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Conestoga College, Kitchener 30th Year

— No. 9

March 9, 1998

Stricter rules

for recipients

of financial aid Students must pass 60 per cent of a full courseload or OSAP eligibility will be lost for a full year, says Carol Walsh, manager of financial services.

By Richard Berta

courseload to retain OSAP

full

Conestoga

College

will

begin

dis^iUty may or may not be exempted from these requirements

provincial new a government pohcy to make the

Conestoga

continued

see page 3

OSAP

the college’s disaetion.

Walsh

September 1998. policy requires a full-time

60 per cent of

student to pass at least

commi:ntar\ Page 5

services at the

registrar’s office.

coLu:(ii:

Lii

Po«»es 6. 7.

Students who pass less than 60 per cent for two successive terms will

i:

] ()

Reaping the benefits of becoming an alumni see

i:

I

page

/0

suspended as a

demic year programs and August for three-semester-a

Hams said.

applying for OSAP assistance again.

available to

More

who have a permanent

Students

programs.

year

information will be

made

OSAP recipients in April,

Harris said.

really a last stop for a “

amount.

Erica Ayliffe

In fact, by the time the Jail-a-

The Doon Student Association has agreed to throw one of

members

executive

one hour

in

its

for

jail

money for a YWCA women’s

to raise

Kitchener

Around 70 other business and political leaders in the area

have

signed up to be assigned a phony charge to support Mary’s Place.

Profile

on

Steve

Chiassoii

of

Combridg^ see page 16.

()l

1

hi: y !

Thon takes place there will be a new executive running the DSA, so ICroeker doesn’t know who will be

Waterloo Region police chief, Larry Gravell, will be reading the charges at Conestoga Mall May 8 and 9 and the people involved have to raise money to free themselves from confinement. “Everybody who has agreed to charged be will participate

with something,” said Madeleine Poynter, vice-president of the and a social Kitchener

YWCA

member

faculty

services

at

Conestoga. “Then they must raise a certain amount of money in order

The event

release

party

.see page

11'

said

he

how

is

on maternity leave,

DSA office while she tied up (Pho^ by

Erica Ayliffe)

'

Poynter,

who

is

also

meals a day and either a private or semi-private room. usually full to the point where we have women sleeping “It’s

on the couch in the TV lounge and on the couches in the board room and the waiting room,” said capacity.”

program

goal of raising $840,000, which matches the YWCA’s address

84 Fredrick St., Kitchener. Mary’s Place is also located in this at

building.

group has raised $500,000 and hopes to raise between $75,000 and $100,000 far

the

during the Jail-a-Thon. Part of the money raised, said Poynter, will go to paying

YWCA’s

,

deficit.

The

the

rest will

be

women who are escaping violent situations, women with mental problems, women who have

parental

home

of

pioneer

YWCA

the

Kroeker said the

after

early in

DSA

decided

involved to support the community. He also said donating get

to

the

the

DSA

It’s^

behind

the

event

a Jail-a-thon. She said the organization thought it would be a fun way to raise money. Poynter became involved with

YWCA

the

two years ago. She

said one of the main reasons she was interested was because of the challenges in funding

Place was facing and challenging situations the

Mary’s the

residents face.

The

Jail-a-thon

is

also

being co-sponsored by Sims Clements Eastman, a law firm in Kitchener.

Conestoga gets a million

Kitchener.

which needs between $50,000 to $60,000 in repairs a year. Some money will also go to the 53-bed shelter, which is one of the VWCA’s major programs. “

symbolism being

for various reasons.

The shelter was named Mary Kaufman, who was an

invested with the interest going to the repair costs of the building,

shelter,

homes

been evicted from and a number of young women 16 of ages the between their left have who 20 and their

to

Poynter said of the

over

at

Poynter said the shelter houses

at the college.

The Freedom Fund began with a

So

usually

“It’s

fire chiefs from Lawrence Bingeman of Jim and Park Bingeman’s Brickman of Brick Brewing. no is there said Poynter

along with cities,

costs the shelter $45 a day woman. That includes three

Poynter.

the organi-

zation will be raising the money and isA’t sure, of the donation

much

YWCA fundrais-

It

per

counselling continuing education

isn’t sure

part of a

number of

women.

the co-ordinator of the applied

a donation to the YWCA. DSA president Chris Kroeker said

is

ing initiative called the Freedom Fund which started two years ago,

from jail. The people and businesses involved can raise the money however they want. It will result in

to escape

ACME’S CD

jailed.

larger three-year

shelter.

K

who

shelter •roceeds from the event to be donated to a YWCA women’s both

14, 15, 16

By

C llKC

Future grad? Vicky Lichty, the DSA’s receptionist brought her newborn son, CJ, into the some loose ends.

agrees to throw member in jail

SPORIS Pages

OSAP

year of post-secondary education at his or her own expense before

9

-

their

The college reports grades to the Ministry at the end of the academic year - May, for two-term per aca-

their eligibility

full

ATHRPS

Pages 8

have

policy.

revoked for a minimum of 12 monflis. Conestoga College registrar Fred Harris said a student must successfully complete a

have

was uncertain how would

students in the college

result

full

manager of financial

said she

many

of this change. But 430 students failed a term during the 19961997 academic year and thus could be expected to be affected by the new

courseload to be ehgible for OSAP, according to Carol Walsh,

a

period of disability, at

during their

eligibiUty contin-

gent on a student’s grades, effective

The new

eligi-

Students with a temporary

bihty.

enforcing

to

must pass 40 per cent of a

disability

maybe

YWCA to the

will

introduce

community and

gain sponsorships for the

organization or the school. Both the mayors of Kitchener and! Waterloo

are .participating.

Klaus Woemer, president and CEO of Automation Tooling Systems Inc. (ATS), was to announce a donation of Conestoga to $1,(XX),(X)0 College on Feb. 26. Details will be in the March 16 issue of SPOKE.


I

Page 2

— SPOKE, March

9,

1998

NEWS

Conestoga Rita Fatila

Protestors rally against * possible attack on Iraq

course

fast-track By

offers

and mathematics. Boutilier program will depend on their strengths and weaknesses in these five areas. the arts

said the individual’s

Conestoga’s Waterloo campus a

offering

new program

is

to help

hi^

adults prepare for the Ontario

school equivalency certificate test

on the development

In an information session

education

general

program Feb. 19, Violet Boutilier, a Waterloo campus administrator and academic coach, said the program helps people to achieve their certificate,

but

will

help

“We’ll customize

what people

want,” she said. “If they just want

Approximately 70 demonstrators ralli^ at Kitchener City Hall’s

math, then they’ll just do math.”

Civic Square

to

it

Students will work in the Waterloo

campus’ StarLab, which

2010 courseware.

offers Star

Boutilier gave a

brief demonstration of the interactive

GED

courseware,

them

questions as they appear on the

achieve a post-secondary education

screen,

too.

session.

which asks students

during

information

the

The $500 course is approximately 60 hours long. Students can also have private instmction in areas where they have trouble and can write shorter practice versions of the offical

GED tests.

“That’s not to say that everyone

needs

said Sharon dean of academic assessment and special projects. “But

preparation,”

Kalbfleisch,

then there are those people

cocky and walk right Violet

administrator and academic coach for the Boutilier,

GED/Literary Centre Waterloo campus. (Photo by Rita

on

very flexible and works well people wanting to get into

“It’s

for

To be

in there

how to do fractions.” For those who need

are

and

GED

preparation, but can’t spend $5(X),

Waterloo

County

board

of

education offers a slightly different

GED preparation course for $64. Adamson,

the

supervisor of education and training

program, a person must be 19 years old or older, an Ontario resident and must be functioning at a Grade 10

and adult and continuing education. This program gives students general

level.

They must not have a high school diploma and must have been

like

out of secondary school for at least

practice tests.

one

year.

Students

in

the

program

evaluated in five areas: writing

are

skills,

social studies, science, literature

and

were

The

21.

protesting

Canadian

involvement in a American-led military strike against baq. The rally was organized by the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group and led by Abdul-Rehman Khan, a fourth-year math student at the University of Waterloo. The protesters assembled at Civic Square between noon and I p.m. before marching to Kitchener MP Karen Redman’s office. Khan reminded the demonstrapotential

A passer-by looks at the protest

(Photo by Richard Berta)

what are you hiding in your pocket?” he said, referring to the weapcHis inspections in Iraq. “And

here,

are protesting the civilian in

we

and

Iraq,

are

what he’s hiding, then

interview.

United States’ willingness to punish the Iraqi people fcff the misd^ds of the

of

I kill all

the bystanders, because that

one

person didn’t want to show

me

information about the

Conestoga’s

GED tests and,

program,

students the opportunity to write

The

By Rita Fatila

Andrew

at the

noon

United Toronto

Consulate

States

in

military strike in the

Middle East

scored and students are given a

Until

1996,

couldn’t

take

results.

The entire course

takes about

nine hours.

development

Ontario general tests

in

residents

In 1996, Ontario

education

GED

their

became

the last

EngUsh-speaking province to allow

own

hi^

the

province, even though the rest of

certificate

school

equivalency

program. the to

determine whether soldiers widiout a high school diploma had knowledge

from

years of training

their

and

experience that would be equivalent to

a diploma

GED

Canadian

Nova

tests

Scotia in 1969.

GED

administering residents

appeared

By

in

1981, eight

“They’d go he said

at

to take die test

to Buffalo or

a Feb.

1

9

“It

Detroit,”

GED information

New Brunswick.”

said

Paul

Raymond,

and

pm

training’s independent learning

access post-secondary education and

,

whom pass the test “It’s

not a walk in the park,” said

“When

write the

The

my

problems

discipline

staff

has

make them

I

GED.”

cost to write the

GED is a non-

Raymond said to beware of any organization who says refundable $50.

it

costs more. “It really

that

isn’t

GED but

know about the Raymond. “It’s how

series

literature

high school seniors, 70 per cent of

measures

amoeba,” said

the

are revised aimually and are

call

not what you

GED

Fatila)

thoroughly

are

standardized with North American

also

“It’s

proceeds to SME

tests

GED

necessarily school-taught.

game

by

higher-paying jobs, the

knowledge

of

of writing, and the arts, science and mathematics tests. The tested

social studies,

the

centre. Besides allowing a person to

cafe.

(Photo by Rita

Barlow.

director of the ministry of education

directer

classroom

larger

Doon campus. “Or they

provides them with a key to a

door,”

Raymond,

Paul

independent learning centre.

Ontario

tests.

who wished

sometimes went to great lengths to find a place where they could, said Jim Barlow, vice-principal of adult and continuing education at Conestoga

March 10

entry fee per

GED

for decades.

Why all this trouble for a certificate?

$

and could protest

finally offered

North America had been using

practice tests are

flew out to

1

MP

march on Waterloo

Telegdi’s office Feb. 25 at

remains.

session at the

Main

aggressor.”

also has plans to

Other provinces offered high schooi equivalency test for decades

counselling session to discuss the

1

WPIRG

The

gives

Challenge faculty member Stelian George-Cosh, as he plays 20 students a once

am

then that power

aggressor,

becomes the main

against Hussein’s use of force

provinces and two territories were

-

the

Feb. 28, as long as die threat of a

Ontario residents

Simultaneous Chess Tournament

1 1

exceeds die level of fcwce used by

what he was hiding in his pocket” Khan said he protested against die Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, and

The GED tests originated in American military as a way

Tues.

own pec^le, but he added, “As soon as another power against his

me

person doesn’t show

if that

protesting Cmada’s - a peacekeeping nation’s actions- in an unsanctioned war,” he said in an

Khan denounced

like

“It’s

be peaceful and urged them to refr^ from arguing wifli hecklers. tragedy

Saddam Hussein. me asking someone

their leader,

tors diat die protest was intemled to

“We

used during the anti-war

Kitchener City Hall.

rally at

board’s

Track

eligible for the Fast

on Feb.

demonstrators

not computer based,” said

“It’s

Mary

college,” she said.

who

forget

the Fatila)

By Richard Berta

bothers us

us up and say,

when people

‘I’d like to

t^ the

can’t afford the $5(X)’,” he

1

said.

In the short time the in Ontario, six to eight

GED has been GED test sites

well you can think and analyse.”

have sprung up with one in Kingston

The majority of people who take the GED are usually women, immigrants

and one

and between the ages of 25-35. “These people didn’t drop out,” said

Raymond said the Independ Learning Centre will send a GED

in

Timmins planned1 fwg fo^

September.

ad^

Barlow. “They just joined a larger

supervisor and marker to administer

classroom.”

tests to

,

Students

who have use4 life as their

groups of 15 people or more

who wish to take the test


NEWS Campus

Caravan:

Unique marketing event By

— Page 3

SPOKE, March 9, 1998

Erica Ayliffe

is

way

a

to

in

Sanctuary

attract

advertising dollars.

Campus

came

Caravan

The main Sony

barreling through the Sanctuary

magazine’s sponsors

are

with video games and give-aways to attract numerous

Ford,

students.

Esso.

The marketing event was put on by Campus Canada magazine, and according to David Henman, the

What

probably

attracts

most students

Feb. 17

organizer of the caravan, to

it’s

a

and

Sony video

games.

