Page 1

Conestoga College, Kitchener — No.25

30th Year

July

No

settlement yet

By Michael Hilborn The negotiations between the community colleges and the management bar-

the

angry with Record.

K-W

Page 2

this time.

we

are close to settling,” it

settled ages ago.

their

detail, so there is

should have

Both

parties

possibilities

in

a better under-

standing,” said Tibbits. Tibbits said he could not under-

stand what problems remained to be resolved since management’s last offer seemed to address all the

outstanding issues. “We’ve backed off most of our

he said. “They (the union) still want no change, more money and more security.” According to a June 19 memo-

things,”

School

of

By Jeannette Altwegg

Canada but is

it

is

getting older

getting better?

of con-

Boettger reported

said

seems

to think

“He seems

whole thing will be settled by that this

whole thing

be settled

and

30,

“It

was

Boettger said he

to

in I

don’t want

they

to

meeting could be

until a

DSA

Tibbits also said a recent article in the Kitchener-Waterloo

Tibbits said there

According to Tibbits, the incident question came about when Boettger representative union invited Tibbits to address an informal meeting of the faculty representatives at the Doon campus. In addition to Tibbits and Boettger, in

Record

which attributed certain inflammatory remarks to him was “not help-

Harper,

Sally

— — was not a list

information’” said Tibbits. Tibbits said he sees this charge as a bargaining tactic on the part of the union as well as a waste of valuable time and money. “I could do a lot more in the community by raising funds than sitting at some hearing,” he said.

Tibbits said the meeting dial

was

cor-

and productive and he used

for the Torbays to endure a series

said.

healthy enough to live without a kidney and whether her husband

Edith Torbay has ever done for her husband. Having returned for part-time work on June 25, Torbay said she

own kidneys.

would even be able

short and easy process

were carried in an article in Spoke written by Corey Jubenville. “Apparently, this union is the only party allowed to send out

were present.

Neither was dialysis. So, instead, she decided to donate one of her

Torbay

also the issue

Bob Evans and Jay Moszynski

favorable

option,

is

of certain statements he made at a board of governors’ meeting that

of 1997.

members

tak-

future negotiations,” he said.

answer charges of unfair negotiatmeeting which took place in November

faculty

outcome

“At the most it will establish a benchmark for the conduct of

committee Toronto to

ing, partly as the result of a

was

issue

preferred

felt the

on the negotiations currently

rela-

tion

contract

was a

a misunder-

standing,” he said. Furthermore,

ing place.

arranged.

“It

was trivial. was really just

colleges’

representative

entire

apologized to Tibbits and the

incident

Walter Boettger, Conestoga faculty

comment

the

June

of the hearing will have no bearing

Student Association (DSA) president Kristin Murphy and educational co-ordinator Tara Llanes, who were present at a recent college board of governors’ meeting

of

On

appear at a hearing of the

Doon

reserve

Boettger said he was one of those

who

scheduled

to negotiate through the media.”

said

als.

to

by August.”

the negotiations and

the

rect

another com-

29

points in

where

is

Tibbits

“In

at the meeting and an indiapology from another. Tibbits

people

reaching a solu-

getting to crit-

raised,

he some-

“If

declined to identify those individu-

Tibbits said there

tion.

will

Tibbits said he has received

personal apologies from two of the

one else?”

to think this

we’re

ical

them.

tics.

who

of

(Tibbits) didn’t say that, did

said

Boettger. fact,

were

meeting

regardless

made

actually

in violation of fair negotiation tac-

statements

the

that

at

plication

(Tibbits)

August,”

on

that ran

June 20.

Donating her kidney may very well be the most selfless act of love Conestoga College employee

to withstand

the surgery.

of

gift

life

ney into someone,” she explained. “The intricacies of disconnecting the kidney are less than the intricacies of connecting

it.”

Torbay said she has been recuperating at

home

weeks

only a five-day stay

after

for the last six at

“They asked me,

However, Torbay said she has great faith in the doctors at St.

enjoyed getting back into some

‘Would you like to give him one of your kidneys?’ and I said ‘Yes, I

Joseph’s hospital in Hamilton.

“These days they (doctors) boot people out really fast,” she joked.

sort of routine.

would.’”

“They said the operation was going to be fine and I believed it

side-effects as a result of the oper-

good

to get back;” she said

for me,” she said.

She said she had no worries about donating her kidney in terms of her own health. Kidneys are a

business several years ago. Called Edie by her co-workers,

system, duplicate wonderful Torbay said. “You don’t even need half of the capabilities of either kidney to function so you can certainly do

Torbay said she was happy

with just one.”

to see

“They were wonderful,” she said. “They gave me a morning coffee break party.”

Torbay said Joseph, her husband

Page 4

from Tibbits

manage-

ment’s position before the union spokespersons. Tibbits said immediately after that meeting, Boettger telephoned Montgomery and as a result of that call, Tibbits was accused of being

since printed a

optimism.

“He

the opportunity to place

at

of extensive tests by doctors to was she whether determine

them.

COMMENTARY

still

cern and he does not share Tibbit’s

ing a rather lengthy waiting

an interview, “to get your normal life back.” Torbay said she has been at the college since 1980 and became chair of Conestoga’s school of

Page 8

editor

“unhelpful”

waiting to get lucky

“It’s

donations.

The Record has

have come

business chair donates

in

Food bank needs more

May.”

in

issues outstanding are

have been working without a contract since February of 1996. president John Conestoga Tibbits, co-chair of the management bargaining team, said in a recent interview that he remained optimistic that an agreement can be reached in time to avoid a walkout which could leave thousands of college students without classes in September. faculties

explored

DSA

members

sent to the

as

August.

he been

Page 7

are sticking to their

position exactly

Walter Boettger, Conestoga’s union representative, said the

said. “I think

Journalism student receives high school diploma and award.

They

at

tions are scheduled to reconvene in

“I think

STUDENT LIFE

are not pre-

make another proposal

Mediator A1 Heritage sent both home after three days of meetings without a new collective agreement in place. The negotia-

(the article) couldn’t

correction, as well as a letter to the

“They (management) pared to

The

still

a worse time,” he said.

with no resolution in sight. sides

Tibbits

to the local representatives, the

remains unchanged.

gaining team adjourned on June 18

ISSUES

ful” under the circumstances. “It

management team

1998

faculty contract

in

randum from the union negotiating team chairman, Ted Montgomery, position of the

faculty of Ontario’s 25

6,

of 32 years, has a condition called polycysistic kidney, meaning his kidneys would eventually stop functioning.

