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Conestoga College, Kitchener 30th Year

— No.

August 1998

28. Orientation Issue

Orientation Issue

Conestoga’s residence almost

What’s

piece bathroom, a television, and kitchenette with microwave and

By Ned Bekavac Rodeway

refrigerator.

private

a

Suites,

for another school year.

only

Brian

As of Aug.

Gill, general

facility

on 55

housing

New Dundee

said.

confirmed

10,

their

at

its

full for

Doon campus

September Page 2

all

ages

j

ages staying with

J

packages,

two-semester sells openings can usually be found in January, and even Febraury when the nursing term begins, he said.

Upon

accepting applications, the

staff at

Rodeway must determine

all

us.”

1

roommates.

some

Though Brian

manager of Rodeway

1

mi

Though Rodeway predominantly

send out applications May 15, attached to the acceptances distributed by the college,” he said.

“We

centre at

1 „

staying with us.”

“You get students of

K

’T

is

in earlier.

“But you get students of

117 rooms. Gill

said.

Conestoga’s child-care

their

into

Aug. 30, but there

students,” he said.

226

to

move

to is

since

date for

an option “Seventy-five per cent of the students this year are first-year

Rodeway

Rodeway can house up

first

the

to move

Suites for the 1998-99 school year.

students in

manager

said

residence

215 students had

rooms

general

students

residence to be fully occupied in time for the new school year.

As of Aug.

Gill,

January,

Rd.,

says he expects the

Kitchener,

air have and closet

About half of the 117 rooms are designated as non-smoking. Gill

manager of

student

the

also

desks

areas.

spots remained.

1 1

rooms

conditioning,

All

residence near Conestoga College, is on the verge of full occupancy

10,

would

Suites

room

like to

are

students

request

immediately

Gill,

pairs

who

they

Rodeway Suites, 55 New Dundee Rd., Kitchener, Conestoga’s student residence, can house up to 226 students in it’s 117 rooms.

with, other

determined

firstly

by

(Photo by Michael Hilborn)

whether or not they chose the

“Some people even know by May 20 that they will be with us.” Rodeway Suites has housed Conestoga College students since September 1993. 14, If fees are paid by Aug. students

pay

full

two

for

$3,500

freezer-rental option ($85 per student to rent a freezer for their room), then by whether the student prefers a smoking or non-smoking

comfortable” summer.

*

room. also

Students

with

Rodeway

fill

profile

personality

semesters, a savings of $125. Each of the 117 semi-divided rooms are equipped with a four-

just before the Aug. 30 student date, completing what Gill “pretty a been has said

hotel

out that

making

rate

is

$64.95 for two adults, with special senior and business rates available^

aids

the

“We

decisions.

Rodeway

summer

Rodeway’s

a

are

making ^budeeTForthe

received

a

lot

of return business. “There has been an improvement every year.” For more information about visit their

Rodeway Su ites,

Web

site;http//ww^.sympatico.ca/ cam pus/conrez.htm.

summer,”

will stop operating as a

while for people to

“It takes a

know of US. We have

\ I

Kitchener Transit will sell bus passes to students at Conestoga

What you missed

durlnffthosammer months town ghost a not College Conestoga

Page 2 By Amanda

Spitfires

So you

Hockey

think nothing happens at College over the

Conestoga College was chosen funding of to receive provincial support a $2.7 million dollars to

students, elementary participated in level, to college provincial the Skills Canada

Over 700

competition held at Conestoga

tournament organized by former Conestoga students Page 12

Slo-pitch

May

5 to 6.

Graduation ceremonies were and at Conestoga June 25 Conestoga 1,180 About 26. students attended the ceremonies

held

which were held

at the recreation

represents about

half of the students

COMMENTARY Page 4

The power of the pen in journalists’

hands

graduated programs.

project designed to help students with specific learning

pilot

who

from

actually their

The Condor men’s hockey team have a new coach this year.

will

Ken Galemo played

Junior

A

from last year. Programs with

computer stations to the Learning Resource Centre. The stations information will be used for purposes only. 21, Conestoga faculty voted to give its union bargaining mandate to call for a

team a

if a general strike in September reached not is agreement new

before then. Eighty per cent of faculty voted per and out of that 80 per cent, 77

supported the motion

Janet Zilio, professional

technology, und as usual,

all

applied arts programs are

full.

the

assistant,

pursue

college

to

career at

home

This College

a

left

the

full-time

with her family.

Conestoga two students in tragic

summer lost

accidents.

Martin Novak, 22, a third-year a and die apprentice, died in motorcycle accident Friday, June a third19. Kulvinder Tail, 44,

tool

The Doon Student Association (DSA) decided to donate eight

cent

And

development

exceptionally

include high confirmation rates and health sciences, business

disabilities.

On May

centre.

This number

Tuition increased this summer at yet the number of applications cent per four up were college the

summer vacation.

College from

during his retirement.

strike.

the

coached for 12 years.

Conestoga summer. Well, here s a brief summary of what you missed during your

Windsor before joining Huron he where Schools with

hockey

Pickling

to

Favorite

teachers,

George Woods,

such

as

electrical skills,

and Bob Hays, law and security, were thrown farewell parties over the summer. The two teachers have decided said they to retire but both have to teach will return in September part time.

Conestoga

College’s

Doon

saw the departure of Bob Gilberds, head of security, this summer. Gilberds plans to spend more relax time with his family and

campus

also

died year woodworking student, 30. June accident in a car

business

of chair Lastly, one studies Edith Torbay, donated

husband of of her kidneys to her 32 years. a Torbay’s kidney replaced been already had that kidney and transplanted 11 years ago

was only expected

to

last

for

about six years. Torbay returned to work June 25.


Page 2

— SPOKE, Orientation Issue

August 1998

Conestoga child-care centre By Amanda

Fickiing

you want a safe, fun place for your kids while you are in school, better sign them up now for the Conestoga College Child Care Centres, because there is already If

for the

list

Doon campus

emergency

location.

and

The

care,

is

licensed by the

Community

of is

which

and

community

fees for the centre are paid

on a

to

fees at the

Doon

age

site are

centre,

5:30 p.m.,

Maria Rogers, team leader at Boon’s child-care centre, says the centre is September but it may have future openings. (Photo by Amanda

attend school, but prices differ

according to amount of time spent care, said Rogers. to

main

at the

day

She

which operates from 7:30 a.m. is

childhood education program said Rogers.

jointly run with the early

said

teachers

the

who

support

and

student

add

the

to

students

degree

diploma

or

are able to contact her at the

more information, she

The Kitchener

Sept.

will

11,

from

be

at

also will be giving out route maps, said Hussey.

“They

will help students set

The four-month bus passes

and 16, Kitchener

Conestoga’s

campus

selling student bus passes, said Jenn Hussey, vice-president of

Doon Student

will

good place

a

Kitchener

Transit

to

for the

reach

students.”

a.m. and 2 p.m. on these days, said

Hussey.

DSA

really doesn’t do anything but set up a time for the

people from Kitchener Transit to come and sell the passes, she said.

“They take care of everything else.”

passes must be accompanied by a Kitchener Transit photo ID card which must be purchased for an

“These ID cards are good until they are dead, unless they lose them,” said Weiss. Weiss said passes are being sold on the September dates, even though classes will be well under way, because she has many other in the

“I can’t at

be

is

Student holding a used

Aug. 24

sale

-

27

to

provide students with an opportunity to save money by picking up textbooks second hand.

Jenn

DSA

Hussey,

vice-president of op)erations, said the money raised from the sale will help offset the

Edwina Weiss, Kitchener Transit fare media administrator, said

schools

Doon

The

Association

book

said having the sale at the

is

By Melanie Spencer

a savings of

college benefits both students and Kitchener Transit. “Students don’t have a lot of money, so a sale is good, and the

college

hold

textbooks

up

additional $5 at the sale.

The representatives will be in front of Door three between 10

The

is

area to go to as well.

every school right the beginning.” at

NEED HELP WITH YOUR HEALTH?

cost of the association’s

Week

of Welcome, which actually runs for two weeks, from Aug. 31 to Sept. 4. Students have been dropping off their books at the

DSA

office

in

the

Sanctuary since April 20. The students set their own prices for their books, said Hussey.

Later in the year, a letter will

be

sent

to

students

how many

detailing

of their

books sold and what

is left,

said Hussey.

Students will then have one to pick up the remaining books, she said, or they will be given to the

month

college’s

peer services or community organizations such as

department

Literacy for Children.

YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE We information first

&

advice

-

aid

non-prcscription medications a place to rest when you are ill

VISIT

The first option is to go through the school, she said. “If they (peer services) don’t need them or can’t use them, we will go outside. There’s plenty of places for those books to go.” In an effort

can provide:

OUR OFFICE LOCATED

allergy injections

-

blood pressure monitoring

-

birth control counselling

-

pregnancy

testing

to

DOOR

#3,

DOON CAMPUS

down

cut

on

students’ wait in line, Hussey said, everything will be

labeled and shelved.

She is also trying to get a book list to help make things more efficient, she said. We’ll

still

have the same

number of people, more, but

INSIDE

for

sale of used

the best routes for them.”

January, said Hussey.

Doon

operations for the Association.

people

$52, she said. The representatives

Fickiing

10,

Transit

Doon centre

said.

