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30th Year

— No. 6

February

1998

16,

Students to pay higher tuition i_:_i

,

By Richard Berta The Doon Student Association hosted a Tuition Fee Forum in the

have to pay higher tuition fees because the provincial government has been reducing its funding for

and its impact on students. Nothing specific has been decided said John Tibbits, college president, but the issue is expected to be covered at an upcoming board of

around $1,403, up from $740 in 1990-1991, a rise of 90 per cent, of Ministry a according to Education and Training survey. At the same time, government spending per student is down 27

is

-.Wr

i*&:,

campaign

only 17 to 18 per cent of the

--

the

“People engaged in training in field of dentistry can be

expected to be high paid after they graduate,” he said. “There’s no

us $300,000 for (college) equipment, but we were able to spend

reason

why

they shouldn’t be pay-

over $2 million due to students’

ing for an education which was responsible for getting them jobs.” Tibbits noted that 30 per cent of

any tuition increase is allocated to financially-pressed students with bursaries and

The reason he gave for this sucwas students’ links with com-

cess

panies through college programs,

emergency funds.

“Financial aid

total

contributions,” he said.

is

given only after

and the subsequent certainty that such links would land them jobs in these companies after graduation.

Shotgun shell found

5-j.v

*

usmmr

Page 2 I

college Pages

life

6, 7,

Doon

at

S

By Greg Bisch fev-

Bingeman Park

-

;

.v

,,

V

4

On Feb. 6, a janitor at Conestoga’s recreation centre

Fair ’98

Job Page 7

found

,

k.

something

just

that

should not have been there. Police were called after the shotgun shell was found in the garbage of one of the dressing rooms, said Bob Gilberds,

IF All RES Pages

of abusing this system.

Tibbits said that Conestoga has many reasons to feel confident

about the next school year. One of these reasons is the success the college has had with fund raising. “Last year, the government gave

Mullan said. However, college students pay

that students

bilities

tion costs students should bear.

ing,”

tive operations at the college.

nowhere

near what they are paying” The increases have raised the issue of what proportion of educa-

per cent from 1994-1995. “There should be no question of the direction public policy is tak-

expecting a tuition increase of 10 per cent next year, said Kevin Mullan, vice president of financial and administra-

election

Tibbits, speaking about the possi-

1991. Tuition costs for the current academic year in Ontario are

governors meeting.

DSA

for 30 per cent of their true fees,”

Tibbits said. “So, we’re

Mullan said college tuition fees have risen steadily since 1990-

Mullan explained

budget analvsis of the student’s Student’s blldt analysis and academic standing,” said

post-secondary education.

Sanctuary Feb. 10. The sparsely attended presentation focused on the tuition hikes for the 1998-1999 academic year

The government

a/Ui/'oH/An Tibbits Tihhite said. cnirl cost of education, “University students are paying

9, 10

at

security

of

head

Conestoga’s Doon campus. “It was probably in a back-

among young women

Violence

pack that someone, at one time, used for hunting,” said

Page 9

Gilberds.

Pages

He added

Sink or swim

SPORTS 14, 15, 16

in

By

Student Association members recently attended a conference in Toronto hosted by the College Community Ontario

Condors vs. Golden Shie Page 14

Parliamentary

Student

Association, where the possible the main rise in tuition was one of focuses.

Conestoga is a member of the along student lobbying association in colleges 25 the of 11 with Ontario. The three-day conference held place at Jan. 30, 31 and Feb. 1 took the

Don

Valley Radisson Hotel in

Toronto. “In general

was a three-day all work, said was that conference Thomas Muller, the DSA’s education

and

it

communications

promotions assistant Jen Hussey accompanied Muller to the

DSA

conference.

iQi

a

Muller said the group discussed,

Ji

in depth, the

cvQx

announcement made

by

provincial

Finance Minister Ernie Eves that gives post- secondary schools the opportunity to raise tuition by up

20 per cent. This announcement changed the

to

lobbying group’s stand point, said Muller, because before they were directing their energy on the issue

towards the government and now they have to focus on the schools. Muller said OCCSPA obviously doesn’t agree with the possible rise conin tuition costs and are also folbe not will rise this that cerned

lowed by a

rise in

funding from

used for

OCCSPA

has been invited to

sit

on the National Advisory Group on Student Financial Assistance, which will be discussing changes

OSAP

to

along with rising tuition

Muller said the council

really

college conference ,

the changes to

off

its

isn’t

feet yet, but that

executive director was meeting, which at the group’s first loan reform. student on focused

OCCSPA’s

Muller said

OCCSPA C_D/

also wants

/-acad to foVo into OSAP take into

discussed.