“He had a transplant 11 years ago and that transplanted kidney, which was only expected to last about six years, began to fail,” she Hoping

to get a

kidney by sign-

be

hours

adding

it

altogether

said

there

are

a

few

ation.

fine.”

The operation took about six

Torbay

she

five to

said,

took the doctors longer to

operate on her husband. “It’s actually harder to put a kid-

want to laugh really hard now, said Torbay. “Sneezing and coughing hurts and I get tired a little easily right now. But, those are things that will go away.” ”1 don’t

right

Also, there are no restrictions in terms of being able to function. Torbay joked that, other than the fact that she can’t play hockey or full-contact football, there are

no

drawbacks.

“I’m also not allowed to bungee jump, which is really good,” she said. “Because I’d never want to bungee jump in the first place and now I have a good exuse.” On a more serious note, Torbay said donating a live kidney wasn’t as easy as she’d first thought.

said.

will

the hospital.

It

was about a year-long process

Edith Torbay back at her

desk

six

weeks

after donating a kidney. (Photo by Jeannette Altwegg)


— SPOKE,

Page 2

July 6, 1998

DSA cites accountability with budgets he

By Lisa Roberts

not a rule,

“It’s

said.

a

it’s

ideas and people, and development

guideline.”

When

about

one reads seminars

various

the

and

trips

executive members of the Doon Student Association (DSA) attend,

one

asks

invariably

certain

a

Who picks up

question:

the tab?

DSA

Cleaves,

Gerry

vice-president of student affairs,

and

have no

they

said

president,

DSA

Murphy,

Kristin

qualms about spending a

little

to make a lot of contacts that, according to them, benefit the student association in the long

money

run.

yearly

a

“It’s

said

thing,”

Cleaves. “We budget a certain amount of money for these things. We’re basically an activity council if you don’t go to these seminars,

you don’t meet anybody.” Cleaves said he didn’t know

Murphy and

Recently, Cleaves,

Hussey attended SuperCon. a student for symposium parliamentary leaders from across Canada. The event took place in Vancouver this year, and was costly, said Murphy. All activities, including a tour along the Vancouver coast in a

were sponsored by corporations. and

ship,

cruise

experience. There’s a spectrum of

and leadership.” Cleaves also said there were attendees from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, but he didn’t meet up with them until the Vancouver. in conference “Sometimes you have to travel 3,000 miles to talk to someone

down the road.” As far as student

activities are

companies However, their $270 registration fee included meals and keynote

concerned, the fees are included

speakers.

pleased the student

“The Royal Bank threw $10,000 obviously, SuperCon into

hasn’t been raised for five years.

some

there’s

credibility to

it,”

said

Cleaves.

with

at packages said he was

tuition

Murphy

Conestoga.

fee

ac'tivitiy

The current cost is $54.50, which includes CanCopy, a copyright fee for making photocopies from

national the Attending conference will benefit students

texts.

despite the cost, said Murphy.

will also be included in the student

“We

all

brought back different

The $7

capital

fee

activity

development fee

upcoming

the

for

different

1998-99 school year, said Murphy.

College Association until he attended a the of Because conference.

services we could offer students,” he said. “There are some things we could do differently around here. It

Georgian College is $177, but, according to Murphy, there aren’t

meeting, he said, he became better post-secondary informed with

taught me, as a person,

Ontario Community Student Parliamentary

about

the

educational

issues, such as the

potential teachers’ strike.

money

“A

little

spent saved so much,” he

example

for

According

DSA

Murphy, the

to

creates an annual budget, and then

presents

it

director

the

to

of

The school collects their said. “They can refuse if

finance.

he

the budget’s absurd.

previous (Hussey,

DSA

It’s

created by

executives.

vice-president

Jen of

operations) and I will create the budget for next year’s council.”

One

thing

DSA

executives

always do with their proposals is over-budget, according to Cleaves. “We always underspend, though,”

how

to lead

a student association properly.

knew

already

otherwise

I

basics,

the

wouldn’t have ran for

I

the position.”

SuperCon

said.

fees,

ideas,

provides

a conference that

is

with

leaders

student

building blocks to better student associations, said Cleaves.

meeting place

to start

It

is

a

networking

with other student leaders, so they

can provide a support system for each other.

“The

social side of

it

big,” said

is

Cleaves. “If you don’t get to know people on a provincial level, they’re just names on a piece of paper.

We

get

a

sense

from accomplishment networking provides

it.

of It

and

The

as

many

fee

activity

student

at

student-oriented events as

there are at the

Doon campus.

run schools themselves differently,” he said. “Some schools only have one big fee. That’s why we try to keep fees “Different

separate at Conestoga."

One

point

the

DSA

stress regarding their

wants to

budgets was

accountability, said Cleaves.

want were

make

to

They

sure student funds

going

something

to

worthwhile.

“We’re

more

accountable

to

students,” he said. “We’re playing

with students’ money. There, we have to be the most accountable. If I have to pay an activity fee but I can’t participate in anything,

it’s

a

Gerry Cleaves

(left),

DSA

Murphy

president Kristen

and keep student fees down.

vice president of operations

try to

DSA

(Photo by Lisa Roberts)

waste of money.”

Conestoga president unhappy with media By Amanda

and the statement was a simplistic view of the world. During the board of governors meeting Tibbits said he believes “the success of the college is due to the combined efforts of all

never said

Fickling

Conestoga College president John Tibbits said in the 1 1 years he has been at the college, he has never been so angry with the Kitchener- Waterloo Record as he was over a recent headline. A headline printed in the June 17 issue of the Record linked Tibbits expressed by other to opinions panel members, during a panel discussion at a conference on higher education at Wilfrid Laurier University June 16. Tibbits professed his frustration,

this,

employees.” The conference included

five

at Laurier,

which

presidents

Canadian colleges and and which Tibbits compared key

discussing

tuition, research

said

was

a

“It

really hurts

to a

means of

such as and fund raising, issues

when people

didn’t

said he

amount of work they

are doing,

for

change and said

from

post-secondary

who for

gratitude

his

said

letter

were highly and appreciated by

insights

informative

people

The

panel.

the

in attendance.

anything

said

he

during

the

not

say

panel

discussion that could have been

But

Tibbits said the conference

and

there

was

reporting”

were

reputation

made throughout ordeal. He two-hour

valuable points specifically

said

Sean

because

Riley,

president of St. Francis Xavier

in

of the

Record, Tibbits said, as co-chair of bargaining, he would like to emphasize that he believes faculty as a group in colleges and universities are generally hard working

and committed to their students and their research. He said the timing of this error “I

know

the

“tabloid

Record,

his

this will

is

horrible.

come up

at the

bargaining table in September.”

