Page 1

30th Year

— No. 14

SpmE.

Monday, April

13,

1998

Canada hits Doon

Skills

What’s Conestoga hosts competition By Donna

NEWS

Fierheiier

The Waterloo Regional Skills Canada competition was held at Conestoga College’s Doon campus on Wed. April 1, 1998. Regional competition categories, a chair overseeing each, included woodworking construction, electrical technology and with

computer graphics and design. Third-year Conestoga College students volunteered to judge the quality of work done by participants in the one-day event, held between 8 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Following are some of the highlights:

DOON CENTRE A Waterloo taltes

on Europe

who

collegiate instructor,

teaches computer tech,

com-

munications and electronics, setup the computer technology competition held in

room 2A16.

Rudy Hofer

said,

“I’d like to

publicly thank Vince Sowa,

who

Chose the judges for computer animation, and John Scott, who provided students for the Internet competition, for their help with this contest.”

Hofer said there were

five high

schools represented in computer animation, and five in Internet

would like to see more college students become involved, as there were only a few entrants from colleges. Hofer is a great promoter of Skills Canada, which recently

design.

He

said he

moved its head office to Conestoga College from Barrie, Ont. “It’s nice to see recognition for students’

skills,’’

he

said. “Skills

them to get that recognition.” Skills Canada has only a few paid positions, including head organizer Gail Smythe and four or five others, so volunteers are appreciated, he said.

Canada

a great

is

way

for

WOODWORKING CENTRE Students in the Grade 7 and 8

Harris

Doug Whistance (right), chair of the eiectrical competition for industrial wiring motor controls, looks over the shoulder of Kevin Boronka (left). Boronka, a student of Forest Heights collegiate intstitute in Skills Canada competition. Kitchener, is wiring a controi panel during ^ a the regional , {Photo by Donna Fierheiier) ’

design and technology competition, held in room W9/10, had challenges to complete three between the hours of 8 a.m. and

shop into a beehive of activity. said Chair Martin Grinwis “Conestoga College pays for all

2:30 p.m. The groups, each consisting of

contest.”

supplies

for the woodworking The quality of wood was

consistent,

he

said,

and the project

of an elevating device, a flotation device and a land transportation

decided on was unknown to them until the start of the competition. “The calibre of work is the same as in previous years, but the num-

device.

ber of entrants has increased.”

had to design and make working models

two boys and two

girls,

A design and technology teacher from St. Benedict high school in Cambridge, Colleen Elsaesser, was one of the teachers on hand to supervise students. She said the contestants were from families of public and separate schools that feed into five high schools in Waterloo Region, including St. Benedict, Cambridge; Resurrec-

Mary, Kitchener; St. David, Waterloo, and Monsignor Doyle, Cambridge.

tion, Kitchener; St.

The cabinet making competition turned the woodworking centre

Competing students were from 15 Waterloo region schools of which 10 were public and five were separate

schools.

They

constructed

sleigh seats (small benches), after first completing a written test.

Judges walked around checking each step of construction and mark-

on quality. A third-year woodworking technology student at Conestoga volun-

ing their preferences

teered to be one of the judges.

Ted Doggett

said he helped at an

round of the Skills Canada competition area high school for the

before judging the regional. “I never had enough guts to enter, but I have enough to be a judge,” he quipped.

Judges marked individually, with wiimers chosen by totaling final

marks for

safety, accuracy, proce-

assembly,

dures,

Doggett

and

sanding,

said.

The contestants took the completed benches home with them following the competition.

ELECTRICAL CENTRE The chair of the industrial wiring (motor controls) competition said funding was supplied by Rockwell Automation/ Allen Bradley,

Cambridge.

Doug Whistance, an instructor at Cameron Heights collegiate in Kitchener, said there were 10 competitors from four high schools in the event.

first

continued on page 2

snubbed by Ontario banks

Premier Mike Harris’ deai for students receives coid shouider Three of Canada’s major banks said no to Mike Harris’s proposal

should serve as a wake-up call to the Ontario government, said

Harris’s plan and the premier has done nothing to ease students’

for a post-secondary student aid

Liberal

David

program

Caplan.

burdens by allowing Universities and Colleges to increase their

in Ontario.

Liberal Colleges and University Lyn McLeod, said that

Critic,

student debt has sky-rocketed out

of control under Premier Harris. “The banks have said they are concerned with the debt load and believe government must provide a

Youth

Critic

Earlier this year, the government asked banks to submit a proposal

tuition fees

over the collection of student loans and soak up the

per

to

take

default.

to get debt down,” said in a recent press

Coupled with these proposals, Harris announced changes to the student tuition problem in the time it would take for students to pay

The banks’ acknowledgement

back their debt. However, this hasn’t happened.

plan

McLeod release.

that student debt is out of control

The

financial

community

rejected

by up

to 10 per cent.

Tuition increases have risen 32 cent since 1995 and, in

November

this year, another

20

per cent increase will be added to that over the next two years.

By the year 2000, Ontario tuition will have risen by almost 60 per cent since 1995, making postsecondary education somewhat of

This puts Ontario last in per capita funding for universities out of all of Canada’s provinces.

Also in 1995, cuts to the postsecondary operating grant fund were $400 million in total. This

$280 million cut and $120 million

calculates to a

to

universities

to

colleges.

With these new increases, students shares of operating costs will continue to rise as the Ontario government continues to offload the cost of education on

backs

a luxury available only to those

the

better off.

Caplan.

of

students,

said


I'age

2

— SFUKE, April

13,

1998

Co-op consultant assists search through June 19. The work term is a compulsory component of the

By Richard Berta

microcomputer software course, said David Sanders, a co-op and employment consultant.

Waterloo campus microcomputer software students will be going on

work placements

starting

May

25

Sanders also teaches a course in career development. During the work term students will have to find a placement in which they will be able to apply

knowledge

their

computer

of

employers.”

Sanders also helps students develop a job search action plan. Part of this action plan involves applying to companies which

software.

The microcomputer software program emphasizes the use of software applications, as well as networks, systems, operating

programming languages,

et

don’t advertise jobs.

“Eighty per cent of available jobs

al.

within a business setting.

are not advertised,” he said, “So,

Theprogram is 10 months long and there are about 55 people cur-

you

enrolled

rently

work

The

could

placement

Dave Fogartj'. “The career development com-

in the course,” said

involve students having positipns as a software technician, junior

programmer,

ponent

or

troubleshooter,

j

graduation, and what’s after that,”

service or help desk.

said

on

resumes

their

Internet. “I’ve applied for

on

have had a chance hone their skills through component in the program a where they developed software

the

to

107 jobs

monster board,” said student Gordon Rogerson. “So far.

for

I’ve received 17 replies.”

region.

the

Sanders

making

is

doing his part

large businesses

area

aware

many

students

of

current

program’s are looking

the

who

letters to

continued from page 1

tion.