Another bonus are

“Campus Caravan saved our (magazine’s) butt,” said Henman. “Nobody makes money on subscriptions. Nobody makes money

of

on news stand

of the shrinking interest in print

The

sales.

Henman is the Campus Caravan.

David

free hair care products

organizer

(Photo by Erica

and other samples. Henman has been Aylifle)

traveling to post-sec-

real

Henman. Advertisers are more likely

in advertising.”

The magazine, aimed

Clairol

portable

advertising attractions.

is

Station,

to the caravan are the

way

promote the magazine through

money

Play

ondary schools across

Canada

advertising, said

at college

and university students, developed the event marketing idea because

promote

their products

now

to

through

for four years

with

Campus

Caravan.

broadcast, he said, so the caravan

“I

know

the country

like it’s a small town,”

he said. Although he admits he still can’t find his Katie Henhoeffer and DSA promotion assistants, Bryan Bambrick and Jenn way around Hussery, help give away free samples at Campus Caravan Feb. 1 7. Vancouver to save his (Photo by Erica Ayliffe) life because of the lack of road signs. from central, eastern and western advertisements. When the idea began, Henman Canada. Each editor, who must be Henman said he does 40 shows a was carting his equipment around attending a Canadian post-sec- year and it takes him three to four in a Honda Civic. The Civic gave ondary school, will be paid and months to get the advertisers on way to a van, and now Henman will decide what goes in the board and arrange his itinerary drives a big moving truck. magazine. with the schools. The magazine has a circulation “We scratch our heads about He said no other magazine he of 130,000 and is mostly delivered what interests students,” said knows of markets its product this to on-campus distributors who Henman of the redesign. “We’re way. The turnout for the event at then pass it on to students. often wrong.” slow, said was All the articles in the publication The February edition of the mag- Conestoga are written by students, and in the Henman, because the Sanctuary azine featured articles fall Campus Canada is redesigning on women’s hockey, Internet isn’t in an area with a lot of moving traffic. relationships and reading week. the magazine “with an eye to On a slow day, Henman said he making it more relevant to stu- Other sections included sports, will usually get around a 100 stumovie, CD and book reviews, travdents,” said Henman. dents and on a good day between The publication will be hiring el and fashion. 500 and 1000. Out of 41 pages, 19 had full-page three student editors, one each

Students are given the opportunity to test their skills on Sony Play Station during Campus Caravan in the Sanctuary on Feb. 1 7. (Photo by Jamie Yates)

ELECTION NOTICE

TO BE ELECTED AS A MEMBER OF THE CONESTOGA COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY BOARD OF GOVERNORS FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING TWO CATEGORIES:

ONE PERSON

IS

ELIGIBILITY

IS

Stratford

campus

Luncheon honors

AS FOLLOWS:

STUDENT OPEN TO ALL FULL TIME AND P.ART TIME STUDENTS ENROLLED IN A PROGRAM OF I.NSTRUCTIO.N (A GROUP OF RELATED COURSES LEADING TO A DIPLOMA. CERTIFIC.ATE OR OTHER DOCUMENT .AW.ARDED BY THE BOARD OF GOVER.NOR5

employers’ input

.

By Richard Berta

TERM OF

SEPTEMBER

OFFICE:

1,

AUGUST

1998

An employer recognition luncheon was held at Conestoga’s campus Feb. 19. The event was the first of its kind organized by the school of access and preparatory programs and services, which helps Stratford

OPEN TO ALL FULL TIME AND PART TIME PERSONS EMPLOYED BY THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS AS A ME.MBER OF THE OFFICE, CLERICAL. TECHNTC.AL. HE.ALTH M.AINTEN.ANCE, BUILDING, SERVICE. SHIPPING, TRA.NSPORT.ATION. CAFETERIA OR NURSERY STAFF.

C.ARE,

SEPTEMBER

OFFICE:

1,

1998

-

AUGUST

social assistance,

and

their

case workers bring their case to

SUPPORT STAFF

TERM OF

on

31, 1999.

prepare students for employment or a post-secondary educa-

“We

The school tries to equip students with interview and other skills that may help them find

employment She said the school, as a result, has programs such as on-the-job training and employment and training

readiness

centred on Stratford

tion.

31, 2001.

us,” Leis said.

are the

ramp

to post-sec-

can

be

relocated

which are campus but throughout

Huron Counties based

ondary education or employ-

Perth and

extemally The terms of reference for these elected internal members are the same as those for February. posted on will be forms Nomination appointed members of the Board of Governors.

ment,” Andrea Leis, program

on need.

coordinator, said.

in the office of the Secretary -Treasurer c:

Forty-two employers received awards of recognition for their contributions to the program.

“For instance, our services can be re-located from Stratford to Wingham, if the need there is the greatest,” Leis said. “We’re not confined to the campus.” The school has six ffill-time faculty members. Thefe are over forty yduth working this year as a resplt of the program. . .

19, 1998. the

Nomination forms will also be available

Board (Kevin Mullan).

The employers had

M.ARCH

Lists of nbrhinees to be posted

on campus bulletin boards on March 23, 1993.

12,

1998

'

* I

I

' ,

ELECTION DATE: UTbS'ESDAV. APRIL' LTyps

either pro-

vided employment, allowed job shadowing or organized mock

Closing date for nominations:

!

'

'

'

interviews for students in the

program, Leis said; ‘^Mpst of our participants are

'

.


— SPOKE, March

Page 4

9,

1998

NEWS

OSAP

Province announces changes to by Victoria Long

1997 report to share the cost of defaults

Four

major

changes

Student

Ontario

The

Assistance

announced

were

Program

First,

provide

to

1998-

be 38.5 per cent, 15 percentage points above the provincial average of 23.5 per cent in 1997. In the following year, high default will be 33.5 per cent.

post-secondary institutions required

ministry’s definition of a

1999

13.

be

will

high-default

high-default program for

by

Education Minister Dave Johnson

on Feb.

their

programs.

the

to

for

students and prospective students

will

with information on the school and

programs which Johnson said prospective students can use as a guide when considering where to invest their money. Specifically, institutions must report program graduation rates, placement rates and student loan default rates as provided by the ministry. Only Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology, including Conestoga College, have a standardized system for collecting its

“Sharing the cost”

expected to benefit.

the institution, rather than the government,

private

Labelled,

new

the

student support branch.

changes

to

makeup of

work

support

student

“sharing the cost”

branch,

means

tution, rather than the

pay

some

Previously,

said,

ly

portion

more

of

the

are

in

This means a two-parent family with two children will be required to allot

an amount which depends

of York University, on the Studio Two television program Feb. 23. The second change requires institutions whose students have a

president

proportional students

Wolfe

government,

to

over

the

number of

the

threshold,

said.

The

change replaces the current loan-forgiveness program.

high default rate in the ministry’s

third

Student Work Abroad

is

made

to appeal on the basis of a family breakdown if her or his family

children.

However, a one-parent family will have to allot the same amount, if the gross family income is the same, to the education costs of one, two, or

three children.

all

Under current

no

regulations,

expected from a family with a gross income of $40,000. Next year, this family will contribute $100, according to contribution

is

the press release.

However, the

-12:30

By Victoria Long

and income tax acts are passed. A minor change announced is that students filing an OSAP application on paper will be charged $10 for ^e cost of processing the application. There will be no charge for applications filed through the OSAP website at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca.

rate

The University of Waterloo’s

In the Kitchener area,

no

post-

determined by family income and

Wolfe

said.

The expected contribution

is

calculated on a sliding scale based

family size and after-tax income, Jackson said. Wolfe said the contribution is

the

announced

initiatives

The 1997 report shows no public

colleges or universities were

over the threshold of 38.5 per cent of former students in default, Jackson said. Private vocational schools vary greatly in default rates from a low of 9-1 per cent to a hi^ of 71 .9 per cent The average default rate for universities is 13.9 per cent, for colleges 27.5, and for private vocational schools 38.5.

pm

Ireland

New Zealand

United States Jamaica

CoiKStoga College has the lowest default rate of any college in die {H'ovinc^, financial aid officer Carol

travel cuts

Finland Japan

Germany South

Africa

Wal^ said.

this year?

Resume

Referral Service!

is to lower that figure to the govemnrent’s set goal of 10 per cent by 2003 by offering more

Critique!

Search for work on the Web!

To sign on:

and password

“Conestjobs”

stu-

despite the Council of Ontario,”

he

said.

“Universities’

research

find-

ings that Ontario universities

have die lowest level of government funding in Canada.” Over the last five years, universities

have

lost 25 per cent of operating grants as a result of

funding cuts, he said. As to die cost of implementing a survey of graduate employ-

ment, Morris said the university l/Ioem’t even have a ballpark figure at present “It will cost

something, but

we welcome

conqiarisons.”

itew requirements

do not

a prc^lem for Wilfrid

Lanrier

University

eidier,

Michael Striddand, media

WLU,

rela-

said

tiiat

about a 10 per cent default rate which is fourth institution has

lowest in the province.

who works program area of the support ministry’s smdent Richard Jackson

programs in the co-op format and by increasing efforts to

in

ensure students understand their

branch explained why die 1997 default figures apply to students who finished school in 1994 or

when

The 1997 figures show Conestoga having three programs with high default rates. These are the print journalism, with 80 per cent, food and beverage management with 58.3 per cent, and graphic design with 57.1 percent.

Campus Worklink.

on a

individual defaulting

dent loan. “University graduates have the lowest unemployment rates

tions officer for

it

John

officer

Morris said. Morris implied having a job decreases the likelihood of an

The

they borrow for educational purposes.

Resume

relations

had increased to 19.5 per cent Walsh said Cmiestoga’s

figures,

colligations

advantage of a free

media

pose

the

UW

province, at 7.4 per cent,

government’s 1996 report, Ccmestoga showed a rate of 15.9 ^r cent and in the 1997 In

free!

"ConesA”

to the

administration

default rate is the lowest in the

goal

Usercode

financial

federal

Kitchener

in

Feb. 13 will lower the average to 10 per cent in five years.

costs,

Britain Netherlands

The Sanctuary

Check out

ments under consideration

Low default

on

refuses to assist with education

Australia France

Also, take

the

refunds from people who default on student loans if the amend-

of the

or both,

one,

secondary institutions fall into the provincial government’s student loan high-default category. The average rate for defaults province wide was 23.5 per cent in 1S>97. The government hopes

Programme

Tues. March 17

It’s

now have

will

post-secondary education costs of

for the student

Experience the world!

You should sign up for the

The province

option of withholding income tax

for

SWAP TALK^

Are you graduating

assessed differently.

to the

on the gross family income

OSAP.

threshold

the

was a famiincome of $55,000, Wolfe said.

Provision

the insti-

will

dramatically, said Laura Marsden,

presented by

many

post-secondary programs.

parental contributions

reimburse lenders for bad debts over the limit of 38.5 per cent this year and 33.5 next year. Dollar amounts will be assigned

our

am

how

of

less

formula used to determine the takes contribution expected other factors into account, Wolfe said, so a two-parent family and a may be one-parent family

policy

that family, with a

that student is eligible for

Richard Jackson, senior policy advisor in the program area of the

bureaucratic costs are going to rise

11:30

allotted equally to the educa-

tional costs of all children, regard-

student’s education costs before

survey-

mean

parental

new

gross income of $40,000 or

Ministry of Education

ing will be done, Wolfe said.

These

the

is

requires a family of four, whatever

post-

tatives during the spring to

“greater

responsibility,”

senior policy advisor,

secondary institutions and colleges will meet with ministry represenout details of how the

less than five years.

Richard Jackson,

'

Universities,

for

bad debts.

of the student support branch of the ministry. unit

change final major The announced is an increase in the amount of contribution expected from a student’s family if the student has been out of school for

will

reimburse lenders

graduate employment data, said Brian Wolfe, manager of the policy

means

which erases debts over $3,500 per term at graduation, by a direct payment from the provincial to the lending government institution which the student used. For single students, the maximum grant will be $2,350 for a “typical” two-term academic year. For students with children, the grant may be as high as $10,000. Total cost for the grant program is expected to be $306 million next year and 92,000 students are

“Conestoga will definitely be looking

these

at

Walsh said. However,

programs,”

the

1995.

A student is considered to

have defaulted on a loan when he or she is 90 days behind in repayments.

Since repayment does not until six

these

only

The Student Employment Office

total

of

were

enrolled

Room 2B04

year, she continued.

reflect

high

defaults

rates

by

a

smdents who at Conestoga during the 1994-1995 academic 19

after

start

an individ-

study, and since government interest

ual finishes

federal

relief is currently available for

18 months, default

For more information:

months

no one can be in more than two

until

years after leaving school. The default rate for Ontario’s

postsecondary institutions has only been calculated for 1996 and 1997, so no long-term trends can be detected.


SPOKE, March 9, 1998

COMMENTARY

— Page 5

7

technology

^et creates zombies By Jeannette Altwegg

Damn I

It!

said no more of mass destruction!

weapons

I’m reminded of a SeaQuest

DSV episode I once watched. It’s

Somehow

rather ironic that something

supposed to symbolize the greatness of technology through human contact over gigantic distances is now being labeled a home-wrecker. Yet, according to a recent Globe and Mail article, a poll of 3,522 Canadians found that about half of those interviewed agreed the Internet can indeed be hazardous that is

to family

The

by the Ekos

Associates Inc., was whether people agreed or disagreed that using

activities at

computers.