The Record printed a retraction on Page 2 the following day, and a to

letter

did

taken out of context.

the

said.

Tibbits said he has a different

vision

to

differently,

said he received a letter

Tibbits ’s

want a

he

work hard enough. Tibbits

open

Tibbits.

on

President John Tibbits students

Worked,

Tibbits

is

things

Tibbits

productive,

that

are

say anything.”

instructors’workload formula, not

members do not

Riley too

doing

expressed

slamming you and you

this.”

implied

made

Tibbits ’s enthusiastic participation

higher quality of education since their tuition is going up. The real of structure the issue is

believes faculty

when

of

anger, and hurt to the college’s board of governors during its June 22 meeting. The headline, which read College UnderCall Faculty Heads

the

Scotia,

some outstanding contributions.

He

said Tibbits.

Tibbits

Nova

University in

the director of the conference

universities

“fire-side chat”,

Conestoga to advance, changes have to be made. The college must stay market driven, he said. “I don’t think we can go on like institutions. In order for

the

editor

written

by

was published, but he said that is insufficient. The letter said Tibbits would like to find ways to

Tibbits

be able to utilize faculty for longer periods, albeit with increased salaries.

slamming you and you didn’t say

“My image in the community damaged.” “There are people who want

anything,” he added.

read this kind of information, and

is

scarred, said Tibbits.

“It really hurts

As

when people

are

a result of the headline in the

they want to believe

Where’s

it

is

to

” he said.

my stuff?

search through a luggage to retreive belongings after returning

Cyclists

mound their

to

of

Conestoga

at the

end

seven-day bicycle tour southwestern Ontario.

of a of

(Photo by Michael Hilborn)


SPOKE,

July

6,

1998

— Page 3

Conestoga College helps learning disabled project By Donna

Fierheller

who

Ontario.

Having Conestoga College included in a pilot project to help learning disabled students was a four-stage process, said special

then called for in January 1998, with each institution submitting

needs co-ordinator Marian Mainland. Conestoga College president John Tibbits signed a contract on June 23 that will provide about $2.7 million in funding for the

location

$30-million total the government would provide for the pilot project. The committee then went to the named proposals and found that geographically, there was a good

project.

said.

finances Kevin Mullan went to a

“Conestoga has a

meeting with the task force committee in Toronto to discuss revisions to be made to the

Mainland said during the

December 1997,

in

by

minister

Bette

surveys

to

references

all

to

and name of the institutions removed. The reason was so each proposal would stand on its own, she said. “The projects had to be unique, with no duplication,” Mainland

the

education Stevenson, sent college

all

faculties

what the current towards

with

former

chaired

university

two copies, one of which was blind,

first

learning opportunities task force

students

and

find

out

attitudes

are

to

with

Mclver, chairman of preparatory studies at Conestoga (Photo by Casey Johnson)

Job Connect program an option

for

faculty

is

Job

or

of

think

part-time

continuing education classes, but the college is involved in

employment all

and

education

preparatory

skills training

among

other programs.

Job Connect

is

one of these

programs. It was formerly called the futures

and

employment

career

preparation program.

Now called Job Connect, it enables people 16 to 24 to get information

on

employment,

academics, training, counselling and resumes. “There has always been a need for

employment preparation and

Bob Mclver, said Conestoga’s chair of preparatory

training,”

studies.

Mclver added some youths

finish

school but have no career choices.

“Before investing three years of time and paying substantial tuition fees at a post-secondary institute,

students should find out where their interests

and

areas:

Marian Mainland special needs co-ordinator

“Stuff that

was on computer was

hours

just

we

spent about four

going

through

the

Mainland said she found out Conestoga College’s proposal was definitely going to be accepted while she was driving home from school on May 12. “It (the throne speech)

on the announced

radio. it

and

was live Eves

Ernie

listed off the

printed material and whiting out

approved

anything that could identify the

Mainland said the proposals were

was certainly excited.” Mainland said that was the last time it was referred to or spoken

then reviewed by a committee of experts on the learning disabled.

about in the media, until all the institutions signed the contracts.

college.”

institutions,” she said.

“I

concentrates on information and

employment planning and

“To go

skills lie,”

he

said.

Jan Stroh, a training consultant with Job Connect, said, “In

Waterloo region, which includes Guelph and Wellington County, the youth unemployment rate is

right into

a job after

way

life works anymore,” said Mclver, who has been chair of preparatory studies at Conestoga for 12 years. “There is a need for assistance and assessment. Making a good and meaningful connection with employers is extremely important and doesn’t happen naturally for a lot of people,” he said. “Hopefull,y Job Connect will give people the edge they need.” Mclver said counsellors at Job Connect are planning to serve about 1,000 clients in this fiscal

school

might

said.

preparation, on-the-job training.

think of Conestoga

studies

Connect

referral,

By Casey Johnson

full-time

some out here and

in another area,” she

cent. That double the national rate for

three

Connect

you

more

youths.”

supports youths through Job

When you

last

budget, taking

view.”

Over 80 per cent of the surveys were returned to the task force, Mainland said. In stage two, the task force set up interviews with administrators and the program chairs from in

of

was

putting

easy to do, but

institutions

vice-president

two weeks before announced which institutions would get funding, Mainland said daily revisions had to be made. “We had to change the

and

view,” she said.

post-secondary

Conestoga’s

between 16 and 21 per

Conestoga

College

students

the

Mainland said manager Jack Fletcher and

During the

administration’s point of

were fertile. “Conestoga College has a wonderfully supportive environment, from both faculty and administration’s point of

throughout

In the fourth stage, she, her

it

environment, from both

Mainland said the task force intended to put pilot projects in place only in environments that

representation

province, said Mainland.

college’s proposal.

wonderfully supportive

learning

disabilities.