DSA to

will return to the college again in

Transit

Fickiing)

There are six Conestoga College Child Care Cees in the area, said Rogers. Parents

Dqon campus

On

Amanda

years.

cost $164, which

representatives

(Photo by

early

in

students,

between the ages of four months and 10

Student bus passes to be issued Sept. 10, 11 and 16 at

Getting from place to place in a new city can be difficult, but with a Kitchener Transit bus pass, at least it can become a little cheaper.

Doon campus.

hands-on

get

Hussey

3,

are

and has a

00

1

office

The ratio of teachers to children varies from group to group. The centre has programs for children

4-month passes

By Amanda

Chirkut Amenarine, a trades and apprenticeship student, waits for the Kitchener Transit bus outside Door

what they

All the full-time teachers at the centre have

a

sell

The

for

experience.”

program.

Kitchener Transit to

are able to emulate

taught.

has

facility

“They

at the college,

full

Fickiing)

main

year,

capacity of about said Rogers.

$755 for an infant, $655 for toddlers, and $530 for pre-schoolers. Plans are also set up for

who

the

maximum

category, said Rogers.

The

(loctor

the

Also, visitors must report to upon entering the site. The child care operates all

open

child care centre

Waterloo Region.”

children

in

No one, other than parents, is allowed to pick up the children unless the facility receives a note from the parents, she said.

Social

not restricted to children of

monthly basis and vary according

The

nurse,

Parents leave emergency names and numbers in case anything happens. The centre also follows strict security measures to protect the children, said

Conestoga students, said Rogers. to the

a

be

Rogers.

The day

“It is a

couldn’t

that

building,” she said.

she said.

Services,

situation

handled by the staff at the site. “We also have the excellent staff, a

Maria Rogers, team leader at Boon’s centre, said the child care programs are full for September, but may open up after that. “Parents only have to pay month to month, so we can’t tell if October will be full, too,”

Ministry

fast

childhood education, first aid, and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, she said. Rogers said there has never been an

to stay

a waiting

up

fills

it

will

if

not

be a quicker

process,” she said.


SPOKE,

Orientation Issue

Old

new again

is

Welcome week to timewarp students By Meianie Spencer

timewarp back into the medieval days on Sept. 4. The movie of

Whether a student

is

sports or simply likes to

sit

and

into

back

music, this year’s of Welcome will have something to please everyone.

the

listen to

Week

The theme filled weeks

Doon

The

Olympic Games

can only

if a student

10:30

still

want it to be good.” Each day will represent a different period in time, he said.

a student can

pub

want

still

it

to

be good.”

Kristin

Murphy,

DSA president

to

in the evening.

day. Sept. 9, will

throw people into the future. Psychic Dan Valkos will perform in the Sanctuary from 1:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.

Retro

I

the

from

with

The next

which

only attend one day,

with

lasting

2:30 p.m., an outdoor obstacle course, and ends with a

1

if

begins

a.m.

complete

attend one day,” he said, “I

:30

1 1

week of begins Sept. 8 with

is

Association

at

second

activities

Caesar day. The day

two eventTimewarp, said

Student

“Even

be shown

will

for the

president Kristin Murphy.

“Even

week

a.m. in the Sanctuary.

theme on Sept.

is the

10,

with a guest lecture at 11:30 a.m. in the Sanctuary.

Clowning around

In the evening, Canadian rockers 54.40 will perform. Tickets for students are $10 in

for

starts

advance or $12

the door,

at

while guests will pay $13 in advance or $15 at the door, said

Murphy.

Aug. 31, the kicks

es,

day of class-

first

off

Week

the

of

Welcome with prehistoric day. The free nooner will be a showing of the movie Devil’s Advocate at 11:30 a.m. in the Sanctuary.

Tuesday Sept. 1 will transport students back to the Wild West. The best-of-the-west day begins with the Molson

Pond

Party,

complete with a beer tent, a barbecue, an outdoor concert and other activities. The barbecue is the first licensed event at the school in a while, said Murphy. Each student will be mailed one free

pass for a burger and pop, he

Mike Merles goes for the airborne summer day campers.

least

By Ned Bekavac

he hopes

1

As

,000 people will

pub

Conestoga College’s

located

centre,

the

at

recreation

from a

getting a boost

is

local brewery.

The Roost has inked a sponsorship deal with Brick brewery that

Single and Sexy, will perform in the Sanctuary at 1 1:30 a.m.

pub

will see the

day ends with the annual golf tournament at 1 :30 p.m. at the Doon Valley Golf Club just east of the campus.

sport a

new

motif.

final

variety

for

Murphy. “It’ll be

is

he

said.

we

will still

have

other brands available

Week of Welcome

in

bottles.”

said.

back

Sept. 2 takes students

to

the Roaring ‘20s, with a casino being held in the Sanctuary from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

On

flower-power day. Sept. 3, movie will be shown

a

outside the recreation centre at 9

p.m. followed by a

The

first

week

camp out.

finishes with a

Aug. 31 Prehistoric Day Sept. 1 Best of the West Sept 2 Roaring ’20s Sept 3 Flower Power Sept 4 Medieval Times Septs Caesar Day Sept 9 Future Sept 10 Retro Day Sept 11 Back to Present

was

that

set up Julv

Amanda

23

nckiing)

Jenn Hussey, Roost manager

pub began July 30. According to Roost manager Jenn Hussey, the pub will now feature more wood, signs and decorations, giving it more of a Alterations to the

Monday Night Football among them.

The Brick logo

will

be

the only one displayed.

Hussey, a second-year marketing student at Conestoga, said there will be notable changes when the

pub opens

“We

fall

term. will

have two

Roost staff will sport new green uniforms this fall. The pub plans to hire between 12 and 15 employees to encourage staff flexibility. “It’s important to have enough staff to cover for those students who may not be able to work because of school,” Hussey said. The Roost will be open daily from 1 1 a.m. to 1 1 p.m., unlike years past when the pub closed its doors from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Roost will remain open until a.m. for special events.

crew

Roost

Hussey

is

Movie

said.

juggling

event

special

potential

in

closer

residence,”

Hussey said. “Though it may be a walk for them, it is still closer than any other pub in the area.”

ideas,

nights and

A

“Our prices are good.

20-ounce

draft is $3.50.

That’s cheaper than

anywhere.” Jenn Hussey, Roost manager

Most Roost

prices will remain as

they are, Hussey said. “Our prices are good. ounce draft is $3.50.

A

20-

That’s

cheaper than anywhere.”

On

1

The

work

are going to

with the students

doors to students

its

enrolled in the

events are

currently

Roost will now serve two Brick draft beers.

Brick beers on tap,” Hussey said. “But we will still have other brands available in bottles.”

will

have two Brick beera,on tap, but

fun,”

we

“By September,

said

students,

feel.

“By September, we

more of a

bounce

(p^oto by

genuine pub

the fall semester approaches,

the Roost,

The Week of Welcome wraps up with a return to the present Sept. 11. The drama troop.

This year, there

air-filled

In conjunction with the deal, the

attend.

The

while playing on the

Roost changes with sponsor

He

predicted the concert will probably sell out, or at the very

flip

Sept.

54.40

concert

will

Roost

will

concert.

The

the

10,

present

in

take

place

at

the

recreation centre as part of the college’s

week of welcoming.

Student planner and guide there to make school easier _

The idea is

By Jason Gennings

their

Among

of

piles

the

students are given

papers

when they come

to register for school

will

be a

valuable tool, the student planner, said Doon Student Association president Kristin Murphy. “If

any smdent

is

having trouble,

then (they can) pull out the planner and start using it,” said Murphy.

new

Hussey. huge;

to help the students in

It’s

many

a

said environment, new school and it’s

students don’t

know

what they’re doing.

The

registration

packages sent

out by the college contain some DSA information, such as a page of the phone numbers for services offered and details about the drug plan, said

the

association,

The

the

packages sent by the

registration college, he

and

there as possible so that

goes to

all

student council does, said Jenn Hussey, vice-president of opera-

everyone

will

use

at least

to

one page.” Kristin

Murphy,

we want you

to

be

Students from different programs during registration arrive will week Aug. 24 to Aug. 28, with

one

page,”

said

“It is a great tool for all

Sanctuary,”

said

the

DSA

“Student photo ID cards are in here, our orientation packages are here, and welcome-week T-shirts

the

various

flyers,

numbers

student

responsiblities, that really key.

Murphy said Jack Fletcher, head of student services, recommends when students are the planner having trouble with their studies. “As well as being used as a daytimer,

Murphy.

much

in there

all

the

fantastic in itself,

the dates for the events.

also has

all

is

prints 5,000 copies of

Murphy. Enough

some

for

we have

of the

college, and student’s rights and responsibilities,” said Fletcher

in

has

try to put as

DSA

the expectations

Jack Fletcher,

college. “It’s a balancing act,” said

“We

you are

responsible.”

is

t

student the includes year procedures guide, said Fletcher. “Like a contract, it spells out all

You don’t have

rights unless

which

r

r

Other valuable information given beginning of the

the student calendar,” said

as possible so that everyone will

ek w e\\ o way that a

to students at the

is

for services offered at the

Time management is the most important thing when you are in

ir^

in

faculty as well.

“Rights and

and information

anybody.”

yA

for every student and

head of student services

is

done^

«

'1

not preaching.”

The

planner,

“The biggest thing we have

I

Fletcher. “It’s

the planners, said

president.