This

may sound

a

too

little

post-apocalyptic for some, but

makes one wonder about

it

the

quality of material that’s available

life.

question, asked

the Internet

the crew of the SeaQuest ended up on a futuristic version of earth where the entire population, except for two people, had been wiped out by mechanical creations which were manipulated by individuals via

and other computer home had a negative

on

the Internet.

One of the more commendable arguments

in support

Internet is that

it’s

of the

way

the best

to I I

get to information quickly from

i

impact on the quality of their

places which otherwise could take

family

weeks or even months to receive. However, there have been studies done to prove that children

life.

One of the

points mentioned in Globe and Mail article was that nearly one in two people polled said they knew someone

the

who

spent so

much

on the computer with their family

time at

that

it

especially, are very

home

I

I

influ-

enced by what they see on

televi-

sion.

Adults

interfered

may be

able to distin-

guish right from wrong, but,

life.

One father who had been interviewed even went so far as to say that his son’s computer playing resulted in the boy’s low grades he was getting in school. So what then does this tell us human relationships in the 90s? Are we creating a generation about

of impersonal, dehumanized zombies

much

i

who don’t know how to

relate to one another? Or are overreacting just a little?

we

young children Taking

this

can’t.

a step further,

who

is

which be addic-

to say that the computer,

has also been proven to tive for some, doesn’t obstruct a

way it learns to interhuman beings? when this so-called

child in the

act with other

Especially

interaction takes on the version of games which can be played over

the Internet without ever seeing

another person.

Letter to the editor

The secret is

follow the tradition of writing a

working for a daily is about the most exciting thing you can do.

and

Night students not vandals, director says incriininate

which af^ared in the February 23 edititm of Spoke, she states that “the machine was damaged both times thiring night school” Did Erica mean to say

was damaged after 4:00 p.m. when the

CE students in this

affair, solely

on the basis of

DSA office’s ckml?

not resptMisible journalism and it serves no purpc«e exttept to create the impression

If die

meant to say di^ she

It is

should have b^:ause her article implies that a Continuing Educadon, “ni^t school” stu(fent was mspondnie for dte

that “night school” students are

damage.

and I

Is

Bica aware thtd many fall-

time da^ stndemte also tate courses at nig^t? Is she aware that

nothing nKare dian a Inmch of

&is is not die case wrmld expect the Spoke

Ctearly,

graduate with at least

some

skill

— who wouldn’t want

Well, after college, I immediatewent to the Cambridge

ly

Reporter for my two month internship. While at Spoke, my average workload was something like

two

stories a

week and two

pictures per week.

My first day at the Reporter, I pictures. like too

Now,

and took

that

may

five

not seem

much work, but rememhad to be profesand with three

ber, these stories

nexteditirm!

sional quality

sources each.

Stewart WrectOT',

do not frequent die

after

was a Conestoga college

to set the record strai^t in the

m<^ amtinuing edoctdka

shnlents

all, I

would be easy;

wrote nine stories

vandals.

area where die vandalism took

Cmn^aing Ethicatkm

place?

Conestoga Colley

with two whole months of some clippings and a

Armed

experience,

of recommendation

letter

pocket,

I set

in

my

out to conquer the

to get this job.

I

spent 16 months trying to find

a job in journalism.

I tried dailies,

weeklies, student publications, papers in different provinces, the

TV Guide, everywhere. Every time

I

thing

would encounter

— dozens of

the

same

other journal-

with a lot more experience applying for the same job as me.

ists

Time

and taking at least one picture. For those of you who think Spoke

'

$

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B 1 5, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. phopp: 748^5366 Fax: 14 ^\^9 7 \ E-mail: spoke® conestogac.on.ca

SPOKE’S address '

...

is

'

.

there are Remember though many editors

what college or university you received your diploma from they care what your clippings look like and if you can write. So care

that is the key to the “mystery” of finding a job after leaving college learn how to write while

you’re in college.

that.

beer commercials or something. Eventually, I got a job with the

writing advertisements for

Erica Ayliffe; College life editor: Barb Ateljevic; editor: Natalie Schneider; Sports editor. Matt Hams, Entertainment Features editor: Jamie Yates; manager: Corina Hill; Advertising manager: Dan Meagher; Production Pearce; Rachel Bisch and Photo editors: Greg Faculty adviser: Andrew Jankowski, Circulation manager: Becky Little; Faculty supervisor: Jim Hagarty;

is fierce. I

I

Imagine, something as simple as

seriously considered leaving

maybe

jobs out there. Not

after time I left rejected.

the field to try something else;

I

know

beat out a fellow Conestgoa College graduate

should

wear off.”

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

'

you step out of college. Finding a is hard. The jobs out there are few and far between

for the glamor of journalism to

Keeping Conestoga College connected

,

know the people and the problems more intimately. And the work-load is still the same. Ugh. So, for all of you still in the journalism program, and those of you writing for Spoke, here is my advice: do not expect to beat off employment opportunities once get to

and the competition

the

,

more laid-back, but the more in-depth, and you

job in journalism

On average, I found myself calling 25 to 30 people per day, writing 2,000 to 4,000 words per day

News editor:

it’s

stories are

world of print journalism. To paraphrase an instructor of mine, “It takes about 10 minutes

SPOKE

Editor: Rita Fatila;

Sure, I

to find a real job in journalism.

classes.

endo!

me wrong

reporter’s job, I scoffed. I thought

me?

that die idiotocopier

get

age guy get to do that? Pretty soon my time at the Reporter was over and it was time

in writing

Erica should stick to the facts and limit the innu-

Now, don’t

never really believed that jobs

I

association with evening

in Ibis case

Amazingly, I’ve found it just as exciting as working on a daily.

and the hours are exhausting.

were scarce in journalism. >\^en my instructors told me I would haye to beat the bushes to find a

upon gradua-

tion.

finding a job

I find it unacceptable to

ty-based weekly in Elmira.

daily.

rode with the police, the firefighters, trucked around in an ambulance and tried out for Wheel of Fortune. How often does the aver-

everyone currently in the program

what they will face

In Erica Ayliflfe’s article “Phot(X<^ier busted again”,

telling

Woolwich Observer, a communi-

tough, just try writing for a The workload is incredible

Having graduated from Conestoga College’s journalism program over 16 months ago, I thought it might be a good idea to letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

success

to

is

Patrick Moore, reporter,

The Woolwich Observer

mainly funded from September

Doon Student

Association (DSA).

to

May by

The views and

opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily the DSA. reflect the views of Conestoga College or Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA logo. unless their advertisements contain the DSA SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out for the of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid

must be sent to the ediby 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to or acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written helpful. typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

space. Unsolicited submissions tor

photograph).

.

,

.

.


Page 6

A

— SPOKE, March

9,

1998

COLLEGE

By Corina

first-hand

women’s groups and made Kitchener

Various

Hill

account of what it is a task force suggested

Ever wonder what life would be like if you lived in prison? The students of Conestoga’s law and security administration found this out Feb. 18, as part of a seminar presented by two correction officers at the

Valley Prison for

Grand

Women.

Watson Blvd., the prison created an outcry from people living

thus

making

than

a

private

federal

feared having

supplied

living

people surrounding federally-sentenced

women. “They did a

lot

what

found

prison

the

in

women

is

“We

a

they

Kitchener had a

women,”

was

as

was

prison

were

maximum

of programs Popovski. said lot

not

being

for

built,

treated

all

as

new Macintosh

computers to be a great asset

in

their pursuit success.

The

graphic arts department received a $130,000 grant from the Special Projects Initiative

Third-year

graphic

Training, said Joe Martin,

dean of applied arts and academic support. The went $ 1 30,000 directly into funding for capital equipment to upgrade the department’s computers, which took

“We

train

students on

so

students used to have to share

since

design

Cindy Hazeleger, said

third

year

projects

are

done on computers, it is nice to have one computer per all

student.

“With one computer for every third-year student,

more

time

to

it

gives us a lot

work

on

our

projects,” said Hazeleger.

Rebecca White, another

third-

second-

and

third-year

among

1 8 computers the department offered. “We did not have enough computers and they were a lot

women

situations,”

they learn to

work

she

said

much

not

noticed

a technical improvement

said Scott.

work, but a speed improvment. Laszcz also mentioned that every two people share one of the new color scanners that were invested

correction officers are interviewed,

put in a practice situation and

checked for references. By completing

education over the high school level,” he said, adding that legally, federal inmates must have a

about the

But

women

for

at

wire of

front

move

fail,

said Scott.

you

teaches

“It

the

adding that starting are paid $29,000 to

Valley.

chain

a

learn

of corrections. you go home,”

field

Grand off

onto a

where they

of institutions,”

surrounds the A white

that

basics

Popovski,

said

officers

$31,000

a year.

Working

prison.

the

you

“If

potential

fun and games

tops

fence

link

college

staff

the

all

tests,

correction officers

10 education.

life isn’t all

at federal

institutions

work

Macintosh computers may seem obsolete to some, but 90 per cent of the graphic design industry continues to use them,

will

a state-of-the-art

dents on

Macs

employable.” The graphic prides

itself

train stu-

so they will be arts

in

department 100 per

their

employment

cent

we

rate

after

achieve

said Miller.

of graphic design.”

high

a

with

rate

or

employment the new

without

computers,” said Miller. that the

to

new computers

“It is just

will allow

students to keep up with the future

excel at their studies By Amanda Rckling

“Some pay

students

International

at

Conestoga College adapt to their programs extremely well, said an international student Because

the

international

students are in

Canada on a

am

- 1

pm

The Sanctuary at:

The

students

TTie

the

that

Doon campus

with

their

are

are

at

happy

education,

said

Vanderkruk. They get to interact with other students, see a variation of education systems

countries, she said.

first

expiry,

time around,

Karen Vanderkruk during

“There aren’t any complaints; seem to be pleased,”

an interview. ITiey know that

the students

if they don’t meet the requirements they will have to stay longer and that will cost them more money, she said. “The students are dedicated to their studies and they have

she said.

excellent

attendance,”

said

Vanderkruk. is

educating

19

international

down from 3 1 students September. The majority

students, in

The

education

international

students department assists in applying to the college. Vanderknik the also said department notifies the students if they have been accepted into the program. “We take care of them from the get go,” she said.

The department international

the

assists

students

a a student in

of students are at the Waterloo campus. Students usually

number of ways.

come

then the department will help with that, said Vanderkruk.

Conestoga

to

to

get

but need to get an English credit

before to

they

further

“English at

the

are

allowed

theirstudies

at

the

is only offered Waterloo campus,”

she said. International

students

come

from all over the world. Conestoga has had students from Japan, Vietn<im and Bermuda, said Vanderkruk.

Some

Sign up

education,” said Vanderkruk.

courses the

an

universities.

24

actually

and learn stuff that they wouldn’t get to learn in their

has

that

into the universities in the area,

Tues. IVIarch

companies

students to further their

fcHT

they have to do well in their

visa

an English credit, said Vanderkruk. A number of students have been accepted

Airband Contest

in,”

said.

International students

Currently, Conestoga College

graduation.

environment we work

the

he

security system,” said Scott.

because

a lot harder to work in

“It’s

“We do have

said

Miller,

difficult

said Popovski.

it.

advisor.

in as well.

Though the initial computers worked relatively the same and produced good quality work, the new computers are just producing the work at much faster rates,

1 1

After passing a public service said Popovski, potential

test,

preliminary

minimum Grade

students

said they were interested in jobs as a corrections officer.

Popovski said Holmolka is paying for her own education. “Women have to pay for their

her

“We have always managed

slower,” said Miller.

whereabouts as well as her college education while she is attending prison. “She’s not in Ontario,”

of

Miller, “but

said

graphic

own

“There has been much graphic design instuctor debate on which is better (IBMs or Macs),” said

a telephone interview.

Third-year

try to teach the

their

said Miller.

Matthew

correctional

program

be employable.”

place in Sept. 1997, said Martin in

student,

“We

value

in

Macs SO they

in

Students

administration

security

correction officers are within the general population at all times,

Laszcz

Fund, sponsored by the Ministry of Education and

students

her prison the asked her of officers

interested

term.

Third-year graphic student Agnes

design Miller

Matthew

were

case

profile

many

back of the prison is highly alarmed and is triggered when anyone comes within five feet

for the money,” said Popovski,

computer anymore.”

high

the

of Karla Holmolka,

problem behind the

“It’s better if

is much better now that students don’t have to fight over the same

instructor

With

is

for graphics

the luxury of having her own personalized computer at school. “This system

$4 a day.

receive

facility

After seeing a slide show of the prison, many of the law and

picket fence that surrounds the

new Macs

commented on students find their

offenders,

a correctional

adding that inmates in the prison

Razor

said Scott.

year graphic design student also

design

with

in

prison •

staff at the correctional facility try

to

security inmates at a

Grant buys computers graphic

work

to

time

first

crime.

woman

Fast forward with Third-year

located

come

to assess the

penitentiary in Kingston. In 1989,

By Anita Santarossa

shop

With 87 per cent of inmates

inmates

that

is

services in the building.

believe people are sent to

punishment, punishment,” said Scott. the

Valley

inmates and preform mass

the

can borrow

Scott told the students that before

of research and

Grand

to

religions

books. prison

the prison, but to provide a safe

by the inmate.) Also

where

with

behind a spiritual centre. The sweat shop is for women only and was designed to give woman a chance to heal. The spiritual centre is a circular building and painted purple. Throughout is the week, ministers from various

that

units

criminals,”

children.”

sweat

a

institution.

women

included

for

Unique

complex

housing

a

looks

bedrooms. Each room has

library

haven

it

women

women were housed

ago,

men and

look similar to a house, complete with a kitchen, living area and

But Scott and Popovski said Kitchener was chosen not to create the

grounds,

changes

“One hundred years

said Scott.

at

look

to

The prison has nine

in their backyard.

in

said

prison like

a model for

rehabilitation easier.

