors’

first

home games

be both be against Fanshawe on Sept. 22 for the men’s team and on Sept. 29 for the women’s. will

,

Free books today

time to light up just outside the pea outside Door 5.

fkifi-smoking PhertO

i|

I,

(Photo by Jason Genntngs)

resource centre

in

Monthly meetings planned attendance

Dietrich

are

the

Student

The Learning Resource Centre

Sept. 9 the first associations

meeting was held

in

The Other

The Sanctuary. Attended by members of four of

Room,

located in

groups involved; the Doon Student Association (DSA), the Students Business Conestoga Association (CBSA), the (IEEE) the

the organizations

at Conestoga College’s, campus will be giving

and programs,

Council (SAC), the (KIPS) and the Law and Security

and to help create .solutions for problems brought forward by the

Students Association (LASA).

associations.

Athletics

On

A

meeting

in

May

prompted the

idea for the association meetings, Kristin president

said

DSA

Murphy. The primary

“This meeting

is

just a stepping

stone to a really good relation.ship

both for everyone between promotions and events.” said Murphy. Meetings have been scheduled

Students

purpose for the associations at Conestoga College to meet was outlined by Murphy.

Association (JSA), the purpose of meeting was to introduce

“We are here to help the students and to promote student events,” he

Wednesday of every month. The next meeting will be held on Oct. 7 at 3:30 p.m.. in The

said.

Sanctuary.

and

the

Journalism

the

everyone to each other. Other groups involved in the association, but who were not in

Other functions of the meetings include raising money for each of

for the first

All associations are

come and

any

in

category,

students, staff and faculty can

for Conestoga College associations By Melissa

arranged

By Jacqueline Smith

welcome

share their ideas.

to

Doon away

starting ,500 books Monday, Sept. 21, at 9 a.m said one of two coordinators at the

about

1

Learning Resources Centre. Cathy Potvin, said that every summer they clear the library of older books along with newer

which the LRC has more than one copy. “Each year, books are donated

ones of

to the

LRC. This enables us to we no longer

get rid of the ones

need,” said Potvin. Although the books

are

not

psychology and

find business,

nursing books along with

many

others.

“Not only are these books free, is also no limit to the amount a student can take,” said

but there

Potvin Last year, the books went

fast.

People who are interested should come early in order to get the best selection, said Potvin

The books

one of the~l the LRC and those

will

study areas in

be

in

to make use of the can use the blue door, between Roasters and the stairs

who want offer

leading to the cafeteria.

^ ^


SPOKE,

SPORTS

Hodson

Leaf netminder Jamie Terglav

who

NHL

is

Sabre forward Edo

kicks aside a shot by Buffalo

ran out of the play by Leaf defender Dimitri Yakushin

in

game

of

a round-robin tournament

the last

in

Sept. 21, 1998

Page 13

the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium. (Photo by Rob Himburg)

hopefuls exhibit taient in Kitchener

Sabres buffalo Leafs Adam Mair

By Rob Himburg

and Sabres defenceman Cory

Sarich. Both goaltenders held their ground,

Led by Jeremy Adduono’s hat

trick

and

overall four-point effort, the Buffalo Sabres

rookies rolled over their Toronto

Leaf counterparts cial

in the final

Maple

game of a spe-

shot the Sabres 9-6.

The second period destroyed any hopes that the Leafs

Hodson

tournament.

The Sabres dominated

the

game with

strong forechecking and great goaltending in a 5-1 thumping of the lacklustre Maple Leaf rookies. The game was one of six that the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex

played host to during the National Hockey League Rookie Tournament that ran from

September 9 to 12. Sponsored by Tim Hortons, Domino’s Pizza and the Sheraton Four Points Hotel, young players with aspirations of a big-money career took to the ice in a round-robin tournament.

Involved were the rookies and signed draft picks of the Montreal Canadiens, Carolina Hurricanes, Buffalo Sabres and the Toronto started as a great defen-

sive battle as both

teams

in the first period.

The

felt

each other out

greatest highlight of

was a fight between Leafs

centre

had as goaltender Jamie

allowing four Buffalo goals on 14 shots, including two of Adduono’s three on the night, with the first one being a picture-prefect shot to the upper left

fell apart,

comer of

the net

which froze Hodson.