Elmira institute, secondary school and Eastwood collegiate. Students were evaluated on a written test, wiring and schematic diagrams, and a wiring project, all to be completed within a 4 1/2 hour p»eriod. Co-chairing the project were electrical technology instructors Bruce Dunnington of Kitchener

The residential wiring contest was held next door, in the Quonset hut. Three high schools were

collegiate

represented, including Kitchener

all

McLeod The

institute,

and

Bill

of Eastwood collegiate.

high

targetting

such

a$

as

the

big

Manulife

employment

work

terms.

looking

after

their

seeking to

students are

ming course

said.

companies and Toyota

at

Doon, while

others

will be pursuing their studies at

and

colleges

other universities.

prcjspective

best

be

will

for

Canacja event invatjes Doon campus

collegiate

Whistance, who will be on the committee at the National skills competition, said there will be one Conestoga electrical technology Student competing in the provincial, which will have six colleges and four high schools in competi-

150 employers,” he

“I’m

students from the

all

class

Some

the

in

take on the computer program-

150

out

sent

“I’ve

agencies

non-profit

But not

in

the

in

for work.

...

Dawn Fasken.

Students

of the students have also

posted

Skills

about

thinking

us

got

being part of a software support

Many

Regional

the

at

said the course Students helped develop their skills for the working world. “There’s no stress

course,

the

in

stop

can’t

classifieds.”

according to Sanders.

Students who will be going on work terms in the microcomputer software program (left to right): Gordon Rogerson, Dawn Fasken, Jason Spencer, Dave Fogarty, Natalie Labine, Graeme Cullen and (Photo by Richard Berta) co-op and employment consultant Dave Sanders.

work

for

schools

supplied

necessary equipment for the

Grade

11

and 12 students. “The

kids get a good start on having their

own

tools

and equipment.”

The equipment

included a hard hat, safety boots, multi meter, receptacle tester, four kinds of pliers, hammer, four screwdrivers, hacksaw, a tool pouch to carry it all, and a carpenter’s brace or list

electric drill.

Dunnington said it is interesting see which high schools are represented in each category of

“If a school has teachers who are strong in electrical tech, for

category will go on to the one-

example, they encourage students

day

to enter that skills competition.”

5 and 6 at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium. Winners from the provincials will advance to the two-day national competition, and those winners will then train for one year and compete in a

A

and

reception

Doon

cafeteria’s blue

room following

competition,

to

announce

the

the

winners and to present them with awards of gold, silver or bronze medals. Other prizes

to

included gift certificates or

skills testing.

from Canada’s music and wooden plaques.

HMV

provincial

from

Skills

competition, to be held

closing

ceremonies were held in the

winners

Regional

CDs store,

each

Canada

May

four-day-long international runoff.

The

will

May

be

international competition

held

in

Montreal

1999.

Spoke - keeping yen informed

Don’t do

Textbook Drop Off Dates Drop off your textbooks to the DSA Office April 20 - August 14

No Books

will be accepted after

August 14

Until j

you

information available at the call

Jenn

at

DSA Office or

number!

Computer Help-Line

Phone:

More

call this

this!

Epiail:

(519) 748-5220 ext. 444

computercoach

748-5131 You’ll be glad you did!

in


SPOKE, AprO,

— Page 3

13 1998

Social services students win bursaries Pair wins

a combined $4,000 due

By Dan Meagher The

burden college

financial

placed on Heidi Woosley and Kim Le just got a bit lighter thanks to

students at the

request,

new

bursaries.

The two first-year

social services

Doon campus split Women’s Soroptomist

language

the

despite

problem and helped her pass the exam. It is that sort of persistence and

carries at the national level.

determination that she credits for her success, and she knows that it is directly related to hard work.

“This

really

is

Woosley

thrilling,”

was actually win this, but it’s

“I

said.

quite surprised to

“I try to be a

Le shared Woosley ’s enthusiasm new-found wealth, saying

watching out for us too, so I just try my hardest and things work

the

money will enable her to take summer courses and get her closer

out.”

to the ultimate goal of graduating.

Le has

“I love learning, lots

good role model for

my kids,” she said. “I know God is

great.”

for the

of doors

and hopefully open after

will

graduation,” she said.

The award, granted to a student head of a family, provides

at the

relief for the

women who

both

balance hectic schedules in order to attend classes,

and complete

Ever since arriving

Canada,

in

strived to better herself,

and she says that the award recognizes her hard work. “I try to tell my kids that hard

show them on a and they see me work at the

work is what matters.

I

that I got a nine out of ten test,

kitchen table for hours and hours, and finally they see my ten out of

Le was

their educational requirements.

ten on the next test.” But

Woosley said it is great to be able to come back to school full time, and that she has been able to

quick to note that marks are not her primary concern. She hopes to pass and graduate, and be content with the knowledge that she did

balance

her

with

studies

her

which was her first goal. “You have to schedule by the minute and not by the day,” she acknowledged as being the key to

her best.

succeeding. She also gave

realities

family

life,

to her claims she provided her and Le with good been have and references supportive throughout.

credit

who

instructors

Le seconded

that

motion and

said that the understanding of her

faculty supervisors has enabled her to achieve her goals.

The Vietnamese mother of two came to Canada 14 years ago and hairdressing from graduated

Le

despite

the certificates they received recognizing their awards from (Photo by Dan Meagher) Soroptomist International of the Americas.

Kim Le

said the bursary

time

when

comes

at

a

and Heidi Woosley show

(left)

off

she and Woosley were

financial the dreading involved with completing their two-year program. “We were

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Page 4

— SPOKE,

April, 13, 1998

Killing in

Jonesboro revives old gun debate

The

recent killing of children by children an elementary school in Jonesboro, Ark. has re-ignited the age-old debate about whether guns are the cause or the consequence of violence. For those who think guns are merely a product of humans’ violent impulses there is the comforting ditty “Guns don’t kill people, people do.’’ Then there are those who see guns’ raison d’etre as nothing but killing. An objective examination of the two viewpoints will find some truth in both. Guns were manufactured for the purpose of killing. But whether guns kill or wound animals or humans is left to the discretion of at

the user.

So it is futile to isolate either guns or people and single one or the other out as the culprit. True, guns by themselves will not kill.

