Page 1

30th Year

— No. 8

February 23» 1998

Student survives strain of typhoid

y/hal'j

Innidu

By Richard Berta

NKWS — Pages

1-3

During the peak of the meningiscare, second-year civil engi-

tis

student Paul Laverty found himself coming down with some meningitis-like symptoms. On Jan. 8, Laverty experienced severe chills and a stiff neck. He

neering

COMMKM\R^ Page 4

tried to rid

Letter to the editor;

COLLKC.L Pages 5

For the next four days, Laverty shuttled between St. Mary’s Hospital, a walk-in clinic and his family doctor before he was diagnosed with paratyphoid fever. “I wasn’t scared,” he said, “I was more confused by the speed things were happening at.” Laverty recalled being asked by his family doctor whether he had been overseas or been in contact with anyone overseas, to which he

Grrrr... E. Legend strangles a wrestler during Conestoga’s wrestling night at the recreation centre Feb, 13. See story (PHoto by Casey Johnson) Page 8-9.

replied negatively. Paratyphoid fever can begin with

someone not washing

pa

Raizes

for paraty-

pected his illness was a flu aggravated by a meningitis shot. However, after he returned to the hospital with a bad fever two days

was

ILATl RKS

rate

25 per cent.

of39C.

Joe

sales

The mortality phoid fever

7

Conestoga. See story on flower

chills, stiff neck, weight loss, blood in the urine and stools, and the possibility of dehydration and kidney failure.

going to bed early. But Laverty was feeling worse the next day. He had a temperature

LIFi: -

himself of the unpleas-

ant feeling with a hot shower and

Student complains about sports eoverage

going to the washroom, and can be spread by the host to other people either through direct physical contact with these people or the food they are consuming. Symptoms include high fever, after

their

hands

He

is

said that physicians at St.

Mary’s on Jan.

9, initially

sus-

salmonella bacteria, which is brought on by food poisoning, was later,

suspected. In the meantime, Laverty was prescribed I.V. (intravenious solution; water mixed with certain chemic^s) to prevent dehydration. Shortly afterwards Laverty was put in isolation at St. Mary’s hospital.

“There was a notice that anyone

See typhoid Page 2

About 50 students show to hear acclaimed executives

talk

10-11

Drujz use in sports

DSA campaign speeches By Corina

SPORTS

paign promises, such as cutting tuition in half and bringing in

and

Hill

Greg Bisch

When

the

executive memDoon Student

new

the of Association took to the Sanctuary about 50 of 12, stage Feb.

bers

Conestoga’s nearly 5,000 students were in die audience. common thread in the candidates speeches was a need for

A

more student involvement. “Sometimes there’s a wall

DSA See wrestling photo spread on page 8-9

in the

office,” said current vice-

president of student affairs, Gerry

Cleaves.

“We need

to

knock down

rmX K ()l T HE)

the

DSA

started taking

nominations for the three elected executive positions on Jan. 19, only four people stepped forward. One candidate recently stepped down, leaving all three candidates with acclaimed positions. But, the

continued with election campaigns with hopes of bringing

trio

awareness to the

DSA

and

its

Cleaves.

activities, said

Jenn Hussey

is

the acclaimed

vice-president of operations. The is acclaimed president of the Kristen Murphy and once again.

DSA

play comes to the Water Street

A new

Kitchener Theatre page 12. on See story in

Cleaves will continue his position student of vice-president as affairs.

Hussey,

who

strippers to the Sanctuary. “What I can do is try really hard to listen to

said

what you have to say,” “We need your

Hussey.

input.”

DSA

office In regards to the Sanctuary, the to adjacent located

Hussey said students should free to

come

in

and

talk about

feel

any

questions or concerns. “Don’t forget where our office to lisis,” she said. “We’re here ten.”

Yet,

unlike

other

candidates,

Hussey addressed the purpose of

that wall.”

When

lack listeners

started the candi-

dates’ speeches, told students she

would not make any empty cam-

the student association. is here to add a bit of “The

DSA

sugar coating to the hard times, and like your exams, your projects your tests,” she said, adding that she would like to give students become more involved with the

school by supporting teams and participating in events.

Cleaves’ speech was less formal than Hussey’s. He opted not to use notes and walked around the stage Since microphone. the with

acclaimed in the same held this year, he felt he position the need to explain why he should

Cleaves

is

do the job again. room for always “There’s improvement,” he said. “I’m not done

yet.

See speeches Page 2

1998-99 schod

Murphy, acclaimed DSA president for the the campaign speeches in year speaks to a small crowd during (P^oto by Erica Ayliffe) the Sanctuary Feb. 1 2. Kristin


Page 2

— SPOKE, February

23, 1998

NEWS

Photocopier busted again The student group was

By Erica Ayliffe

in the

process of trying to relocate the

Doon

same

The

Student

photocopier

Association

that

copier

when

it

was broken

for

the second time.

The machine was damaged

found Feb. 9 with its touch the for broken screen second time. The copier, which was placed in the same area by Room 2A19, was vandalized for the second

both times during night school. Boertien said the DSA has

only

two

weeks

arranged to place the copier in alumni/co-op placement the office across fi'om

is repaired.

$1,350

the copier

DSA said

the

first

and 4 p.m.

organization’s director of stu-

by p.m. security worker.

dent

life

Becky Boertien.

health

machine

the

machine to its insurance company. They will do the same this time, said the cost to fix the

&e

Students will be able to access between 9:30 a.m.

being repaired.

The

when

office

after

who wanted

me had to wear

to see

abnormal heart pressure.

He

returned to school Jan. 26. “I

he

reported a heart beat

of 100, in contrast to the normal heart rate of 72 to 77 beats per minute.

He

photocopier was found vandalized during 9:30 p.m. and TTie

11:00

a

Doon

missed

Laverty

be

Paul Laverty, 2nd-year engineering student.

civil

if

can remain in your body for a he said. Laverty is nontheless grateful that he came out of his ordeal unscathed.

except for instant soup,” he said. He said he had to watch what he

blanket.

overworked digestive system. He added that he continued to be racked with chills, but

my

fever

104

F.”

wanted

has to avoid over-

“It

I

ate to rest his

still

year,”

could not cover himself with his

said he

first two weeks “Now, I’m back to

he’s not careful.

couldn’t get any food for myself,

Speeches

my

ease could flare up once again

(Photo by Richard Berta)

so

to be

exerting himself because the dis-

at

contagious,

still

me five minutes to my way from the

my old routine.”

he was out of the hospital.

He

tests

back,” he said.

home,” he said, “I could sleep more at home than in the hospital where I never had more than four hours sleep.” But Laverty ’s condition still demanded close attention even if to

on

But Laverty said he’s glad

medicines.

was glad

took

back, saying he would rather do anything other than lie in bed. “I had to make up for a lot of

assigned prescriptions for certain

was

don’t like going outside,”

parking lot to the school.”

also reported a blood

and 140. Laverty was released from the hospital Jan. 16, after being

“I

still

said. “It

stop shaking

pressure in the mid-’90s which

“I

result of the illness. has only managed to regain

two or three pounds, since he

and blood

rate

1

and a half as a

He

rubber gloves and a gown over their clothing,” he said. Laverty also experienced an

should have been between 120

was vandalized on Dec. 17 was

time

— continued from page

Typhoid

“I’m

still

same person I was “Only one person

the

before,” he said.

“Everytime

I

put

would

my

blanket on,

rise to

103 or

Laverty lost 30 pounds in a week

told

me

I’ve

changed since being

sick. Well, I’ve

and I’m happy I’m doing.”

become

giddier

what

to be doing

— continued from page

1

throw out

to

the idea of school being a nine-to-

job and make it interesting for Doon campus students. “When you leave here, you will five

want

remember

to

what

this

school did for you,” said Cleaves.

“This

is

your

participate in

grow from

life,

it,

it.

work without “You are going to hear from us more, and we hope to hear from you as well.” Cleaves went on to stress the doesn’t

“It just

you,” said Cleaves.

need for students

come forward DSA. “We can-

to

with ideas for the

not be successful are

if all

the ideas

coming from eight people

in

DSA acclaimed president, Kristin Murphy; From left vice-president of student affairs, Gerry Cleaves and acclaimed vice-president of operations, Jenn Hussey.

DSA DSA

(Photo by Erica

Aylifle)

an office.”

Throwing away

his speech notes

taking the microphone from Cleaves, Murphy started out by making fun of his own name. He said that during the campaign there was confusion about whether

before

Kristin

was a man or a woman.

“As you can see

Gerry Cleaves, explains why he renewed his position as DSA vice-president of student affairs for a second year during the candidate speeches. (Photo by Erica Ayliffe)

at least last

time

I I

am

a

man

is

.

.

checked,” said

Murphy. “The best thing about

name

.

that they put

me

my

in the

female phys-ed class in Grade 9.” Murphy’s speech echoed Cleaves’ with his concern over student involvement. “We can only do so much without you,” he said. “We need your input to make things work.” He called himself a very approachable person, and added that as long as he is the president

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SPOKE, February 23, 1998

NEWS

— Page 3

bands fiiiid approves new course ‘98 New human resources program begins in Mrs. Robinsons

Battle of the at

faii

By Rita

an all-expenses paid showcase

Fatila

of these also offer band networking opportunities and lots of pubUcity.

‘98,

Conestoga’s battle of the bands, will

Conestoga’s winner will have toeir

go on to compete against bands from

entry fee paid for by

over the country. Whoever wins Conestoga’s Feb. 25

all

Steve

said

manager

entertainment

Harris,

for

Doon

the

Student

Canadian Organization of Campus Activities, a

by

on

body

DS A. Harris

will be.

‘To get

in the top three

would be a

he said. “It also gets our

great honor,”

name out there.” The CNME gave Harris the push to organize a talent night for Conestoga,

Association.