Murphy. “The student planner is a great piece of equipment for

Conestoga

College, we’re going to make it fun for you,”’ said Hussey. “We’re excited and

the

there

DSA president

tions.

‘Welcome

Murphy.

school.

new students, telling them who is part of the DSA and what the

excited.”

try to put

least

at

“Students on the day of their registration eventually end up in

contain in

said.

first-year mail-out

“It says

“We

as much

use

students.”

Murphy.

Orientation packages will be in and envelopes, see-through

students

by

registration

-

having programs on different days, said

are available here.”

Murphy.

The information and paperwork receive begins with a mail-out sent to first-year students

different

the services,

and

it

“Rights and responsibilities that really key. You don’t have rights

is

unless you are responsible.” Fletcher said he does not expect

students to go through and read everything, but they should know what is in the guide in case they

have to use some of the services, like appeals.

When new

it

college

It

the

has

study tips throughout,” said

students arrive at the

some

are

overwhelmed by

new environment and

conditions,

learning

and the guides can

help, said Fletcher.


Page 4

— SPOKE, Orientation Issue

August 1998

COMMENTARY Journalists, take caution So, you want to be a

advantage

People

journalist?

Well, then,

may

suggest

I

media have

the

power

to

we also have the power to One slip of the pen is all it takes;

create, but

a good tape recorder, a

destroy.

pen and a closed mouth. One thing you will learn, if you truly love to write for newspapers, maga-

one reason for one not to keep his or her word. But then we also face a dilemma. To tell the truth is sometimes not as easy

fast

as

that there are lines that

it

can never be

cKoas«ff ^ VQcat wx> poitu-tcon...

O'fer

seems.

We,

zine, television or radio, is

of.

in the

as Journalists,

tmth, but what

crossed.

half the truth?

Anthony Wil.son-Smith, a columnist for Maclean’s Magazine, stated in his Aug. 3 column that, “Journalism is not a profession. It has no universal code of conduct, or specific requirements. The time

we break

that

if

go out

to seek the

the truth only wants to be

Do we keep our word, or do bond of trust to report the

facts?

“Journalism

?C)LUiTjoM

not a profession.

is

has come.”

What better Job could one ask for? we have to do is go out and talk to people and then come back and tell the

has no universal code

It

of

All

public, in words,

We

what they

we

don’t save lives;

bom

and those

that die.

don’t save the

we

doing

to either destroy or help save

We We An I

come.”

what people have been it.

Anthony Wilson-Smith,

what reporters do.

report; that’s

columnist for Maclean’s Magazine

are suppo.sed to report the truth, but

what

is

The time has

requirements.

report on those

We

earth;

report on

conduct, or specific

said.

the truth?

me what

old gentleman recently asked

was taking

at school.

I

These questions may or may not arise your day as a Journalist, but they are

replied,

"Journalism.”

He suddenly had

we should always be aware of and always know the answers to. Wilson-Smith said, “Everyone in

this concerned look on and then said, “There is much power you people (Journalists) have over

questions

the world.”

Journalism would benefit

his face,

think,

comment actually made me “Wow, he’s right.”

We

who

This

are the ones

will include in

stop and

our stories and what

are the ones

who

decide

in

we

will

what order

the facts (which others have told us) will be

arranged

in

our

stories.

Alt this power we “people” have with our tiny little pens, yet there are no mles that exist to make sure this power is not taken

Rays

of It

more out of

takes a lot

there are

why is it so many

miserable people

our

in

I

cafeteria,

me

and

scene

approached the computer

to ring in her order, she asked;

“How much

an original hamburger?” The server simply responded,

is

answer, she told

me

The

woman

is it

that

of the products front of you?

final

I

decide to share

words, thank goodness,

from her were, “Well,

nity presented to her to

this Just

I

heard

sums up

It would have been easier to Just place her order and say thank you. Instead, she wasted her energy, and got herself

my

day.”

Unwanted sunshine spreading

by going through the process of thinking up what things she could say next. All for a humburger and fries.

can be

that

frustrated

you don’t know the price

when

they print out right in

you don’t know the poor service.” She made her remarks in a degrading

prices.

just

Maybe she was having a bad day, but does mean she had to share her unhappiness

as annoying as the

unexpectedly, but

tone, loud

handled herself with the professionalism that probably got her hired.

The woman waited

in line

cold beer to pour. I

it

with the unsuspecting people around her? I’m not saying that I am a walking smile, but it is very rarely I will snap at a person I

roll in

is

a

lot

don’t know.

easier to prepare yourself for the

sun than

it

is for

the rain.

prepare yourself for the sun than

I

concluded that she had been a walking wretch the entire day and I took pity on the I

others

who had

the misfortune of

coming

would be lowering

It is

a

shame she

the Scottish motto:

didn’t take the opportu-

Student

life

produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Amanda

Pickling;

News

editor; Anita Santarossa; Issues

Editor;

and

for

Happiness spreads, but so does misery. So, to the hamburger huffy and any others who thrive on being grumpy, try to live by

It

SPOKE

Editor;

is

Amanda Pickling;

Activities editor; Michael

Hilbom; Photo editor \ Production manager: Anita Santarossa; Advertising manager; Michael Hilbom

Circulation^manager; Michael Hilbom; Faculty supervisor. Jerry Prank; Faculty advisor: Bob ReidSPOKE s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

“Be happy while y’er

leevin, for y’er a lang time deid.”

the

SPOKE IS published and

it

the rain.

into contact with her.

convinced myself

Unwanted sunshine spreading can be Just as annoying as the thunder storms that roll in unexpectedly, but it is a lot easier to

and continued

stood in line beside her, choking back a few choice words that were as ready as a

to

thunder storms that

It is

enough for the entire line to hear. The server was visibly distressed, but

change the

direction of her day.

at the server.

I

burger she was inquiring about was $2.49, so I told her.

my

the

myself to her level should a thought or two with her.

the

to do nothing but complain about the size of her hamburger and how it was hardly worth eating.

“I don’t

know, but the prices are on the wall.” I quickly glanced up and saw that the

Not happy with

it,

was going to be but unfortunately it was not. that

“It is ridiculous that

it

set the

order.

and thought

did,

remark directed

I was patiently waiting in line at Harvey’s while a blonde woman in her mid-to-late 20s waited to be served.

the server

go ahead and

decided she wanted a value burger combo she rudely placed her order, which was followed by a snarly

for you.

When

coming generation of Journalists (including myself) will take action to persuade the media industry to reach a universal code of ethics soon. In the mean time, use wisely your pen of much power.

When

witnessed a display of misery in our

column. Let

agree, and hope that the

“How

Just recently,

this

excuse for doing nothing about existing problems.” With him I most certaisly

end of

that

world?

prompted

to agree on a new industry-wide standard of behavior, because there is no

I

community and our

own

media

sunshine more enjoyable than thunder storms

a person to be miserable than to be happy.

So, then,

if

institutions put aside their behavior long

enough

we

decide what facts

leave out.

We

in

is

would make every day so much

easier.

mainly funded from September

May by

to

Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and

opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).

MS


SPOKE,

Orientation Issue

— Page 5

August 1998

Local committee plans AIDS walk By Anita Santarossa

Sandy Stauffer, support co-ordinator for the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area, says the Rainbow Youth Group welcomes people aged 1 6-25 to join. (Photo by Anita Santarossa)

Many social

outlets for people

and on Dec 1 ACCKWA will be holding an open house for World AIDS Day, said Bartram. ,

The AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area (ACCKWA) plans events surrounding AIDS and HIV, said Deanna Bartram,

“A vigil, who have AIDS,

On

organization.

On

of different sexual orientation

event, called

wish

take

to

part

issue

in

discussions and/or plan activities.”

The Conestoga College commuand surrounding cities offer a variety of social outlets for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered persons, said Joan Magazine, counsellor for student services at Conestoga’s Doon campus. She said the Doon campus started a gay/lesbian club about nity

Magazine

realizes school

students,

lesbian

community

to participate

one student came

in, until

me

to

and suggested organizing a club.” The club is currently dormant, but Magazine hopes that new and returning students will be interested

with

continuing

the

a great priority to

also important to

with to

grow

the

as an

become

“Life can

with

filled

“and the club can act as both a social group and stresses,” she said,

support outlet.”

no present

is

location of the club, but

specific

Magazine

said she hopes once a group

formed a special location campus can be organized.

is

on

really

“It really is

up

to the students,”

said Magazine. “I realize students get busy with their studies, but I

willing and

happy

advisor for the group

to

if

be an

students

up

to

the

students

What you get out of something is what you put into it.” There are a variety of off campus themselves.

who support gay, bisexual and said persons, transgendered lesbian,

Magazine.

The

at Victoria

presently located on 122 Frederick

Kitchener,

Kitchener.

St. in

AIDS AIDS

Established

AIDS

Committee Kitchener

Cambridge,

1985

in

the

community-based

non-profit,

sponsors

organization

a

gay,

lesbian and bisexual youth group

Rainbow Youth,

the

Bartram.

of

and

event,”

discussion that is

group

provides

great

know

opportunities to get to

other

gay, lesbian and bisexual people of the same age group that are in the community,” said Stauffer. “Issues surrounding gay, lesbian and

bisexuality are discussed, allowing individuals to raise questions or explain problems they have. It’s a group, so they know they are not

local

raised about

$60,000

where

scale event

in total

or

artists

anyone

with

a

creative eye par-

said.