But it is also true that an individual with a gun may kill more easily and without considering the consequences than if he had not had a gun to begin with. Why is this? Because it takes only a split second to fire a gun and another split second for it to hit its target - or anything else which happens to be in its way. Thus, it is the combination of people and guns which kill, not one or the often

A response

from cynics who would dilute of the responsibility from this combination will be that people with knives can kill, and so can people with axes, people with ropes, people with spears, etc.

some

But there is no other instrument that has such immediate effects as a gun, is as portable as a gun, or can offer its user the luxury of being a comfortable distance away from the person, people, animal or animals he is about to kill, without him having to wimess the gory results of his actions. Consider this: guns are the largest and cheapest component of arms sales, particulaxly the ubiquitous Kalashnikov rifle. Ever since arms sales skyrocketed some 25 years ago, the incidence of regional conflicts around the globe has risen.

Before

1973,

registered globally.

no

a

As of

less than

ally.

This

United

Nations

regional

conflicts

the

dozen

1993, this figure had risen to

72 armed conflicts internation-

is in

direct correlation with the

rise in

arms

sales

personal relations.

Clearly, the presence of guns increases the likelihood of armed, open conflict whereas

is

interstate

Pearl, Miss, last October, as well as

theme was Scott Poland, of

Of

relevant not only at the level relations, but also inter-

position before,” he said, as he recalled other school shootings in the U.S., including

makes

the utilization of

other, non-violent solutions a possibility.

of

this

the National Organization for Victims Assistance as he surveyed the carnage in Jonesboro. “Sadly, we’ve been in this

the lack thereof

course, this

Echoing

Jellyfish don’t bark, slobber or

West

Paducah, Ky. and one in Stamps, Ark. in December and Fairfax, Va. in February.

“The single greatest thing we could do to reduce the murder and suicide of young people,” Poland concluded, “is to reduce

gun

availability.”

claw furniture

Having one of these sea animals as a pet has become a very popular trend in Asia

By Jeannette Altwegg Some trendy

don’t have to clean up after them, even though their prices range from somewhat

of you must have heard about those

little

pets called jellyfish

which seem

be taking Asia by storm. Apart from being unusual and somewhat hypnotic, these things have been compared to the lava lamps of the hippie era. I never really was one for pets anyway, but to

jellyfish?

pet rock

must rate right up there with the idea of stupid hobbies of the

It

decade!

Apparently Japan is one of the largest jellyfish consumers in the world. According to a recent Globe and Mail article, nearly

359 tons of edible jellyfish were sold by Tokyo area wholesalers last year. Having been consumed as appetizers steeped in vinegar and soy sauce, jellyfish strips are a must for most well-to-do dinner table.

Yet, they are supposed to be very easy to take care of. For one thing, they don’t bite or

leave claw marks

They

exorbitant to outright exploitative.

on your

favorite chair.

also don’t slobber or bark, and

you

So what’s

the sudden

these jellyfish

hype about keeping as pets anyway?

Looking kind of like a mushroom on multiple legs, there’s nothing really extraor-

dinary about the creature except

The jellyfish can be bought,

its

somewhat of a status symbol. The Mercury article mentioned

price.

as

you have the money to waste, at apparently any and every pet store in Tokyo with prices ranging from about $20 to $54 Canadian each. However, without special tanks to keep these pets in, the jellyfish

if

trends are often set by single

who have nothing better to do than create something to waste their time 20s and 30s on.

would soon turn

And, with aquariums costing as much as $720, this indeed becomes an expensive hobby. (Can anyone say, ’’rin-

Buying a jellyfish for a pet seems almost as big a waste of time as when the idea for a

to jelly.

pet rock really took off.

whether they originated

off?)

As

Available with such extras as different colored pieces of filters for the aquarium so the creature’s

environment changes color according to your mood, this critter seems to find

its

way

into almost every

Tokyo home

SPOKE IS published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Editor:

Photo

Dan Meagher, Student

life

editor; Jeannette Altwegg; Issues

editor: Richard Berta; Production

Circulation

SPOKE

and

Conestoga College.

Activities editor Toria

Lone

manager; Lisa Roberts; Advertising manager; Casey JohnsonDonna Fierheller; Faculty supervisor; Jim Hagarty; Faculty adviser: Andrew Jankowskis address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

(Hmm?

in

Tokyo

I

wonder

also.)

for those trend-setting ladies of the

orient,

maybe they should

on something

concentrate more

that’s actually

worth an

effort,

like actually trying to get out into the real

world once in a while! (In other words, get a life!)

SPOKE the

that these

women in their

is

mainly funded from September to

May

by

Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and

opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or Qped; a WordPerfect or Word file would be helpful.

MS

Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, April

Journalism student’s photos published First year

You

Germany

from

moment

happens.”

first-year journalism student

has College transformed his love of photojournalism into a photo spread in a

His

Conestoga

photos

drew attention from the paper’s Toronto-based publisher, who was at the protests and witnessed

of

protest

the

of the protesters, as well as the imagination of the German publisher, with whom captured the

major European daily, as the result of a chance meeting. Darko Zeljkovic found his work gracing the pages of the Evening News, which is a Belgrade daily published in Germany. The paper has a circulation of 300,000 and sells 270,000 copies daily in the former Yugoslavia. His photos of the Kosovo protests in downtown Toronto

spirit

overnight

I

was shooting

at

them,”

Zeljkovic will maintain a working relationship on a voluntary basis

he

for the time being.

recollections of the

The budding photographer also remm to his homeland this summer to ply his trade on

Europe and he hopes to expand his network of contacts on the

He

plans to

Zeljkovic has entered

photos

might even go to Kosovo,” he said. “But I also plan to visit Canadian peacekeepers in Bosnia to do something on them.” “I

that

still

in

some of his

competitions

in

the

United States, and hopes the exposure will lead to some steady work. His next goal is to be published in Canada.

Zeljkovic can’t help but react

news

does, however, have fond way of life in

continent for future opportunities.

the frontlines, so-to-speak.

to the

said.

emanates

Darko Zeljkovic used work in a large paper.

his trusty

camera

to land himself

with the shutter.

me

allows

“It

to

express

myself despite the

language

barrier,

and

photos also draw an

immediate emotional which

reaction,

isn’t

always the case with the written word.”

Darko Zeljkovic “He said he was interested in my work and it ended up in a couple of papers over

there, including the

front page,” Zeljkovic said.

The eager student had been on hand to collect news photos for one of his courses, and was thrilled to get the chance to show his wares to a larger audience. Zeljkovic turned to the college’s

program

journalism

of

his

finding

hopes

in

after

calling

serving as a soldier on the Serbian side of the recent civil war in his

homeland.