OCCSPA

devel has devel-

strike action plan if college

demographics,

oped a

such as the older age of students and students with families.

faculty

members

renewing

their contracts.

The lobbying association also Regents, a sits on the Council of

is

account

college

provincial organization with representatives from the ministry of

education and training and other provincial government ministries and post secondary schools. During the conference, the group

of also talked about the integration mandatory lap top computers into college

Muller said one school he has a couple of

programs.

Boreal College

knows of

OSAP.

fees.

coordinator.

Finger Eleven

December

in

Erica Ayliffe

Two Doon

-3

later

camping equipment and carrying a canoe.

DSA members attend

11

same backpack

sports equipment.

Winooski’s Feb. 7 dressed

Page

the

was probably

that

is

courses that require students to have lap top computers to do

immediate word processing. OCCSPA has asked the provincouncil cial government to set up a to create guidelines concerning to discuss finan-

these courses and students cial aid opportunities for in these programs, said Muller. issue of collective bargaining of college contracts was also

The

over

strike

The plan

basically a package of informa-

tion that helps

OCCSPA members

deal with a strike and

communi-

cate with their students.

The Doon Student Association paid $645 for Muller and Hussey where to attend the conference, they spent two nights in a hotel. Muller said the cost is high

because schools help fly in students from northern colleges to the group’s headquarters in Toronto. Besides attending conferences, Muller was also assigned 15 MPPs he has to meet with to discuss tuition increases

and the changes

OSAP. He has met with one MPP to date and has three more to

meetings coming up. “They’re the voice,” said Muller

concerning (

OCCSPA)

it’s

the

MPPs.

“If

hit every single

their job to

ment with these

go

we

MPP,

to the govern-

issues.


.

Page 2

— SPOKE, February

1998

16,

Campaign coverage VP

Student affairs

DSA

worried students think

DSA board chairman

a clique

Cleaves for another year

acclaimed president

By

Any suggestion is welcomed by DSA, Cleaves said, regardless of how it’s delivered.

By

“Complaining is the first step. Come in and throw it at us. Let us know where we can do a better

first

year

man

of the

Student

to

job.”

Association’s

able as possible.

Rita Fatila

Rita Fatila

the

my campaign

loved running

I

Gerry Cleaves, the Student Association vice-

last year,” said

Doon

president of student affairs, “and

miss

I’ll

it

this year.”

Cleaves, like the other three can-

DSA

didates for tions, faced

no opponent

He

year’s race.

in this

Gerry Cleaves,

Cleaves said he was surprised and disappointed that no one ran against him, especially since he had about five possible opponents in mind. He is also concerned about student involvement, he said.

“I’m worried people think

and

stage

go Think

hold

I

Tanks.”

Fatila)

on couches out

entire first year

the Sanctuary. “We had our big dream of taking over Conestoga.

Last year,

was The

I

didn’t even

know who

getting involved with.”

DSA

is

ready to give stu-

dents more of what they want. Cleaves said, pointing out that the

Matthew Good Band/Wide Mouth Mason show at Stages drew more people than the Big Jan. 27

Cleaves offered himself as an

example of someone who “came out of nowhere” and joined the

DSA.

Sugar concert

at

the

recreation

centre in September.

not hard.

I

did

it

DSA

“If that’s the kind of stuff that

last year.

Bryan [Bambrick, a DSA promotions assistant] and I spent the

analysis

will bring people in, then we’ll

do

kick from Cleaves was the school

class

drug plan, something that he said took up a lot of his time this year. “For a while I felt like vice-president of the drug plan,” he said.

tive.

“Now

newly

said of Stevens’ withdrawal.

against Hussey, a

in

ran

DSA promotions

president of operations Johanna Stevens - but Stevens officially

dropped out of the race Feb.9 Hussey, a Wellesley resident and first-year marketing student, said she still plans to campaign. “I don’t want to give that up. If nobody is running against me, I still want to campaign,” she said. “I’m in marketing. It’s marketing myself.” In fact, with the help of her

mar-

keting classmates, Hussey came up with some slogans for her campaign: With the flick of the pen, vote for Jen; Be fussy, vote Hussey

and

Women

and

men

vote for Jen.

Hussey said she contemplated what DSA position to run for, but was sure she didn’t want to be president.

“I’m a

I

have

my

foot in

don’t want to barge through the door,” she said. I

Hussey’s responsibilities as vicepresident of operations are mainly administrative and internal. She will be signing DSA cheques,

dealing with budget matters and

and

known

shouldn’t

be

problem Murphy,

Fatila)

a for

who He

as an outgoing person. that about

tures

on

50 per cent of

his candidate

said

the signa-

nomination

sheet were people he didn’t know.