Put

flie

has high hopes for whomever that

Mrs. Robinson’s will represent the school at the Canadian New Music Explosion in Toronto, talent night at

the

that organizes entertainment

Canadian

for

activities

By Rita

Real-life practitioners in

Fatita

which hasn’t held one for the past

Conestoga’s board of governors has approved a new post-diploma program to start in September. The human resources course

aU-day integration exercises will be held occasionally. Graduates of the program will be prepared to write the provin-

on university and college graduates and will be funded by its tuition costs alone. According to the minutes from the board’s Jan. 26 meeting, a

cial

will focus

tuition cost of

$5,000 has been

i<fentified.

The board is considering reduc-

As

of Feb. 11 (the deadline for entries), seven entry forms had been returned to the DSA. Although 20

Maureen Nuramelin, a

member

program will qualify students for

in the nation.

Being listed in the

COCA directory

also gives the winners

Canada-wide

pubUcity.

Other prizes in the a boodi at a

CNME include

COCA convention and

had been printed up, he was pleased with the

number returned. “If we

got 15 or 16 back

we would

have to do two nights. That would be

in

ment

said.

resources manager, benefit advi-

Tibbits told

sor and compensation manager.

college

judges from an array of places,

sation

much to judge.”

including local radio stations

and

The cost to attend will be $3 at the door and $2 in advance. The event starts at

compenand labor relations wUl be

Legalities of payroll,

among

the topics

“It

won’t

DSA

towards a purchase of self-help

president, Chris Kroeker, said the group decided to donate the money to the group because they feel the brochures can benefit all

students regardless of their

program.

brochures.

The brochures cover 23 topics, management, stress including divorce, coming out, permanent weight control and perfectionism. The group originally asked the DSA for $2,000 so they could purchase 300 copies of each topic at

Once

brochures

the

the information.

18 cents a brochure.

The women’s group already purchased 300 copies of five topics that they felt fell under antia using messages violence

Women’s group member Joan Magazine said she hopes the purchase of the brochures will be a long-term plan. Both the University of Waterloo

and Wilfrid Laurier University stock the brochures.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR THE AUBREY HAGAR

distinguished teaching

AWARD Nominations

open January close

March

5th, 1998

9th, 1998

the Nominations forms available from committee members.

For

are

purchased, a stand will be set up or outside the inside either to access students for Sanctuary

details contact a

selection

committee member:

Lana Lee Hardacre (ECE x369) Stu Hood - (Guelph 824-9390) Tony Kattenhom - (Doon x213)

Ruth MacIntyre - (Stratford 271-5700) Jane McDonald - (Doon x719) Alix McGregor (Doon x430) Arden Mertz - (Doon x276) Mark Salmikivi - (Doon x353) Ted Spicer - (Doon x282) Brent Walker - (Doon x209)

a

program,” president

ftie

will

really

offer

more

representative,

who

hadn’t been picked at the fime of

John

the meeting, will either sit on the plan board of trustees or

board that the

diploma programs and will

The union

she

posttry to

grant degrees.

CAAT the CAAT sponsors committee. Three board members

members of

who

are

CAAT pension CAAT supplementhe

plan or the tary plan absented themselves

and comprehensive will be kept as well, he said. The board also plans, pending

from voting due

approval of the fiifl board, to seek ministry approval for several

the finance reta:^ treasurer and audit committee, as well as farther discussion on tution fees,

of the program,

on

executive

traditional

she said,

Internet self-study,

allowing students to hold down full-time jobs while taking the course.

grant.

be a

the

committee of the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology in Ontario acted as the sponsor^ip committee. Now, the committee will be made up of four management representatives and one union

A focus on being broad-based

course,” she said.

Some

8 p.m.

at all

board business, a motion to alter toe sponsors committee of the college of applied arts and technology supplementary plan/retirement compensation arrangement was carried.

said

tau^t

Nummelin.

entertainment magazines.

be

comprehensive

The three-person judging panel hadn’t been finalized by Feb. 11, although Harris said he was seeking

government

The Doon Student Association Women’s Conestoga’s gave Resource Group $1,000 to put

wiU

Ctmestoga

too

program. In other

representative. “It

Such positions include human

DSA gives women’s group $1,000 By

tihe

entry to mid-level positions in a typical human resources depart-

will rely

Erica Ayliffe

Maureen Nummelin, faculty member

Harris said

will bring together

program” school of business

entry forms

the

welding engineering technology program, an electrical engineering technology program and a perinatal health post-diploma

Previously,

faculty

bands from campuses across Canada. The CNME wiimer will receive a 1998 COCA membership. “It’s quite a hefty prize,” said Harris, explaining that a COCA membership gives bands access to the entertaiiunent department of almost every college and university

CNME

institutions,

be a really comprehensive

“It will

graduates.

school of business, said in an interview that the

post-secondary

human resources exam, Nummelin said.

ing the cost of tuition for college

three years.

human

resources will be available and

COCA national conference. Both

the

The winners of Doonstock

slot at

proposed programs. These include a municipal paralegal certificate program, a

to conflict

of

interest

Reports from toe president sec-

md

were deferred to the board’s next meeting Feb. 26.


Page 4

— SPOKE, February 23, 1998

COMMENTARY

Letter to the Editor

Moshing

Sports

for idiots

coverage

Picture this: your favorite

band

is finally

making a

concert appearance in

You sit on the phone for 45 minutes

Toronto.

unfair

waiting to get through to Ticketmaster to ensure

you get tickets for you and your friends. A month goes by and the concert

have been reading your paper for some time now and I

would

like to voice a complaint.

date has finally arrived.

You wait

My complaint is that the hock-

for

ey team seems to be getting a lot

teams are getting I

do

little

realize that

hockey

is

nice to see

a

it is

how the team is

doing, which isn’t so great right

now. losing

and the last game had over 350 minutes in penalties. know this because I score all

favorite

I

home games.

They had a terrible Quebec trip where they were kicked out of their hotel for fighting a security guard.

You seem to have forgotten about the two soccer teams. Both played in a tournament in Kingston last week.

The men’s team brought back a silver medal to Conestoga and

woman’s team played here

Editorial

Opinions belong in the classroom Education

is

defined in Webster’s

other people’s right to their

own opinion. who filed the

Conestoga on the weekend. There has also been no mention about the two extramural teams that travelled to Humber

dictionary, at least in part, as a gaining of

By

experience, either improving or harmful.

complaint does not share this view. Opinion is not fact and should not be taken

and won silver in coed indoor soccer and no mention about the coed volleyball team that won a tournament just a couple of weeks ago. I do understand that these

appeal after a student stated Westhues

at

stories are

not as big and

exciting as a story

on

the

accomplishments of our great hockey team and their players, but

some recognition

song of

singer wails the

streak,

the

the doors

as the guitarist plays the opening riff to your

They have a four game

varsity

When

you get trampled by a bunch of goons and are forced to give up your frontand-centre dream and settle for 10 metres back and to the left. Finally, the moment you’ve been waiting for is upon you. “Ladies and gentlemen, introducing the world’s most awesome band!” The spot lights blast on, and you can faintly make out the figures of the band members

all.

public favourite and that

and snow front and

finally open,

no

to

two hours just so you can get

centre in general admission.

of coverage while other

coverage at

in line in the rain, sleet

to those

who have competed in Conestoga’s name would be

of us nice.

And

for at least

student,

it

one University of Waterloo

was harmful. Ken Westhues

Professor

made

“racist

won

his

The student claimed she was unable

to

couldn’t function properly due to the

Westhues apparently

articulated.

UW appointed to the

crowd trying

as such.

die-hard fans

There are multiple sides to every topic of discussion, which leads to opinions for each viewpoint. Free-thinking adults should be allowed to formulate and express an opinion. It is up

show because

who

to those

listen to

their

it

to decide if

a

who

people

to take in a show. Stupid

don’t realize there are true

who couldn’t make all

the tickets

amateur wrestlers. If these people want other at surf,

why

can’t they

venue so the

smash

to

show instead of

sometimes offensive, even hurtful...”. He added it is an essential element in guaranteeing free expression of ideas in a

but not to give

university.

The problem never should have progressed to this point. The student in quesapproached Westhues and

An

were

satisfied with the

essential part of learning

outcome. is

the

felt

if

so obliged. But to claim a professor

she

because he expressed an opinion him or her the opportunity to explain is both futile and pointless. By removing opinions from the classroom, learning becomes stale and oneis

racist

The

university has the right to

they, or

do

What

in

anyone else for that matter, cannot them how to teach it.

by the journalism students of Conestoga College. life editor: Barb Ateljevic; Features editor: Jamie Yates; Entertainment editor: Natalie Schneider; Sports editor: Matt Harris; Photo editors: Greg Bisch and Rachel Pearce; Production manager; Corina Hill; Advertising manager; Dan Meagher; Circulation manager: Becky Little; Faculty supervisor; Jim Hagarty; Faculty adviser: Andrew Jankowski; SPOKE ’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

News editor:

Erica Ayliffe; College

a

CD and push and shove each other in room? When you

can save money and time,

why

Of all

not?

the concerts I’ve seen. I’ve

had

to

stand at the back of the bar simply because to see the

show and

And I have

to

leave the

I

show

miss out on the true

getting clobbered or standing so far back can’t see anything.

SPOKE

SPOKE is published and produced weekly

why don’t all of these derehome with all their friends, put

concert-going experience because I’m either

is tell

Keeping Conestoga College connected

involuntarily getting the

the comfort of their living

intact.

tell

professors what material to teach.

into each

Or, better yet, licts just stay

want

sided.

to

at the back of the can actually see the

crap kicked out of them?

are

to the

do so

real fans

The student could have made her objection known and then left the class

his decision that “expressions of opinion

it

were sold out

push, shove or crowd

full force,

valid one.

exchange of ideas and the acceptance of

Editor; Rita Fatila;

it is

as the

happens. The

realize that there are true die-hard fans in the

work, but more to make sure the opinion can be identified

from

it

back of the crowd swarms forward and you find your face pressed into the back of some guy’s greasy hair and another guy’s sweaty, rotten armpits cover each of your ears. You’re moving up and down and back and forth with the current of the crowd. Your friends are long gone. You feel faint and short of breath and really, really hot. You get kicked in the head by a size 13 Doc Marten which is passing overhead. You just want to die. And you still haven’t seen anything that’s happened onstage, and quite frankly you haven’t been paying much attention to the music at all because you’re more concerned with keeping alive. Yes, you have fallen victim to the wrath of a mosh pit. Now, why would anyone in their right mind want to go through the trouble of getting tickets, blowing money and wasting time in line just to participate in a Royal Rumble of sorts? Stupid people, that’s who. Stupid and inconsiderate people who don’t

president Peter Mercer, said after rendering

parties

^POKE

not the job of an instructor to remove

note,

appeal. University of Western Ontario vice

discussed the matter with him until both

Student Athletic Council

in

further attend the class because she

tion should have

Nick White

It is

students’ opinion

a sociology class.