He

love with the photoof journalism for

fell in

graphic

side

several reasons. “It allows

me

to express

language

the

despite

myself

barrier,”

Give yourself a job

Zeljkovic said.

“And photos also draw an immediate emotional reaction, which isn’t always the case with the written word.”

He

said

his

in

faith

his

abilities also triggered his

hopes of

in

photo-

landing

a

career

journalism. “I

know

I

can do

it.

Get up

to

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fill

out an application form, you are

someone are eligible. Students under 18 must have

the actually developing a business plan. Take

guarantee the loan.

completed form

to a participating

How

Bank. The bank

will

con

I

opply?

Pfck up an application at

any college

or university

is

branch of Royal

review the business plan and

decide on application approval.

The deadline to apply for a 1998 loan

a major

(Photo by Dan Meagher)

timing

professional

Zeljkovic ’s

— Page 5

his former home, even though he has tried to remove the war from his memory. “I was never for that war. I just didn’t understand it. One night I was partying with the guys, and

have to be there, right on when something

just

the

A

1998

Conestoga student sells photos of the Kosovo protest in downtown Toronto

By Dan Meagher

at

in

13,

June 12,1998

YOUTH OPPORTUNITIES ONTARIO


Page 6

— SPOKE, AprU

Skills By

13,

1998

Canada takes over woodworking centre The competitors were judged on different aspects of the

Lisa Roberts

Although Deckert complained of dusty the shop was that morning, she said she felt the competition was going well for

how

competing in the Students Waterloo County Regional Skills Canada competition invaded the

construction

such

and

management,

organizational abilities.

her.

woodworking centre

Pamela Deckert is an 18-year-old OAC student from Preston high school in Cambridge. She calls her

I

involvement in woodworking a

contest at

“freak accident.”

year-old

needed an extra course in Grade 10, and I liked woodworking so much I stuck to it,” she

12

to receive a

hands-on building experience on April

1.

Students

arrived

morning, and

at

early

8:30 a.m. they

started to construct sleigh

the

for

the

in

benches

Over 20 competed in

competition.

different high schools

time

as

materials

and

“I

to

Doon campus was

18-

from

Resurrection

secondary

Catholic

school

in

Kitchener.

“It’s

not the type of project

too

“It’s

much work and too little

time,” he said.

^

Simon, however. Green believed he could make a good showing for his high.school. Like

“My

I like

teacher

recommended

that I

enter the competitipn,” he said. “I

doing more intricate projects. I’m

guess he

just here to give

my best shot.”

my

division will

collegiate institute in Kitchener,

pressured

could represent

Winners from the woodworking go on to compete in

Devon Green, 18, a Grade 12 Cameron Heights somewhat

felt I

school”

student from felt

teachers to

said

felt

doing,” he confessed. “I’m into

Luke Simon, a Grade

student

Simon

he could best represent his school despite what he considered the effortlessness of creating the sleigii bench that morning.

he

do the best I can, but

enjoy being here,” she said. Another contender enjoying the

Recommended by his

explained.

the event.

“I’m here

enter the competition,

the

Provincial

morning.

Canada

Skills

competition on May Kitchener Auditorium.

that

6

in

the

Pamela Deckert, 18 goes to work on a sleigh bench she constructed for the recent Skills competition. Centre: Luke Simon, 18, is all smiles as he fits the pieceis together for a sleigh bench in the Woodworking building. Bom students were competing in woodw^l’kinp^r the Waterloo

Top

left:

,

Canada

County Regional

division for Skills

Canada on

April

(PhStos by usa Roberts)

1 .

Top

w

Regional Skills Canada competition chair Martin Grinwis oversle^s the woodworking competition as over 20 high schools took part in the cabinet [making competition. right:

HPboto by Donna

;

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'

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0 am - 1 pm the Sanctuary - TV Ropm 1

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Intornot dssigners By

Lisa Roberts

Students were marked on various such as the layout and design of the site structure and

-=

compete at Doon camDus '

categories

On April

1,

Doon

students

its

may have wondered why

invading

computer labs

easy

Competitors also received marks like using graphics and text, converting photographs to a “gif’ or “jpeg”

the

in the

pages,

and organization of

the content of the site, interactive availability for users to provide input, and readability.

several, high school pupils

were

individual

navigation

on completed tasks

“A”

format, and tables.

wing.

19-year-old David Shepherd, an Elmira District Secondary School student, decided to enter the competition because he feels

I

Early

college placements? A hands-on tour of Conestoga College? An April Fool’s Day gag? Actually, the real reason secondary school students were literal

was

present

to

contend in the

annual Skills Canada competition.

The Doon campus was chosen 1998 Waterloo County Regional Skills Canada event. Room 2A13 was in use for three to host the

contests: Internet website design,

computer animation and graphic design.

Students

participating

in

the

Internet design competition were asked to create a three-page website outlining the Skills

Canada competition. The websites had

to

include items such as graphics and text, thumbnail photos that could be enlarged by clicking on them, links to external

home

W

pages.

Competitors

were also to incorporate two of five options, including Java script, image maps and frames. The pages were .'to be viewable

in either Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 or Netscape 4.0 or earlier. !

he’s well versed in the Internet.

He

said that he

wanted to promote by representing it, and hoped to win a medal. I taught myself web design through sites on the Net,” explained Shepherd. “I took some courses at school, but most of the the

school

computers there are useless now.” Shepherd, who graduated from the Elmira high school in 1997 and returned this year to complete his calculus course, said he got

OAC

started in

computers

of age

when he Commodore 64.

at five years

got his

first

His first program was completed by the time he was 10. However, he confessed he was a late bloomer when it came discovering^ Internet.

to

got into the Net two years ago,” said Shepherd. “I got my first connection to web design ftere. I enjoy surfing the Net for information on design, but I don’t stick to particular webI first

sites. I

Vista

usually use

-

you get

Yahoo or Alta where you

to

cVnsTru’ci^TS;7heSk1irsCa“n;d^^ the Internet design division of the annual event^^ need to go by using them.”

grammatically,”

Shepherd, who wound up in third place for Internet design, intends to take

courses in electronics at the Doon campus next year.