Bob

number of

projects they could fund under the

stage,

College June 24.

short-listed the

Mainland said proposals were

is

not the

year.

The paid positions are subsidized up to $4-an-hour through the program and can last up to 16 weeks, he said. “The subsidy is intended to give potential employers a bit of a

when looking at our youths for employment.”

financial break

The program

is

not for youths

alone.

Mclver and Stroh said although Job Connect concentrates mainly on youths, there is about a 10 per cent adult component. Job Connect, which works in conjunction

with

Lutherwood

Youth Employment Centre, is only one of four Conestoga projects. The college is also connected with Cambridge Youth the Services and Guelph’s Second

Chance Employment Counselling. Conestoga has a program set up at its Stratford campus. For more information call the centre at (519)

743-2460.

Special needs co-ordinator Marian Mainland holds the pilot project proposal. The proposal was accepted by the learning opportunities task force to share in the $30 million-government funding of (Photo by Donna Fierheller) a five-year program to help students with specific learning disabilities.


Page 4

— SPOKE,

July

6,

1998

COMMENTARY

there still something worth celebrating? Is

just join the United

Maybe we should

With Canada Day celebrations winding down, another year is on the

States or, at least,

horizon.

know

Another year of Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard and the federal govern-

in the world: you’re either

it like in America where even the youngest kindergarteners

with

cutbacks

to

make

life

that’s a fact.

together not

Ontario government leader Mike Harris and his other provincial counterparts thinking of

new and worse ways

the greatest

is

an American or a

People pulling

Another year for govern-

ment

for certain their country

nobody, and

ment battling it out over Quebec separatist issues.

do

because

miserable

but

of,

in

for the average person.

spite of, their

Another year for Canadian Tire Corp. the Canadian dollar with

money providing

the only competition It

really

it

differences, to help

has.

makes you stop and wonder. Do

we

still have something to celebrate as Canadians? Just think about the future of this country. Is there really anything more to look

Canada

The looming problems of an unlikely end Canadian

there’s

nothing

Throughout the world we are liked for our including army peace-keeping efforts scandals and all. We are also the sixth-largest aid donors in the Western World, according to the

in spite of, their differences, to help those

foreign

in

years

ago,

contemplating for

was

I

say,” she said, “so

applying

it

afford to go.

My

boyfriend had just finished his

year of

management

and had nothing but encouraging words for me. If I wanted to learn job skills and get a sense of accomplishment, he told me, I should follow my heart and go back to school.

To help me

in

my

decision making,

turned to the only source

I

knew

I

I

could

depend on for honesty and wisdom:

my

would

that

how

to say

could

I

all I

needed

say,

make the knew it.

to

alter life as I

Then

it

was

all

of

two-year stay here. I did experience

moments of great and panic because of the workload in the program. Yes,

stress

Yes,

I

did find the occasional gray hair

because of the numerous deadlines, exams and assignments I tried my best to fulfill. Yes,

I

did live up to the college stereotype

of pulling “all-nighters” to finish certain projects or stories. I

even contemplated leaving the program.

When

confiding in two instructors,

who

remain nameless because I don’t want to be seen as playing favorites, I revealed that I simply couldn’t handle the stress shall

involved with journalism. I

I

all

the time

mother.

continuous months.

She gave me a piece of advice I will never forget. “You’ve always had something to

the sinking ship.

I

The encouragement

was ready

let

to

nothing

and

become a

why

it

or not,

I

when I

my

teachers,

I

pleased to announce that

am more

was

than

with

to

life in

I

got in return

made

prepare

Editor:

Amanda Fickling;

Student life editor: Anita Santarossa; Issues and Activities editor: Michael Hilbom; Photo editor \ Production manager: Anita Santarossa; Advertising manager: Michael Hilbom; Circulation manager: Michael Hilbom; Faculty supervisor: Jerry Frank; Faculty advisor: Bob Reid; SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

me

for the future.

mean

make

sound

like

nothing but sanctimonious drivel, but

all I

learned,

and

to

who

I

on

Spoke

this

learned from, means a

Working I’m

me

glad

for

six

months

with invaluable experience, but it

provided

stepping stone from which

student

lot

me.

provided

interest in the organization. Nonetheless,

on

it.

me I

a with can propel

myself towards a writing career which

much

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Amanda Fickling; News

its toll

many

don’t

I

I

will

enjoy.

it

SPOKE

Editor:

started to take

I

trials and tears of frustrations, can thank Conestoga College for teaching me how to use a valuable tool which will

president.

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

program

I

will

eventually

became

was

After

general.

All gave me valuable experiences never forget.

my communication me to meet fellow

could sympathize with their troubles, I found myself repeating the same words of comfort and support that were given to me at my time of need. I learned how to use a computer and software programs. Before college, I could figure out where the “on” button was, and that

the

them. Although

have indeed survived two of the toughest and most rewarding years of my life. I made many friends in the program, both teachers and students, all of which I will miss dearly when I leave Conestoga. Every person I befriended had different things to teach me, both with academic pursuits and I

me improve and enabled

journalism students. I found myself encouraging other students

had the

great writer.

Unfortunately, there wasn’t I

I

jump

off

skills

I

I became involved in the Journalism Student Association for a short time, and

felt like

helped

effort

encouraged to stick it out, so to speak, because I had already come so far in my decision to improve my writing abilities. Because of the constant reassurance and support of

a

less

So, be proud. Celebrate!

of should

short

told that, believe

potential to

be

to

maybe we should focus

a tangible future

for

alone 18

honestly

couldn’t survive three weeks,

was

seem

things certainly

on our differences of opinion and start remembering some of the rich heritage we do have in common.

persevere in this demanding course. I

these aren’t the best times we’re

Some

getting worse, but

there are the massive efforts within

received

maybe

living.

own borders to help fellow countrymen and women to survive die ravages of mother

down-

But the benefits and rewards far outweighed the trials I experienced during

So,

third-world

little

deeply appreciate

is all

Helping each other, as well as other is what we are famous for. Even the Americans think so.

our

me

what Canada

countries,

Americas.

motivational speeches as to

moment

a

in

decision

hill.

my

to

journalism teachers put into the program.

sarcasm, that from then on

first

studies at Conestoga

not learn

properly?”