Popovski

more

in

a bed, a desk and a stand for (Televisions are a television.

who

federally-sentenced

Canada. He also added that 75 to 85 per from inmates are cent of Kitchener, Guelph and Hamilton,

the

Scott and Steven Kathleen Popovski have been working at the Kitchener prison since it opened its doors nearly two years ago. Located at 1575 Homer

near the prison

a prime location for the largest

women’s prison

fliat

working

like

be made to women’s prisons, allowing for a trickle-down effect for lower profile criminals. “We’re working hard to create

shelters in the area

for

women s

look at the inside of a

Speakers give students

fear

LIFE

an

students

are

getting

education paid by their parents, while others are sponsored by companies, she said.

has

If

to

a

renew

student

his

visa,

needs to get a

visa

visitor’s

If

to

travel

to

United States, then the department will help out. Students are also given tutors through the department, should they require them. Vanderkruk said help is offered in both academic and non-academic situations. the

Once

the

international

students have completed their

Canada they must their home, said Vanderkruk. They are allowed to stay and work in Canada for one year if they find work in their field of study no more than 60 days after studies in

return

to

their graduation.

A


)

)

— Page 7

SPOKE, March 9, 1998

COLLEGE

LIFE

disabled student overcomes obstacles Cambridge man refuses By Donna

Fierheller

can’t just

would go Using

sit

to

to attend school let nineteen leg operations get in the way of his career

and do nothing. He

“The

crazy.”

exam

wheelchair for transportation is not new to a

Determination and a strong will to succeed led the father of three

student in Conestoga College’s micro-computer software applications program. John Sutton said the Waterloo campus is all on one level, with

children

push-buttons for doors, so it is easy to navigate if you have to use

campus,

a wheelchair.

the first semester of the three-

him

The Cambridge man, who has had 19 leg operations since a car

program before his knee became infected, requiring him to in have another operation March, 1997. “Because of that, I missed a

altered to

that

month of

the desk.”

a

accident in 1978, refuses to

keep him down. necessitated his

many

let that

has, however,

It

adjustments in

life.

attend

to

the course at

Conestoga

on

life

better outlook

now and

feel that

it’s

a

doesn’t

lost

Paola Sutton, John’s wife

Doors

in

Cambridge,

Mainland had a desk accommodate his needs. Sutton said, “The desk will stay

guy

way because that uses

there is another

same

the

Sutton

may need

it

once again, as is working

loose.”

complete the course, Sutton said, so he had to choose a different program that could be completed

was going through

I

its

doesn’t feel that

John Sutton, a computer software applications student at the Waterloo campus, spends many hours on the computer at his (Photo by Donna Fierheller) home. doped

up

still

September 1997 didn’t slow him down too badly. He said he was off for two weeks, then went back to school just in time to write mid-term exams, although he was

medication. “I only got 40 per cent

instead. His wife Paola (pronounced powla) said during an

along with his course of study. Sutton said thanks to instructor

home, “John

Barb Power and Marian Mainland

had

to

says with

have a screw

His wife Paola said his school

in special needs, his last operation

said he

literally

work keeps him busy and keeps his mind off the setbacks. He has a better outlook on life now and

Auto-Cad

three years in vocational rehabili-

way out of his leg. He

a grin, “I

anyway, I decided on a 42-week micro-computer course. This fit

for

set-up,

so they put a wheelchair sticker on

Workers’

Since the course was only offered at the Waterloo campus, Sutton

interview in their

out.

courses.”

Compensation board pension, but opted for up to tation

more months. To help

for three

a 10 centimetre screw

the bill,” said Sutton.

a Workers’

computer desk

the

to

on a close

get

and applied mechanics, because you can’t miss a day let alone a month. They are very in-depth

Sutton said he was encouraged to take

straight out

couldn’t

with the wheelchair he was in

school,” he said. “I got

“I loved computers, so since

Kinnear

he

enough

was accepted in Doon, completing

within the allotted time frame.

After his 14th operation in 1995, while he was a shipper-receiver at

before. Anything they

With his leg board,

Compensation board would not fund the extra semester he needed to allow him to

cause.”

up the

could do to help, they did.”

year

The

really,

to set

all

week

the

too far behind in technical math

“He has a

They had

over again just for me, because everyone else had written

College to study mechanical engineering technology. Sutton said after upgrading his skills at Conestoga’s Cambridge

he

were

instructors

really good.

in

pretty

with

on the Access (programming) exam, but I got 76 per cent overall in the course by the end of term,”

It

it’s

a lost cause.

has been a long,

bumpy road

who

is looking forward to graduating in June and working as a software technician or systems analyst. “In the meantime,” he says, grinning, “I’m

for

Sutton,

enjoying the course. It’s really interesting, and I’m surrounded by other computer geeks.”

he says proudly.

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beside Harveys

)

ues.

GUELPH

CAMBRIDGE

4

(

41SHESPLCRR9.

23 WELLINGTON ST. E

622-7774

8:23-5341

across from McDoiralds

)

(

the

DSA Dinner Show

402 WNS ffT. N

"rii

live at

across from Wendys

Tickets $

March 24

1

(INCLUDES LASAGNA DINNER)

DN SALE AT THE

DSA

Office

<5

%


Page 8

— SPOKE, March

1 in

4 victims raped whiie attending coiiege or university

9,

1998

FEATURE

Sexual assault services provided at Conestoga known

By Rachel Pearce

the

to

This

victim.

is

called date rape or acquaintance

Inside the door of Conestoga’s

Student

Services

along

office,

The same pamphlet

rape.

further

that

a

1993

University

states

study

at

concluded

the wall immediately to the left,

Carleton

of two racks there stands brochures about all the information one could want about social issues such as alcohol abuse,

approximately one in every four

self-esteem, sexually-transmitted

diseases and

while

are

rapes, are assaults, Sexual experienced by about one in every three women, according to one of

produced by the

college.

What may

surprise some,

assaulted

or

university

attending

Karen

Rittinger, a counsellor at

sexual assault are

howev-

about 85 per cent of

sexual assaults, the assailant

is

welcome

to seek

help through student services. confidential,” she said. that

you are going

harm yourself or someone

to

else.

open

the options

someone came

them

to

we would

speak to somebody

in crisis, they

Most sexual assaults committed by men, says pamphlet

ask

at the

would

sexual assault centre. That

be a really good support to them.”

who

said

the

K-W

Sexual Assault Centre has a 24-hour crisis hotline, said she would recommend them. “They are really good people to

“Even

ago, and

if

you had

been assaulted as a child 15 years

was coming back

it

to

you. There’s no time limit on thenservices.

“There’s also the sexual assault treatment centre,” she said. “If it (an assault) just happened and the survivor wanted to lay charges,

need

they

to them.

talk to,” she said.

That’s different.” “If

one of the community

to

agencies that deals specifically with sexual assault. If they wanted to speak to a counsellor individually, that would be one of

Rittinger,

and “Unless

“It’s voluntary. It’s free here, it’s

them

“But, definitely,

college.

you disclose

er, is that in

sexually

student services, said survivors of

sexual assault.

the pamphlets,

women

could talk to a counsellor,” she said. “We would probably refer

be examined by

to

a doctor.” The stand

student services

contains

office

sexual

pamphlets

of

full

the

located in

assault

information

on

including

the

definition of sexual assault, crisis

numbers and support group numbers, as well as a helpful

line

containing

booklet

information

services the college provides for the prevention of assault.

Drug-related sexual assault The study was conducted under

By Jamie Yates

the request of law enforcement

By Jamie Yates

by an aquaintance high because it is someone

assaulted is

For many women, sexual assault and rape have created

you know personally and they can invite you

a society for them to fear.

anywhere.

Some women fear walking home alone at night, have

women

She said 60 per cent of

experience sexual trouble trusting people, or assault more than once and even dating. that disabled women are A pamphlet by the Ontario even more prone to become Women’s Directorate said victims of sexual assault. statistics show that nearly all The pamphlet said people sexual assaults are committed who commit sexual assaults by men against women and are responsible for the girls. A small percentage of crimes, the victims are not. sexual assault What a woman victims are men. wears, where An employee at About 98 per cent she goes, what the K-W Sexual she driidcs or of sexual assault Assault Support who she talks to Centre, who victims are women. does not mean wished not to be she is inviting named, said a sexual assault or survey done in giving up her 1993 reported one in three right to say no. These myths girls are sexually assaulted blame the victim, not the and one in five to seven boys offender. are sexually assaulted. The K-W Sexual Assault It said all kinds of women Centre employee said about are sexually assaulted and one per cent of sexual that it doesn’t happen to any assaults are reported to the certain ‘type’ of woman. police. Other cases could be She said about 98 per cent reported by a friend or of the victims are young relative the victim has told, women, many of whom are she added. assaulted before they reach If you are sexually assaulted, she said to report 18 years of age. Teens and college and to a hospital immediately. university students, she said, This helps ensure your are in the greatest risk range attacker could be brought to for sexual assault. justice, she said. About 98 per cent of the The pamphlet provided assaults, she said, are several options women have committed by men. She also if they have been sexually said of that 98 per cent, 90 assaulted. Victims can talk per cent could be committed to someone they trust, such by someone you know and 10 as a close friend or relative, per cent are strangers. or contact a rape crisis centre, The pamphlet said most a woman’s counselling people believe that sexual service, a hospital sexual assault happens in dangerous assault care coordinator, places, such as parking lots, a teacher or guidance but more than half of all counsellor, a health worker or sexual assaults happen in their doctor. private

homes.

The woman Sexual

at

Assault

the

K-W Centre

said the likelihood of being

For more information, call the K-W Sexual Assault Support Centre’s crisis line (519)741-8633.

officials to assess

Rohypnol, known as the ‘date rape’ drug, is often

a

substance people relate to

prevent the misuse of

dye

many

involve

substances,

in

its

rohypnol tablets to

easily identifiable

and

has changed the formulation of the tablet so that it does not dissolve quickly in liquid. Roche as also

released

article

Feb.

13

asked

stereotypically

why rohypnol is known as the

courtesy of Beth Wanlin, manager

‘date-rape drug’,

of public relations for Hoffmann-

rohypnol has become a catch-all phrase for drug-related sexual

La Roche

who

manufactures rohypnol as well other as perscription medications, said dmg-related rape is not related to one particular substance. A study, presented in February 1998 and conducted by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, said a couple of substances have been labelled ‘date-rape drugs’, but found almost 20 different substances have been associated with sexual Inc.,

assault.

The

which tested urine

study,

samples of sexual assault victims, found the largest number of

involved

incidents

and

another

per

40

involved

incidents

alcohol

cent

of

multiple

substances. tested

by the

American Academy, 208 involved alcohol, 93 involved marijuana and 40 involved cocaine. Another 32 contained GHB (gamma

Wanlin said

trazepan) and of the five, only one contained rohypnol alone.

Rohypnol, part

of a family of drugs known as benzodiazepines, is a prescription

medication used in the treatment of anxiety and sleep disorders. Wanlin added, in a telephone interview, that the drug is used in

80

countries

world, but

Canada.

is

around the not marketed in

Victim Services Program -Cambridge 650-8527

Guelph/Wellington

Women

in Crisis (24 hrs)

Wellington County 1-800-265-7232

Victim Support Line 1-888-579-2888 Toronto (416) 314-2447

into this theory.

“Drug-related rape

is

not a

new

phenomenon,” said Wanlin. She said

labelling

‘date-rape

rohypnol

drug’

as

gives

Conestoga's

the the

impression that there is only one drug to be aware of, but that is

Student Services (Boon Campus, 748-5220)

not true.

The common way rohypnol is administered to victims is in a beverage. Wanlin said a person can be drugged anywhere such as in a bar,

it

Counselling Services 330/329

ext.

Health Services 254

ext.

home, or

at a friend’s house, people should not assume only usually happens in a strange

so

Safety Office ext.

470

place.

strangers, to take drinks only

Only five Rohypnol (flunidrugs.

article said

749-6994 Cambridge Memorial Hospital 749-6994

Guelph 836-5710

and

The

Waterloo Region Sexual Assault IVeatment Centre St. Mary’s General HospitaX

Wanlin said rohypnol is not proven to be the most common drug used in sexual assault and that the study conducted by the American Academy gives insight

hyroxybutyrate), a nervous system depressant, mixed with alcohol

contained

662-3854

that

To help prevent from being drugged, Wanlin said to never leave a drink unattended anywhere, to not take drinks from

other

New Hamburg and Area Interfaith Counselling Centre

assault.

at

Of the 578 samples

Kitchener-Waterloo Sexual Assault Support Centre 24hr. crisis line 741-8633 571-0864 TTY/TDD

authorized to carry rohypnol.