Other winners included Melissa 17, and her partner, Mike Kowalski, 18. The two students of St. Mary’s high school in Kitchener won the graphic design

Woods,

includes negotiating rapids like Phil’s Hole, the Greyhound Bus

Wilderness 'Runs Whitewater Rafting is bt^ldmg fceir 12th annnal wet and wild weekend,

Eater, Butcher’s Knife and the

and are inviting college .students from across Ontario to diallenge the class

3

to 5 rapids of the

Ottawa River from June 5 to 7. The guided raft trips on main channel of die O^wa Rivi

Coliseum, which can

and

rafts

flip entire

their contents into the

Woods, a Grade

1 1

student, said

she worked well with Kowalski. According to Woods, she was better at coming up with the written

components

for

then-

but Kowalski excelled at handling the artistic aspects.

project,

“I

make

sure

things

work

weekend’s festivities. Kayaks and canoes are also available. A.S an added bonus, students are able to enjoy Ontario’s only fixed

bung^ jump tower.

pveitumed

Alastair Baird or

is

rafters

so everybody

gaaaanteed a safe

Be^h ball

trip,

volleyball, tug-of-war.

hockey and other

athletic

won

third

she it

said,

for

“and

competed here last year for the category, and in ‘96 was in small engines,” he said. Both separate school students said they were excited just to compete, and neither expected to “I

Kowalski, an OAC student, has been interested in computers since he entered high school and was

recommended by his teachers to enter this year’s Skills Canada.

University

take

home first prize

in the graphic

design division.

Conestoga College would likn to announce a new graduate program in

Human Resources Management (Co-op) 48-week program, you can gain credits CEBS. CCA & CPA designations.

for CHRP,

Apply

now for

Fall

98, call the College Information

Centre for details: 51 9-748-5220.

ext.

656.

Conestoga

For more information contact

Mark Gaud

& College Graduates

Continue Your Studies in a Dynamic Profession

In this

College

at-

Wilderness Tours: 1-800-2679166, or e-mail at wt@wilder-

[j

nesstoiffs.com.

of The

Week Tues. April 1 1

Toung comenaers of Piotr Kiostecki, Jeff Vala, Megan House skyrider for the Skills Canada competiton. The Grade 7

school

in

Kitchener.

and Christina Waish (not shown) build and 8 students are from Canadian Marty (Photo by Casey Johnsor

in

same

artistic

ivioifle

The team

place

(Photo by Lisa Roberts.)

content.”

competitions are included in the

Not to worry, though guides are able to collect all liver.

oversees

partner

competition.

Students invited to Whitewater rMing weekend Interested in going whitewater rafting?

Mike

^

'

:30

1

am

The Sanctuary


Howard Stern approach

to

comedy

Politically incorrect

comedian pays .

and

for you.

By Anita Santarossa

comedian

Canadian

Russell

isn’t reluctant to

his heritage, or

make fun of

anyone

else’s, for

And he especially who pretend to be of a

matter.

on leprosy

Peters stopped by the Sanctuary, March 31 for a free nooner,

hates those

are not your flavors of the day,

sponsored by the Doon Student

different ethnic origin than they

Associatioft.

really are.

If

explicit

sex-talk,

incorrectness and jokes

go home! However,

if

political

you enjoy

Stem-like Howard more a approach to comedy, here’s a show

Peters, 27, a

was

Brampton

native,

raised in an East Indian family

that

“I hate those guys who go around with their shirts undone and gold chains hanging around their necks,

pretending they are ginos. Italians are the real ginos,” said Peters

during his

^^>-1

.

ji-

said Russell. “Canadians think

are funny, but they don’t

know

let

you you was

Conservativism main complaint . with

it.”

Peters’

decided

‘Tm too much

of

it

When

for

someone”

on

life,”

Peters

said in an interview following his

show. as a stand-up comic then stopped for two

He began in

1989

years.

In 1993 he

he

where

asked

gets

his career choice

be honest and I play off of stuff that I know, and even stuff that I

would

but would

know

to

like

never do.”

Aside from his regular schedule, black for performs

Peters

was 24 and then wasn’t what I wanted to

my

and even writing, for

his material for his act, he said pretty much everywhere. “I like to

Russell Peters,

until I

rest of

continue to wants Peters stand-up comedy, but is interested starred in a lowbudget films. Canadian film Boozecan, directed by Nicholas Campbell in 1996.

a

smart ass to work

act.

do for the

.

Arabs.”

He

competitively for a while.

boxed

vAflor to tr» us, nc they th^V call rail us they do refer

in acting,

Canadian audiences.

Peters said he wasn’t into school so he became a comedian. But before he got into comedy, he and did it enjoyed boxing

“I

visit

met manager

George Carlin, who advised Peters on stage as much get to as he could. “George is my inspiration and idol,”said Peters. “He is the one that put me in the

only thing that Peters is job his about dislikes

The

unresponsive audiences. “Shitty audiences, that’s the worst, but it all comes with the territory

beast,

Peters really enjoys his work,

it’s

the nature of the

guess.”

One major

criticism Peters has

American his concerning audiences is that they do not recognize East Indians. “Americans

think

we

(East

Indians) don’t exist,”said Peter.

removed from any type of media, and when

“We

spotlight.”

I

and

are

totally

especially the sleeping-in part.

nights for the Nubian Disciples of Pryor in Toronto and accompanies Mastermind Street

comedy

Jam on Monday and Tuesday evenings, between midnight and a.m., on Energy 108.

1

Peters has a great spontaneous that incorporates audience

act

no-bull a with Canadians should relax a little and try to get p^t this political correctness thing and just

participation attitude.

enjoy, said Peters. “Call an owl an owl,” said Peters. “It

won’t offend anyone.”

CORRECTION

“I’m too much of a smart ass to work for someone and I

my own

enjoy being in control of life.”

Peters has had the opportunity to go international with his show. He has performed for audiences in Denmark, Sweden, England, Ireland, Germany, eind the United States.

comedian Russell Peters the Sanctuary lounge March 31

International

nooner

in

.

performs

at

a free

(Photo by Casey Johnson)

He said that his best audiences have been in England and the U.S. “Canadians are terrible people to perform for, whether you are in comedy, music, theatre or anything involving the performing arts,”

Congratulations to t^e rondor men’s hockey team members (left to right): Mike Traynor, week’s Darryl Sinclair and Jason Snyder were misidentified in last edition. Sooke reerets the error.

DSA Award Winners

SPOKE

Award

of Distinction Gerry Cleaves Jack Fletcher Teresita Llanes Sean Hunter Jennifer Veitch

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SPOKE, AprU

Local

Gardner said he believes science have a role to play in society because they tend to keep up with scientific literature fiction writers

The

Waterloo Library held a

Public special

reading on April 4 to raise fiinds for the

WPL. The

Friends of the

event featured

author Janies Allan Gardner who read some

local

Aan

better

He

listed

the rest of the world.