Deanna Bartram, fundraising

about

co-ordinator

$60,000 in

all

our

we

she said. year we

raised

takes place in group meetings

is

more up-

“It is a

“Last year

she

ticipates,”

Stauffer, support co-ordinator for

“The group invites youth between the ages of 16 and 25 to meet once a week for discussion and activity planning,” she said.

in

event t^es place at Kitchener City Hall, said

______ _______

annual fundraising

ACCKWA.

said

to

Saturday

last

largest

“Last

“The

in

said

“The walk

Sandy

Stauffer said

Park

Bartram.

held in total confidence.

“\^^ether the club will continue is

is

called

organizations

club.

am

she

individual.

There

“There wasn’t anything available the college for the gay and

is

it

is

become involved community in order

four years ago. at

though

said

(ACCKWA)

Waterloo and Area

those

lives

will be held afterward,”

Walk Canada, held

By Anita Santarossa

their

February, the Chairs for Charity

Sept. 27 there will be a

for

lost

she said.

fundraising co-ordinator for the

walk

memory of

in

“The decorachairs

tive

then

there

a

is

banquet

dinner

total.”

She said the event a great opportunity for people

are

auctioned off and

afterwards.”

ACCKWA

is

teams together. “Local universities, high schools and colleges usually get several teams together to participate, but the majority of people sign up individually.” The mandate of is and provide support to education for those with HIV and those affected by it, but also to encourage the prevention of to get

ACCKWA

was

recently

admitted to Ontario’s Ministry of Health permanent funding program, said Sandy Stauffer, support co-ordinator.

“This

a step in the right

is

direction,- but operation

costs

continue to rise and we haven’t had an increase in funding for the

years,”

five

last

said

Stauffer.

transmitting the disease, said

the said, she However, permanent funding program is

Stauffer.

much

This year

AIDS Awareness

Week will be held Nov. 23

to

28

better than living in fear of not getting any funding at all.

alone.”

Special needs average Counsellor says most learning disabled students have

A

average intelligence or better. Many of them are intellectually

$2.7 million

Mainland means those with an

grant, to identify

gifted

said

gifted.”

I.Q. of

1

20 or

the identification and education of special needs students. These

Mainland,

funds will be dispersed over a

too, said he

four-year period.

the

“This

above.

is

a vast improvement over

and educate students with

“Their disability is they don’t process information the way most

“These are not students

people do.”

who

is

The

Improvement

an

over

Bill

82,

says counsellor By Michael

(Photo by Michael Hilborn)

help are often dealing undiagnosed problems,” she

Hilborn

you knowing classroom, a

How

would you

feel

if

walked into you were at least as smart as everyone else, but unable to keep up with your classmates? According to special needs co-ordinator Marian Mainland, this is the problem facing up to

300 Conestoga College students every semester. Mainland, a counsellor since 1983, said many of the students who qualify as learning disabled

come

all

ondary being “It’s

the

way through

school

system

the sec-

without

properly identified.

easy to identify the people disabilities

and

with physical we’re well equipped to deal with them, but the ones who really need

with said.

“We

we

can

“We

can’t help

them

if

we

Consequently, by the time they get to high school, they often fail and teachers their tell to

counsellors

about their

special

needs. Mainland said. “They don’t want to be lumped in

with the so-called dummies.” biggest the said Mainland challenge facing the special needs co-ordinators is identifying the specific

problems

of

these

“Most of

she would like to improve on those numbers so that more students can be identified sooner. The special

needs

these people are of

staff

currently

at

Doon

consists

campus

of

counsellors and two support

three staff.

Mainland’s job will be made easier in September, thanks to a special provincial grant.

The Project

students.

special needs co-ordinator

said.

while the other 40 per cent show up over the school year. She said

challenged.

do.”

don’t

identified at the time of admission,

are

is

Learning is

Opportunities

a $2.7 million grant that

dedicated specifically towards

only nine province to

the purchase of

equipment,

such

way most people

they learn,” she

intellectually

who

the

interest in the martial arts, Mainland said is a way for

focus

Mainland said 60 per cent of the students with special needs are

how

in

notes in class. Both counsellors have

Marian Mainland,

are classified as slow learners and forced to take classes with other

children

they don’t

come up

understand

said

of

one

are

process information the

with a plan.

the

for

as

phonics software programs for computers and tape recorders for people who have problems taking

difficult to deal

assessment before

He, have

program.

specialized

disability is

problem the begins in the early grades, where children who are otherwise bright,

Mainland

failing

people have problems processing information aurally, while others information.

funding

to

receive this funding,” he said. He said some of the money

determine

with written have to do an

additional

would go towards

are

everything. Their

it

Conestoga.

at

was pleased

institutions

the exact nature of the student’s problem. For instance, some

find

Roger Mainland

first priority is to

Bill 82,” said

also a special needs

is

co-ordinator

“We

Mainland.

“These are not students who are failing everything,” Mainland said.

special needs,

or better

I.Q.

and

He

relax.

keen which him to

a

said

the

feeling of inner peace he achieves

Aikido helps him to convey the same philosophy to his through

students

— thereby helping them

to learn.

82 was a fund set up by the Bill Davis Conservative government in 1979 to address the needs Bill

students of requirements.

with

special

According

to

Mainland, the funds in that program were poorly administered and very little of them actually went to the people they were designed to help. Betty Stevenson, who ironically, was the education minister in the Davis cabinet in 1979, will administer the current program.

Mainland’s

husband,

Roger

Mainland said he takes a great from inspiration of

deal

Muhammad

Ali, a

man who is own battle

currently fighting his against a disability.

On there

the wall in Mainland’s office a quotation from the is

former heavyweight champion. “I hated the training, but I said, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the

rest

of

champion.’” “That’s what needs special

Mainland.

your I

life

as

a

try to teach the

students,”

said


— SPOKE, Orientation Issue

Page 6

DSA By Amanda

August 1998

companies

inks one-year deal with beverage

Fickling

out

prizes

and

T-shirts

Doon Student Association (DSA) events now be sponsored by Molson Canadian and Mark Anthony products, which produces Mike’s Hard Lemonade, among

Hussey,

prizes

to

one year

sponsor

vice-president

Molson will be sponsoring Doon Student Association Welcome.

Molson will donate the tent barbecue. She said this is a

said

will

DSA

not

saves

because the tent will

make

sponsorship Hussey.

money on the tent, any money from

of either companies,’’

reward

to

Hussey said Coca-Cola was also interested placing a vending machine in the Sanctuary, but was not able to because of the

activities

throughout the Week Amanda Pickling)

contract

(Photo by

but the

school

the

Beaver

cost $900.

“The

way

The sponsorship is not just for the Week of Welcome, said Hussey. Mark Anthony products and Molson products signage will go up in the

of

M&M

DSA

a great

in

DSA

the

is

Sanctuary.

barbecue will be licensed and sponsored by the two companies as well as by Meats and Weston bread company, said Hussey. for

will

“Giving out prizes

of

planned, she said.

benefit for the

has had problems Hussey thinks the encourage more people to

students and volunteers,” she said.

at least,

She said the DSA sent a proposal to the companies and they came back and told what they could offer. The two companies will have a big impact on the Week of Welcome events that are

Hussey

DSA

In the past, the

operations.

The

and

volunteer.

The companies have decided Jenn

as

students

getting volunteers, but

other alcoholic beverages.

said

for

volunteers at the events.

will

the association’s events for

such

posters

Foods

The movie night, which will be held outside the recreation centre, will also be a licensed event.

policy, said Hussey.

to students,” she said.

“Mark Anthony products will be sold, and we will have Molson on tap,” she said. Hussey said there hasn’t been anyone

Those students who are of age will get bands and will be able to drink, while those who don’t have bands won’t be served alco-

opposed

reacting negatively to the sponsorship of alcohol producers.

holic beverages, she said.

vending machine

“We

said

are

drunkenness

not

and

promoting drinking,

but

students obviously drink,” she said.

At most events

The bar

be “ID’ing”

“Coke was concerned with In

movie

at the

OFF CAMPUS

past

the

the availability

cafeteria

income for the DSA, so

DSA

the

in

did

the

has in

not

the

get

a

Sanctuary, said

Hussey.

“We will

the

cafeteria,

night, said Hussey.

She said the two companies

with

Carpet

food services.

there will be a wristband

staff will

has

Red

and

be giving

are keeping our friendship alive,” she

said.

Ball builds

life skills,

coach says

softball By Anita Santarossa

have

be a full-time student, as meet the academic standards throughout the term. to

well

Playing softball won’t get you a job but to be successful you have

be able to plan your life and have a good attitude, said the head coach of Conestoga College’s

“If

as

you can’t pass you can’t Broome.

to

play,” said

women’s varsity softball team. Yvonne Broome said she runs the team like she would run a

can be stressful enough aside from the dozen other things going on in students’ lives, but part of being part of the team deals with these

family.

stresses.

“We’re

all

here to help each other

out,” she said.

“We

to

try

resources, and

all

our

we work

well

utilize if

together we’ll be successful, win or lose.”

Broome and her husband have been coaching the team for the past four years, and both have

She said she

realizes that school

“We have to travel several times throughout the season, but the girls seem to get their work done on the bus trips, and we even rent out a study room when at our away games. We have even had students write

and

exams while my husband

acted as proctors.” Students learn not only about the I

extensive credentials in the sport

of softball.