When An

sexual assault

prescrip-

reduced the number of distributors

not just rohypnol.

Services

Roche has added a blue

to their

make them

but drug-related rape can

used

The article said Hoffmann-La Roche has taken precautions to tion drugs.

drug-related sexual assault,

how commonly

rohypnol is actually connection with rape.

Community

from a bartender, to not accept open drinks at a party, and also to look for anyone who seems overly intoxicated because they might be drugged.

you are drugged, Wanlin said, if you are alone, to get help from someone who works in the place you are at or call 91 and then go to an emergency room. If you are with friends, get them to help you and go to an emergency room.

Security Office ext.

357

Student Support Groups 337/360

ext.

Student Services providing support, information

and counselling

In the event

Doon Campus Room 2B02 748-5220

ext.

360

Guelph Campus 824-9390 ext. 148 Waterloo Campus 885-0300 ext. 224


.

SPOKE, March 9, 1998

FEATURE

*Ten behavioral traits of potential By Dee Bettencourt

the following attitudes and actions that abusive men are prone to, as

The following are 10 personality traits which could indicate whether you might be a potential abuser. The abuse may be verbal, physical, mental, sexual and/or economic need

(you

to

control

all

1.

and/or watched being hit.

your

you recognize yourself as having an unhealthy predisposition

3.

you are not alone, says Ryan, Anselma House

for abuse,

put-downs,

Insults,

You remove your

4.

“Men can

Be honest and

evaluate yourself to see if you display some or all of

Coeds

Somehow, your shortcomings become your partner’s fault as you

6. Even you may wonder about your Jekyll and Hyde personality. You are even-tempered one

8. Your overindulgence of drugs or alcohol cannot help but endanger any relationship you

.

in

By Rachel Pearce Provided by Conestoga College

and

hotel staff), and anyone can enter the rooms at any time. I have seen these

my first two

available

services office at

in

the

student

Doon campus

in

a pamphlet called. Your Guide to

doors left open in the dead of the night, and it gave

Homer Watson Boulevard

me chills.

victimized.

one and only resi-

Last year, there were

dence, Roadkill (pardon

(unsubstantiated) niraours tibat a was raped in her

gM

Suites.

My parents often asked

room, and

I

wouldn’t be

me what it was like there,

surprised

and I knew they were

happened.

curious to see for themselves. But I never invited them. Liberal as they may be, having grown up in the days of free love, they would have

Sure, there are surveUlance cameras in all of the common areas and the hallways. Sure, guests are expect^ to sign in at the front desk. But what if a

been ^palled. Beer bottles and garbage were often scatter^ thrcmgh the halls. Once, on my way upstairs, I nearly tripped over a drunken 18-year-oId girl

who was apparently hav-

^

ing a party by herself c« tl» elevator floor. She was friendly and out-

^d asking

me how my evening had been.

At first I thought it was

A quaint college-

days story I could share with my fri^ds some day. Then, as I looked at her, I saw a pathetic young thing, a sitting-duck for any drunken young buck

who was lacMng brains and compassion who might want to have “some fun” with her. Incapacitated as she obviously was, I doubt she ^ould have even noticed. P|n residence, young guys girls live

Ryan warns

that

it

is

after recognizing

many

not only

relationships

in

which abuse occurs. “Don’t think that everything is always fine with lesbians or homosexuals; they assume roles as well and may be abusive or

where you live, where you are if you are going to be out

semesters at Conestoga College, I lived across

and

that forms the pattern of abusive relationships.

heterosexual

She says the next step for men, and admitting they have a problem, is to reach out to one of the many counselling

a vicious cycle

agencies

for

Interfaith

or

to

such

help,

K-W

as

Counselling,

work on freeing themselves of

negative, abusive behavior.

“Freedom.” says what everyone

is

Ryan, is

“It

basically

looking for.”

toge&er

amicably. Everyone is a fiiend. People leave their doOTs opeii (despite •

numerous warnings by

'

girl

if it

actually

At all times:

Project an image of calmness and confidence. Walk with determination and purpose and be alert to

hesitate

your surroundings. Don’t to

draw

attention

to

yourself if you are afraid.

was raped by someone

who lived there, who had

any

going or

Personal Safety and Security, the following ‘common sense safety tips’ can help students avoid being

funny.

Ryan advises it is up to both sexes to accept responsibility for their actions or inactions.

start over again with a honeymoon courtship and expressions of great

7.

OK.

getting drunk.”

to

is

ever

help students a potentially avoid becoming victims of assault

By Rachel Pearce

going, smiling

damage

occurred.

remorse. This

natural,

is

is

won’t say that because of the provincial cuts, guys are angrier and hitting out more - that is not an acceptable excuse. Nor is

easier

is

“No abuse

says,

I

will do whatever you win your partner, then drive her away, only to repent and

must

regarding cheating.

dangerous situation

me, Rodeway)

Although quarrelling

Ryan

Some safety tips to

Opinion

in our

It

to pretend the

abused,” says Ryan.

You

project your behavior onto her. She’s the reason you fail tests, lose games, are broke, etc.

.

responsibility.

you

never

partner’s

from friends and family. 5. Jealousy is no stranger to you and you may make accusations

take responsibility to get help, if they just admit to a problem.”

You may already have problems with the law. 9. 10.It is not easy for you to admit you have hurt someone and accept that

and

experience with battered women through her job with the non-

abusers

form.

for

support system by isolating her

During

provocation.

mother

Ryan, 42, has over six years of

says,

without

slanderous name-callings are well within your vocabulary.

administrative assistant.

home and

explosively,

often

drive too fast, deliberately scaring your passenger).

If

profit

unpredictably,

2. It’s tempting to manipulate through fear (i.e. you occasionally

the

finances).

Jane

by Anselma House: You were abused as a child

identified

moment, then rage

— Page 9

—Use caution

with strangers. Don’t

tell

them

4 p.m.

to

walk alone

Make arrangements

at night.

to

friend or stick to well-lit areas where there are other people.

stuck.

paths.

At the Doon campus: Avoid isolated areas of the school. If you are alone, let security know where you are so they can check on you

periodically.

^Walk on the opposite side of the street from parked cars and avoid dark entrances and

—Do not — you

stop to give strangers

directions.

If suspect someone is following you, head directly to the nearest home or business that looks occupied, and call for help.

after dark,

Wear flat shoes and avoid overburdening yourself with bags

close

and parcels.

going to be at school

move your car to a parking lot. You can park in

Airband Contest

no need to sign in at the desk, and who, perhaps, had been in her ro<Mn before? The cameras wmild certainly ttq« him walking in the haU,way, but who would think Acre

Tues. IVIarch 24 1 1 cim - 1 pm

The Sanctuary

was any&ing wrong, considering he lived there? Let’s face it. There’s a hell of a lot of drinking and fintemizing going on in Conestc^a’s co-ed dorm. It can make college

a truly wonderful experience for some; a time they will remember

Sign

up

at:

the

DSA Office

life

forever.

But, just look at the

One in

three women is sexually assaulted. statistics.

Most are college

age.

One in four women are assaulted while attending college or university. Many rapes occur in situations

where a woman

is

alone with a man whom she knows. Often, alcohol is

involved.

Girls, please lock your doors tonight.

meet a

you go out, and about how long you will be. If you go out drinking, work out ahead of time how you will be getting home to avoid being are going if

If you are

in conversations

—Try not

late.

—Let someone know where you

lot after

While walking:

i\m l^p. Miu! Schedule Tues.

March 17 or

Thurs. March 19 3:30 pni) The Other Room in The Sanctuary


Page 10

— SPOKE, March

9,

1998

COLLEGE

LIFE

College grads can maintain relationship through alumni More promotion of association needed, says manager By Barbara

Conestoga’s alumni association wants students to know they are all

Valentine’s also

can take advantage of the many

more focus hired

inform students that

once they graduate,

their relation-

ship with the college isn’t ended; different

a

carnation drive

status,”

takes

said

Mary Wright, manager of

Wright said it’s important for alumni to stay in touch because

to current students,

which she sees happening now. “Grads that had a good experience here and know about the programs often recruit from us,”

(students)

relationship with the isn’t

ended;

it

she said.

just

“Alumni who are more actively involved sort of feel they benefitted from their education. This is their opportunity to give back to

takes a different status.”

what they

Wright.

make them aware,”

Wright. “I don’t think

it’s

the college.”

Mary Wright,

“Students aren’t as aware of (the alumni association) because we haven’t done enough promotion on to

Wright said graduates are now

manager of alumni, job employment and

said

supervising

co-op education

them when they’re a current because they’re more focused on completing their

“He’s looking at a plan in terms of how could we strengthen our

studies and graduating.”

and providing full time employment opportunities. “The alumni association sees

position on

for

Some ways tion tries to

known

campus and become more visible.” The alumni association has a

themselves as dedicated to.. .the college’s interests and to promote and help in the success of the college,” said Wright. “That’s sort

through articles

board of directors that includes

of the whole focus.”

the alumni associa-

make

around campus

is

co-op work terms,

providing work term opportunities

a focus

student

and

“Once

college

campus

involved

they are supporting the college, such as offering job opportunities

association.”

aren’t sure

actively

student as a field placement.

graduate, their

Students aren’t too aware of the alumni association’s presence on

be

participate.”

and leisure

recreation

a

alumni, student employment and co-op education. “They’re automatically members of the alumni

offer, said

to

on,” she said.

it

just

campus and

is

This year, the alumni association

services they provide. to

Day

of different things. “Their focus is to come up with a variety of different things that we want to do to encourage alumni at a variety

done through the association. “It’s something we have to put

'considered part of the association once they graduate and students

“We want

four standing committees that look

and ads in Spoke and having alumni speakers come in and talk to classes, Wright said. The annual

Ateljevic

itself

profile for the

and co-op education, wants to provide a higher (Photo by alumni association on campus.

Barbara

Ateljevic)

Alumni membership has its benefits, says manager By Barbara

Ateljevic

office.

As

well as job postings on and outside the

bulletin boards

Maircli

9

-

^

Sign

up

at the

job centre in office

also

association.

access,

where

Two programs the

alumni

association

-

March

19th.

3:30-5:30

from

pm

financial service offers a variety

of

services

Room 1B21 • Facilitator:

mortgage

Larry

ElliS'-

the

for

office

to

RSP

plans and tax

The resume the

resume

and

critique service

referral service is also

will give suggestions on how improve or change your resume improve your chances of job

They to to

preparation.

success.

The home and auto insurance, which was launched in September

also offers a 24-hour job hotline

1997,

sign

The student employment

100

where students can find out about job opportunities. The number is 748-5220, ext. 562. Wright said

alrnost

menu-driven and gives a of postings received. For further details about the line

short

homes twice

from 8:30 a.m. 748-5220,

ext.

to 4:30 p.m. at 756. Have your

number on hand. The job fair is also a regular service provided by the student employment and alumni office. The recent fair, free to alumni and students, had several graduates representing their companies and student

a year.

Wright said it is the primary communication vehicle with students. The association also offers group discount tickets to places such as Canada’s Wonderland and the African Lion Safari.

or Jeanette in

is

description

these jobs, personal assistance is available Monday through Friday

“Those two membership benefit of plans are what we’re working on and trying to expand upon in the next year,” she said. The alumni association sends an alumni publication. Connections, types

Please see Elaine

office

up within a two- or

seen

has

three-month time frame, said Members have been Wright. saving between $100 to $200 through this insurance plan.

recruiting for additional positions,

said Wright.

The

In addition, the association tries

alumni

association

is

to offer a variety of events, such

currently trying to get a computer

Room 2B02 to

as the recent skating party held

and printer for students. “It will be strictly for students to sign on and use for printing of

sign up

event.

at

the recreation centre,

said.

March

prior to

Wright

About 25 people attended

the

^ V

resumes,” said Wright. She said job searches can done over the Internet. Students

our from perspective because it was the first time. It’s something we hope to “That’s

19th. ,

Conestoga’s

for

graduates. This includes everything from assistance in finding a

Student Services, in

inside

available

provided to students and alumni. To have your resume critiqued, drop it off at the office and staff will review it within 48 hours.

to graduate’s

jobs received are

categorized and placed. These are

of alumni, student employment and co-op education, said the

PROBLEM GAMBLING WORKSHOP •

the

all

2B04, the

a job binder

Ross Dixon a group home and auto insurance program. Mary Wright, manager

DSA Office

Thursday

is

Room

offers

students to look through.

members

offered through

financial service and

March 9 Chess Tournament - March 10 Pool Totmiament - March 11 Fooseball Totun. - March 12

Euchre Tournament

There are several benefits to being a member of the alumni

.

positive

build upon,” she said.,

Students should take adVdrItage of the job search assistance ‘avail.

able at the student

employment

can book however much time they need and they should bring their own pa^r.' 'The comptitet and printer sHduld be-in plade' By Apfil or May, Wright said. *

.