That was

journalism

the

program here at Conestoga College. I had wanted to take the program since I graduated from high school, but I was unsure about the whole thing. After all, it had been years since I last attended school. Also, because I had been recently laid off from two jobs then, I knew I’d have to take out a huge loan so I could

why

aid

are in need; that’s

but

of,

about.

mainly Africa, Asia and the

College provides building blocks Two

who

Government of Canada web site. In 1995-96, Canada provided almost S3 countries,

according to a 1997 Angus Reid Group poll. We are number one with the French and the

People pulling together not because

Canada is such a great place? Canada ranks in the top 10 as one of

the

it

thing’s for certain, though, we’ll be there.

billion

best countries in the world in which to live,

Ontario.

Quebec just this year. was floods in Manitoba, and who knows what it’ll be next year. One Last year

peaceful nature of our country, are what makes us so popular, according to the poll.

But then again, why are Americans saying that

but

left

kind of

at least that

together the country.

mention that it would completely ruin any chance of keeping the rest of Canada from breaking off into their own until

— but

brainwashing leaves little room for taking your government apart while trying to put

to

countries

it

their differences

debt.

Not

and it sounds a bit primitive would never work in Canada where people are so diverse their only commonality is Sure,

to

selflessly

massive relief efforts for the

in

ice-storm victims in

The degree of personal freedom Canadians enjoy, health care, the environment, and the

about.

just

something

Hundreds of thousands of people donated

No kidding.

dollar,

won’t recover, certainly isn’t be proud of. Neither is a government that would rather cut social programs to save a few bucks and then waste it on army equipment, which ends up collecting dust anyway. Then there is Quebec wanting to be its own nation, which would plunge us into further that

is all

nature.

Americans. Canadians are internationally known to be honest, friendly and polite.

in

need; that’s what

forward to? to the constant decline of a

who are

those

I’m glad

I

listened to

my mother.

mainly funded from September to May by Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out the

is

Doon Student

of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


— SPOKE,

Ceremonies honor student

July 6 , 1998

— Page 5

ability

Convocation highlights Guest speakers: Thurs. June 25, Rick Brock, 4 p.m.

owner and

CEO of

S-S Technologies Holdings Ltd. I

. j

Thurs. June 25, John 7:30 p.m. Whitney, president

of

Whitney &

Company

Realty Ltd. From

June 26, 4 p.m. Lynda Davenport, former chairwoman of Conestoga Fri.

(Photo by Michael Hilborn)

June 26.

By Ned Bekavac

attended

the school health services ethics committee. He has long been

graduation

their

ceremonies held June 25 to 26, said John Sawicki, manager of public affairs.

Awards:

The ceremonies were held

Governor General’s Academic Medal

J.

leisure

,

About 1,180 Conestoga students

College board of governors

Andrew

to right, Tanya Kavelman Pam Kogut, Bob Noble, Jane and Natalie Adsoe graduated from the recreation and services program at Conestoga’s 30th convocation held

left

Mitchell

Patterson

The Conestoga College Mastercraft Cherie Award Morrison

The James W. Church Achievement Bruce Award

Cook

attended by

were

about half of the

who

students

at the

and

centre

recreation

actually graduated,

said Sawicki.

The ceremonies, which began with horn-driven renditions of O Canada, were celebrations of past and

accomplishments

future

ceremony, which began

final

4 p.m. Friday, honored graduates of a number of areas: the school of health sciences and comat

munity

services;

college

access

school of

the

and preparatory

Sawicki,

who

Awards:

led

is

also a college

were

Graduates two-hour

treated

highlighted

the

graduate of print journalism

Jennifer Ertel graduate of recreation leadership

Aubrey Hagar Distinguished

Teaching Award:

Alumni

The

currently

Ertel

Vancouver, where she ation

therapist

human

to

quest

said, citing

valleys,

president Richard Nixon.

“The one who wins

who wants

to,”

is

the one

James

W.

Hospital’s Health Sciences Centre. Ertel

named

$ 1,000-award,

in

first Conestoga’s of honor president, goes to a graduating student who combines academic

excellence

founder

also

is

of World Access,

which

with

community

teacher at the

service and

Guelph Campus

concern for the well-being of the

shows a demonstrated

individual in society. Cook was the student

and an

facilitates

outdoor recreation trips, primarily for people with disabilities. the attending Graduates post-ceremony reception in the cafeteria had various plans for their future.

Conestoga. Carapina, Vlado

23,

who

mechanical from graduated engineering technology (designs and analysis program), earned the Engineering

Award

Proficiency

in

his

third

year.

Carapina

is

continuing

his

education with a two-year program at Lakehead University in Thunder

myself more Carapina said. Sarah Stone, 22, is a marketing graduate who is now applying for a managerial position at Cotton “I just

want

to give

options, that’s

Ginny

at

the

all,”

Stratford Festival

Marketplace;

started in February 1995.

The

(Photo by Michael Hilborn)

Bay.

she said.

Church Mastercraft Award was awarded to Bruce Cook, who first enrolled in the general arts and science pre-health option then went on to a three-year nursing program which

The

a recreacquired

Bruce Cook, left, receives the James W. Church Achievement Award from James W. Church, Conestoga’s first president.

brain injury program at Vancouver

Mechanical of the highest peaks

Davenport a speech by former US

lowest

is

the

in

Jen Wilkins, 21, stepped into the

for harmony. is full

in

lives

workforce upon graduation, and leisure and recreation the services graduate now works at the detention centre which was one of her work-placements while at

of the Conestoga College board of governors and current executive director of Waterloo Eldercare Inc.

and

Distinction

of

accomplishments.

Life

of

Award, given to the graduate who best combines career success with work that shows commitment to community development, was given to Jennifer Ertel, a 1991

that

significance

live passionately in a

Bev Walker

a

to

celebration

Davenport spoke of the need

program.

James Heer

ceremony.

the

The Honorary College Shield Lynda to presented was Davenport, a former chairwoman

automated manufacturing

Memorial

Hospital in Fergus.

organization

their

Residential

Groves

and

academic assessment and special projects department. John W. Tibbits, president of Conestoga College and John marshal,

graduate of mechanical engineering technology

Sunbeam

the

Home

president

Distintion

Dave Arjune —

Unit,

studies; the continuing education division; the

Alumni of

and has Order of Nurses, the Homewood Health Centre, the Guelph Public Health Gadshill

in

at the Victoria

recreation leadership graduate.

anticipation.