She

said

women’s

she

has

provincial

coached “If

ball

for 16 years, both she and her husband are Level 3 national certified

coaches, and she played on the Canadian National Team that won the World Championship in 1972.

The

college

competitive, but

CambridU

Am

Wings Stanley Cup champions, autographs a progra Jamieson (left) and his brother Josh at Ortario Sporte

(Photo by Michael Hilboi

Change

Now

is

a non-

Youth resource Centre in Guelph. profit

Volunteers needed.

you

are

please

call:

If

interested

(519) 822-9034

SPOKE Classified Ads are

$10

for every 25

words.

Student fee is $5 for every 25 words.

Contact

the

manager at: 748-5366

Ad

.season

lasts

can’t play.”

Yvonne Broome, coach of Conestoga’s women’s varsity softball

is

team

said she

encourages anyone with any background and skills to join. “We can teach you the skills to play, but your character is what has to be determined to want to learn.”

The

Classifieds

league

Broome

you can’t pass, you

for only

two

months, said Broome, but in that two months they have found that the girls can come a long way. “We learn from ourselves, each other and by observing other teams for strategies,” said the

game of softball but they also learn how to organize therpselves, work as a team and build character, said

Broome.

“Many girls haye used me as a reference for job interviews upon graduation,” she said. “Knowing how

to

work with

team

a

and

organizing your life to include extracurricular activities are two

softball coach.

important

Last year’s team had only two veterans, with the rest being

employers consider when hiring.” The team practises every day for

rookies,

she

said,

and

they

managed to win the bronze medal. “The key to the success of the team”, said Broome, “is that we approach the game as not just

game

life skills,

skills.”

two-month

begins Sept.

Tryouts

is

that

school comes first, because without an education you cannot succeed.

team you

1

prospective

season

which Broome. Aug. 31, but

2, said

begin

Broome

said they usually find that people cut themselves, and find

out on their

She said her philosophy

In order to join the

the

factors

own whether

they will

be able to commit or not. “If you’re willing to stick,

we

have a place for you,” she said. “We’re here for the kids and to promote the game of softball.”


SPOKE,

August 1998

Orientation Issue

— Page 7

Ex-inspector arrives as security supervisor by Jason Gennings

supervisor

security

compared

duties

to the job description

issues.

He admits most officers don’t have such a varied career. His other involvements included being captain of the police diving team, and a hostage negotiator.

There is a new sheriff in this here town, and Conestoga College will have to get used to our new security supervisor, Allan Hunter. Hunter, 52, has been hired to replace former supervisor Bob Gilberds, who retired at the end of

Milner said he would like Hunter “on stream” with the college before they address the changes coming. “We feel we have selected a very competent individual who will

last year.

bring a great deal to the college,”

things with in the police services,”

said Milner.

said Hunter.

Gilberds to get

Drawing on a 32-year-old career as

regional

a

filled.

The

police

skills

Hunter will bring

to

“I think it was opportunities, which were given to me, and desire on my part to do different

In

future

his

college.

the

at

he hopes that the

Hunter stresses that although he has taken a retirement package from the police, he did not come to Conestoga College to

Conestoga include more than the

Hunter

average police career.

security

office

involved

with

with the Waterloo police force, to

particularly the law

retire.

begin his 32-year career. His career includes time as a

program. “One of the first things I’m going to be looking at is determining

officer.

At 20 years of age he

He has sold his beloved sailboat Pogo, named after a beagle, and postponed plans to relocate up

detective, as a staff sergeant for

uniforms

Cambridge,

in

a

as

assignments officer dealing with major crimes, and as a policy management employee. Hunter also spent time in charge of internal audits, and research and special

north.

my

hobbies were just distractions from work,” said Hunter, a long-time KitchenerWaterloo resident. “On their own I was no longer enjoying them.” Hunter said he needed to keep working, and so Aug. 4 he returned to the working world about 80 after beating out “I

started

found

for

applicants

position

the

planning.

commander, and was soon promoted to the rank of inspector. Hunter said he was part of the team that created the policing standards branch, which is a

as

Barry

manager

Milner,

resources,

physical

said

would be some changes

combination of internal affairs, public complaints, the freedom of information department, and legal

of there

in

the

College

become

will

the

where security is scheme of things

students,

and security

in the greater

Conestoga

at

we make any

before

decisions,” said Hunter.

Hunter the

is

new

know

planning to speak to

students as they arrive to

and he wants them

register,

Later, he served as a detective

security supervisor.

said,

to

that security is a resource

available to them.

In the future, he said, he

may

law program as well, but no plans have been made

like to teach in the

in that direction.

meantime he

In the for

new

is

“looking

challenges” at Conestoga

Allan Hunter, the

College.

new

security supervisor,

Conestoga College on Aug.4.

began

his

DSA

OSAP applications up

for

By Michael Hilborn

seeks students class, board reps

the bursary pot and of that cent, the college

By Melanie Spencer

class

up during

There are many benefits to joining the board or becoming

Week of Welcome With quickly approaching, the Doon the

Student Association

(DSA)

is

student involvement in the board of

trying

to

increase

and

directors representatives.

A

table will be set

The number of students applying government funding has increased compared to this time

board was limited, said Hussey. This year, the constitution has been changed to allow an unlimited number of students to join the board, but only two members for each program in the various schools at the college will be allowed to vote.

two weeks of activities with posters, banners and pamphlets, to get more people involved,

the

said Jenn Hussey, vice-president the with operations of association.

a

representative,

class

last year,

after the meeting, the students

receive pizza and a pop, she

Hussey said prizes are also given away, like T-shirts and

of directors

Twice a semester, an appreciation night is held to thank both board of directors and class

overspending or going

representatives for their help,

on a shopping spree,”

she said.

At the end of Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operations

the

members

the year, all of

receive letters of for

recommendation

their

Hussey student group will also try to visit classrooms to make sure everyone is aware of what the

board and representatives do, she said.

governs

the

reflecting

the

board

The

association,

the

said

student

association is also trying to get more people involved as class

who

representatives,

act

as

between the students and the association.

liaisons

she said.

she said.

The

association is accountable

for the purchases it makes, like the new color photocopier, she

“As

They

students,” she said, “we’re

spending students’ money.” In previous years, the number of students

who

could

sit

on

the

as

they

for any contract.

applications on the Web.”

amount of money the bursaries was

Carol Walsh, financial aid

$350,000 lasryear--and there should be more than that this year. She said she could not say exactwill be ly how much more money

Until this year, the student loan

said the

available until the final registration

the bursaries fees,

ajte

available

the is

CIBC is the said Kevins currently involved in educational financing only in Ontario. Previously, the bank also held the student loans in Manitoba and Nova Scotia, buThas since backed out of those provinces. The Royal Bank is now carrying the student loan programs there, he said. Kevins refused to discuss the stating of negotiations, state merely that it was “a bit of a

If

applications for these.

in

because

tied to tuition

which have increased by 10

per cent over last year, she said. Under current legislation, 30 per cent of the revenue from tuition fee increases must be dedicated to

said

regardless

Hussey

said.

can become representatives, said Hussey. “We encourage at least two per

who

class, in case

up,” she said.

one can’t show

the

takes over the loans, students will have to fill out a new set of papers in order to maintain their funding,

was the case in Manitoba and Kova Scotia, he said.

as

program was financed and administered by the Canadian Imperial

Bank of Commerce,

headquar-

London, Ont. vice CIBC to According president John Kevins, that may change over the next few months.

tered in

Kevins,

who

financial

and

is

in

charge

of

administrative

operations, said the bank is in the process of negotiating with the

result of concerns

|

Kevins said there

is

^Iso

the

question of loan guarantees to be settled with the federal government before the bank can decide

on whether or not to continue with the student loan program. He said the CIBC currently has 700,000 outstanding student loans on its books, but was unable to give an exact dollar figure on the amount.

from students, employees and

visitors,

smoke-free: the following entrances are designated

-

Doors #1 and #5, Doon Main Building main entrance to E.C.E.

-

main entrance

-

Like the board of directors, there is no limit to the number

of

another financial institution

ATTENTION SMOKERS! As

contract

outcome, however, students would funding, still be able to access the lender. the not is CIBC if even

/Can enter their

but there have not yet been any

numbers are in. The increase

federal the

conditions.

He

“This year, the students

saries in place for students who can demonstrate a financial need,

in

at

touchy issue.”

on the Web.”

said there are also bur-

available

over

communicate

also

information about events at their bi-weekly meetings, to be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays,

of people

said.

Walsh

bid,

governments

to

concerns and views of students,

Hussey.

would

who

and

provincial

Class representatives provide

an opportunity for students

voice any questions or concerns

“The board of directors stops us from overspending or going on a shopping spree,” said

tered banks,

time frame is faster,” she said. “This year, the students can enter

funding for bursaries

efforts, she said.

The

any significance in those numbers. “It could be that the processing

Walsh

hats.

stops us from

tics,

number of applications was 200 more than th^^ameTime last year, but there was not necessarily

their applications

to last year’s statis-

there were 4,500 full-time students enrolled at Conestoga as well as 31,000 part-time and “distance-education” students. government the Although oversees the student loan program, the rhoney comes from the char-

according to Conestoga’s

31 , the

Hussey. The board meets once a month for about one-half hour and

per cent for administrative

According

financial aid administrator. Carol Walsh said that as of July

said

30 per

allowed to take

costs.

for

said.