Connie

Willis,

Gene

Wolfe and especially Terry Pratchett as his personal favorites. humor,” he said. “I like the whole range of science fiction but I keep coming back to com“I like

edy.”

passages from two of his recent works.

enjoy showing people a

“I

Gardner read a 30-minute pasfrom his latest release. Commitment Hour, from Avon Books, as well as a short story entitled Muffin Explains Teleosage

The former

Rose Olesen, president of

Gardner’s latest work. His first effort. Expendable, was first published in 1997 by Avon and is now in its third printing.

Friends of the

set in the

WPL

He

also recognized the contribu-

Mary

Shelley

and H.G. Wells as visionaries and pioneers of the genre.

enough

Gardner said Arthur C. Clarke and the late Gene Roddenberry, the producer and chief writer of the popular Star Trek television series.

will

have changed a

far

away

lot

that things

but not so

would be

wonky.”

ence fiction on the map,” he said. Gardner doesn’t read science fiction as

much anymore. He says he when he

prefers to read mysteries

reads for pleasure.

Among

contemporary

— Page 9

the collection at

WPL.

The reading was

set

side

Olesen

She says there are more readings in the

the

library,”

said.

plans for

future but she will have to wait and

up

to raise

the profile of the library and to increase public awareness of its

see

how much money

this

event

raised.

Admission to the reading was $4, with a portion going to the

WPL

activities.

“I enjoy

of

different

showing the people a

endowment

fund.

favorites. In fact, he studied under Mitchell at a writers’ workshop in

is

pleased to be

WPL

and he has been an active patron for more than 20 years. Rose Olesen is the president of the Friends of the

money

WPL, an all-vol-

Olesen

worked event.

her

is

working

to

for the library.

one of the people who Gardner to the She has a passion for is

to bring

libraries that artists,

Adopt-a-Book and Adopt-a-BestSeller programs that have added nearly $2,0(K) worth of books to

He also is a big fan of a number of Canadian authors. He cited Margaret Atwood, Robertson Davies and WO. Mitchell as his

raise

25th century. Gardner said he likes that time frame because “it’s far in the future that things

“I think he (Roddenberry) has a place in history for keeping sci-

unteer group that

tions of Jules Verne,

Both of his novels are

tions.

able to help the

library.”

is

have made significant contribu-

Banff in 1976. Gardner said he

different side of the

logy to the World at Large.

1998

author gives reading

sci-fi

By Michael Hilborn

13,

days

was nurtured during

Wilfred Laurier University where she majored in English and economics. at

Olesen has also been involved in other fundraising events, including

Local science fiction author James Allan Gardner read passages from his recent works at Waterloo Public Library April 4. Gardener enjoys setting his fiction in the 25th century. (Photo courtesy of Linda Carson)

More signs The

or spring!

on the last day of March this year following a long warm spell Jonquils are the earlist-flowering members of the daffodil family: their outer ring of petals is a pale cream color unlike the daffy’s pure yellow. These bulbs were planted on the sunny south side oi first

jonquils started flowering

Doon’s main building

in

a protected nook.

(Photo by Victoria Long;

AHENTION YOUR A SPORTS ENTHUSIAST WHO IS IF

OUTGOING AND HAS

97/98 ATHLETIC

AWARDS BANQUET FRIDAY APRIL 17, 1998 THE CLARION INN, KITCHENER $7.00

PER PERSON

ON SAU AT THE KECNEATION CENTRE

EXCELLENT LEADERSHIP QUAUTIES, WE WANT YOU!

JOIN SAC. APPLICATIONS ARE

NOW BEING

ACCEPTED FOR THE 1998-99 STUDENT ATHLETIC COMMITTEE. DROP OFF YOUR RESUME AT THE RECREATION CENTRE NO LATER THAN THURSDAY, APRIL 16 TO MARLENE FORD.

--


— SPOKE, April

Page 10

13,

1998

Mexican coffee grower on speaking tour Tributaries cafe hosts gathering to promote fair trade

concept

By Victoria Long

made in a restored historical Guelph April 1 when Gutberto Osorio

History was

building in Olivera, a

Zapotecan indigenous coffee grower from the State of Oaxaca, spoke to coffee lovers gathered to hear about the changes coffee co-ops have made in the lives of growMexico.

ers’ families in

m

ing in age from a few months to

mittee

He was

raised speaking

Zapotecan but learned Spanish

after a long, involved process in

which

groups supporting fair trade in Europe played a major role. “It was a big headache for us to get

solidarity

it,”

he

Recently,

co-op

his

enter the North

started

Aey aim to

American market

with their organic coffee in the near future, he said. Olivera talked to the group about

WELL BE LOOKING TO HIRE

the real costs of producing coffee

RETURNING STUDENTS

and the improved standard of living his community has experico-op got since the enced

Supponad by Doon Stud*r< Aisodafon

First,

up

the speaking

a larger portion of the sale

growers’ co-op because the sale

Europe,

in

is

distributors

America or

North

Japan. There are no intermediaries, middlemen, to take a cut,

cooperatives. Tributaries has just

vehicles and storehouses as well as

community development pro-

jects including schools

and health

clinics, she said.

Third, Graham said the co-ops encourage environmentally sound production methods which reduce or avoid chemical fertilizers or dangerous pesticides. “Most specialize in shade coffee that preserves the forest and provides

including

Olivera brought a wallhanging with him that shows the organization of the co-op. Rooted in fami-

America which have

North migrated

songbirds

from

south for the winter.” Lastly, fair trade buyers extend credit

and offer long-term con-

has

tracts to cooperatives so the years

He

of intensive cultivation that precede the first harvest will not go unrewarded, a situation which has

branches symbolizing the fruits of their cooperative labor. said the greater profits

from

coffee growing have enabled the co-op to do a number of beneficial projects in the community and establish a regional warehouse so members can buy basic needs in bulk at lower prices. One ongoing

project

replacing leaky thatch

is

roofs with corrugated metal, he said.

(Photo by Victoria Long)

and shared transportation

tools

many

faith, the tree

Guelph.

a restored downtown

traded coffee bought from grower

critical habitat for birds,

community and

is in

historical building in

Second, the growers cooperatives of their income in member education, production invest part

organized.

ly,

Tributaries cafe

she said.

in

said.

exporting to Japan and

Peer Services

set

tour.

made directly to coffee

(Photo by Victoria Long)

TALK TO YOUR FACULTY OR DROP IN TO STUDENT SER VICES!

who

Days com-

He told the gathering his 2,800member co-op is one of the larger

Gutberto Osorio Olivers and tour organizer Julie Graham of Ten Days For Global Justice talkwith members of the audience for Olivera’s presentation on April 1 in Guelph.