The adjudicator

accounts, the student

as such.

recently

and unbalanced arguments”

“racist overtones”

all

As soon

time.

all

first

How

I

fair is that?

mainly funded from September to May by Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA the

is

Doon Student

unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).

MS


SPOKE, February

COLLEGE

— Page 5

23, 1998

LIFE

Big plans for a small town band says Bithell. “It will be hard for Tim (MacGregor) because he’s a

By Jeannette Altwegg It’s

pretty hard for the

new

juvie-correctional guard for

kid in

neighborhood. This is especially true when it concerns the music Luckily

CRASH

for

of

be worth it. Although there are no plans for

the

after the tour, Bithell is optimistic.

NOWHERE,

band members have jammed with some pretty big heavyweights and are ready to go touring for some of the big bucks. “It’s who you know,” says Brian Bithell, guitarist of

“I’ll probably just bum around,” he jokes while leaning comfortably back in his chair. “Get a job, make some money, whatever.” Bithell is very forthcoming on anecdotes about experiences he

CRASH of the

NOWHERE. second-year law and security

Brian Bithell of

administration student at Doon, 20-year-old Bithell says one of the

more

young

full

Bithell, though, will

scene.

A

He works

time so quitting will be hard for him.” The sacrifice, according to offenders.

town to make an impression on the

moments

inspiring

in

and the band have had

CRASH

of the

NOWHERE.

The

(Photo by Jeannette Altwegg)

the

in their

travels.

community

reminiscing

celebrity relates several stories of

band experienced near somehow man-

band’s short existence happened when they were invited to an exclusive party where they met

“We weren’t getting any gigs and we were fighting every single

how

practise,” says Bithell of his for-

members of Sloan. “They wanted us to open for them, which was pretty exciting,”

mer band experience. “So we decided to call it quits.” After the break-p, Bithell and

aged to pull off their performance anyway. In one instance, CRASH of the NOWHERE was playing at the

says Bithell, adding that they still keep in contact with the Halifax-

MacGregor decided

Cambridge

based band. Currently

CRASH

NOWHERE

of

“We

they liked

it,

but, for

some

Bithell describes

NOWHERE

CRASH

the

CRASH by

of the

Borderline, stole Butcher’s $50 drumsticks and the show was

delayed for 15 minutes while everyone was scrambling, looking for another pair.

looking forward to a scheduled cross-Canada tour the band is planning for July.

he

“WeTe hoping

that the tour will he says,

adding that he’s looking forward to meeting a lot of new people. When asked whether it will be

NOWHERE was

On other occasions,

is

really help our image,”

Bithell

tour, Bithell laughs.

I’m basically

“Considering that at school most of the time right now anyway, I don’t think so,”

members.

bash

Valentine’s

has high turnout By Amanda

played throughout the night

Pickling

Stages.

What

a bash

it

was! About 500

students attended the Valentine biz

bash at Stages nightclub, 312 King St. W., Kitchener, Feb. 12. Although attendance was down from the Christmas bash, where

600 people partied Garage,

at

president

Conestoga

Business

Sammy’s of

the

Smdent

Association Lia Chamicovsky said the past three bashes have all been successful.

“We’ve had the highest turn-out this year than ever before,” said

Chamicovsky during an interview. The Valentine bash was a little lower in attendance, but that

is

probably because students are busy with projects. “Generally the third bash has a

lower attendance,” she said. bash Valentine The organized by

the

was

CBSA executive

and Stages nightclub. Stages staff said is amazing to work with, Chamicovsky. “It’s a group effort to make the bash happen,” she said. The St. Valentine theme lent itself to the outrageous activities

One game was

at

called the

wheel of love. Students spun the wheel, picked an envelope and received

prize

the

envelope. certificates

included

Prizes

Howl

to

the

inside

at

Bithell,

who

occasionally sings, lost his voice while singing. “That’s pretty hard,” he says seriously. “Losing your voice during the middle of a song but you have to keep going, especially

hard for him to quit his job for the

and MacGregor after the break-up of the band Spill, over seven months ago, of which they both had been

started

NOWHERE.

Bithell says

Canadian “altemarawk” band, their music ranging from light to very heavy alternative rock. Co-founder of the band, Tim MacGregor, is lead vocalist and plays bass, while Rob Butcher is their drummer. a

as

had

gift

The

local pub, and baskets goodies including valentine of full My like videos romantic All Best Friend’s Wedding.

when you have a show

to do.”

However, whatever his experiences may be on stage, Bithell says that the band’s main focus is having fun and, maybe, earn some

money doing

it.

The Kitchener fire department responds Rodeway Suites Feb. 3.

to

a

false fire alarm at (Photo by Jamie Yates)

his

“I started to bleed everywhere,”

been playing the drums for 14 years before he joined CRASH of

of the

all

he says laughing. “But I kept going because the fans are first.” Another time, says Bithell, their openihg act, a band named

says, explaining that Butcher

that just died.”

open

who

him if he wanted to play.” The band shot off from there, he

reason,

split

Bithell

fingers.

joined as their drummer. “We just heard he played drums and asked

.

and

when

know who he

was,” he says of Butcher

working on their debut album, though no release date has been set, says Bithell. about Capital “There was talk Records wanting us,” he says. “They got a hold of our demo and .

didn’t even

Fall Fair

lost his pick

band, which included having to find someone to play drums.

is

.

to start their

own

the

the

catastrophes but

False By Barbara

fire

alarm at rez long time since the last one. “We’ve never had three

Ateljevic

trucks)

alarm around 2:30 on Feb. 3. Brian Gill, manager of Rodeway Suites, said the alarm went off because of a student cooking in

while the

her room.

Rodeway

Gill,

fire

who wasn’t in the residence

at the time, said there was no time to call the company that monitors the fire alarm before it reached the

department. was a false alarm and unfortunately there was a time delay,”

fire

“It

said Gill.

wasn’t the first time false alarm at the residence, he said it has been a

Although

there

it

was a

first fire

truck to arrive

confirmed there was no

Two

trucks,

other

beginning

to

the lot,

turned around and left when they realized the alarm was false. smaller fire truck stopped in the driveway before driving off. Gill said there are four fire exits at the residence; on the east, west,

A

front and back of the building. He said there were no problems evacuating the students and the

whole procedure took about a minute.

Now Hiring Do you wont to get involved in Student Life and make a difference! Leadership positions are available with the DSA Executive.

Term

May

1

,

1

998

-

April

30,

1

999

Stages.

ets for the bash were $6 in advance and $8 at the door. Proceeds from the bash will be

used to pay a loan given to the association by the college, said Chamicovsky. “We just bought 15 new computers with the loan, as well as new Simply Accounting software,” she

Applications are available

February 25 at the DSA Office. Deadiine Friday, March 20, 1998

said.

The loan given has to be paid

to the association

in

two

years.

The

business association raises money by holding biz bashes four times a year, selling chocolate almonds,

having raffles, doing 50/50 draws and bake sales.

were

parking

of the prizes were donated by

The bash was a fund-raiser for The tick-

fire.

that

into

turn

Suites

Moon, a

the business association.

(fire

show up,” he said. About 100 students had to be evacuated from the residence

engines rushed to Rodeway Suites with sirens blaring, only to discover a false

Three

‘Please note these positions ore not

full

time paid

Executives are rewarded by honourarium.

positions,


— SPOKE, February

Page 6

23, 1998

COLLEGE

Conestoga grad’s

spirits

By Anita Santarossa

Joking about the finger that remains on his hand, he said, “I

With a disease that can kill little as 24 hours without treatment, Conestoga College elec-

shouldn’t

engineering graduate

trical

Noot

is

Mark

a survivor of the meningo-

coma

After 10 days in a

London’s

intensive care unit at

Mark

Victoria Hospital,

woke up

his right

finally

and four

to find his legs

on

fingers

in the

chance of him ever getting meningitis again, he said, “There’s not much left of me so I hope I don’t it

dwelling on his misfortune, Mark feels he is lucky to have survived and is ready to of

continue to pursue his goals.

Qualification test which

a

he won’t be able

to

certified electrician.

realizes

do any practical work, but is hoping to get into the technical aspect of electrical engineering.

Dutch from the

1997,

24,

For the

first

time since his

coma he heard

son’s lapse into a

code information specialist Hydro, Don Ontario McNicol is a tutor and friend of

for

Mark’s.

He

AutoCAD

forget.

are the best Christmas gift

added

he

with

a

Mark

The

of Waterloo

University

the

at

has.

courses at Conestoga technical training courses

and

two

said

possibilities,

Donations can be made at any Royal Bank in K-W or outlying areas. For more information, contact Henry Benjamins at 669-5846, or Gary Good at 669-1533 or 669-1458. “It will take a lot to do what we want to to accommodate Mark,” said Dutch, “But it is for Mark and his life and all the changes he will have to deal with.”

Now Mark

McNicol has

also contacted the

Ontario Training and Development

who

has

many

to

shirt

Laurie Doersam and Darren McCann of the student employment, co-op education and alumni services office, sell (Photo by Rita Fatiia) carnations by Door 4 on Feb. 1 3.