‘The board

five

fs

work

(Photo by Jason Gennings)

to Student/Client Services Building

from smoking at these entrances. Please watch for the signs and refrain locations on campus. You may use any of the many other outdoor


August 1998

-^eek Of

iVelcome 9^

of Events

Week Of >Nelcome Schedule Travel with us as

*

we warp through

time

Monday, August 31 Free MeeiicR 11:30 am, The Sanctuary Featuring The Devil's Advocates, as seen on speakers corner.

FREE FOUR ^ARTT Tuesday, September 11:00 am - 3:00 pm. Outside by the Pond Free concert featuring Derivation and Planet Smashers. Free BBQ burgers. Wear your WOW t-shirt today! Sponsored by MolsonI Wednesday, Septembbr 2 10:30 am - 2:30 pm, The Sanctuary your hand with lady luck at the casino games. Black Jack, poker, crown and anchor, and the horse races are just some Of the of chance. Don't miss your chance to win great prizes! Try

Thursday, September 3 ^VfROOR 9:00 pm. Recreation Centre

&

^^VIE

games

f

this movie is outside! summer's blockbuster hits. Tickets only $3 for students $6 for non-students. Free 600 ml of coke with admission. After the movie stay around for a camp out.

Bring your lawnchairs

Featuring

one

blankets

-

off this

September 4 ^VIE 11:30 am The Sanctuary Free movie what else can we say. Friday,

W THE

,

-

Tuesday, September 8 4%WE/94^ 10:30 am 2:30 pm. Outside by the Pond Run through, over and around a series of hilarious obstacles. Take the challenge or challenge a

8:00 pm An all ages prizes

-

friend.

feilE/TeC^I NiCHT event, VIP

don't miss

access

to

lee/E CffARCE leviR#

Conestoga

students, great

door

this!

Wednesday, September 9 R#yCHIC ||E4lRIHC# 11:30 am - 1:30 pm. The Sanctuary A

Find out

'

what the

future has

Thursday, September 10 8:00 pm. Recreation Centre Featuring 54-40. at the

DSA

All

ages

in

store for you!

€MCERT

event. Ticket information available

Office.

^

September 1 1 4llOIV41ft C0UP 1:30 pm tee off, Doon Valley Golf Course

Friday,

$25 entry fee/person. Register by

Tues, Sept. 8 at the

DSA Office.

ll WWtfipjHVpi:

™ ^


SPOKE,

Orientation Issue

wW

is

the

Doon Student Association The Doon Student Association provides services and organizes activities for the students at the Doon Campus. The DSA represents the voice of the students to College Administration

on

and education. All full-time students at the Doon Campus are members of the Doon Student Association.

How is

the

Funded?

DSA

DSA

MW M'

Mission

The DSA is funded through a compulsory student activity fee of $54.50 paid by all full-time students of Doon Campus. The fee collected by the College on behalf of the DSA.

The DSA is committed to addressing the issues that concern membership, while providing opportunities for social and educational advancement.

Statement

>

issues affecting policy

its

Meet the DSA Executive Committee

Gerry Cleaves, Student Affairs

VP

Tara Llanes, Education Co-ordinator Patty Stokes, Entertainment Manager

Jenn Hussey,

VP

Kristin

is

Operations

Murphy,

Jessica Umlandt, Public Relations

President

Manager

k..

Ellen

Promotions Assistant

^ Karla Hebden,

Menage,

Promotions Assistant

Photo not available

Vicky Lichty,

Photo not Bryan Bambrick, Promotions Assistant

available

Becky Boertien, Director of Student Life

Contact the

DSA for more information on

Sharon Van Hemmen,

•i

Administrative

Assistant

Accountant

DSA services, activities, and opportunities to voltmteer

Telephone: 51 9-748-51 31

Fax: 51 9-748-6727

e-mail:

listen@doonsa.com

information hotline: 51 9-748-5220 ext.8DSA

WWW:

www.doonsa.com '

nmm

t-rci


and Recreation

Athletics

Recreation Centre Facilities Available oval/running track

Horseshoe

VolleybailVBasketball Courts

Badminton courts

Fitness

Double Gymnasium

Indoor running area

Lighted outdoor tennis courts

Soccer pitch

400m outdoor speedskating

American-size squash courts

Condor Roost Licensed

Two

Adult Leagues Shiftworker’s

awareness and your

Hockey League

be scheduled based on availability of times that teams can play. Games will run Monday, Tuesday and Thursday

Games

will

from October 1998 to

April

1999 from 8

pits

a.m.

tion.

beginning October 17 for eight weeks

Dates: 2 days, October 17 and 18

Cost: $80

be arranged with co-ordinator

Rollerblading

Workshop Adults

-

Learn the Safe

Join our certified instructor as he offers an

workshop

’and Women Games will be scheduled

Men

on the hour with

be posted and printed for all teams. All teams are welcome, but registration will be limited in each division. games will be held Women’s League

Men’s League

be

outfitted with

CSA approved

a

ipants to supply their

will

to 11 p.m.

runs from October 1998

to

participants are required

All

hand, elbow and knee pads.

O.S.A referees assigned to all games, plus on site convener supervision. Weekly stats

on Tuesdays from 7

emphasized.

The league

(1st division)

be held on Thursdays from 7

— games

The league runs from October 1998

helmet,

We ask partic-

own equipment.

recreation centre at 7 p.m.

Men’s league (2nd division) - games will be held on Mondays from 7 to 11 p.m. The league runs from October 1998 to April

$250 deposit required

with registration

Men’s 35+ Soccer League (New Division)

-

games

from 7 to

11

p.m.

will

be held on Fridays

The league runs from

Adult Powerskating- Beginners Do you want to improve your skating skills for the

upcoming season? Join us

some pre-season

for this

conditioning to

Dates: Sundays from 2 to 3 p.m.

for

3

some prb-season

for this

conditioning to

help develop balance, power, speed and

for

3

it

travels in the

be day

You

will

trips or

learn

how

read and interpret topographical maps, minology, grid and magnetic bearings,

magnetic declination and resections. Then

we will spend a day in the field putting our new skills to the test. Students will receive their own topographical map with case, and be available. Students are

Cost: $64.20

expected to provide appropriate clothing

No

previous experience

is

is

an introduction

is

required, but

to travelling respon-

Students

will

learn

practices,

finding, conservation

and proper safety precautions.

beautiful Kolapore

new

human waste

spend a day

skills. All

hiking

in

,

Cost: $171.15

Yoga

for

Beginners

Join our certified instructor as he intro-

duces you

to

Yoga. The program

is

open

men and women of all ages. will teach you how to relieve stress through various It

techniques and methods of relaxation.

the

Dates: Saturdays

be

October 17 from 9

will

course location.

time to be arranged with co-ordinator

Uplands practicing our

technical equipment

to

Dates: 2 days October 31 and November 1

an asset.

stoves, water treatment,

will

and transportation

Introduction to Hiking

to

ter-

compasses

management, route

you

anyone who

weeks beginning Sept. 13

the gentle, relaxing form of Tai Chi.

Tai Chi will help

for

is

multi-day excursions.

one, for

and

Date: September 19, time to be arranged

This course

upcoming season? Join us

own

lunches.

Adult Powerskating-Intermediate Do you want to improve your skating skills

We will then

and meditation,

transportation, appropriate clothing

out-of-doors, whether

for the

their

Wilderness Navigation

Sept. 13

Join our instructor as he introduces you to

cise

will

Cost: $64.20

tion,

form of oriental exer-

ice

Cost: $96.25

the basics of clothing and footwear selec-

this gentle

moder-

to build

agility

sibly in the backcountry.

Through

to

more advanced rock climbing skills. All technical and

upon which

with co-ordinator

This

Beginners

and top-roped climbing on easy

help develop balance, power, speed and

$250 deposit required

Tai Chi for

includes techniques for belaying, rappelling

be supplied. Students are expected to provide

wilderness camping

Adult Programs

understand progression. Instruction

safety gear

November 1998-April 1999. Cost: $750 per team (GST included) with registration

logical, easy-to-

Cost: $20

Dates: Sundays from 3 to 4 p.m.

Cost: $800 per team (GST included)

a

in

and

agility.

1999.

technical rock climbing

from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

weeks beginning

The league meeting will take place Monday September 21. at the Conestoga College

World

vides a solid foundation of understanding

(1

to April

1999.

Verticle

ate rock. This introduction to climbing pro-

will

to 11 p.m.

Cost: $171.1$

day course) Sundays, September 12. October 7 and November 7 Dates:

one, for

to April 1999.

time to

This course presents the fundamentals of

and

to beginner

intermediate levels of rollerblading. Safety is

-

loca-

Introduction to the

Way

Cost: $1000 per team (GST included)

Indoor Soccer Leagues for

and from the course

Dates: Saturdays from 10:30 to 11:50 a.m.

introductory

with registration

diamonds

treadmills

transportation to

overall fitness level.

recreation centre at 9 a.m.

$250 deposit required

Softball

gym and Classroom

to

The league meeting will take place Mon., Oct. 5 at the Conestoga College 11

Sports Bar

Olympic-size ice arena

supplied. Students are expected to provide

Cost: $80

for

8 weeks beginning

to 10:20 a.m.

to


0 August 1998

Athletics

and Recreation

Varsity Tryouts

Varsity Home

Softball Coaches Brian and Yvonne Broome August 31, 1998 4:30 p.m. Diamond #1

Women’s Soccer

Women’s Softball

Conestoga

September

September

November

Thursday, Sept. 10

Saturday, Sept. 12

Saturday, Nov. 7

4 p.m.