IF INTERESTED

for Global Justice’s national

price for the beans goes to the

and better organized of small cofgrower co-ops in Mexico, Central and South America. Olivera said his co-op got a license to export to Europe in 1985

98/99

Julie

said

later.

fee

^5 TUTORS FOR THE NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR

national

resource coordinator of Ten

their 80s.

WE

Graham,

through his spoke Olivera Spanish translator, Joan Atlin, to a friendly group of about 40, rang-

occurred in the past or to nonorganized growers, when the world coffee-market price goes

down. The guaranteed minimum

In addition to promoting fairly

installed its

own

coffee roaster so

can custom-roast the beans Farmers from the bought in Co-operative Rainforest Chiapas, Mexico. These are organic beans and the cafe’s brochure Coffee Brewed With Justice: Fair Trade Comes To Guelph says, “It has been reported that non-organic coffee is the world’s most heavily sprayed food prodthat

it

uct.

...

Tributaries coffee

is

grown

without chemicals. This means the farmers are not exposed to chemicals while growing the beans, and the coffee drinker in Guelph has a healthier product to consume.” sustainably

roasting coffee reminiscent of a giant antique woodstove with shining brass accents. After Olivera spoke, Tributaries’

machine

is

one of the co-op members, Jo Burnside, demonstrated the art of coffee roasting. As the beans were

aroma

filled the cafe

price

ensures growers a return

heated, the

from

their investment that will

and many of the crowd congregated around to see the process take

cover the cost of production at a fair wage, she said.

place.

Since 1987, the co-op has run a campesino (small farmer) education centre

RETURNING STUDENTS

must work, having the to the centre means they can return home and pass on

the adults

children

Fall

Semester Classes

come

the information learned, Olivera said.

“Our

Begin Monday August 31

which teaches children

of farmers the techniques used in organic coffee production. Since

priority is to protect the

land by not using harmful chemicals,” he ??id. Olivera is on a speaking tour to

promote the idea of fair trade in coffee and hopes to establish partnerships in time.

He

Canada

is in

at the

same

the process of nego-

an agreement with two Native Canadian groups as well as tiating

To Receive Marks And Registration Information Registrar's Office

Must Have Your Summer Address

businesses like Tributaries which are committed to promoting fair trade.

One of the owners of Tributaries Cafe, a worker co-operative in the downtown area of Guelph, Bill Barrett, said Tributaries coffee is certified Fair

Trade coffee and the

13 cents per pound license fee Tributaries pays for the logo is well worth the price. displaying Products

Tra^Mark

the

logo

Jo Burnside, a member

of the Tributaries

are guaranteed to provide benefits

of the operators of their

new

TransFair or Fair to both producers

and consumers.

co-op

in

Guelph,

is

one

coffee roaster. (Photo by Victoria Long)


SPOKE, AprU

13,

1998

— Page 11

Engineering students receive

awards

academic prowess

for

By Dee Bettencourt

the

Grand

Valley

Chapter

Mark

R. Brown (mechanical engineering technician, numerical

of

OACETT mother It was a moment would cherish. Thelma Devries

(Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians

OACETT

applauded as her son, Peter Allen

walked past the coffee, beverages and catered desserts to accept an award for distinguished academic achievement in ele 9 tronics engineering Devries,

24,

technology,

i

telecommunications

systems, on April

3.

“I’m here to cheer him on,”, said Mrs. Devries. “When he works at something, he does a bang-up job.” So have seven other welldeserving engineering technicians and technologists, all within their final year at Conestoga College.

The eight students were selected by faculty members for attributes such as high academic standing, ability to work in a team, and completing assignments on time. Each received a 13- by 16- inch, gold-framed plaque, presented by Jeff

Rowenn

Guild

in the

Student/Client

the

building.

Rowenn

is

a

and

technician),

dues from approximately 20,000 members. The OACETT Act reserves the titles of Certified Engineering Technologist or Technician (CET) for graduates of a three-year program, and Certified Technician (CTech) for graduates of a two-year program. Rowerm encouraged the students

Lagassie

engineering

Brenda

M.

engineering

(civjl

technology).

Lagassie, 21, the only female was all smiles as she speculated hard work on and off

recipient,

campus may have

led to this day’s recognition of her achievements.

have been working part time year and full time summers at Conestoga Rovers for “I

during the

to consider joining the association in order to obtain

four years,” she said. “It’s a lot of work, but it has helped guarantee

one of the above designations and

my spot in the civil program and at

upon ^aduation help

to

collectively

maintain

work.”

recognition by their industry.

The following

Devries

students joined

is

Robert

already on

J.

said

he

has

already

received one job offer and another

Devries in the award presentation: Riel (construction engi-

on

its

way. “This award

is

my resume,” he said.

J.

ing technician), Jamie

McGregor

in front of

bench

(electrical engineer-

engineering

tronics

Judge stands

Ted Doggett, a Conestoga woodworking tech student, helped judge the regional Skills Canada competition in woodworking centre on April 1 1 998. (Photo by Donna Fierheller) ,

neering technology), Christopher

Services

of

(welding

Goll

member-

ship

Room of

member

funded

is

primarily through annual

Pette

T.

(mechanical engineering technology, design and analysis), Shawn D.

a nonprofit profes-

is

sional association that

Shawn

control),

and Technologists).

Bos

(elec-

technician).

Bubble wrap book began in barroom By Anita Santarossa

alternative uses for bubble wrap.

Ever wonder what else to do with that bubbly packaging material besides popping it? Well, now there is a book that lists and illustrates an array of uses for this plastic air-filled wrap that everyone

Dress from Ripley’s Believe

Inspired

fights over at Christmas.

Written by the Spam Guy (aka Joey Green) and Ae Duct Tape Guy (aka Tim Nyberg), The Bubble Wrap Book may seem like a joke. But don’t count your bubbles before they break, because this

book provides some

interest-

ing and cost effective solutions to life’s

little,

and sometimes

big,

problems with just a little help from bubble wrap. For instance,/ what better idea than using bubble wrap as a cushion to cover those hard stadium seats

at

baseball

or

by Brenda

in the

Red Or

It

Not Museum, Green and Nyberg collaborated on their written effii^, on a bunch of bar napkins, to produce this fascinating book on bubble wrap. So take a seat in your favourite bubble-wrap padded chair with your bubble-wrap pillow and bubble-wrapped cat curled beside your bubble wrap slippers and enjoy this

inventive,

practical

entertaining

book on

and

the uses of this

Don't get a Shock!

usually stress-relieving product.

The website address on Bubble Wrap book

technology instructors Bill McLeod (left) of Eastwood collegiate, and Bruce Dunnington Kitchener collegiate institute co-chaired the Skills Canada residential wiring competition 1 998, in the electrical centre. (Photo by Donna Fierheller)

Electrical

the

http://www. octane.com/bubblewrap.html.