The

active with St. Peter’s Lutheran

Church worked

“I’m just working

at the

right now,” Stone said.

mall

“But I’m

applying as assistant manager of the store.

”My

Conestoga College diploma

should help.”

Jason Gennings also contributed

member

of

to this story.

Sherry Sampey is all smiles after receiving her nursing diploma at (Photo by Michael Hilborn) graduation on June 26,


Page 6

— SPOKE,

July

6,

1998

Komer Award

Preparatory student wins By Anita Santarossa

pointing out her children, that, “In the

beginning

As

tears

of

joy

ran

down Theresa

this for

Godfrey’s face, she accepted the Marjorie Komer Award of Achievement, given for the focus for change certificate course at Conestoga’s Waterloo Campus, June 26. Godfrey, who just completed her first year in law and security, said in her speech she wouldn’t have been able to get where she is now without the encouragement and support of her instructors.

The Komer Award was 1991 in

was an

after

ruined her

dreams were

memory

first

given out in

of Marjorie

Komer who

instructor, for various courses such

over 14 years, said Vic Komer, one of Marjorie’s nine children. “She was a very driven and determined woman who helped people believe in themselves,” said Komer. “She would have

been proud of Theresa.” According to Cox, focus for change

20 years of marriage

self-confidence,

shattered, but

focus (for change)

and

that

once

learned that

I I

I

women

“My

is

a

course for single mothers, or with a desire to discover their

got into it

homemakers or

had a future,” said

been

Cox, co-ordinator of focus for change, a women, said Godfrey is a unique person and an inspiration to

many women

she

began

become

in focus.

wouldn’t let barriers,” said Cox. she

Theresa Godfrey

in

seeking

are

“Many

independance.

wasn’t

course only open to

who

potential,

Godfrey.

obstacles

do

certificate

Being separated

“When

to

as food preparation, cake decorating and focus for change, at Conestoga College for

interview.

fault

was going

changed, and I said I am doing this for myself and that was the greatest feeling.”

making me realize what talents I really had and what I could do with those talents and where I could go,’’she said afterwards in an

my

I

children, but halfway through

that

“My most memorable experience occurred every day with instructors, like Debbie Cox,

totally

myself

told

I

my

financial

students

were

who

haven’t

single mothers

the education system for

many

years.”

proudly displays her focus for change Marjorie Komer Award with co-ordinator of the course Debbie Cox, June 26. (Photo by Anita Santarossa) (left)

The 12-week program

is

the first step for

she

women to develop a career path, said Cox. New to the program this year is Nobody is

see such a talented person not realizing

was

much

Godfrey’s self-discovery was evident when she said in her emotional speech, while

program funded by the Waterloo Regional Health Unit to help students balance parenting and school.

“However,

it

she had to offer.”

Godfrey

me to how But Cox said

was a sad moment

finally

began

to

for

realize

her

potential

and began

to rediscover

who

as a person.

Perfect, a

Students thank teachers at year-end potluck lunch By Anita Santarossa

“Students enter the program because they need direction,” said

The academic preparatory student forum held a potluck lunch, June 25, at Conestoga’s Waterloo

Sharon Herman, co-ordinator of preparatory studies.

campus,

of the program, share

in appreciation

of their

and support. Katherine Steffler, 29, and Kit Hyde, 31, are two students of the academic preparatory studies teachers’ dedication

course,

who

took

part

in

organizing the potluck event.

The student forum students

within

is

the

preparatory program at College,

who

gather for discussion

easier.”

and Hyde both wanted

potluck for their instructors, at the Waterloo campus, June 25. (Photo by Anita Santrossa)

a lack of self confidence,

said

who

has taught and written curriculum for the program since it began in 1985. our job to make students

is

they really I

use

a pie take one piece at a time

and in the end devoured the entire

A

you’ll

have

pie.”

variety of students

come

into

the program, including those social

on

workers’

assistance,

compensation and unemployment,

Herman. She said students

said

through

a

series

evaluations

to

Focus

for

employment

to

do

in

goals, said

university,” said

go

while

Herman.

What makes Herman’s job rewarding

of

tests

determine

go and

is

so seeing her students

their

“The

for

me

is

the other end,” she said.

change and and training

The program allows students to work at their own level and progress

two,

satisfaction

seeing that students have gone through the tunnel and come out

Herman.

and two weeks job shadow-

ing)

will

others will begin the academic “prep” course, and after completing go on to college or

12- week

class

some

to other adult high schools,

evaluation courses (10 weeks in

are

Herman.

“After evaluation,

eventually graduate from college. initially

capabilites and interests.

readiness to

factories for the rest of our lives,”

Kathy Steffler (left) and Kit Hyde are two students of the academic preparatory studies program who organized a

common

esteem and

self

have,” she said. “The analogy

change the direction their lives were taking. “We didn’t want to work in ,

low

academic Conestoga

encouraging in helping achieve our goals,” said Hyde. “They were also the ones that made the transition back into learning that

Herman (standing) co-ordinator of academic preparatory studies, helps student Donna Eykens with some mathematical equations. (Photo by Anita Santarossa)

as,

Herman,

“It is

“The teachers have been very

Sharon

such

traits

realize the potential

years.

Steffler

students, in the beginning

a group of

and organize social functions for the students and staff of the preparatory program, said Hyde. Both are single mothers, and before attending Conestoga they were out of school for almost 10

much

Many

about what they wanted terms of careers, but felt the course and teachers helped in directing them towards specific goals. “Sharon’s (Herman) our guardian angel and she kept us in line to do our best,” said Hyde. The evaluation process develops a training plan, which provides students with a map of what they will pursue and what they have to do to achieive their long-term clues

that

determine whether a student is ready for an academic

said Steffler. “I am a people person and need to be around

preparatory course, said Herman.

people.”

Steffler

Before taking the focus course, and Hyde said they had no

at

their

own

rate,

said

“It’s kind of like an old school house where different grades are in the same room. “Our main goal is to encourage all of them to have self-confidence and eventually obtain their goals,”

said

Herman.


SPOKE,

July

— Page 7

1998

6,

whammy

Double

the tents and bags of the 725 cyclists (left), and program manager Blair Keller unload returned to Conestoga after the second annual Cycle Ontario Experience.