11

Humber

Men’s and Women’s Outdoor Soccer Coach Geoff Johnstone August 31 - September 3 3:30 p.m. for Goalies 4:30 p.m. Everyone

Game Schedules

vs.

Conestoga

(Exhibition

a.m.

3 p.m.

Mohawk vs.

Carleton vs.

Conestoga

Conestoga

Game)

Game) Wednesday, Sept. 16

Tuesday, Sept. 29

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

Durham

Fanshawe

vs.

Wednesday, Nov. 25 vs.

7:30

Conestoga

Humber

Conestoga

Main Field

Coach Ken L. Galerno September 8 to 1 5 p.m. Recreation Centre Arena

Conestoga

October

5 p.m.

December

Saturday, Oct. 3

Canadore vs. Conestoga

Saturday, Dec. 5

3 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 26

Cambrian vs. Conestoga

1

p.m.

St. Clair vs.

Conestoga

11

Thursday, Oct. 8

JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! work? There are many part-time employment opportunities within the Conestoga College Athletics and Recreation Department. Below is a list of part-time positions available for the 1998-1999 academic Looking

for

year. For

any

more information

or to apply for

4:30 p.m.

Lambton vs. Conestoga

October

Fleming vs.

Thursday, Oct. 8 5 p.m.

Conestoga

Seneca vs. Conestoga

Friday Jan. 29

Men’s Soccer September Thursday, Sept. 10

Humber

Saturday, Oct. 17

vs.

Game)

(Exhibition

the operation of the intramural

programs!

and var-

S.A.C. members will have the opportunity to develop leadership, presentation and people skills plus meet all kinds of peosity athletic

In turn,

you think you want to be part of S.A.C. please contact Marlene Ford at 748-3512 ext.452. ple.

If

1

p.m.

February Wednesday, Feb. 17 7:30 p.m

Loyalist vs.

Conestoga Tuesday, Sept. 22 5 p.m.

Fanshawe

vs.

Conestoga

Seneca vs. Conestoga

Men’s Hockey September Sunday, Sept. 13

Friday, Feb. 19

5 p.m.

7:30 p.m. Sault vs.

Saturday, Oct. 3

Dutchmen vs. Conestoga

3 p.m.

(Exhibition

October

with a variety of functions with

7:30 p.m. Boreal vs. Conestoga

Conestoga

letic staff

January Wednesday, Jan. 13 7:30 p.m

5:30

Recreation Centre at 748-3512.

S.A.C. (Student Athletic Council) The Conestoga College Athletics and Recreation department is looking for a few good men and women to become part of S.A.C. for the 1998-1999 athletic season. All positions are for one year. The purpose of S.A.C. is to assist ath-

a.m.

Canadore vs. Conestoga

of the positions, please contact the

^Scorekeepers ^Timekeepers ^Varsity Team Managers ^Cllff the Condor ^Hockey Game Announcer ^Videographer (demo tape required)

vs.

25

Friday, Sept.

Men’s Hockey

(Exhibition

Game)

St. Clair vs.

Conestoga

Friday, Sept.

Oct. 7

Wilfrid Laurier vs.

4:30 p.m.

Conestoga

Lambton vs. Conestoga

(Exhibition

and Saturday October 31

Game)

(O.C.A.A.)

Championship

Championship

Wednesday March 17

Saturday, Oct. 17

2 p.m. Boreal vs. Conestoga

Ontario Colleges Athletic Association

Friday March 5 and

(O.C.A.A.)

October Friday October 30

March Saturday March 6 Ontario Colleges Athletic Association

25

7:30 p.m.

Wednesday,

Conestoga

to

Saturday

March 20 Canadian Colleges

Wednesday, 7:30

Seneca

Oct.

28

Athletic Association (C.C.A.A.)

vs.

Championship


Page 12

— SPOKE, Orientation Issue

August 1998

Former students

strive to strike

rich with sio pitch

it

Students have also purchased

make a

land to

He

said 50 acres of the land, near

made

Arthur, Ont., will be

“We

intend to build playgrounds

park near town of Arthur

DeSousa.

for kids as well,” said

“The main purpose of

ball

into a

ball park.

the park

is

to create a friendly, fun, family

getaway for weekends.” Referring to the business end of

DeSousa and

things,

Schill said

they are trying to promote having

fun while making money.

By Anita Santarossa

“We Two former Conestoga

Clinton

DeSousa

tournament held

and Jim Schill are the head conveners of the Labatt Slo Pitch (Photo by Anita Conestoga College’s Doon campus Aug. 1 -2.

(left)

at

Qualifiers Santarossa)

College

students have invested in the Quirke Slo Pitch Organization, which held a recreational slo pitch tournament at Conestoga College’s Doon campus Aug. 1-2. Jim Schill, a former electrical engineering student, and Clinton DeSousa, a former business administration and accounting student, are two of 10 shareholders in the business.

“I didn’t like school much, so I decided to get into something I do

sports and business,” said

like,

this a

goal

to

is

said

early,”

retire

DeSousa with a smile. Quirke Slo The

Pitch

Organization holds three slo pitch tournaments a year, said Schill,

and the Aug. 1 weekend’s tournament began two years ago. “We managed to get 1 1 teams participating this year, which is 23 down from actually teams we had last year,” said Schill.

The Civic Holiday tournament will

continue

be

to

held

Conestoga College, while Quirke will organizing other be tournaments once The Ranch

project.

Burlington and shareholders)

(the

pur-

project

is

completed, said Schill.

The tournament has attracted teams from as far away as St.

Catharines, but

the majority of the teams are

from

chased the land two years ago, and

the Kitchener- Waterloo area, said

we hope

Schill.

make

to

into a

it

camp-

ground/ball park, so people from

town

of

out

have

a

convenient place to stay when they play said in tournaments,” currently has no ball diamonds, but it has two camp

The

sites,

“The winning team receives a $250 cash prize along with sports bags and becomes a qualifier for the Labatt Provincial Tournament,”

he

DeSousa. site

a general

hall,

two ponds and

a creek, said DeSousa.

said.

The tournament

is

sponsored by

Labatt. All teams are guaranteed three

games and cash

prizes

go the

top three teams, said Schill.

Survey camp prepares students for work By Anita Santarossa ..if

you are away from home for the

first

better perspective of

Immediate problem solving and practical experience are two things third-year civil engineer-

ing ...if

you are anticipating academic problems?

students

you are not sure your previous study habits work for you in College?

...if

camp

Forest, Ont., said Gerry

at

Pike Lake in

engineering

civil

Conestoga College’s Doon campus.

The

at

camp

is

part

of

the

three-year civil engineering program, and was scheduled this year between Aug. 17 and

?

24, said Nakluski.

“We go

Don't wait Don't hesitate.

the

at

survey

instructor

will

you have questions, concerns about anything

acquire

Mount

Nakluski, ..if

We are here to help you succeed.

out of town because

it

away from commitments at home like family and friends, and allows them to focus strictly on the takes the students

other

See a Counsellor in Student

Drop call

in to

Room 2B02 Student

Services

The course

your campus

FREE AND CONFIDENTIAL

to

Doon Campus

us at 748-5220 Ext. 360 or 337.

or

80 hours

course,

with

projects

to

some extensive complete,”

said

Nakluski.

A lot of preparation work goes into this course, said Nakluski.

“The camp

is

an integral part

of the course, where students find out what kind of materials

and equipment they will need, as well as being able to tackle problems immediately rather than waiting for the end of the term.”

The survey camp has always civil

engineer-

ing course, said Nakluski, and

more time to complete projects than regular classes, he said. Regular school-year courses don’t allow enough time to complete certain tasks that would be expected in the work force, he said.

for the past 20 years it has been held at Pike Lake. Prior to that,

“Field

work

in other courses is

Student Services OfficeAVaterloo

very segmented, and

Student Services

period

Campus Ext. 224. Office/Guelph Campus 824-9390

doing calculations for submissions due each morning. “It is actually a very intense

in total,

is

giving students

!

work is done during the and evenings are spent

Field day,

been a part of the

course.”

Services at

what

expect.”

time

and feeling lonely?

at

DeSousa. Both Schill and DeSousa said they enjoy running tournaments, and their new land purchase, called The Ranch, in Conn, Ont., will keep them busy with their future

“We

Harry Jaipersaud of the Red Devil co-ed team makes it to first base in a semi-final game of the Labatt Slo Pifeh Qualifiers tournament at Conestoga’s Doon campus Aug. 2. (Photo by Anita Santarossa)

make

are hoping to

full-time career, and our ultimate

many only

allow five hours per week over a of 16 weeks,” said Nakluski. “The survey

camp

is

up to mirror that of the real working world, so students get a set

it was held at various places such as Grand Bend and the

Muskoka

area.

Students live in the 10-unit motel and farmhouse with several dorms, said Nakluski.

Nakluski has been the only who has regularly gone to the camp with the class. “Normally, two instructors go up, but I’ve been the only faculty member that has repeatedly gone over many years.” instructor


SPOKE,

— Page 13

August 1998

Orietation Issue

CAMBRIDGE CAMPUS

STRATFORD CAMPUS

Welcome New and Returning Students

Welcome New and Returning Students

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS!