'

,


SPOKE, March 9, 1998

feHeyliS

CD release party

entertaim

lt'5

A force

CD release

Groovin’ with Groovy Religion

to be reckomedl with:

®0](B[l[D[i>[D6BB(!] OKiajj] aiBEiIi

QaOQfflBte

rnonfl

by Natalie Schneider

ri

ihe nostalgia of playing in a band, the rush of performing

m

Any doubts about

and the creative outlet that bands offer can wear off quickly for some people. For those that continue to have a passion for what they do

Engine.

With special guests The Kramdens and Dumb As Sheep,

ACME played a tight set to a packed crowd on foe upper level of Van Gogh’s Ear, Wyndham Street North, in Guelph. According to singer Matt

behind. For over a decade the Toronto-based band Groovy Religion, formed in 1982, has been building a forum for their music. Since that time they have released their debut LP, in

The

track disc

is a perfect sound choice for those not be familiar with Groovy Religion. Groovin’ songs like Wes Stem to the mellower Ballad of the Girl gives the album an edge. You’re not going 1 1

who may

to find

The

bored repetition on

Canadabis.

on Canadabis, Dimebag (Owed

track

first

the Stooges) will

be the

first

to

single circulated to radio

and video. The decision to initially release this song was made by their production company. Handsome Boy. Frontman William New is more than happy with the choice. “I think it’s

record.

one of the best sounding songs on the

I like

their

Stooges will be the

game plan first

in that

Owed

and Honey

single

O

to the will

be

the second single. They’re probably stylistically the furthest two songs apart from each other, so I’m tickled

by

that,” said

New

in a

phone interview fi-om

Toronto.

many

shuffles within the band over the band members New, Steve Mahabir, guitars, John Borra, bass, harp aijd organ, and John Lalley, dmms, have been keeping busy with their new

years, current

release.

Vancouver at the Cannabis Cafe. The opportunity to hold a release party at Cannabis Cafe seemed the fitting place for them to introduce Vancouver to Canadabis. “Jeff,

who heads up

the label

Handsome Boy, had

seen the cafe in the course of his travels and thought at that time that this would be a good place for a band to

have a listening party.

entitled

BEAT GROUP NUMBERS! that they all write songs in different

ways gives them

an advantage. The musical input changes often. Either foe entire band collaborates together for a song or it shifts to two people within foe band or individuals. While some of foe songs on Canadabis are about

Canada and cannabis, ideas behind the songs also stem from a more personal level, said New. “Honey O is basically an account of a a date I went on when I was 13. I took a girl to a local movie theatre to see Easy Rider. Jimmy Tear is about a friend of mine that passed away a couple of years ago. There are a couple of songs that deal with incidents in Canadian history and others that deal superficially with marijuana including Honey O, so there are a bit of crossovers there. It’s certainly not a concept album, the motifs for the songs are all over the place,” said

New. of the most rewarding experiences for many bands is playing to an audience. This is an opportunity to see how receptive foe public is towards them, but things can easily get very ugly especially if you’re just starting

important

It’s

Prior to their Toronto release party on Feb. 14, they flew to Canada’s west side on Feb. 1 1 to celebrate in

Canadabis

nicely,” said

it

When just

to

ducktail

New.

know much about

“I don’t

our record became

seemed

the Cannabis Cafe, but

off.

have

to

foe

right

perspective

when foe crowd isn’t warming up to you or

especially

no one there, said New. “You need to have foe right attitude, especially if you’re an opening band and it’s not your show. You have to be philosophical about it. I have played Toronto shows were we’re low down on foe bill and people are getting there late. So they’re there for foe end of our set if at all. “So you start a set with a half dozen people in foe room and I think in some ways that’s foe mark of a band. I mean anybody can get up to speed with 300 kids jumping around, going nuts, but can you still turn on when you’re in front of a half dozen it there is

disinterested spectators. I think you’re selling yourself

Although things are a

circumstances,” said New.

little bit

it’s still

against the law,” said

because

I

think people have to

looser in Vancouver,

New.

“I

admire them

make this type of stand

in order to see things change. I for one am tired of being jailed for smoking marijuana. I don’t think that anyone should be put in jail for smoking a flower.”

The

first

50 people

to attend the release party

were

foil of cookies, hemp papers, a CD and other munchies. Plus, when opening foe CD one can find a smokable hemp product as well as a chance

given grab bags

win a bong. However, even though New believes strongly in foe freedom to smoke marijuana, he said that foe release to

of

Canadabis

in

is

no way trying

to

promote foe

usage of marijuana.

“These days marijuana is quite a strong drug with hydroponic growing and cloning plants. I wouldn’t advocate to use any drug but having said that, I don’t think you should be a criminal should you chose one drug over another. It seems absurd to me that if one wants to drink alcohol it’s somewhat accepted by

short

if

you can’t play a rock

set

it

The

for

pre-show interview. “I played it Craig (vocalist for The

for

nobody

them?”

hears

asked

Grainger. “It’s a better record than foe last one because it was

a total accident foe way it was We recorded 16 or 17 songs, but only nine made foe

done.

CD. We for an

originally

EP but

it

wanted

five

just kept getting

bigger.”

Their reputation as a force to be reckoned with seems to be increasing in size as well.

When

Hamilton-based band The Headstones played Guelph last summer, ACME was hand picked to open foe show.

They had already opened for The Headstones a few years ago when they were in foe middle of promoting their first recording.

Kramdens) and he said, ‘Oh, here comes ACME just like a jet

As a token of thanks, Grainger was presented with a custom-made microphone stand

engine.”

that singer

After

conferring

with

band, completed by

foe

guitarist

Brad Dawson, bassist Nathan Martin and drummer Eric Martin, Grainger decided to use foe expression as a working title.

“We

didn’t

know what we

were putting out

we

at foe time,

started calling every

so

song Jet

Engine,” said Grainger. “When we recorded foe songs, we wound up not using foe title for any song after all.”

Hugh

Dillon used

onstage.

ACME

showed

off both

new

and old material during their set, including foe powerful Orange Amazing, A Wonderful Thang and a pseudo-psychedelic tune called Supermagicman from Jet Engine.

They

also included songs

from

their first recording. Fighting

Amongst Ourselves, including foe encore favorite. Papa.

of recordings foe band planned

Jet Engine is now available in most music stores, and foe band plan on setting up some local

to eventually release.

performances

The new

making marijuana available to their customers and allowing smoking on the premises. they’re bravely

was foe vocalist Kramdens who unknowingly came up with foe title for foe CD. “We recorded foe track The Zero Ward last year,” remembered Grainger during a Grainger,

One

Despite

foe local

music scene were successfully laid to rest on Feb. 21 during foe official launch of Guelph band acme’s second effort. Jet

success surely follows them closely

1986 and then Tom -A Rock Opera released in 1995. But it doesn’t stop there Canadabis, their newest release, emerged this February.

DOS®

photo and story by Lisa Roberts

CANADABIS

live

Thin Gypsy Thief,

— Page 11

CD

“What good

contains

are

demos

demos

if

to

support

the

release.

under any

Despite some of the challenges that face a band, foe most fulfilling aspect of the business is the immediacy of getting a song to a ultimately

listening audience, said

New.

“If you’re writing a short story

time to find print, but

if

it

may

take a long

you write a song you can

week and

sing it in front of an audience immediacy,” said New. To capture a glimpse of Groovy Religion you can catch them at foe Warehouse with Rusty in Toronto on March 7. Although Groovy Religion isn’t starting an official tour, foe near future will hopefully have them touring throughout Canada.

write

it

this

foe next.

So

I

like foe

“The touring will hopefully start sometime in April and May, when foe weather gets better. Things are still

up

in foe air with

a cross Canada

tour. I’ve

got

my

Vancouver soften things up and

fingers crossed that we’ll at least get to

because we’ve just been there to talk to foe media,” said New.

JjSociety, providing

you don’t drive,” said New. have invested interest in seeing things change or perhaps I’m biased, but I’d rather think that had I not been in prison for smoking marijuana that

^|P“So perhaps

I

I’d, recognize it

as an, unjust law,” he said.

New-who mainly said

and melody lilies, he finds foe' ijand works w^lj together and foe fia^t writes.foe lyrics

ACME

vocalist

Matt Grainger kicks out foe jams during foe band’s 21 at Van Gogh’s Ear in Guelph.

CD release party on Febi

.


Page 12

— SPOKE, March

1998

HEY!

foretells futures

Psychic at

9,

Conestoga

The Kramdens perform their semhstylish show in Gueiph

^

by Lisa Roberts “I hate

when people asked us

it

ourselves,”

describe

said

to

Craig

Norris, vocalist and lyricist for

The

band

Guelph

Kramdens.

“Well, I’m five-foot-eight and a half

.” .

.

This

humor

deadpan five-member group has

typical of the

is

the

developed over their years together to cope with the stress of the music business. Bass player Will Key, guitarists Iain Grant and Steve

by

Amy Sonnenberg

do is not have sex for the next months for it not to happen.” Valkos has been involved with psychic phenomena for almost 30 years. In that time, he has written such books as The Psychic World and How You Can be a Part of It and The Psychic World of Your Dreams. He is planning on releasing two more books later to

six

Psychic

Dan Valkos saw

the futures of

into

Conestoga college

students in the Sanctuary Feb. 19.

up for which each

Scores of students lined brief consultations in

person could ask Valkos three questions regarding his or her foture.

Kiran Sharma, a first-year was student, journalism impressed with Valkos’ projections. One of Valkos’ predictions for Sharma was tiiat she would t«

famous and one day be on TV. “I’m very happy with what he had to say,” she said. “My fiiture looks bright”

a first-year

Christine Losier,

general business student, found Valkos’ answers encouraging.

Losier explained that Valkos details about her brother

knew

that she hadn’t told

Valkos,

who

him.

nique as telling the probability of the future, said he has an 85 per control of your

“You

said. “I

could

own

tell

are in

destiny,”

you

that

He

them. Past seminars have included The Psychic World and Who Were Reincarnation You? Valkos will be teaching the two-day seminar The Advanced

Psychic World starting March 25. Consult Conestoga’s Continuing Education program for details. Staying close to Conestoga would be a good idea, according to Valkos. “Kitchener- Waterloo will

describes his tech-

cent accuracy rate.

year or early next year. has also lectured at 21 colleges, Conestoga being one of this

he

you are

going to become pregnant in the next six months, but ail you have

be booming

in

the next

couple of years,” he said. However, if you agree with other psychics

who

believe the

world will end before we ever get to see that happen, Valkos* disagrees. Rest assured, he said, “the world is not going to end in the year 2000.”

Knox, and drummer Rob Leader complete The Kramdens, who recently opened for ACME during their performance at Van Gogh’s Ear, Wyndham St. N. in Guelph on Feb. 21.

The band has been together for more than eight years, but only

CD,

released their debut stylish, last

semi-

summer. Their hard

work and debut effort has resulted in a number of southern Ontario gigs,

including

launch

the

Kitchener eight months ago. honest were songs “The

reflection of an excursion Norris

ing stick,” says Norris, “but there

in

went on with his Grade 8

explained Norris. “I usu-

reveals his lyrical openness.

could be worse things like Michael Bolton.”

recreations of

my

life,”

ally write

me,

what happened

about stuff that interests

stuff that catches

my eye.”

musicians expected to

embody an

image. “Craig handles the lyrics, but there’s the pressure to

conform

into,” said Grant. “It’s like

we’re expected to demonstrate worldly awareness. Anyone can do vocalit convincingly like

(^M

ist)

Michael Stipe.

It’s

a

shame

people aren’t judged legitimately.” Songs like Martyr’s Shrine, a

THE XREA!a R .OF: "S!:S It’s

to

the alternative music scene we’re

lumped

makes

daily

class,

“What occurrences more

beautiful than our

The Kramdens are aware of the heavy marketing of alternative music and sympathize with other

Twoonie Tuesday “ You’ll

of

semi-stylish at Mrs. Robinson’s in

The

grandiose vision?” asked Norris. “You gain more success if you’re true to

their

ScarierTtian ‘Scream’"

TUESDSY

opened for on Feb. 21 as a favor to fellow musicians. During the

launch of semi-stylish, opened for The Kramdens

yourself.”

The song writing process takes more effort with time, as the band

Robinson’s.

reveals.

party) because they

“When

“They played

“Everyone has

to

(the

CD

first

felt like

we

ACME at

both were on the outside

edge of the Guelph community. Both of us are in a situation now where we don’t want to hook our stars to

anyone.”

The group

will

begin

laying

down tracks on March 20 for the new CD, which will be released sometime

this year,

and they say

they will be experimenting with

newer

ideas.

taken a few years to turn this comer, but we are the absolute “It’s

band in Guelph, other than King Cobb Steelie,” said Norris.

busiest

don’t make people cringe with our music; we’re a pop band with an edge. People like us.”