Alumni Association holds its annual

with

deal

of us take for

granted. “I can’t just throw

my

on the floor anymore,” he

said. “It’s a big process just to

down and pick it up.” Mark and his family would

reach to

thank

all

those

like

who have

By Barbara Atel|evic

three and

Conestoga’s alumni associa-

finally got to

the first time

He

on

go home for

Jan. 28, his 23rd

continues to live

at

tion took part in Valentine’s

Day by to

selling

students

Mark to Mark

the Freeport Hospital in Kitchener,

Feb. 13.

but gets to visit his family on

embraces the Noot home in Winterbourne, Ont., as

cannot write due to his hand,

Mark responds to his father’s humor by smiling gracefully and

ing while he gives the answers. McNicol expects Mark will write the test this June.

weekends. Across the road is a school yard with a baseball diamond. “That

The annual event was to raise awareness of the

diamond was where Mark

alumni asso-

board,

chuckle.

This

the candid attitude that

is

saying, “See up with.”

what

Mark explained his

home

I

have to put

in

an interview at has been a

that his family

off,”

have fun and laugh he said. “There’s no sense

it

in

test.

someone must do

said

Since

the actual writ-

that

Mark has

always been an energetic and devoted student who always wants to

all

are allowing

CCQ

McNicol

great support.

“We

write the

know more.

a light at the end of the tunnel for him,” said McNicol.

“There

One

being glum.”

is

light that is already

burning

learned

how

to play ball... he

first

was a

IS

APPLIED ARTS

IS

for this

but were

well

as

to

Mark may not be able to run around those bases yet, but with his amazing will and determination there is no question that he will turn a home run once again someday.

raise

money by 2 p.m.

said

still

TO BE ELECTED .AS A MEMBER OF THE CONESTOGA COLLEGE OF AND TECHNOLOGY BOARD OF GOVERNORS FROM EACH OF THE AS FOLLOWS:

STUDENT OPEN TO ALL FULL TIME AND PART TI.ME STUDENTS E.NROLLED IN A PROGRA.M OF INSTRUCTION (A GROUP OF RELATED COURSES LEADI.NG TO A DIPLOMA. CERTIFIC.ATE OR OTHER DOCUMENT .AWARDED BY THE BOARD OF GOVER.NOR5

year

self,

sold out

Karen Parrinder, student

Parrinder,

employment assistant

student

also

employment and co-op education;

employment

“We

Mary

Wright, manager of alumni, student

them,

Karen

and

“So

many

students don’t realize they’re part of the alumni,” she said.

FOLLOWING TWO C.ATEGORIES: ELIGIBILITY

ordered

great pitcher,” says his father.

for

Parrinder said volunteers sold flowers the included her-

Extra carnations were

as

assistant.

ONE PERSON

300 carnations and faculty

ciation,

ELECTION NOTICE

were $2 each, $5 for $10 for six. Inside was each package a Hershey’s kiss, and cards were also available. The flowers were sold at stands by doors 3 and 4. colors,

helped them throughout

their ordeal.

birthday.

Valentine carnation drive

who have

contributed to the fund and those

Mark

McNicol.

I’ve ever received, other than tools

course,”

currently looking

is

into the options

“Hi Dad.” These mumbled yet hopeful words were two that Dutch said he will never the words,

Benjamins. This fund is to help Mark and his family with expenses, such as prosthetic devices, home renovations and

things that

A

Dec.

received a phone call

of

the last

is

become

thing he must do to

Mark

Mark is The Mark Noot Trust Fund organized by two friends of the family, Gary Good and Henry for

transportation.

again.”

Instead

Concerning his career, he wants

operation.

was

And

would be a

to write his Certified Certificate of

determined he will walk again some day, he said. Mark’s father Dutch was told by doctors that Mark had a surviving. chance of slim However, Dutch said he found his son improving ever since his

“It

too often.”

Mark

ty,

is

hospital.

it

there

if

hand gone.

Despite this shocking real

On

wave

when asked

get

coccal disease, meningitis.

high

still

deadly meningitis

after surviving

within as

LIFE

wanted to get from different

volunteers areas of the school.” Although the alunuii association ordered extra carnations this year, they were sold out by 2 p.m. Last year, they sold out at noon, Parrinder said. The carnations, in various

some

people from admissions, the alumni board of directors and liaison.

A recreational leader-

ship student also dressed up as Cliff the Condor and delivered the carnations to classrooms to those who requested they be delivered. Parrinder said the decision to sell carnations

was

natural. She said that unlike roses, they are cheaper

and

last longer.

.

TERM OF

OFFICE: SEPTEMBER

1,

1998

-

AUGUST

Got a story

31, 1999.

idea you’d

SUPPORT STAFF OPEN TO ALL FULL TI.ME AND PART TIME PERSONS EMPLOYED BY THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS AS A ME.MBER OF THE OFFICE. CLERICAL. TECHNICAL. HEALTH C.ARE,

M.AINTE.N.ANCE.

BUILDING.

SERVICE.

SHIPPING.

TR.A.NSPORT.ATION.

CAFETERIA OR NURSERY STAFF.

TERM OF

OFFICE:

SEPTEMBER

1,

1998

-

AUGUST

the

Nomination forms

Board (Kevin

nominees

ELECTION

be available

in the office of the

to

D.ATE:

MARCH

If so, let us

know!

Secretary-Treasurer of

Mulla.n).

Closing date for nominations:

Lists of

will also

covered in

SPOKE?

31. 2001.

The terms of reference for these elected internal members are the same as those for externally appointed members of the Board of Governors. Nomination forms will be posted on Februa.". 19, 1998.

like to see

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke(®conesto12,

1998

gac.on.ca

be posted on campus bulletin boards on March 23. 1993.

WEDNESDAY. APRIL

1.

1998

Or drop by and visit us Room 4B15

in


COLLEGE

Conestoga By Greg Bisch

“It is

something that

National Co-op Week, which be celebrated across Canada

all

is

certainly

of Canada,”

for all co-op instiand university.” As for what can be expected to be seen at Conestoga College, there will be a series of promo-

said Hart. “It

is

tutions: college

Conestoga’s programs over the past two years have received formal invitations to the breakfast.

“The

breakfast

is

actually

Conestoga co-op advisor Linda

tional

Hart in an interview.

around the school during National

going to be prepared by students from our food and beverage program at Waterloo campus,” said Hart. The program is one of three co-op programs run

Co-op Week.

by Conestoga, which also include

March

9-13,

awareness

is

of

designed to create the benefits of education,

co-operative

said

“It is to publicize the benefits

including

tools

posters

to

In fact. Hart is hoping to have a

employers as well as students,”

message promoting the event put on Conestoga’s new billboard sign

education

co-operative

of said

Hart.

“Also,

to

recognize

employers. Without their support co-op would not be possible. It

will

create

some

publicity

for them.”

promotional effort was tarted by the Canadian Association for Co-operative Education but is being supported by its provincial Co-op such as counterparts, Ontario, of which Hart is a This

,

member.

in

Doon campus’s

“It

boulevard.

would show

the

students,

woodworking Conestoga’s technology program, mechanical engineering technology, robotics and automation program. “The

breakfast, in addition, gives

employers and possible employers that Conestoga College supports

the opportunity for the food

co-operative education,” said Hart.

skills,”

The key event at Conestoga during co-op week, however, will employer recognition an be breakfast at the Waterloo campus on March 13. Employers who have from students co-op hired

— Page 7

LIFE

Co-op Week

to celebrate National

being celebrated in will

SPOKE, February 23, 1998

and

beverage program to show off their

program

the

and

coordinators

college president John Tibbits.

As far as Hart’s job with Co-op Ontario, she said she works on a team that is helping combine the former College

transition

She said the two organizations merged in October 1997 to create a stronger, more solid unit. Part

to

Co-operative Educators of Ontario

and the former University Cooperative Educators of Ontario.

included

of Hart’s job

putting

together a media kit promoting

National Co-op Week.

“We

putting

are

media

together

go out

kit to

to

the

co-op

all

institutions throughout Ontario,”

she said.

Other than the employers, those

we

committee for Conestoga’s board program the governors, of advisory committee chairs of the three co-op programs, as well as.

are

“One of

Hart.

said

also invited include: the executive

things

the

put together in the media kit

quotes which have been compiled from co-op institutions Ae benefits speaking about

Conestoga Linda

Hart,

recognition

is

of co-op.”

co-op says

advisor,

employer

important. (Photo by Greg Bisch)

Police looking at native justice system for pointers and punishment

Ontario police look at alternative ways to address crime By Corina

Hill

“The background

is vital to

any

contact with native people.”

Orvin

name

is

Sullivan, whose native Shouwhoo or South Wind,

spoke to a group of law and security

administration

students

native law focuses on the pain in

international

to

nine years.

border,” said Sullivan, adding that

of

Sullivan told nearly 80 students that

at

the

Columbus

time

landed,

Christopher there

were

own

customs,

language

its

and

Policing in Ontario

traditions.

was

“There the

no

people living on the land and used fire and

mother

earth.”

differentiates being native

believe

we

are protectors

mother earth. We take what we need and leave the rest to others.” But what do natives have to do with law and security? Well not only do natives have their

own

justice system, but they

Attention

SOMETIMES DOWN?

WHY NOT END THE ACADEMIC ON THE UP!

YEAR

CONSIDER HIRING A TUTOR!

COME TO STUDENT SERVICES (2B02) TO BOOK YOUR APPOINMENT! [^ienrlces

adressing

punishment,

and crime co-speaker said

Rob Davis. “What we are trying

to bring in is irestoratative justice in the community,” said Davis. Sullivan said the police are now

“We

ARE YOUR MARKS LIKE A SEESAW-

ways

Const.

to

of mother earth,” said Sullivan. “We do not spoil and disgrace

Rob Davis a native craft Feb. 1 1 in were talking to law and security Davis and Sullivan 2A56. Room (Photo by Corina hhi) administration students about native justice.

starting

is

alternative

at

show their presence. “There was no such thing as owning land. You can’t own noise

from any natives worship mother earth as opposed to a god.