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS!

r WELCOME WATERLOO CAMPUS STUDENTS

We at

SPOKE

Employment

Training

Readiness

English Language Studies

Health Office Operations

Welcome

Microcomputer Software

Certificate

Personal Support Worker

all

new and

returning

students, faculty

Continuing Education

Food and Beverage Management-Year

and

1

staff

RETURNING STUDENTS Food and Beverage Management-Year 2 cACC

tl»e

best

^o/t

a successJuC

Employment

yca/t!

Training

Readiness

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS

Message from the President elcome

the

to

W: The

1998-99

enviable

academic year.

employment.

of a

start

new

year

is

always a time of expectation and high hopes.

year proves

It is

to

my wish

that his

be a most successful

and enjoyable one for you. Conestoga Ontario’s

premier

community

attract strong

highly skilled students,

and

we have

excellent relations with our local

President John

I

W.

Tibbits

businesses

and industries, we have

attractive

and

and

--

efficient facilities,

most important

record

of

Your success here

obtaining

is

the first

--

our

goes beyond the classroom and

what you learn about

laboratory;

yourself

and

valuable.

Whether your involve-

others

step to a rewarding future for you

ment

and

student government,

the community,

look to you for

skills

which

and

will

leader-

ship.

rapidly becoming

is

We

college.

graduates have an outstanding and

1

is in athletics,

activities,

encourage you

intelligence

to

apply your

and energy

to

get the

most from your Conestoga education, to take full

advantage of the

opportunities you have here. 1 also

encourage you

active, contributing

to

member of the

Conestoga community.

yourself,

Learning

when

also

peer tutoring, clubs

and

recreational

you

give

of

you learn and grow, and

gain important

skills in

communi-

cations,

teamwork, creativity and

problem

solving.

I

be an

or

associations

is

wish you the best for the com-

ing year.

John W.

Tibbits

Conestoga College President


.

Page 14

— SPOKE, Orientation Issue

August 1998

r

1

Speak your mind

I

ATTENTION STUDENTS DSA Prescription Drug Plan

in

I

SPOKE

I I

Send your

letters to the editor to: I

Opt Out Deadline Friday, September 11, 1998 Family Opt Friday,

In

11,

I

Room 4B15

I I

L

Deadline

September

Conestoga College’s Doon campus

FAX: 748-5971

I

E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca

I

j

1998

No Extensions qON

%

Questions? See us at the DSA Office or Caii 748-5131

&

o

COLOUR PHOTOCOPyiNO

hO'

9(

KANNINQ

Need a Ride?

Kitchener Transit

These services are now available at the

student Bus Pass Sale Doom

Cannp>LJS TMursdaV- S^p>t^nnloor

1

FridaVx Sop>tonnd^r

1

1

DSA Office.

Nominal Fee applies.

Peer Services SupporM by Doon StudwtAnodsHon

O

WodnosdaVx O onn - 2 jp>nn, Dailv Door #3 Fov^r

1

<5

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A TUTOR?

.

.

1

Unlimited Travel

$164 for 4 month pass, plus $5 for photo ID card. Questions? Call Kitchener Transit at 741-2525

ENTHUSIASM

A DESIRE TO HELP YOUR PEERS

80% OR BETTER IN THE COURSES YOU ARE INTERESTED IN TUTORING

STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS

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SPOKE,

Orientation Issue

August 1998

and

Victorious Verve has vim, vigor Ned Bekavac

from

Time,

Hymns, It’s

wonder

a

this

show ever got

The Verve’s troubled North American tour

lation the this

Phoenix Plaza Amphitheatre

Ashcroft yelled.

band was on the verge of break,

withdrawal left Ashcroft as the band’s sole vocalist and left him strapped

time for good.

The weeks leading

to the Verve’s first-ever

North American arena tour were not easy. Shows in Chicago, Pontiac and New York were downscaled due to poor ticket sales; their scheduled gig at the Molson Centre in Montreal was cancelled altogether. When opening act Massive Attack removed itself from the tour and Verve guitarist Nick McCabe pulled out because of tour-related stress, one could easily have forgiven the UK quintet for canceling the entire North American leg of the tour. Yet on this night, Richard Ashcroft

to

the

guitar

much of the

believed

for

those

evening.

Peter Salisbury,

song

“This

With a booming rhythm section of Simon Jones and

1

997 release Urban Hymns,

including the sombre Drugs Don’t

in

who

Work and

Sonnet,the gorgeous Velvet Morning, and

its

Lucky Man. Though he has been said to be snide and arrogant, Ashcroft owned the stage with his latest single.

is for all

of

who

those

us from the

start,

not

are here because of

Richard Ashcroft, vocalist and lead guitarist for Verve

the

encore.

predictably, left

not those

the

start,

who

are here because

Ashcroft said as he introduced On

Your

Own,

1995’s

A

from Northern of

the

quickly became the Richard Ashcroft Show. While other singers look as though they

smaller stage and the fact that much of the concert took place before dusk, the Verve

are but going through the motions, Ashcroft

was void of the enormous light and screen show that overwhelmed the Copps Coliseum crowd in Hamilton just two days later.

sang like a

man who

in love with his

The band churned out 10

sounds of the lovely Space and

tracks

work.

from

its

So

“This song is for all of those who believed in us from

Because

this

hypnotic set, the band tore through the rollicking Come On as the audience chanted its romping chorus. Ashcroft returned for two acoustic tracks. its

enthusiasm.

Soul.

background,

didn’t matter.

it

Sister and See You in the Next One (Have a Good Time), to open the band’s

cial,”

who

Somehow, To close

vitaiity

fist-pumping

of the Nike commer-

the Nike commercial.”

preferred to stay in

somehow single-handedly beat the odds. Though the band hit the stage with little fanfare, the

multi-platinum

McCabe’s

Mich., on July 29 amidst specu-

in Pontiac,

breakthrough Urban through the

beautifully

outdoor venue. “I know we’ve had some trouble lately, but we’re going to do our f ing best!”

off the

ground. rolled into the

their

rippled

— Page 15

Though

Symphoney,

its

the

Verve,

biggest

far

hit. Bitter

knew of

for last, Ashcroft

too

Sweet the

trick.

“This

is

America, we have

to play this

song,” he said.

What followed was

a 10-minute swirling

epic that had Ashcroft improvising and

way through one

strutting his

biggest

hits.

The band

left the

of 1997’s

stage beating

the odds.

As they said their good-byes, you couldn't help but get the feeling that the band was going to

Shame,

call

it

quits.

too.

For during 90 solid minutes on

this night,

they put pure, passionate, gimmick-free

music back on the map.

Tea Party a rockin’ picnic By Melanie Spencer Something always seems to go wrong when a concert with more than two bands is planned for London, Ont. It usually involves one band not being able to perform at the last minute. The Tea Party concert on July 30 at the Western Fair Grandstand

was no exception. Shortly before the show began, an announcement was made informing concert goers that EMI recording artists. Econoline Crush, would be unable to attend, as they were stuck in St. Louis. Many people sitting around me said they

Jeff

Burrows

opening

Tea

Party.

wished it had been the act, Joy Drop, who released their debut album the day before, who had been a no-show. Joy Drop played far too long to people who were being merely polite.

An

occasional clap pierced

an apology to

an opportunity for the

men

Party,

who were

treated.

play an extended

set.

they didn’t disappoint their

Red.

between words

Econoline Crush, the majority in

touring in

support of 1997’s Transmission, to

The Canadian rockers singer and and keyboardist Stuart Chatwood and drummer Jeff Burrows played music from their independent album and three major-label releases for almost two hours. guitarist Jeff Martin, bassist

Martin

of

(Photo by Joseph Cultice)

this as

fans.

While a few fans in attendance may have been mildly disappointed by the absence of

and Stuart Chatwood,

saw Tea

Canadian rockers Treble Charger took the stage next by announcing to a screaming audience that they were not Econoline Crush. Then they launched into Ever She Flows and the mosh pit sprang to life. During their short set, the recording artists played many of their hits, including the haunting

BMG

Jeff Martin (centre)

the three-quarters full grandstand

And

the otherwise silent night.

(left),

took the opportunity songs to offer some of wisdom about

while introducing Psychopomp and Release, which Martin has described in the past as relationships,

for

the

women on behalf of way women are

band which began with Correspondence from The Edges of Twilight, and After a lengthy

came back

set,

the

for one encore

included a stunning version of the song. Winter which appears on both independent CD and their

instrumental Solstice, their

major-label debut album. Splendor Solis.

Near the end of the night, Martin joked with the audience about the sound of the band’s next album.

He

said critics would describe it as Jim Morrison playing bluegrass. “Gotta love those f ing critics,” said Martin with a laugh.

OUR EMI CAMPAIGN NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

-

PLEASE BUY

OUR TREATS

The Kidney Foundation OF Canada

Return to sender Raylee Bonnell, of Kitchener, returns a serve on the tennis courts Conestoga’s Doon campus. (Photo by Amanda Pickling)

at

SPOKE -

It’ll

make you

laugh,

make you cry. It’ll make you think. An(j that’s

no

lie.

it’ll

.


Page 16

SPOKE,

August 1998

Orientation Issue

still Msolutelv the BIGGEST PABTY In

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Digital Edition - August 31, 1998