Also chipping in for the Sabres in the second were winger Jeff Martin and defenceman Brian Campbell who also chipped in with two assists. The only bright spot for the Leafs occurred while Dan Snyder was in the penalty box for an instigating penalty. Winger Ryan Lindsay stripped a Sabre

off the ice to the dress-

A

couple of minutes later, he returned to the ice and, with his team in need of a pick up, he threw a crushing hit ing room.

on Sarich. This lead to which both players fell

a brief tussle in to the ice.

The

Leaf’s play quickened for a short while but

came back down to its dull pace. The Montreal Canadiens ended up with

eventually

the best won-lost record, with 3-0, while the

Sabres, Leafs, and Hurricanes

all

ended up

with a 1 -2 ratio. For those who missed these rookie conexhibition tests, fear not. With the schedule, there will be a few stops in Kitchener, so if you’re in the mood for preseason action, contact the some auditorium for game dates and times.

NHL

NHL

Leafs forward Eric Golody is sandwiched between Buffalo defender Cory Sarich and an unidentified Sabre. (Photo by Rob Himburg)

defenceman of the puck and worked a give and go with Allan Rourke for a shorthanded goal, cutting the lead to 4-1, the closest the

Leafs would

get.

9.T€€T

on the cake for Buffalo came in the third when Adduono completed his hat trick in a mad scramble in front of the Leaf

The

Maple Leafs. The game itself

the period

shutting out the opposition as the Leafs out-

Kenny and limped

icing

net.

Also having a good night for the Sabres were forward Norm Milley Alexei defenceman and Tezikov who both added two assists. Sabre goalie Martin Biron stopped 37 out of 38

Attend the Country’s Largest University/College

Career Fair

shots for the win.

Among

the Leafs roster, a couple of prominent names stood out above the rest. The first

is

Marek Posmyk,

Tuesday, September 29

10:00

first

is

Employer

Owen

the

Co-Sponsors; Conestoga College

Hockey Sound

University of Guelph

Wilfrid Laurier University

Leafs the

most about Mair are his leadership skills and his nasty mean streak, both of which were evident in the touma-

game against the

Sabres.

Leafs forward Frantisek Mrazek is stopped in his tracks by Sabre defenceman Dimitri Kalinin while pursuing the puck. (Photo by Rob Himburg)

in

University of Waterloo

interests the

hient’s final

bus schedules

Student Employment Office

Platers.

What

lists,

I.D.

and information available

ney. He is known locally by his local appearances with

League’s

& Transportation

with Student

Hamilton’s Adam Mair, who was given the captaincy of the team throughout the tour-

Ontario

pm

Victoria Street, Kitchener

Free Admission

Also a possible attendee

3:30

Conference Centre

Hamilton.

the

-

Bingemans

round draft pick. The hulking defenceman is highly touted by Leafs brass and is expected to attend in camp major their

1996

am

a

During the first period, Mair blocked a point shot by Sabres defenceman Shane

University of

Waterloo

f

Conestoga

^GUELPH

College

[j|


Page 14

— SPOKE, Sept. 21, 1998

SPORTS

Condors triumph over strong Humber Then

By Neven Mujezinovic

was time

it

Mihelic to turn

Dan Mihelic was Conestoga

umphed 1

0

tri-

Sept.

was

home

the first

the season played

exhibition

game of

about

on the bumpy Conestoga

The match

started badly for the

Jessie Calabro capitalized

Condors’ defending

inert

make

past the keeper and

The Condors did not

Condors on some

20th minute

prowess

later,

with the Condors con-

ning goal, ensuing kick, Mihelic soared above every-

one and headed home his

to put the ball

The 3-2 score was a

Humber. heads and

-0 for

it 1

lose their

be in his usual position of goalscorer in the future. The midfield was superbly orchestrated by Paul Mouradian. Only the defence looked a bit shaky at times, but once Krauter recovers from his injury, it should

and transformed a into an

Humber goalkeeper

Humber went up

of

game. Both teams played an excellent match, but in the end, Conestoga was the better team by a one-goal margin. Humber is traditionally one of the best college teams in Ontario and this victory should be a great morale booster for the Condors. Along with Mihelic, all the strikers looked dangerous and created numerous chances. Bell looked like a classy player in the sweeper’s role, although he will probably

when Mihelic showed

in the area

miskick by the easy goal.