^A^Sulvanl^n

look

travelled freely

other religion is that the

UP,

the

dealing with punishment.

nearly 500 nations each with

What

SOMETIMES

have extremely unique ways of

on Feb. 11. Tae native Canadian, from the crane clan of the Saugeen Nation, has been living off the reserve for

starting to use native talk circles when dealing with criminals.

has a powerful effect,” he opens people up.” Legal law doesn’t address the rights of the victim, said Sullivan. In a native talk circle, everyone “It

said. “It

sits

side

formation.

by

“There’s

bottom to the Sullivan. “Everyone

or

is

in

side

a

no

circle,”

cirle

top said

in that circle

equal.”

In general, Canadian law protects

- Graduating

Human

“You have

to

own up

to the very

have to face your victims when you do this.” Currently, Sullivan and Davis are working side by side to help a Waterloo community that is plagued by violence. On Feb. 12, Davis and other police

officers

Community

involved in the

Safety

and

Crime

Prevention Council of Waterloo

Region

were

to

accompany

Sullivan while he conducts a talk circle with

neighborhood people in

Cedarbrae public school to talk about the positives within their community. “We have to heal ourselves,” said Sullivan.

Students!

in

Resources Management!

Thursday, February 26

Room 2A11-1 Doon Campus 3:30-4:30 p.m. Program design^ job opportunities^ cost, co-op feature^ admission procedure^ UNIQUE FEA TURES early!

yet

nature of your wrongs,” he said. “You have to admit it, but you

Post Diploma Program

LIMITED ENROLLMENT! Apply

criminal,

the victim, said Sullivan.

Information Meeting

New

of the

rights


Page 8

— SPOKE, February

23, 1998

left

— Members of the Bushwhackers

demonstrate one of many things that can be done with SPOKE.

if looks could kill, Chi Chi Cruz would be

dead from this glare from Joe E. Legend.

Fi>ee Tuey.

feir.

10:30 cwu

SsMcsIopss 24 12:30

The'Scw/tuary

Cla$$ Cep. Meetins Schedule Tues. Feb. 24

or Thurs. Feb. 26 3:30 pm, The Other Room in The Sanctuary


SPOKE, February 23, 1998

Wrestling

comes

— Page 9

to

Conestoga By Michael

Hilborn

combat

you like rock n’ roll, dancing and big macho men, then the recreation centre was the only place to be on Feb. 13 when International Championship If

girls

made

Wrestling Conestoga.

The all

its

debut at

the fanfare and

Blowout and judging by the reaction of the crowd of the College

approximately 1,000 people, it was a success. There were seven bouts on the

The format of the ICW is to pit good guy against a bad guy, with each wrestler knowing his role. The good guys don’t a

Although wrestling the

bout, Chi Chi Cruz,

school in Cambridge, where they

how to put on a good show while minimizing the risk of injury.

Yet injuries do occur. Sheik Mustafa, who at 299 pounds is one of the biggest men in the

The

Juan DaSilva prevailed in the third by pinning his oppo-

dren.

Seven-year-old Brandon

Silva,

and his brother, Kyle, said

the experience

by the Centre.

Rodney

Blackbeard, again by disqualifi-

Right

and another

entered every minute or so.

it’s

stands for.

many

are so

Wed. Feb. 25 Guest Speaker Thurs.

Fed 26

BYOB

-

1 1

:30

- 1 1

am

Have Fun

-

;30

am. The Sanctuary

The

generally

:30

t>ut:

wrestlers

it:

SAFE!

Sign

up

the children

DSA

and were

warm and

Some

might

friendly

argue

professional wrestling

is

legitimate sport but there

that

not a is

no

doubt that it is real entertainment and has something for the

whole family.

-

X

Toum. - March 12 at the

signed auto-

towards their fans.

pm. The Sanctuary

Iceep

families here,” he

graphs, posed for photographs,

Euchre Tournament - March 9 Chess Tournament - March 10 Pool Toiunament - March II Fooseball

- 1

what good clean fun.”

said.

hugged

Maircb 9

It’s

Conestoga athletic director Ian James says he agrees. “I was impressed by the fact that there

affection.

Family Awareness Centre - information display Mocktails - 1 1 :30 am - 1 :30 pm. The Sanctuary

a good organiza-

tion,” she said. “I believe in

the ring.

favorite with the crowd, prevailed in the end. Kalman, a Cambridge, Ont. native, is a veteran of the Ultimate Fighting circuit which differs from wrestling and other

Cheyanne

She said she appreciates the

objective was to throw one’s opponent over the top rope until there was only one man left in

was a big

Devon, Taylor and

Recreation

it

“Bigg Dawg” Kalman, who

try to intice wrestlers into fighting for their

at the

groin.

The

adds

up

“I think

started in the ring

Siberian Tiger Kadesh excitement to the competition.

set

Joe E. Legend pinned Rhino Richards after kicking him in the

Perhaps the most entertaining

said,

entertainment value of the ICW.

man

Above

,

cation.

event of the evening was the Battle Royal, where two men

double teamed during his match.

1 1

ager of wrestler Don Juan DaSilva, said she was impressed

match

against

was “cool” while

Ashley Andrews, who identified herself as the personal man-

Muay Thai. Geza “Bigg Dawg” Kalman Jr. won his nent,

is

many of whom are chil-

“it r<x:ks.”

Don

— Bigg Dawg Kalman of Cambridge

winners of course are

real

the fans,

Abdul Musafa was also fied.

Top

was limping noticeably end of the evening.

their cousin, Jennifer,

disquali-

are

learn

Scott D’Amour won the second bout when Sheik qualification.

Casey Johnson

themselves

are products of the Hart Brothers

against the Fury Brothers.

with the help of the referee, defeated Terrance Storm by dis-

Photos by

wrestlers

at the

first

is

dedicated athletes as well as talented performers. Many of them

business,

In the

professional

not a competitive sport in the conventional sense,

who

successfully defended their

sets the stage

for an inevitable rematch.

by the tag team title bout, which featured the ever-popular Bushwhackers, card, highlighted

hurt

to

biting.

showmanship

carnival, complete with costumes and sideshows. There was even a midget referee and a tiger named Kadesh. The event was billed as

the

each other and anything goes except try

always win, which

ICW rolled into town with

of a traditional old-fashioned

title

because

sports

competitors

Office


Page 10

— SPOKE, February

23, 1998

FEATURE

Drug use in sports

Ben Johnson put spotlight on steroids variety of concoctions, including strychnine tablets just short of

By Dee Bettencourt

lethal

Ever since Canadian Ben Johnson, sprinter

levels,

to energize

them.

Their faces and bodies were often massaged with cocaine and coca said

Strauss

earth (London Daily Star),

who

exceptionally

set

grueling six-day races, lived on caffeine for the first three days,

Olympics and then tested

then added strychnine, cocaine and heroin later to delay fatigue and

an unbeaten 100-metre world record at the 1988

anabolic

for

public

the

steroids,

Belgian cyclists favored sugar cubes wetted with ether drops, while the Americans used a variety of agents from camphor, digitalis,

has

attention

its

drugs in sports.

Ben sprinter Canadian Johnson tested positive for

did not

It

matter that Johnson was

use after winning the 100-metre sprint with a record-setting time of 9.79 steroid

only one of 10 disqualified at Seoul; he became the

watershed of modern steroid

seconds at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. Johnson

use.

was

Almost every subsequent scandal has used Johnson as the marker by which to measure its nature and significance, according to editors Levinson and Christensen, Sport,

Volume

participation.

may

“Winning

as

their bodies to stress.

In broad terms, doping measures

(workergogenic either enhancing) or anabolic (growthSelf- administered stimulating). or trainer-controlled substance are

elite sport.

to

racehorse,

dope,

strength.

their

Taylor

claim

prizefighters of yesteryear took a

liver

does one access these

substances? The Honorable Charles L. Dubbin Commission researched the proliferation of banned substances in 1990 and illegal

stated their supply

and distribution

a multi-million dollar business. The black market consists of

is

mail-order

gyms, dealers and businesses whose supplies come from clandestine laboratories, without regulatory safe-guards, in the U.S.

and Central and South

people don’t realize how analogies these

Some

appropriate

An Rex

magazine said the most popular veterinary steroid used by athletes is Winstrol-V. The most famous bust in Olympic

Certificate of Appreciation - The Recpients of this award are members of the College Community whose contribution to college life has been significant.

who

-

The

contribution to college

recipients of this

life

when Olympic

history

was

sprintqr

Ben Johnson for

positive

tested

veterinary

the

produced

First

in

1959

at

the Sterling- Winthrop Research said article the Institute,

Winstrol

scientists

intrigued it

achieved at dosage levels well below those producing negative

award are members of the College Commimity

side effects.

In humans, the article said, increased muscle mass was also

has been outstanding.

of Excellence - The highest award presented by the Doon Student Association recognition and appreciation of autstanding leadership and involvement in college life.

Award

in

noticed without negative effects damage or liver as such bloating.

The article also said Winstrol can prevent catabolism com-

Doon Student Association Award Nomination Form

Name

Phone

of Nominee;_

Staff/Administration

monly associated with stress. European countries, the article

:

have

said,

Winstrol in treat

Year:

Program:_

Student Faculty

M

Postal Code:

City:

Address:

School: Dept.:

for:

of Distinction of Excellence

The above named nominee has made

injectable for years to

conditions including bums,

come

chronic

with

conditions such as HIV. Another steroid the

Certificate of Appreciation

Award Award

used

humans

extreme exhaustion and the weight loss and muscle wasting that

Award Nominated

now

in

Olympic Association.

the following contributions to College Life at

Conestoga

:

of physical damage in humans, it

said

steroids haven’t

most vet

been

in tested extensively humans, thus their long-term

safety is questioned.

veterinary

It

said until

conducted on steroids and their

more research

is

toxicity, using these

dmgs

for

considered risky.

of manager James, Ian and athletics Conestoga’s recreation centre, said that not all athletes use steroids, but there have been some caught using the drug. He also added that all people, not just athletes,

use steroids. “I like to keep it general,” said James. “There is no difference between athletes, students or

people using it” James, an athlete himself, said he has encountered people on fitness

steroids in his athletic career.