“We

hav^ a measur-

‘A Wu.iiT):?sf(((-x Riut! Lo.Mji

Oi-Otiiin .r\?n3THKll,lS.~

S(xs,snt;M). 'f'tmjjt.rRr

WHSTTOODID

last SOMMER. mvn'ixrti&ai&

imsim

»u^i* (*

3ES^!S.««cWi5 '^88iSa S«SWte!3»*ifaSS»'T^ ,w

The Sanctuary

Tickets $2

onsaleattheDSAOitice

to,”

we

“An EDGR-OF-YDUR-SRATTlnRTf,I.F.Rf

»^

Mrs.

launch

wanted

said Norris. “At the time

band you can write songs in 20 minutes,” explained Norris. “Then you become more seasoned. You become harder on yourself.” Grant, who comes up with the music writing, feels that successful bands have members with lesser positions when it comes to song writing. “If you have five members in a band contributing in the same way and have the same level of input, it won’t survive,” he said. Comparisons have been drawn between The Kramdens and artists like Counting Crows and The Wallflowers, but the band take it you’re in your

all in stride.

Be Hooked For Life!

Kramdens

ACME

own

'

READ SPOKE


SPOKE, March 9, 1998

HEY! WMovie

^Movie reviews

review

Sphere

Kundun

to

fails

THE STORY OF THE FOURTEENTH DaLAI

make an impact

by Natalie Schneider

him

and

Emotionally

brags

of an

explores

the

It It

intelligent life

from other

place

takes

all-star

cast.

of

possibility

planets.

present-day America. Unfortunately, Sphere It

falls flat

on

its

in

face.

team production effort from Michael Crichton {Jurassic Park) and Barry Despite

the

Levinson

(Sleepers),

who

also

directed the flick, Sphere fails to deliver the excitement various

promotional advertisements promised. Dustin Hoffman (Wag the Dog) stars as psychologist Dr.

Goodman, who

is

Norman

brought out to

the middle of the Pacific

Ocean

an apparent plane reason he is being summoned is because an alien aircraft has been discovered at the bottom of the ocean covered to investigate

The

crash.

real

in coral reefs.

Years

Goodman wrote

earlier,

a

abandoned

aircraft,

interesting

things;

they find a few

a half-eaten package of almonds frozen in the hands of a human pilot and an

American

manufacturing

seal.

Wow. This must be an American aircraft.

But wait,

huge

there’s a

golden sphere in the main chamber. TTie sphere has no doors, nor does it reflect any of the team’s members.

Upon

discovery of the sphere, the crew being invaded by, of all things, a giant squid, numerous

s^

and hundreds of podlike eggs that attempt to smother the investigators. On top of that, an alien being named Jerry attempts

jellyfish

to

communicate with

finds a friend in

the crew, and

Goodman.

breathtaking,

Last week’s opening of Kundun, the story of the fourteenth Dalai

Lama,

moves away from

conventional

the

concepts

of

Hollywood film making, which

Buddhist of non-violence and the

to

principle

remained strong for his country. In

advisors assisted

Up

country.

him

to flee the

then he was

until

determined not to leave his people. This was not an act of cowardice. If he stayed he would have surely

imagery, which makes the tale

even more moving.

exile in India.

is

such an extraordinary

story.

of

Instead

and

endless

concentrates

fast-paced

on

action

Kundun

violence,

emotion

and

Kundun chronicles one of today’s most inspiring figures, the fourteenth Dalai Lama. The movie begins in 1937, in Tibet,

An

is

when

discovered.

One of

most remarkable

the

aspects of the film, besides the captivating images,

many of

is

the cast

the fact that

members

are

directly related to the characters

innocent child,

only

two

Kundun was he would become

they

portray.

some have

Plus,

years old at the time,

family

years at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean and is able to talk freely with a psychiatrist. Go figure.

not aware that an enigmatic spiritual leader for Tibet and the rest of the world.

Curiosity almost kills this litter of cats as one by one the members attempt to enter the sphere itself.

The film is an enchanting true young boy reincarnated as the fourteenth Dalai Lama. As he grows into a man he is faced to deal with one of the most

Lama. The character of the adult Dalai Lama was profoundly portrayed by Tenzin Thuthob Tsarong. He is a relative of the Dalai Lama’s

story of a

ties

with the actual Dalai

government document outlining life from outer space that may have quietly invaded earth. Since he’s the author of this document, Goodman is therefore roped into

inside the crew’s holdings as well.

unsettled times in his land.

Tencho Gyalpo filled the role of Lama’s mother. This hit really close to home since she was

Poisonous

the exploration of the craft.

shortages! Nightmares for sure,

In 1950 chairman Mao’s Chinese communist army assaulted Tibet.

portraying her grandmother. As well Lobsang Samten

This started a long hard journey for Tibet. The Dalai Lama was forced to face this challenge alone. The United States and the United Nations turned their backs on

acted as the guardian to the Dalai

He’s

by

joined

team of professionals; Samuel L. Jackson (Jackie Brown) who plays mathematician Harry Adams, Sharon Stone (Casino) fills the role of biologist Beth Halp)em,

who

is

a

also a former

flame of Goodman’s, and Liev Schrieber (Scream 2) portrays scientist

Ted Fielding.

Together, the team must descend

However, the action doesn’t stop there. Lots of

mayhem

sea

takes place

snakes!

Power

could they be invoked by the crew members themselves? Maybe that’s because once they

but

penetrated collective

the

sphere,

their

subconciousness was

released, and set free to wreak havoc on each other. Here’s the moral of the story.

The sphere was sent upon earth for intelligent humans to use this new power to make their dreams come

to the bottom of the ocean to examine the ship for any signs of life and to give a general report. Of course, as a mandate for thriller movies, adventure and suspense

simply too primitive to use that power right now. Could we just maybe forget about the whole

ensues.

thing?

How fit

does the

into the

crew

title

of the movie

whole plot? Once the

begins

investigating

the

true,

literally.

It’s

man

portray their culture, their lives their

homeland

in its truest

form, from the heart. In his career, director Martin Scorsese has obtained a long list of classic film making such as Raging Bull and The Last Temptation of Christ.

His eye for imagery and his passion for his job really shows through in Kundun. He brought

group of Tibetans to bring compelling story to life.

forth a their

Kundun gives the general public a very important gift - knowledge. Although Kundun is only a small glimpse into the long history of the Dalai Lama and Tibet, it still portrays a strong image of the

Tibetan people and enduring struggle.

To not know their

history

tragedy in

just a

their

It

has

little bit

and culture

UP,

SOMETIMES DOWN?

WHY NOT END THE ACADEMIC ON THE UP!

YEAR

CONSIDER HIRING A TUTOR!

COME TO STUDENT SER VICES (2B02) TO BOOK YOUR APPOINMENT!

a

the Dalai

who

Lama, is an ordained monk and was educated by the Dalai Lama. This truly takes the film to a higher level. It.makes the film real

it

was

moved to March 7

stated that

Club

Isis,

276 King

St.

W.

in Kitchener,

was

to

open on Feb. 27.

instead.

Leadership positions are available with the DSA Executive.

SOMETIMES

of

extended family.

Do you wont to get involved in Student Life and make a difference!

already did.

-

is

itself.

New Hiring

is

Due to the lukewarm premise and the lame plot developments, I

ARE YOUR MARKS LIKE A SEESA W

long

CORRECTION In last week’s issue,

arguable,

nonetheless, to say that

because the cast is telling their story not anyone else’s. They

and

end the Dalai Lama’s

the

been killed. His death would have brought an end to all Tibetans for they would have lost everything that surrounded their lives and their beloved spiritual leader. To this day the Dalai Lama still lives in

fitting for

Jerry the alien has been living a

200

visually

a journey to a

place so far removed from the comforts of our land.

Kundun

solitary existence for almost

and it is

He remained

Tibet.

dedicated

by Lisa Roberts

LaMA

Directed by Martin Scorsese

by Barry Levinson

directed

— Page 13

Term

May

1 ,

1

998

-

April 30,

1

999

Applications are ovaiiable

March 25 at the DSA

Office.

Deadline Friday, March 20, 1998. ‘Please note these positions ore not

full tir

Executives ore rewarded by hpripurarium,


Page 14

— SPOKE, March

1998

9,

show mixes

Golf Once

the winner

By Dan Meagher and

you are a golf fanatic, be on the PGA tour, but they just won’t give you your to

may

playing card. Well, there

just

be a tour for you.

many

the

stops at the

1998 Golf Show at Bingeman Park in Kitchener was the Bogey Tour, which offers 17 tour packages to your average golfer in various locations in Ontario.

Ranging from $500

to $1,500,

the packages provide golfers with

a schedule of 10 events at various locations in a given region.

phenomenon

It is

a

that is really starting

promoters say.

to catch on, the tour

“Our memberships increased 500 per cent last year, and we’re hoping

250 per cent

another

for

Devon of Bogey

increase this year,” said

Bestard, vice-president Tour.

Bestard noted that most of their memberships roll in once March and April come around. “Once they play the Masters our phone starts to go nuts.” The company’s head of marketing and promotions, Craig

Loughry, said, “everyone starts to get the itch at this time of year.”

Loughry added largest

that they are the

amateur club

and hope

to

Canada

in

become

the nation’s

largest club.

The show

new

lines.”

New

Let’s see,

Among

dons the green jacket at Augusta, golf thirst grows of our

Matt Harris

would love

from Mizuno this season is the T-Zoid Mighty Big, a secondgeneration driver based on the T-3 from last year. “It has a larger head, bigger sweet spot and its easier to hit straight,” Taylor said. “With a longer shaft, you get a longer swing arc which translates into more club head speed. And with

more speed, you

nize the event. “Because

smaller show,

come to,” he said. Smallwood was size in

Smallwood

said

“It gets the

when asked what main function of the show was. On a more serious note, Smallwood said he would like to see the show branch out to include more warm weather travel options

the

split

By Dan Meagher Condors men’s hockey team got mixed results in their

evolutions

changed in have been some in

irons,”

said

show who

squad drubbed

first-place

from Cambrian Conestoga 6-2 to solidify their hold on the Ontario Colleges

.

title.

.the

Rec'

tew

Centre early “in February with

the’

may have held over previous game when

from the both teams combined for well over 300 penalty minutes. Cambrian outshot Conestoga 37-28 in the match that saw Condor head coach Kevin Hergott use Phillip Popp between the pipes in place of Darryl Whyte,

Feb. 20-22.

Visit

get

we

,

who didn’t dress for the defending’ Jha .

,

games. ,

natiohal

champion' Golden 'Shields ranked seepnel’in

tlie

arfe'

country and

throughout the country in

near

“They have

Smallwood noted the

I

the

future.

gies.

end of

the travel

all

tours

that

manufacturers who the show attended

like

this

U.S.,”

the

in

Loughry said. “But there has never really been anything like it in

of those areas

and not really

to sell

Canada, so it’s really taken off.” Bestard believes that some golfers like to move around and

was covered was

their products.

“They

play

One

were there

cov-

haven’t

promotion

the

of

He

unusual

about

specific location.

it

shows

However,

was for

Others, such as the representa-

the

from The Bogey Tour, travfrom location to location to expand their clientele.

tives

to

die-

el

hard golf fans

golfer in

“Canada has the largest per capita number of golfers in the world,” Bestard said. Loughry

most

added

as opposed to the

casual

that there are

you who need to your golf needs, fear not, because the warm weather is on its way. And whether you want to spend $600 on a driver, or simply pretend you’re on the PGA Tour, you will have that choice.

So

golfers in Ontario alone.

the

in

province with hopes

look

strong

heading

playoffs, with after the

As

a

into

12-3-1

the

record

win over the Condors.

for

opponent,

other Conestoga’s lowly Boreal

the

Viperes, the fortunes are not so

promising. The Condors doused

them

8-1 in their

own

building,

dropping them to 4-12-1 The loss leaves them floundering in fifthof playoff place and out .

contention.

Conestoga’s tO-6 record leaves th’em in third place for the play-

p^s, meaning ftey will likely face

up

third

seed

Seneca Scouts, beat the Condors 7-5 at the

the second-place

who

Rec Centre on Feb.

On

individual

Condor

forward Darryl Sinclair wrapped up the league scoring title with a seven-point weekend. That left him with 47 on the season, nine ahead of Mike Senior from Cambrian, with only one game remaining on the schedule. Another Condor, Matt Ooodbum looks like he will stay ih tte top ten in lea'^e^sjxxTog. l|4 'ciirrently sits .ej^tb’.lrt the .

for playoffs

OCAA with 28 points. The OCAA playolf picture been clear for a while

1 1

terms.

for those of

satisfy

For that reason, they feel it advantageous to promote is their packages in large

to lock

as

one

card.

one million

centres

at

“It’s also very simple for them to have a schedule handed to them and not have to worry about booking tee-off times or anything like that,” he said. were Bestard and Loughry quick to point out that their promotion is there for everyone, and not just scratch golfers, because very few golfers can actually break 90 on the score

he

manufacturers

golf

courses

of

me and

users,”

also said

for

attend

to

variety

opposed to being a member

that reason.

show appeared to

end

the

a

products

people like

to

their courses.

appeal

their

sell

golf courses.

local

to sup-

port the area courses

weekend games

hostilities

weekend journey north to Cambrian and Boreal from

'

“We

into

questions

Condors taking only one minor penalty. It was feared that

The

Cambriari’S

^

to

were

display

explained.

were preying on the golfer’s “itch” that Loughry described. Also present at the show was a representative from Mizuno. Mike Taylor, from Brampton, said this was the second year that Mizuno had attended the Kitchener show. “Toronto is our big show,” he said. “That’s where we show most

from

future.

need

moving

mostly higher-end brands and new, expensive technolo-

had representatives on hand to answer

several retailers at the

faf ,cry

the

in

on

The clubs

um driver, while the hottest selling

has

right) playing (internet photo)

of respects.

not

much

(above

The

joked

Several area clubs

Calloway

Woods

old people out of the

that

set of

never see Tiger

midst

advances in golf technology that were present at the show. Representatives of Ping were unveiling their new custom titani-

new

you’ll

Smallwood

malls,”

ered.”