third.

fair representation

the

It was an even game in the first half, as both teams threw caution to the wind and tried to outplay the other. The Condors’ attacking style was reward-

his

from

8 metres out.

game and looking for the wina comer-kick was won. From the

McQuade’s shot was just fractionally too high and Joe Shamon missed the mark by about half a metre.

in the

1

Ten minutes

continued playing an attacking brand of soccer. They came close to equalizing the score 'a couple of times, but Paul

ed

through the

trolling the

soccer pitch.

when

Midway

half,

goal, and drilled the ball into the net

hard-fought game.

in a

It

Humber College on

for man-of-the-match

up.

he received the ball on the left wing five metres inside the Humber half, shook off two defenders running straight at

second

a hat-trick hero for

men’s soccer team

as the

3-2 over

it

improve.

minute Condors’ defence. Goalkeeper Lou Caprara made one save but the Condors’ defence was again caught ball-watching and Calabro was on hand to thump the ball into the back of the net. Dwayne Bell had a great chance to level

Humber coach Germain Sanchez said his team looked rusty and would need a few weeks to fulfill its potential. He was impressed by Conestoga’s ball control. “Conestoga deserved to win. They have a much better team than last year and look

the score shortly after, but his delightful

well prepared,’’ said Sanchez.

pressuring

after

chip

came

2-1 in the 25th

the

Johnstone admitted that in the last 20 mingame he played his best 1 1 play-

off the upright.

second half. Condor coach Geoff Johnstone shuffled things at the back and

utes of the

In the

and went for the win. “Although we were outplayed in the beginning and lucky not to be down a little bit more by the end they (Humber) were

ers

was a much more solid defence. Bell, one of the few veterans, played

the result Striker

sweeper, filling in for injured captain

Dan

lucky to get out of it with just a 3-2 loss. We played some superb soccer in those last 20 minutes,” said Johnstone. Three-goal hero Mihelic said after the

Krauter.

Humber had

another chance early on in the second half after Bell made a rare mistake and gave the ball

lightning

away

counter-attack

in midfield.

followed,

A

game

but

that

it

feels “pretty

good”

to score a

Calabro’s well-struck ball hit the upright

hat trick, but a huge grin revealed that

and bounced out of play.

felt

much

It

merit to lose.

Humber to tie the women’s game against Conestoga in first exhibition game of the

Humber

ty for

superior

soccer

was a gutsy performance by Conestoga, whose players are

the

10 at the season on Sept. Conestoga College soccer field. When Filomena Aprile transformed the penalty into a goal,

making the was done,

final result 2-2, justice

Humber

as

side.

Still, it

just getting to

did not

know each

other’s

weaknesses. The of both halves saw the

strengths and

ends

Jurisic

in first

will.

The Condors were outplayed for most of the game by a technically

took a controversial late penal-

Marco

better than that.

Women show promise By Neven Mujezinovic

(left) and Paul Mouradian (right) get ready to jump for the ball as and Zlatko Lakoseljac look on. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

Walter Martins

it

Condors controlling the game, not leaving any doubt about their physical preparation and their

Technically, the Condors will

have to improve if they are to advance to the play-offs. As a consolation, the Condors did have the best player on the field. Heather Heimpel, but she will need a little more support from her teammates. Condor coach Geoff Johnstone criticized his team at halftime for kicking

the

ball

The second half saw a continuagood defending by the Condors and near-misses by Humber. Finally, the pressure paid Humber, as Angela off for McDonald volleyed home, being tion of

the

game

at 1-1.