“Steroids frequent people of

all

he said. “People I know have used it “They (steroids) will enhance short-term abilities to perform, sports,”

but anyone

is

unwise

to

get

involved with them.”

Whether

the steroids, used

by

the individuals he knew, were animal steroids, James said he

wasn’t sure.

James said he hasn’t encountered anyone using steroids at Conestoga’s recreation centre. “I think I’d notice the signs,”

he said. “Fortunately, most people who frequent the centre

a general-purpose steroid. It has the ability to cause dramatic size and strength gains with little

are fitness types of people.” James said the side effects of

The Please submit your Nomination form to the DSA, attention Becky Boertien Nomination Deadline Friday, February 27, 1998

ingest to known been mibolerone despite its questionable effectiveness and high -toxicity in humans. Even though the article said animal steroids have certain

article

analyzed in humans, raising concerns about its toxicity.

Phone U

dismpts normal liver function. It said misguided athletes have

Equipoise, was mentioned which is pqniltu' with athletes as

water retention. Equipoise, also known as die ’Big E’, appears to be effective, but has yet to be

Nominator:

is

an effort to clean up the profession and comply with the standards set by the Canadian

changing

muscle improvement must be

steroid Winstrol (stanozolol).

The article said when Winstrol was administered to test animals they showed large gains in bodyweight The gain was

Awards

of Distinction

March 1998

demonstrated increased muscle tissue with little androgenic activity.

Doon Student Association Annual Awards

Award

attitude

this

an

to

mentality,

club”

boy’s

although

in disciplin-

benefits without scientific proof

article in a

because

Criteria for

to run as fast as a

But how

improve and Norwich

in

seem

athletes

influence their offered are systems. scholarships, lucrative professional careers and prestige. Doping has a history as long as that of organized contest and war.

use

artificially

and

Norvich

testicular

some

can be.

who feel

Richard Strauss, author of Drugs and Performance in Sports, says ancient Greek athletes ate sheep

to

to

how

the races).

might

testicles to raise testosterone levels

According

“old

been lax

members due

Cheque Drops. This drug is and cells liver to toxic

By Jamie Yates

from

compelled to

the training levels

Wirmers

isn’t everything; it’s the

commonly referred doping, is commonly found

their

College of have

Ontario

in

historicallly

ing

the

said

Animal steroids considered risky

builders look so ripped, their muscles resemble a side of beef?

also

Jim Tatum:

use,

to

damage, collapse and even death (several Tour De France from died have cyclists amphetamine overdoses during

athletes

only thing.”

Drug

Romahn Verinarians

Vet drugs for humans?

shrinkage,

well be explained in

by

vet

Brampton-Mississauga

in the

tissue),

than higher The genesis of

statement

team

psychophysical stress, complicated by the hazards inherent in

to take part.. .it is not the triumph but the struggle that matters...”,

doping

practices.

their

in

know of a husband and wife

or how some body-

of competitors

aim

I

fave you ever noticed

To match even

Creed which declares that “...the most important thing... is not to win but

athletes

them

use

pectoral-muscle hypertrophied development seen in body builders (which may be the start of breast

their sports.

Olympic

the

available to veterinarians, as they

and Taylor, authors of Training and Conditioning of Athletes, tremendous face athletes

to the Present,

I.

Despite

this

stripped of his gold medal.

atropine

trinitin,

insulin,

epinephrine, used to help alert

abuse can cause side effects

From Ancient Times

readily

are

“Steroids

said,

Waterloo,

of

convicted and

increase their confidence.

on performance -enhancing

fastened

Romahn,

Jim

who have been

disbarred for selling steroids.”

practices

Investigative agriculture reporter,

cyclists,

faced

previously

whose on

athletes, focused pharmacies that sell directly to customers and veterinarians.

are

butter to nullify pain.

labeled the fastest junkie on

positive

include physicians

area

sources

Legitimate

America.

article

said

the

most

dangerous animal steroid is mibolerone, also known as

steroids include kidney and liver damage, and tendon ripping, when the muscle grows faster

dian die tendcms. He said other signs of steroid

use include increased body and balding acne, weight, perstmkiity changes, such as a idiort-fiised

temper.


SPOKE, February 23,

FEATURE

1998

— Page 11

Students agree Rebagliati deserved gold Canadian Olympic snowboarder’s medal reinstated by the International Olympic Committee By Jamie Yates

opinion.

Mark

In a survey conducted Feh. 12, 15 Conestoga students

unanimously agreed that Canadian

snowboarder Ross Rebagliati deserved to get back his

of

stripped

gold

his

was medal

fair or

have

whether the IOC should been tougher on him, Kilimnik, a law and

by the International Olympic Committee after testing

Kim

marijuana use. claimed he hadn’t used marijuana since the spring of 1997. His medal was reinstated Feb. 12 after an appeal by the Canadian Olympic Committee. When asked if the IOC’s decision

deserved to have the medal back. “It’s totally fair,” she said. “It’s (marijuana) not a perfor-

10

positive

security student, said Rebagliati

for

Rebagliati

back

give

Canadian snowboarder’s gold medal was to

the

a

broadcasting

improve an athlete’s ability. “Marijuana is not a performanceenhancing drug,” he said. “It would probably take away from his performance.”

Tim Bender, a materials management student, agreed.

Olympic gold medal

Rebagliati, of Whistler, B.C.,

Feb.

Moretti,

student, said marijuana wouldn’t

mance-enhancing drug. “Marijuana has nothing to do with the physical capabilities of a person. He deserved to have his medal back. “He earned it,” she added. Other students echoed Kilimnik’s

“If anything, what it (marijuana) would do is not enhance,” he said. “It would have counteracted his

performing well.” Sparrow Rose, a general business student, said the incident wasn’t a big deal. “In

my

personal opinion,” she wasn’t a big deal. “It (marijuana) wouldn’t have

said, “it

made

chances

his

of

better

winning.”

During the appeal, the Canadian Committee argued

Olympic that

Rebagliati ’s

for marijuana

of

direct

positive

Mark

test

may

use.

Kim

Moretti,

broadcasting

not be a result Three students

Kilimnik,

law and security

expressed similar views. “If he’s telling the truth, if

it’s

from

second-hand smoke and he never touched it, he can’t do anything about it,” said Jeff McPherson, a machine shop student.

Jeremy Snider, a woodworking student, agreed. “I believe

him

(Rebagliati) that

he hasn’t taken it (marijuana) for 10 months,” he said. “Like they said, pot depressant, not an

more of a enhancer,”

is

-I

he added.

David

i

.

Pettigrew,

management

a

student,

materials said

he

I

Rebagliati

deserved his medal back because the amount they found in his system was felt

small.

Tim Bender, materials

Ken

management

Miller,

electronic technology

ATTN: JOURNALISM STUDENTS We need you

to attend the

Monday, Feb. 23

next

JSA meeting on

at 12:30 in rm. 4B14.

Be there!

“Ten years ago, they wouldn’t have even have been able to find marijuana (in Rebagliati ’s system),” he said. “He hadn’t used it since ’97 and got it second-hand. “It’s not an enhancing drug,” he added. Canadian officials also argued, during the appeal, that not all sporting bodies test for marijuana use. Nicole Davis, a nursing

Thursday

March

(.oiclon. C'liiolph)

it’s

isn’t a not tested in

every sport, it’s not fair to take away the medal,” she said. “It was also such a small amount

thinks the IOC’s decision

was

Ken

Miller,

an

athlete, so it’s fair.”

electronics

student,

said

from

pm in

he

Please see Elaine or Jeanette in

Student Services,

Room 2B02 to sign up prior to

• Facilitator: •

Larry Ellis

fair.

“Every nation has different rules about pot,” he said. “They said it doesn’t improve the ability of an

(in Rebagliati’s system).”

19th.

:

(S;

drug

the

Room 1B21 Mood

“Because

stimulant and

nursing

PROBLEM GAMBLING WORKSHOP

3:30-5:30

(StoiH^

Nicole Davis,

management

technology

student, agreed.

10th Guelph International

February 27, 28, March 1 Nev'^y Location COLLEGE INN

David Pettigrew, materials

March

19th.

I


— SPOKE, February 23, 1998

Page 12

h

f entertainment

it* s

Andrew

Sapp and Mike Peng appear as Vladimir, Pozzo and Estragon

Lakin, Alan

V\^aiHng by The audience

piled

Water Street Theatre

the

into

quietly.

They

waited anxiously in their groups for

Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for

Godot, celebrating

its

second night

with

of production

sold-out

a

venue in Kitchener on the comer of Water and Charles streets opened its

The

170

capacity

stage doors to Waiting for

on Feb.

1

3

and

Godot

will continue to

do

The platform

middle of

sat in the

by rows of

the theatre, surrounded

The

seats in every direction.

resembled a

landfill site

with one

among damp wood

barren tree perched

of

smell

stage

it.

The

chips

covering the floor of the stage lingered

the

in

Flipping

air.

his tired

and robotic Lucky by a

attire

make time pass

show a remove

illuminated the stage to

young man struggling

to

his boots. This youthful character is

none

than

other

portrayed by

Estragon,

Andrew Lakin, who

by his side-kick Vladimir, played by Michael Peng. Estragon and Vladimir are the two tramps in the production. The

is

later joined

audience witnesses their day-to-

day escapades as they wait and wait.

Funny

cynical

antics,

follow

the

tirelessly wait for

Iwo

as

something

Their boredom

Kathleen

is lifted

of

revealed to the audience). Just when the two tramps believe

Godot is coming, a messenger boy (Marcus Mares) arrives to tell them Godot will be coming the

He

is

not your

typical production. At times

hard to follow.

it’s

important to

It’s

wipe away what you are used It’s like

to.

leaving reality completely

behind, yet at times you can relate

The reason Beckett’s play was brought to the Water Street Theatre

was ly,

dramaturge,

show

Godot

to write about.

perhaps, as you

may be

I

a dif-

And

experienc-

ing tonight, a challenging

watch, but

is

that

“We have a resident ensemble which makes us unique in the Waterloo region.