Andy, of Nevada Bob’s golf store. Nevada Bob’s was just one of

,a.

in the

course, wooden-shafted clubs.

vast

The game ‘wa§

game

appetite for the

Chances are

on The Bogey Tour.

of the gloomy months.

that

drivers, but there

Athletic Association

gives the avid

it

golf fan a chance to whet his or her

think that’s just about

“Not

tough

its

shows, such as the upcoming Toronto event, where Loughry said some 35,000 people attend. As for the Kitchener stop,

a variety of primitive golf tools,

item was a

The

a

to other area

including stitched balls and, of

new

it’s

referring to

comparison

things a bit, because

contrast to the

dis-

a nice one to

it’s

from the Golf Historical Society of Canada. Society members Ross Ditner and Paul Sorley showed off

was a sharp

more

The show, now in its fourth year, has been a success, according to Dave Smallwood of the Galt Country Club, who helped orga-

also featured a look at

clubs.

Condors

get

tance.”

the history of golf with a display

It

old with new^

.

,

who would make

showdown. With only in the league, the

has

terms of the four-team in

we^

from Sault and Boreal

teams showings

six

left

them

out of the hunt early.

Fourth-place

Sir

Sanford

Fleming will likely have to face Cambrian in the playoffs, which is good ne\vs for the Condors, who have stuggled at home against Ae Coughs., The Condors cemain vinless at home in 1998.'

^

.

.


.

.

SPOKE, March 9, 1998

SPORTS

— Page IS

ganger, stronger and better

Titanium good for goiters By Becky

Little

thing this year, but the price

One

Golf enthusiasts are continually searching for new advances in technology to give them an edge to their game. Titanium remains the biggest winner when it comes to advances

innovation

Although titanium clubs have been out for about three years, they are still the most popular choice for those who can afford

with

new

Top-Flight’s

in golf technology.

is

against Spalding because Spalding

is

Ball/Club System

$30 a dozen.

steep at about

is

balls

Arrow

ball.

distance.

said

Elastomer covers on balls also an improvement. The covers allow for balls with liquid

use of the

centers so

drivers.

gives the feel of a

it

The problem with

professional

according to DeMeuleneare,

balls,

driver.

Callaway

is upset because they Spalding was trying to confuse people into believing

that

Callaway

that

run up to twice the price of a regular stainless steel club with a graphite shaft.

better than a regular professional

Thibodeau

The clubs are popular because titanium makes the club lighter and more weight can be put

ball.

Therefore the ball will

with Nike on

into

the

clubs

bottom

of

the

•is

can

are

,

club

resulting in greater distance.

Titanium balls are also a big

Bus

trips

that they are softer,

last

supports

new

the

with

balls

its

At Pro Golf in Kitchener, Garth Thibodeau said the biggest thing was the new soft spike

and they more easily damaged. The Elastomer cover protects the ball from normal wear and tear

titanium

that

designed

is

used with the Callaway Big Bertha

professional ball.

Nathan DeMeuleneare, from Nevada Bob’s in Kitchener, said

C

maximize performance when

It has tear drop shaped dimples which are supposed to optimize air flow and result in greater

are

them.

to

claiming that their Top-Flight

shoe

golf

has

that

rubber

spikes instead of metal.

Junior equipment was expected to be a big seller.

“anything

said it”

also

was going

to

be a

longer.

big seller this year.

Another note about balls comes from an associated press article by Ron Sirak. Callaway has filed a lawsuit

Also for the golf enthusiast there are the Bushnell binoculars for $400. They are supposed to be accurate within one yard.

Sticking around Eric Costa, a constuction engineering student, passes time between classes playing pool in Sanctuary, Jan. 23, 1998. (Photo by Casey Johnson)

going ove weii with students

DSA sells out trip to see Jordan and the By Greg Bisch

each other after a while,” she said, while trying to remember bus trips of the past.

Despite recent complaints from Doon Student Association about lack of student involvement, the DSA’s bus trips tend to be a differ-

“When someone

the

ent

story,

said.

“We do 3

idea for a bus

student

in

life,

a

bus trips have always gone over well,” said

variety of

done

we

have had

have

ago, the idea

is

DSA

very

good

.

musical

from

as an elected member, but as a paid employee.

seem

to

blend into

rates.

DSA

subsidizes

half of the bus rate.”

Last year, she said, the Camilla Scott show was a new idea so they tried

it

out.

went very

well,

and

this

year

we

did the Camilla Scott show twice with two bus loads of students each time. It all comes down

what catches their interest.” “We do a variety of different activities to try to get something to

everyone,”

she

said.

“Everybody

prefers

different

DSA

a Jerry next year. “It is just a matter of reserving the tickets ahead of time,” she said. Springer

This year’s trips included a Buffalo Bills football game, Buffalo Sabres hockey game and

“I

Blue Mountain skiing. Planed trips yet to come include .a Toronto Raptors game in which the Raptors play the Chicago Bulls

on March 22. The tickets went on sale Feb. 22 and sold out within hours.

However,

still

on

sale are tickets

for the Toronto Raptors verses the

Los Angeles Lakers After a

for

number of

March

31

requests, the

considering

is

things.”

trip

encourage people to come up new ideas and bring them to

with the

DSA.”

However, she added, the

students signed

up

to go.

interested in.”

D5A bus trip

she said.

She added reasons

why

that there are

many

the trips appeal to

students.

“Seeing as in bulk, the

we buy our company

tickets

selling the

TORONTO RAPTOR/ LALakeis

or each game) ;ale Iwon. Feb. 23 (ts

5^’^..

trip

should not require more than a three hour bus ride. “This year the Toronto Blue Jays are not doing that well. So, we are not planning any trips to see them,” said Boertien. “We try to be aware of things people will be

the tickets, only 10

“Whatever works, we do again,” talking

“As well, the

for

DSA director of student life _ ”

since June 1991, not

“All the years

for a trip to see

the

and the Becky Boertien Beast. Because of

experience. She has been working for the

came

have group

Therefore, a student pays less for their individual pass,” she said.

“It

Beauty

participation.”

Boertien

out.”

Once, a few years

everyone.”

the

try

she said.

get something for

Boertien.

things

it

up

“The

of

we

However, not all trips have always been successful,

recent interview.

“Most

up a new

trip,

activities to try to

Dst''

brings

tickets usually

Bulls

ff

Limited tickets avaiiable„„..„^ 2 tickets per student


Page 16

— SPOKE, March

9,

1998

SPORTS

Local teacher hooked on pro bass fishing^ By Michael Hilborn For many people in Canada, spending a few hours out on the water with a fishing rod and a couple of cold beers is the ideal way to pass the time on a warm summer day. For Cambridge’s Steve Chiasson, fishing is both a

way of life and

a serious business.

Chiasson, 36, is one of Canada’s most successful bass anglers and one of it’s most articulate ambassadors. He devotes most of his time during the summer months pursuing his favorite pastime and makes enough money in the process to qualify him as one of the top winners on the professional bass fishing circuit.

Chiasson has won five major tournaments to date. He is the 1997 Chevy/Mariner Pro Bass Angler of the Year and the winner of the 1997 Lake

St. Clair

Pro-Am

championship. Chiasson entered his first tournament in 1981 and bought his first bass boat in 1987, just six months teaching receiving his after certificate. “I

knew

that if

I

hadn’t

done it then, I probably would have ended up getting married and would never have had my bass boat until I was 40,” he said. Chiasson hails from Hamilton, Ont., and like most avid anglers, he discovered the joys of fishing at a young age. His facer’s family is from Nova Scotia and it was there

that he caught his first fish, a brook trout. Unlike many of his colleagues on the tour, Chiasson is technically an amateur and does not claim business expenses or even compete full-time. He is a Grade 8 teacher at Hespeler public school where he teaches math, phys-ed, history and He also coaches geography. volleyball, wrestling and track and field. In addition, he is a football and basketball referee. With all that going on and two young

children at

home, perhaps

it

is

not

is

environment because of the emphasis it places on live release. He says that by setting an example for the public, will become people more conscious of the necessity and for

the

benefits of conservation.

Chiasson has some advice for

who would

those anglers

all

like to

improve their results. “Take everything you’ve learned from books, videos or whatevey and go out and apply it,” He said. “You have to put in your time on the water.”

during

the

summer

months.

Nevertheless, Chiasson

says he

doesn’t feel that he

a disad-

vantage

is at

when competing

against

he says that competition sharpens you want to be one of the best, you have to compete against the best,” he said. For those who have the skill, there is a lot of money to be made

on the professional fishing tour. Chiasson ’s biggest payday came in 1992 when he won the Rice Lake Championship and took home the

GMC

grand prize, consisting of a 4x4, a trailer and a Ranger boat with a Mariner 150 h.p. engine. The total value of that package was over $70,000. Chiasson said that event remains the highlight of his career.

In addition to prize are

money, there

many endorsements and

spon-

By Matt

has questions about fishing and equipment. that the Chiasson says Sportsman’s Show is a good place to pick up good deals on the latest rods, reels and lures. The show runs from March 13 to March 21 at the new National Trade Centre at

Exhibition Place.

TTie Toronto Sportsman’s

celebrating this

its

Show,

50th anniversary

new

spring, opens at the

Centre at Trade Exhibition Place on March 13. According to a press release, this year’s show has approximately 600 exhibitors who represent manufacturers, retailers and outdoor poups. Billed as Canada’s largest outdoor showcase, the show will also include a number of feature exhibits. A major attraction of the show the Indoor Gold Whistle is National

Retriever Trials. Entering

its

39th

12 sponsors, Chiasson says that

finals

Ontario so he

pleased to participate. “Sponsors want people who can communicate well, look is

show themselves manner,” he said. Chiasson says that he believes

March

taking 22.

place

Sunday,

From March 16

to 20,

hawks, falcons and other such wildlife will be apart of the Birds of Prey show. Something the kids may be interested in are the Jack Russell

professional and

Terrier Races,

in a professional

final

(Photo by Michael Hiibom)

which begin on the

Saturday

of

the

show

(March 21). Another daily attraction is the Subaru Forester Arena Show, which will feature ATV/Dirt Bike demonstrating

professionals assorted skills.

For the climbing enthusiasts.

WALKSAFE

A SAFE and FREE Escort Service to Rez, ParKing Lots, Bus Stops

as always.

The Ontario

Dealers’

Association

several

Pro Fishing

sponsors

seminars on the 16,000-litre simThe Toronto Star is

ulator pond.

also sponsoring seminars, witii

such pros as Italo Labignan and Henry Waszczuk. They will take place at the Toronto Star Casting PcMid.

There

is

a $10,000 scholar-

ship that will be divided

among

Bass Masters Rids Casting Championship, whichis BPI sponsored by the winners of the

Mutual. Other exhibits that wiU be at the show include archeiy demonstrations, trout development shows and a 10-metfe educational dis-

play ft-om the Ministry of Naturat Resources.

Admission

to the

show

is;

for adults, $7.50 for seniors

juniors

(ages

6-15),

$10 and

$25 for

families (2 adults and juniors), and children under six get in for free.

A

10-day pass to the show

costs $25.

Show hours

a.ra.

to

to Friday;

10

are

9 p.m. Monday

11

a.m.-8 p.m. Saturdays; 10 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays.

FOR THE AUBREY HAGAR

DISTINGUISHED TEACHING

AWARD Nominations

open January close

March

5th, 1998

9th, 1998

details contact a

selection

committee member:

Lana Lee Hardacre (ECE x369) Stu Hood - (Guelph 824-9390) Tony Kattenhorn - (Doon x213)

Security Office

The Service is available to Everyone - StafS, Faculty, lull and part time students.

show

Toyota

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

For

pm

30-foot-high

Fishing will be a large part of the

Nominations forms available from the committee members.

Monday - Thursday 10:45

new

wall available this year.

year, the trials run daily widi the

health of recreational angling in

@

who

there will be a

Harris

sors for the successful angler. With

they are essential to the success of the professional tour and to the

pm to

Zebco/Quantum/MotorGuide. He will be available to give advice to fishing enthusiasts and anyone

Annual sporting showcase has it all

his skills. “If

6:45

Chiasson will be at the Sportsman’s Show, where he will be representing his major sponsor,

suprising that he can only compete

the full-time professionals. In fact,

Steve Chiasson, professional bass angler.

fishing tour

the professional

healAy

oON

Ruth MacIntyre - (Stratford 271-5700) Jane McDonald - (Doon x719) Alix McGregor (Doon x430) Arden Mertz - (Doon x276) Mark Salmikivi - (Doon x353) Ted Spicer - (Doon x282) .3rent Walker - (Doon x209)

C


Digital Edition - March 09, 1998