But the Condors, instead of being demoralized by the goal.

started playing their best soccer after that. Shortly after,

made

Melanson, who back of the net. The Condors had one more glorious chance to extend their slotted the ball into the

lead when Danilla Sirco hit the post after a beautifully struck shot

from about 20 metres All in

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Midway

of the season and said team must improve on its finishing and putting the ball in the back of the net creating numerous after rest

his

chances.

through

“Conestoga is a good team and they gave us a good game,” said Pileggi. Johnstone thought the women were lucky to get

Conestoga went on a fast break and after a dreadful mistake by the

first

half,

Humber

Punett a proud

as a stepping-stone for the

and the skillful style Condors defending tenathe

ing

it

1

managed

to

squeeze

the draw.

mak-

defence,

solid

some schemes that were just too complex for

attacks

this early in the season.

without conceding a goal.

Keeper

made

1^1

Defence

naiionaie

YOUR PRIDL YOUR FUTURL YOUR MOVL

Nancy Tucker some outstanding

saves to keep Conestoga in the

game.

said that,

tried

absorbing

waves of Humber

Having

he put part of the blame for that on himself. He said he

-0 for Conestoga.

The Condors looked in

.

goalie, Alycia

the ball into the net,

is

game

Pileggi described the

game started out with Humber imposing its

ciously.

out.

the 2-2 result

teams could be happy with. Humber coach, Vince

it.

The

workforce.

all,

a fair one, and one both

That is definitely a part of the Condors’ game, which needs refining.

Join our

Heimpel

a defence-splitting precision

pass to Karen

aimlessly

instead of passing

game

exhibition

“I

Heather Heimpel from a

Humber

fights off

a challenge

player. (Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

the

must simplify things for next game and we

should

do

Johnstone.

better,”

said


SPOKE,

Fine fore-cast for annual

Page 15

Sept. 21, 1998

DSA golf tourney

Annual golf tournament draws full

slate of college participants

Valley Golf Club

Doon

to

comprised of Jeremy Windego, Mike Baghdadi, Ramsey Albsa and Terence Michelle by one

By Ned Bekavac The weather

suited the event to

stroke.

a tee.

Third-place finishers was the

On

uncharacteristically an balmy mid-September afternoon, the Doon Student Association held its annual golf tournament at the Doon Valley Golf Club. Organized by DSA president Kristin Murphy and promotions assistant Bryan Bambrick, the event paralleled the successes of

team made up of Jack Fletcher, Chris Gibson, John Paul Worley and Jeremy Slater, who scored a 66 Team-$6.50 was awarded with .

the winners’ prize,

tournaments “Everything ran great,” Murphy said. “Everyone really enjoyed Sept.

1 1

golf balls.

Third-place finishers received CD compilations, courtesy of

tournament

maximum

ECHO magazine.

48 players College

every participant was given free water bottles for their

Though a steady wind reeked

was

game

run

^ed Bekavac)

tournament.

scores,

participation.

The 18-hole tournament concluded at 8:30 p.m. Murphy said the DSA golf

havoc with many shots, the 1:30 p.m. tee-off time gave participants the chance to play their holes under the beaming sun.

The

computer Debbie Simpson, Sandra Goosney, Lucas Wagner and Dave Haeside, an tnira-year golf annual DSA 18-hole in the action early during programming analyst students, raise a glass

Though the top three teams were rewarded with prizes for best

Conestoga participating in teams of four for their chance at various prizes donated by the community.

from

cool-

received shirts from Roots and

themselves.”

The

Molson

gift certificates for

Jack Astor’s bar and grill. The second place winners

past.

featured the

and $20

ers

tourney has become a staple of the

in

DSA’s

“scramble-tournament” fashion,

“We

where players shoot their next shot from their team’s closest ball, Murphy said. Scores were kept by

year,”

activities.

will

be doing one next

Murphy

said.

“This tournament

is

always a

success.”

Though only

the players themselves.

The tournament was won by team-$6.50. The team had a score

were

of 64. enough to defeat the squad

by tee-off time.

half of the spots

days prior to the 48 spots were filled

full three

tourney,

all

Cameron Mart, Scott Morrison and Nathan Matheson, all third-year management the DSA golf tournament Sept. 11 at Conestoga College, take a breather during students studies (Photo by Ned Bekavac) college. the from participants tournament attracted a full slate of 48

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— SPOKE, Sept. 21, 1998

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Digital Edition - September 21, 1998