We

a group of actors

who

show

to

encourage audience

configuration,”

not a hit

in

when

it

first

opened, said

the producing artistic director at

Theatre

& Company.

in

this

Scadron-

said

know Godot and

Godot, so ested

I

been

in

another

doing

in

production. But as

again

I’ve

wasn’t inter-

initially I

was reading

I

it

thought ‘Wait a minute.

These are not the people that remember from the ‘60s’. When read

it

now

I I

see three generations:

1

GenX, a boomer and a GenY.

All

human

of

Beckett

illustrate in

to

explains

Godot

is

and

play

that

very

a

that

it

as they

translated

it

into English.

Once

it

had been translated into English it was quite a success in the advant

to

an

an

entertainment

increase

involving

in

huge

Phantom of the immense the

special effects, like

Opera,

and

the refreshing outlook

a

bit,

but

it’s

performing

like

Beethoven’s Ninth symphony.

at

some

major piece. So

that’s

doing. However,

we

such

a

way

as

point,

it’s

a

what we’re

are doing

to

If

have

it

it

The things that make up your

front of you.

part of you, that

‘Why do I exist?’ “This may be exaggerating

you’re an orchestra you have to

later

and relevant

audience of today.”

popularity of action-packed films,

perform that

and

understood

addresses the age old question of

Godot

French

Production of Waiting for Godot.

Despite

Godot)'

Waiting for important

existence

seeking

is

ex-patriot living in Paris, wrote in

in Theatre & Company’s (Photo courtesy of Kate Holt)

Marcus Mares appears as a bike courier

of them have different takes on the

Scadron- Wattles

Waiting for Godot 1953 in Paris but was

and an

Wattles.

which

Beckett’s

done

hadn’t

they

that

problems

opened

cases,

opportunity to do work together

and accept the creative space that Beckett and we have

opened up here.”

four

this for

them an oppor-

some

taken before, in

play looks like, or sounds like, or acts like,

around

stick

tunity to take roles they hadn’t

a

to lay aside

actually have

and have been part of

some of your preconceived notions of what a

members

ensemble nice-

their

it fit

said Scadron- Wattles.

“I

In the notes for discussion night

theatre,”

that

by Lucky, played by Sheehy, and Pozzo,

Holt)

said Stuart Scadron- Wattles.

with the characters.

VanBelle,

modem

years. This offered

never does.

Waiting for Godot

ficult

(Photo courtesy of Kate

considered to be

It’s

the classic of the

they

never comes.

are visited

garde theatre.

“As you may or may not know, Samuel Beckett, who was an Irish

conversations and utter hopeless-

ness

arrival

identity is never

wrote, “Waiting for

soft light

as Estragon

and Vladimir wait for the

David

A

leads

long rope. The curious characters

softly chatting

engulfed in darkness.

a

is

cowboy

through

program manuals and below the heated lamps, the audience was brought to an abmpt silence as they were

who

ruffian in

following night.

so until Feb. 28.

production of Waiting for Godot.

J\!aicxlie.

Godot (Godot’s

show.

& Company’s

^Aadof

fat*

played by Alan Sapp. Pozzo

help to

Theatre

in

from the

Water Street Theatre has received a lot of support from the

are going to be dealt with in the theatre.

You can

where are some people going to stand in front of you and interact with you about your life? More and more we crave that in our leisure

what we present

Shadowlands

For

said

time,”

Wattles.

is

get a spectacular

experience almost anywhere, but

community. “People just don’t crave spectacle. Intimacy is also necessary and a theatre of

are life

ticket

571-0928.

in

intimacy. You’re not going to have

Nicholson

be

a chandelier crash onto the stage in

April 18.*

Scadron-

information

Look

call

forward

by

starting

to

William April

3

to


SPOKE, February 23, 1998

HEY!

— Page 13

Club Scene

Expect the unexpected photo and story by Natalie Schneider Monotony can

the liveliest

kill

To put an end to one needs to seek new

soul in everyone. Triple Jay-Bee, from left: Joel Bard, vocals and rhythm guitar; Jamie Perry, drums; Ian Barry, bass; and John McKinnon, vocals and guitar. (Photo by Lisa Roberts)

Club

King

276

Isis,

renovations

and

good night

doors open Feb. 27 at 9 p.m. Despite the presence of nightclubs lining King Street on its

either side.

Club

opportunity

for

While couples wined, dined, and romanced each other on Valentine’s Day, Guelph band

have to dress up formally.” McKinnon and Bard were together in Foundation, a rock

experience something fresh.

Triple Jay-Bee played another in a series of area gigs, this time at

band

Buffalo Bills in Guelph.

Most bands

stick to an original

“When

material.

During a post-show interview, McKinnon said he found personal satisfaction with the

new

format.

“We’re switching from heavy songs to a cleaner sound,’’ he said. “This way, people can hear what we do as musicians.” The band line-up include^ vocalist and rhythm guitarist Joel Bard, bassist Ian Barry and drummer Jamie Perry. Performing songs from a variety of artists, ranging from The Beatles to REM, Triple Jay-Bee appeal to audience. try to

all

members of the

“We

usually

do louder shows,

the Valentine’s gig, but

we

like

also

do

in 1995.

did playing

all-original

was

live

frustrating because we played to nobody,” he remembered. “At least people come to see us when we’re doing covers.”

During the Feb. 14 show, the band injected some fun into the otherwise standard performance by asking the audience music

Isis is a new club-goers to

Club promoter Imraan Savai said that

the

club

was

situated

in

Kitchener because the nightclub scene is very accommodating in the area.

The

fact that the area also

houses an influx of other night clubs doesn’t worry him. “Nobody is doing what we’re doing here. We’re not catering to the general crowd. We’re trying to

crowd that doesn’t find what they want in Kitchener. The crowd that basically goes out to Toronto or Hamilton or wherever to find a night scene where they cater to the

Correct answers were rewarded with elaborately wrapped bundles of candies. This is just one of the ways in which the

can enjoy themselves,” said Savai. “Club Isis offers a break from the norm, There’s a whole different atmosphere in here. You won’t find the same atmosphere in a lot of

band

places

trivia questions.

make

to

tries

presentations fun for

their

usually

performed during

down here. when I go

“I find

all.

They also performed hits by a number of artists such as The Eagles, Eric Clapton and Dion and the Belmonts. Requests from the audience are welcomed and their

out to clubs in Kitchener they’re basically all the same,” said Savai. “ It’s either just a bigger or smaller club, that’s all it is. There’s nothing that ever changes. The crowd is the

same

crowd

goes

that

from

Club Isis, 276 King opening Feb. 27.

St. W., Kitchener, will

be celebrating

club to club.”

hasn’t been officially

Although the opening night will be hosted by Energy 108, Savai stresses that it might seem like the

estimates

same old thing but

vide

insists it’s not.

it

at

its

With a surprisingly packed house Buffalo Bills on the most romantic day of the year, it can be

people.

As soon

as the club

the

is

able to pro-

accommodations,

say that there’s nothing

wrong wiA occasionally delving musical

appreciating what

history

came

and

bands will also be featured. Savai

we

want.

a

start.

get things going,” said Savai.

Already in the works is a rave which should be coming in March. Patrons can find DJs from all around the world at this event, ranging from London all the way to Australia, said Savai.

Many people probably remember that Club Isis was once the location of the Volcano, a club which catered to live music. The

location

is

the only thing these

clubs have in

stated that things will constantly

change

to give

people what they

“Whatever people down here what we’ll give them,”

like, that’s

said Savai. “I work with a lot of clubs in Toronto and I’ll be using those contacts. I’m going to try

and get the same concepts down here and try to implement them and see if they work in Kitchener.”

two

common.

People can expect a more open concept compared to the small quarters that used to enclose the Volcano, said Savai. Though the holding capacity for Club Isis

Twoonie Tuesday

before.

For booking information about parties or banquets, call Triple Jay-

Bee

at (519)

763-2798.

\ oii’p; It

Be Hooked For

$CAR1CH

p SAN

Lu-eI

‘SCfiS?AM’r

‘'An EmjR-OF-Vl'>L'S?-SFAT’'rjIRTS.I,FR!"

ivioifie off XfflO

’AtVii.isTiXKOS Shi)};:

ioAbi

0:-C) «!.).<

lAffeek WHAT you DID

Mon. Feb. 23 1 1

:00

am

The Sanctuary

live

People can think what they want but in time they’ll be exposed to more and more once “It’s just

at

fair to

grand

set, Savai approximately 500

shows.

into

“We’re just a straight-ahead rock and roll band,” McKinnon said.

we

material,

Guitarist

number of local acts, including Jake Stacey and Foundation, all of whom performed original

CD

to perform live.

roster of tunes for their live performances, but the fourmember outfit stuck to covering hits from the 1950s to the 1990s.

and vocalist John McKinnon has been in the music business for 13 years and said he’s found more success in doing covers. McKinnon played for a

that released a

' i;

swinging

quieter shows, like weddings and banquets. During those, we also

McKinnon found the experience disappointing when it came time

W.,

undergoing last minute

is

preparations to ensure a for all, will be

plays the hits •O

)

things to do or see.

Kitchener, which

Triple Jay-Bee by Lisa Roberts

repetition,

The Sanctuary Tickets $2

OD sale at the DSA Office


Page 14

— SPOKE, February

23, 1998

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For more information, contact the UFCW National Office; • 416.675.1 104 • fax; 416.675.6919

M9W 6K4

in

the bacon".