Judy Gane

who

Biking trek wheels to a close at Conestoga’s sports centre

including 300 Americans and one

725 who began this odyssey on June 20, all but 20 completed it. “One guy had his house broken into and another had his wife go into labor,” Keller said as she and Judy Gane volunteer fellow of hundreds the unloaded knapsacks and tents that were hauled by a transport truck. Erb Transport, one of the sponsors of the tour, donated the

man from England, began

truck and driver.

said that of the

By Michael Hilborn Karen Geisel, a second-semester journalism student, holds Open the at received Alexandra Award she the secondary school graduation heights Door/University ceremonies held June 24. (Photo by Melanie Spencer)

After seven days, 550 kilometres and countless mosquito bites, the Experience Ontario Cycle

(CYCLONE)

to

conclusion

cyclists

came when over 700

a

returned to their starting point at

Conestoga College student honored twice at graduation By Melanie Spencer on top of the world. And with good reason.

Karen Geisel

is

The second-semester ism

journal-

Conestoga awarded her

student

at

was College Ontario secondary school diploma, as well as the Alexandra Award on June 24 at the Open Heights Door/University secondary school in Waterloo. “I wasn’t there to get the award, but I found out at 2

a.m.,” said Geisel,

who

left the

because of poor attendance,” said the single mother of two boys, aged three and four. Returning to school has made a difference in her

life,

said the

journalism student. “My parenting skills

improved,” Geisel said. As her self-esteem has done

who

said she believes she

received the award for setting goals and following through with them. Geisel enrolled at

Conestoga completed

without her high

having school

diploma.

Although her father will never Geisel graduate, he was aware of her college plans. “The day before my father died, I had my interview for the see

college,” she said. “I

was able

college

to tell

process

had

him

the

already

started.”

Four credits short of graduating, she quit

high school

end of Grade

11,

at the

and didn’t

return until January 1997. “I

was given

quitting

the choice of

or being kicked out

cyclists,

arriving

Wanda

noon and continued to singly, in pairs and

Pemell, of Dorchester, Ont., and Ruth and Dan Levack, of

sometimes in large groups, until the last rolled in around 4 p.m. Program manager Blair Keller

London, Ont., said they had a wonderful time but were glad it

just before

stream

in,

was

over.

that

life is that

when we needed

it.”

Katie Welch, of Guelph, did not without tour the complete incident. “We were riding through a

couple of dogs ran up near me and one of them hit my bike and I went said.

I

Welch. the

more

experienced riders on the tour, was somewhat more critical of the organization.

no

Boehm, of Chicago,

111.,

enjoyed

she

although

said the

and the weather, some of the facilities were not up to

hospitality

expectations. “I think they have

I’m on the right

some kinks

out,” she said.

lineup.”

Boehm several

Geisel credits Jane Buchan, who taught her a few classes, including Grade 12 English, with encouraging her to write. Buchan was really happy Geisel

said she has ridden on

the

Rocky Mountains

summer. Unlike some

Boehm

in

of

Colorado

the

said the heat

problem for

others,

was not

a

her.

“It often gets as hot as this in Chicago,” she said. “Some of our friends from Texas said they found

ment, including lending Geisel

the weather cool,” said Boehm. The figures are not yet in on the

the deferral

payment for tuition, said Geisel. Along with the Alexandra Award came a $50 cheque, which she plans to put to good

amount of money charities that

raised for the

were sponsored by

event, but the number of participants exceeded those of last the

use.

“I’m going to see Iron Maiden this weekend,” Geisel said.

one,

last

Conestoga student. Her mother also provided her with support and encourage-

make

this

like

tours

including a 465-mile trek through

into journalism, said the

to

to

“At one of the camp sites there were only three showers, so there was a long

work

to.”

money

when

the Six Nations reserve

Mary Boehm, one of

“I’m planning on going into broadcasting after I graduate. I feel that’s the path I’m being

the

“They were always there with water, fresh fruit or yogurt just

scary,” said

path,” said Geisel.

went

wonderful,” she said.

on the road, was down, he (the dog) backed off. It was pretty

she has found a sense

“I feel that

guided

well worth the effort. “The church organizations were

but as soon as

long absence.

showing them

Pernell said that in spite of the lack of sleep, the adventure was

“I left a bit of skin

Geisel said she is also setting an example for her children by returning to school after her “It’s

this.”

down,” she

a

of purpose.

old

of

turnaround.

told her the news.

Winning the Alexandra Award was a surprise for the 29-year-

collection

have

ceremony after were handed out. When she arrived home, she received a message from her mother, who

diplomas

The

Doon campus on

well,

matter what, there’s always a chance for redemption.” But the biggest change in her

the

Conestoga’s June 27.

was a long haul,” said Levack he savored a cold one on the patio at the Roost. “It was a good time. It’s the first time we’ve done “It

as

Welch had a close encounter of the canine kind during the (cle Ontario Experience which finished at Conestoga’s Doon (Photo by Michael HHborn) impus June 27. itie

year,

when 266

riders took part in

the Cyc)e Ontario Experience bike ride.


Page 8

— SPOKE,

July

6,

1998

DSA wants to

replenish food bank By Casey Johnson

salmon, canned mushrooms, canned vegetables and baby food.

The Doon Student Association (DSA) is requesting that students recognize the need to keep the student food bank full even during

summer months. Becky Boertien, DSA’s

the

of student

was almost completely out of

good

said the food

life,

know

here

the students that

if

during

realize there is

a need for

still

still

over

supplies

for

summer

the

food. Students are

coming

in

summer

the

months.”

People tend to bring in the same types of food like Kraft dinner, brown beans and soup, said Boertien.