(right) of

is:

April

1

,

football

games? And why not stuff your shoes with bubble wrap to soothe those aching feet?

^'^branch'"^'^

Green and Nyberg have also sug-

some things to avoid doing with bubble ^rap. Though it may be a very useful and cost- effective

Canadian Institute OF Management

gested

product, there are several things that they 'suggest we avoid.

According to Green and Nyberg some bubble wrap uses

here are

we 1.

suit

2.

should avoid:

Never make a deep-sea diving out of Bubble Wrap Never use Bubble Wrap as a

pincushion

Leading The

Way For Over 50 Years

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN MANAGEMENT Learn about the

CIM program in the Conestoga College

Continuing Education Catalogue

Never bury a loved one at sea a Bubble Wrap body bag

3.

in

4.

Never

microwave

Bubble

Wrap The Bubble Wrap Book comes comple^, with

a brief history explaininjg its origins, along with unresting facts. It even provides^ interaction with its reader^ by adding bubble wrap trivia quiz

or

Phone or Write

CANADIAN INSTITUTE

MANAGEMENT

jFIRST^vUNITEDICHURCH > >^i|y n B a n d William

17

Friday; Appli ^

«ree

Saturday Aprn 18

^

^l\ioon^-^

^8 am

-

1

pm pm

-

Proceeds support scholarships and cornmunity projects.

or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE of MANAGEMENT National Office

also tjffers suggestions on how to get your hands on firee bubble

1-800-387-5774

wrap and welcomes your ideas on

either

Grand Valley Branch P.O. Box 24083, R.P.O. Evergreen Kitchener, Ontario N2M 5P1 (519) 896-3165

questkms. It

of

todonM^books PLEAsrtAix: 740-5^ accepted itnlif Frid^, April

mmmmiiidA-

i

jI"*':'-'''

-

-

XC-

'


Page 12

— SPOKE, April

13,

1998

Aubrey Hagar Award

Distinguished teacher to be announced soon By Jeannette Altwegg Teaching Award winner will be announced within the next week or so, according to the selection committee’s chair, Jane McDonald

she has been chairing the selection committee for the last three years. The award is given to a full-time Conestoga faculty member who has proved him or herself iimovative and creative, demonstrating integrity and professionalism, and

in a recent interview.

excellence in curriculum develop-

The Aubrey Hagar Distinguished

McDonald, who

is

the profes-

sional development consultant for ’'the entire

Conestoga College, said

ment, said McDonald. ’’Someone who would promote the college within the college and

in

community

the

as a whole,

she said.

Nominations closed March 9 and

McDonald

said that, as part of the committee, she is really looking forward to selecting one of this year’s

nominees as the

recipient.

usually very difficult to pick

were all absolutely wonderful. Winners will receive $800 in professional development funds as well as a liripipe and a framed Conestoga College coat of arms. The Aubrey Hagar Distinguished Teaching Award was created to

award were created by college with help from senior management, the faculty union, and Hagar himself. Hagar was an administrator with faculty

the college for 17 years before he retired in 1986, said

McDonald.

a winner, she admitted.

recognize the outstanding contribution and or leadership of a facul-

Faculty and union representatives created the Aubrey Hagar

six

ty

member. The selection committee and criteria for the

Distinguished Teaching Award to recognize Hagar’s many roles as

”It’s

”We had nominees from a wide range of college areas this year and they

director of academic and college planning as well as director of strategic planning.

instructors from all Conestoga College’s programs are chosen by a committee comprising representatives from all schools in the college. Usually chaired by the professional development consultant, this committee also includes for-

Full-time

This

is

where those

all-nighters really pay

areas

off.

of

mer recipients of the

distinguished

teaching award winners. Together

members choose the wiimer and individuals are usually notified directly by the president, McDonald said, adding that the these faculty

llievfolet

acknowledgement

official

is

at

convocation. 36 inonths/$1,150 down

This year’s nominees are Martin Hare, engineering technology (mechanical); Jake Huschilt, engineering technology (electronics); John Kroisenbrunner, trades and

engine, 5-speed manu transmission, 4-wheel ABS, dua front air bags, rear spoiler, tinted dining front bucket 2.2

technology; Maureen Nummelin, (business) management studies; Bev Walker, college access and

preparation studies; and George

dy side moulding

Woods,

trades and apprenticeship.

CBSA banquet to be held this Thursday By Amanda

Pickling

The aimual Conestoga Business awards Association banquet that will be held April 16 at the Four Points, 105 King St. E., Kitchener, is a good networking Students

experience, said the

CBSA

presi-

dent.

Employers come from outside of the college to the banquet, said

president Lia Chamicovsky. A nomination for an award even gets student’s

a

TUnill)

name

recognized,

she said.

TliSTED

--And

X TRUE

There are about three nominaper award, said CBSA

for

tions

Vice- President

1598 (levrolft

You

dlierZZ4

FEATURING: Glass sliding electric sunroof, AM/FM stereo with CD player, 2.4 litre Twin Cam engine, fog lamps, sport suspension, rear spoiler, 16"

cast-aluminum

wheels, cruise control

Raymond

Phillips.

don’t have to be nominated to

attend the awards banquet, said Chamicovsky. Winning and nominated students will benefit from the recognition, said Chamicovsky. The award is an excellent thing to put on a resume because employers really notice those things, she said.

The master of ceremonies will be Gordon who is a faculty member of the materials management Ian

program, said CBSA Treasurer Leilani Anderson. Presenters of the awards are from the business’ they are representing, she said.

a 36 month lease. A mimmum down payment or trade ol Si 150 and S300 secunly aepc.:ii arc required Annual k.iometre iim*t 20.000 eopiy to per excess ktlometre. Other lease options available 'tFreighi t$620'. licence taxes and msuf ince n:: .“-ludcd Oeai<»r ma, set 3? lease br less new or demonstrator models of Cavaiie: Coupe and Cavahe' 224 equipped .^s described dealer order or uade may be necessary, .ind applies to qualified retail customers m Southwestern Ontario only. Limited time offers which may not be comblr^ed with ether otb-"^ See your Chevroir-r Oidsmob'te deaic *•*' dm.nis “Graduate rebate subject to program rules. o

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the lease of 1998

There are often alumni students and past winners who present as well, said Anderson. The awards banquent will be succeeded by the final biz bash, said Chamicovsky. The $18 ticket for the awards banquet includes a free ticket to the bash at Sammy’s, but students don’t have to go to both events, said Chamicovsky.

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