BAKED Canada Bread Dempsters Karnes • McGavin's

Defence Fund, November 1997

300-61 International Boulevard,

right

wages and

Country Style Doughnuts • Olivieri Pasta & Sauces Shur-Gain Pet Food & Livestock Feeds

OTHER:

©

company continues

— period. After

"bringing

fair, pleaie join ui in

MEAT PROOUaS Maple Leaf • Burns • Overlander Swift Premium • Prime Poultry Campfire • Shopsy's • Coorsh Clover • Bittners • Devon • Parma Hy grade • Mary Miles • York

the

workers should be paid what's

just $10.90,

of their jobs. Then about 900 pork production workers in

If

their

it's

but to try and swallow up the competition. Canadian

October to

was

Canadian workers should have

someone's idea of a "competitive

ees wanted to improve on their industry-low base rate of

same

of the United Food and

benefits reduced to rock-bottom levels just because that's

North Battleford, Sask. bacon plant because employ-

$9.88 per hour. The

members

T Commercial Workers, or UFCW. We don't think

Maple Leaf

the scraps. In August 1997, Maple Leaf locked outworkers at its

all


SPOKE, February 23, 1998

— Page 15

An escape from routine, everyday life

Adventure games By Becky

Although

Little

much People need to get out of the once in a while and adventure games are way to do

it is

in the

a

little

early to

do

way of outdoor adven-

ture games, the Paintball Arena, at

ordinary

36 Francis

that.

indoors and open Wednesday evenings and Saturday afternoons.

Flag Raiders Inc. located near is an outdoor paintball facility with over 80 acres of nine Breslau,

different

combat

fields.

village,

sugar

Charles Street),

is

Appointments

are

not

always

necessary.

shacks,

Another indoor adventure game on those long stressful days is Laser Quest, located at 255 King St. W. General manager Nancy Mclver,

fishing

said

Some

of

the scenarios include the Second World War, Columbian drug lab,

Laotian

St. (off

Cambodia and Viet Cong village.

to consider

in

Joe Kimpson, a marketing grad

more businesses are coming to work on team building (giv-

ing co-workers a chance to prac-

from Conestoga College, has been running the facility for 15 years.

great stress reliever.

He

inside the only thing you’re think-

said,

“We

are rated in the top

tice

working together).

It’s

manager says

relieve stress,

also a

“When you’re

ing of

is

like

It’s

what’s going on in there. a whole other world

behind those doors.” Instead of paint, of course, the players are shooting each other with a harmless laser. Special vests are worn and players aim for the lit patches on the front back and

««ad this before you PLAY

shoulders of the vest. After the game is over a score card is handed out and players can see

how many

times they were

shot and compare that to other <iom mnpimiaty dl«ord*r« or

scores.

Laser Quest

is

also available for

birthday parties because great

game

it

is

from

for anyone aged seven

and up. It

piaybrg.

a

from playing,

costs $7 for a 25 minute game.

three in North America. There’s

one and

one in California For an inexperienced paintballer it is an impressive site. “We do all the props ourself,” he said. The group organizer calls Kimpson to reserve a day of adventure. Call early because a $20 deposit per person must be made two weeks in advance. Total cost is $42 per person for a in Florida,

Rules of play

one.”

this

Laser Quest

for

in

King Centre

in

Kitchener. (Photo by Becky

OCAA on

keeps

Little)

lid

fisticuffs

standard package.

Kimpson

will provide a

map

location

in

games are on. The group is divided then

try

to

into

OCAA hockey convenor Tom

the

Mauro said been down

opponent’s flag. Individual

players

are

you would never know from watching recent Condors men’s hockey games, fighting "livough

throughout the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association has drof5)ed off since Christmas.

teams

capture

Cambrian’s intimidation

over -

available and, rain or shine, the

and

OCAA have expressed concern

By Dan Meagher

to

an information package. The adventure begins at 8;30 a.m. sharp and you play untill 4 p.m. Special packages are the

also

penalties have

fliat

“right across the

welcome on open days (Saturdays and Sundays) but make sure you

board,” in the second half of the

ahead to reserve equipment. Standard equipment include mask, gun and ammuntition. Flag Raiders will not be open until the middle of March.

Conestoga’s recent penaltyfilled match with Cambrian and their subsequent rough game with Seneca are anomalies in the post-Christmas schedule, Mtairo said. Yet, Mauro did admit ctmcera

General manager of Laser Quest Nancy Mclver demonstrates the use of a laser. (Photo by Becky Little)

at

the

rough stuff. “They (Cambrian) have gotten two or toree letters from me already, so they know where I stand.” One of the problems faced by the league in die attempt to keep penalties to a minimum is the lack of quality officiating. the

Mauro

season.

call

but i Mauro says die league has done it’s best to curb

tactics,

penalty

lofty

totals

amassed by Cambrian. “They were in a lot of trouble earlier in

said

Seneca coach Francesco Bazzocchi said that his team has ,

the season, but I’ve talked to

come

officiating

8-2

Conestoga’s

better.”

loss

to

Cambrian on Feb. 7, left a couple Condors suspended, including assistant coach Gary Thiel.

Mauro noted diat a game misconduct for a coach carries an automatic one-game suspension. Contrary to po|mlar belief, Mauro said th^ there are only a couple of reasons for suspending a player who drops the gloves. For instance, being involved in a seccmd fight during erne stoppage in play, or instigating a fi^t both carry automatic “Otherwise

it’s

Mauro

pretty discre-

a player has been involved in a few incidents Twill warn him, and I can also rule on an incident based on the circumstances, but it has to be fairly blatant to carry a suspension.” Several of the teams in the tionary,”

said. “If

to

accept the

le^e’s

and play through it. “You know, it’s like that pretty

much everywhere so we just have to play smarter and put up with it,” he said. As for Cambrian’s tactics, Bazzocchi said he will not allow his players to indulge diem and they

will

back down when

chtdlenged.

Condor coach Kevin Hergott seconded those sentiments, sayhis team knows what Cambrian is like and they just have to be disciplined. “You can’t get away with taking a lot

ing

of penalties

he

suspensions.

officials are

for their services.

them on a couple of occasions and things have gotten

good

hard to come by on a consistent basis, especially for afternoon games, when most qualified officials have day jobs. He said it is also tough to find them in markets such as Kitchener where several leagues compete

in

this

league,”

said.

Mauro downplayed

the fight-

ing issue, though, saying that it is merely die nature of the game,

and the best he can do it under control.

“Once to have

is to

keep

in a while you’re going

one of those games,” he said. “The trick is to limit them, and I think we’ve done that”


PageJ6^I^SPOKEj^]e^^

SPORTS

Home slide still haunts Condors Hockey team winless at home By Matt

Condors dominated the scoring

Harris

opportunities in the period despite being outshot 33-9.

Conestoga men’s varsity hockey team continued in its downward

home

at

spiral

Feb.

11

as

the

affair;

total

to

the

teams 170

tallied his

nearly

five ejections.

Mike

Traynor

notched

Darryl Sinclair added a goal and three assists to his point total.

who had

three points apiece.

“Our defensive coverage was and we have to work on

brutal

staying out of the penalty box,” said Condors coach Kevin Hergott. officiating

it

second of the game with

Darryl Condor Sinclair (21) waits for the

The second period saw much of same type of play. The teams managed to exchange goals in between penalties and other various stoppages in play. The early part of the period was MacDonald’s show. He scored two

Top;

goals in the span of a minute, pushing the Scout’s lead to 5-2 at

MacDonald (foreground) celebrates one of his

puck while Mike Traynor (15) ties up the front of the net.

appeared.

Seneca’s

Right:

the halfway mark of the period. Traynor scored his final goal while the Condors enjoyed a two-man and then Snyder advantage, brought the home squad back into striking distance with just over a

was atrocious. It made the Cambrian game look good.” He added the team fought back well, making the game closer than

the

the

MacDonald

“The

at

period.

the

within a goal.

the

hat-trick for the Condors, while

Seneca was led by Ian and Andrew Wakileh,

ahead of

just four seconds remaining in the period to bring Conestoga to

in the sin bin, as well as

minutes

point

Bradley Brown and Brad Cripps scored five minutes apart, with both goals coming via heavy traffic in front of Whyte. Traynor

departed with a 7-5 victory over the Condors. The game was a

combined

forged

Seneca

midway

Seneca Scouts came calling and

penalty-filled

in ’98

three goals. (Photos by Dan Meagher)

something for our remaining games.”Both Hergott and Bazzocchi voiced their disthat smart,

and

that’s

The first period saw Condor Sean Murray ejected after he checked MacDonald into the boards from behind. The thuggery continued

minute left in the period. Seneca notched a pair of goals in the third, ensuring their victory. Sinclair gave some hope of a

all

throughout the game, culminating in four players being tossed in the third period for fighting. Conestoga opened the scoring early in the first period when Traynor tipped in the point shot of

comeback with his lone goal. After stripping a defenceman of the puck at the Scout’s blueline,

pleasure with the officials.

defenceman Jason Snyder while Conestoga was on the power play. Seneca evened the score just over a minute later when Wakileh puck past Condor slid the netminder Darryl Whyte. The

a rose between two thorns.

Sinclair

Colin

deaked

Seneca

March out of

Unfortunately, his goal

his

goalie

pads.

was merely

Francesco coach Scouts Bazzocchi said his team played a focused game. “We had to play a smart game tonight and not fall behind,” he said. “We didn’t play

Ian

we have

to

“It’s pretty

work on

much

like

that all

over the league,” Bazzocchi said. “I guess it’s something we’ll just have to accept.” Conestoga goes out on the road for its final three games. They visit Cambrian and Boreal and finish the regular season at Seneca Feb. 26. The postseason tournament begins at Sault College in Sault Ste.

Marie March

12.

OCAA MEN’S HOCKEY

D5A bus trip

TORONTO RAPTORT Vs. Chicago Bulls

March 22

LYi.

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Seneca

16

11

4

1

23

Cambrian

15

11

3

1

23

Conestoga

14

9

5

0

18

16

7

6

3

17

Boreal

16

4

11

1

9

Sault

15

1

14

0

S.S.

and

Fleming

2

INDIVIDUAL STATS ,

March 31 (for each game)

Team GP

Name Darry Sinclair

CON

14

Mike Senior

CAM

15

Jimmy

BOR

Serge Moreau

Trevor Meyer

l

G

A

PTS

23

40

11

25

•36

15

16

16

32

BOR

16

12

19

31

CAM

15

20

10

30

17

"»//////^

Sn^a\e Mon. Feb. 23 Lirnited tickets available^ 2 tickets per student

Ratte

j

* as of February 16, 1998

Digital Edition - February 23, 1998  
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