“Although these donations are

who would

greatly appreciated,

want to eat brown beans a week?”

five

days

when someone donate food maybe they

Boertien

said

wants to could think

The

Becky Boertien receives a food donation from Stuart MacKinnon, second-year telecommunications student in systems design, June 26. (Photo by Casey Johnson)

Save the terminally

Different parts

the world think

of

differently regarding

address and deal with the emotional

and

spiritual pain that

nies the last stage of

Bommel

said the

first

step

is

“One of the simple

med-

rules is

you can’t deal with emotional spiritual issues if you are writhing in a fetal position on the bed,” he said. Only then can you that

and

of

each

other,

says Harry van

Bommel,

begin to look at alternatives, such as a change of diet, exercise, spiritual

he

author of various health-care

books

needs and emotional support, subjects of hospice and pal-

very familiar to van

liative care are

Bommel. While

in his

20s, his

An

At age 24, his mother was dying. Van Bommel said his history and

outspoken proponent of hospice and palliative care spoke to Paul Gainss freelance workshop class, June 26 at Conestoga

political science

College.

injections

Harry van Bommel, the author of 16 books, including Dying for Care: Hospice Care or Euthanasia, campaigns to raise public awareness of the needless suffering terminally-ill people endure. “The public assumes they have to suffer pain because that’s what they’ve witnessed, and they assume that’s part of the dying

craved to do,” said the Netherlands native. “In fact, I

degree didn’t pre-

one at home. “Nursing care, bed baths, giving

thing

this

where they

families

come

at

members, no matter van Bommel.

are, said

This notion of families helping each other takes on a different meaning in North America. “It’s when we translate it into North American, Harris-governmenthealth-care,” said the author, “it

means we

can’t afford

the family does

it,

it,

so unless

you’re out of

But the information about hospice and palliative care wasn’t as widely available then as

“My

it

now.

is

euthanasia appear an attractive option to palliative care, he said. “I believe that euthanasia is a

you are

to

want

your

she could have.”

who

professionals, the belief that

sizes palliative care instead of a

better to give than receive,

curative treatment.

obstacle that

According to van Bommel,

management.

It

also attempts to

to

The Toronto show

Colm

Wilkinson

Valjean,

be a burden

to

including

left

said.

Boertien said she would like to implement a system that will

DSA

allow the

many people “Right now

to

monitor

able

would

no

there are

kept,” she said. “But

being

how

use the bank.

to

statistics

I

think that

quote

statistics

enable

the

college population to better see the need to

keep the food bank filled. “As usual no names will be used, but the figures will be used to help with the need,” she added. Boertien said student services

works

DSA

in

conjunction with the

distributing food to those

students in need. Zehr’s food vouchers are also available through student services.

receipts

now exceed

film

the

of

to

combine

modem

pain and

symptom that is

control methods, and what hospice care is or

Seven Canadian been hired

have

all

hospital

administrators

and governments think right thing to do, he said.

it’s

the

“We’ve seen too many of our and

grandparents

We

parents

will not

that ourselves.”

die

go through

performers perform

to

leading roles in the production.

Michael Todd Cressman from Elora, Ont.,

is

leader Enjolras.

cast as student

Cressman has

performed opera, musical theatre and classical concerts in Canada, working with the Opera Atelier of Toronto and the

London

Fanshaw

London,

Ont.,

actress

Broadway production, and was nominated for a Dora Award for her performance in Anne of Green Gables. Susan Gilmour was bora in Edmonton, Alta., and has performed the role of Fantine (a factory

worker)

in

five

around the world. Gilmour has also starred in productions of Man of La Mancha, Oliver!, Chess, Evita and Kiss of the Spider Woman. Timothy Howar of Spirit

$1.8 billion

than

greater

The

previously played the role in the

the

Les Miserables has been seen by about 40 million people worldwide and box-office

appeared in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. Eponine is the daughter of Les Miserables’ Thenardier, and is played by Jessica-Snow Wilson.

companies of Les Miserables

in

Symphony

Sharon Matthews of Hamilton, is schemer Madame

Matthews has appeared in past Toronto productions of Les Miserables, and was an original cast member of Show Boat. She also

a

of pasta. But the supplies diminish quickly,” she variety

time

time. Titanic ($1.5 billion).

response to health-care systems that have not worked well for people who are dying,” said the activist speaking before the Senate Special Committee on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in 1994. “We

miserably. in

his

first

Broadway company

Thenardier.

doesn’t exist

star

Jean

recreating

he

original

will

as

doctors,

the father of two. attitude

costumes.

Ont.,

be a burden to your family,” said

This

The Boublil and Schonberg is a new production that will be presented by the American National Company, with new actors and changes to musical

used across the country because

Palliative care, also referred to as

comfort care, aims to provide relief to these people through pain

recent press release.

an

more effective. “If you are older, you don’t want

fortable.

Princess of

the

it is

is

must be overcome to allow palliative care to become

attempts to

at

Wales Theatre, Toronto, said a

Orchestra and Choir.

days more com-

It

July 21,

The notion of palliative care, that he so vigorously campaigns for, will not become popular and better

teaches death education courses to

$138 worth of

office hit

Les Miserables will open for an exclusive return engagement

highest-grossing

should be.”

their last

you

Harry van Bommel

now

Hospice care, which is a concept of caring for the terminally-ill patients, usually at home, empha-

make

older,

family.”

old.

I

time,

campus

1987.

don’t

process as well,” said the 43-year-

that if

able to buy

this

returns to Toronto

since “If

need

is

juice, peanut butter, rice, tuna or

legendary role for the

had known more, I could have done more,” said the activist in a 1997 Toronto Star article. “My mother didn’t have a pain-free death, but I know regret

canned

props, the sound system and

luck.”

was not some-

few times.”

fruit,

Box

I

fainted the first

Boertien

that

this time,

lunch and supper time to care for

pare him for the reality of caring for a dying loved

items

suggests are: canned

bank

the food

Les Miserables

mother, father and grandfather died within a four-year period.

by Melanie Spencer

terms of nutrition.

Off

The health-care system makes

said.

The

There,

Italy.

their family

life.

In order to control this pain, van

ication.

families taking care

accompa-

in

ill

from needless suffering, says hospice author

was

food

“I don’t

life

“I

bank

are

director of student

fill

Conestoga’s cash registers. director

food.

DSA’s

To

Boertien said she had to use the money from the donation boxes located beside most of

River,

plays

Alta.,

student Marius

who

young

falls in

love

Cosette (Regan Thiel), adopted daughter of Valjean.

with

Howar has performed in Canadian and national touring productions of Miss Saigon, The Who’s Tommy, and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Thiel, who worked with the Stratford Festival in Camelot and Romeo and Juliet, is from Saskatoon, Sask.

Diana Kaarina from Vancouver, B.C., is cast in the performing group ensemble, and previously played Meg Giry in the Asian tour of The Phantom of the Opera. To purchase tickets, call TicketKing at (416) 872-1212 or

go

to the Princess of

Theatre

Box

Office.

Wales

Digital Edition - July 06, 1998  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you