Besides his social

skills, Murphy many other qualificawhich will make him a good

said he has tions

two years at high school in Georgetown, he was student council president. He president. In his last

also

managed

three years

a

restaurant

for

and spent eight years

with cadets.

One

of Murphy’s goals

will be

creating an umbrella program for all the fundraising organizations at

Conestoga. Murphy said he hopes to coordinate the fundraising

be

activities of the student athletic

a well-recognized figure on cam-

council, the Conestoga business students’ association, the DSA and

pus.

others.

If

said his goal

is

to

you haven’t noticed already,

Doon

Student Association

is

my position,” he

tions Feb. 16-19.

election,” said Cleaves.

One Jenn Hussey,

DSA one

promotions assistant and newly acclaimed vice-president of operations for 1 998-1 999, standing beside

of her

recruiting

members

campaign posters.

(Photo by Erica

board of director’s and class representa-

tives.

But the bright-eyed blond says she plans to do things that are out of her job description, like getting students

more

involved.

“Just being stuck behind a desk crunching a couple of numbers and signing a few cheques is not me,” she said. “I’m going to be out there.”

She was also recently to assistant manager at the Roost. She works in a grocery store in Wellesley, is finishing up a temporary job for a real estate appraisal

held since

company that she has the summer and will be

done her job

at the reception desk Conestoga’s recreation centre as

dent.

time,” she said. it

all,

because

doesn’t

I

think

I

mean

do,” she said. “I liked being one of the big fishes in high school and

then

I

moved on

in college to a

whole collection of all the big fishes from all the high schools.” Hussey said she also learned how to budget her time. "Because I’m juggling so much. I’m always on the ball.”

at

1

1

“I’m organized.

I

budget

at

of the

DSA. The

Cleaves said when creating ads, DSA is not allowed to be ‘too provocative.’ All ads have to be the

Zippergate,

scandal,

involves

affairs for the

Gerry

DSA, who was

mastermind behind

The ad

the

this ad.

features an article dis-

cussing Cleaves’ relations with Lewinsky before her alleged affair with Clinton. Cleaves,

who was acclaimed

vice-president

for

the

next

year, said he did the ad because he likes to have fun with campaigns.

“This (Lewinsky)

is

a big politi-

of

this time. If

Hussey said she will still be giving a campaign speech Feb. 12, but is not sure yet what her man-

someone

to

look

at

my

I

ad,

can get I

know

got their attention.

“Anytime you can take a shot at what’s in the media, why not and if

I

can take a shot

why

to

the

physical

resources

is given by Barry Milner, head of physical

called

Cleaves, vice-president of student

I

sent

resources.

phoney

cal thing

with the students.

DSA

then the final approval

member

Kitchener.

She said she hopes the DSA as a whole will become more involved

“The

doesn’t function well if people don’t know about the election.”

accompanies a brief scandalous

to

date for next year will be.

Monica

large picture of

article involving a

DSA’s is

A

said.

awareness for the

office for approval, he said, and

my

Next year Hussey said she planning to only keep her job the Roost and will be moving

might have

“It also creates

Lewinsky, the woman who claims to have had sexual relations with U.S. President Bill Clinton,

promoted

of Feb.

know

Ayiiffe)

assistant.

Hussey said she learned a lot this year as a DSA promotions assistant and a first-year college stu“I realized just

Spoke.

This 19-year-old works numerous jobs.

She puts in a minimum of 10 hours a week as a promotions

in particular that

caught the eye of the student body is an ad resembling an issue of

DSA

is running against him, he is still going to run a campaign. “I am doing the campaign because I still feel I have to earn

up campaign advertisements for the upcoming DSA elecputting

I

PA and

the door, but

out

getting

“the people’s president”, and to be

the

him either. The position of president had two candidates on Jan. 30 - Kristin vice-

three people.”

By Jamie Yates

president of student affairs, will continue with that position next year because nobody ran against

DSA

he

Images of Monica grace Doon halls

was acclaimed. Gerry Cleaves, the DSA’s vice-

current

“Each

Lack of student enthusiasm is one of the first things Murphy said he plans to tackle. “It’s something I want to change, and the president could do a lot to change that.”

assistant, she

Murphy and

two or

at least

for the three

When nobody

Murphy

quite a bit,”

position should’ve been run for by

Doon

DSA positions had to be

by Jan. 30.

me

“It upset

of a campaign.

The nominations

DSA

of operations, dropped out of the race Feb. 9.

Student Association vice-president of operations for 1998-1999, Jenn Hussey, said she is really happy to have the job, but was looking forward to the challenge

elected

faced even less competi-

Murphy

acclaimed

(Photo by Rita

vice-president

Erica Ayiiffe

The

999.

tion in this contest after his only

VP

assistant acclaimed

1

opponent, Johanna Stevens,

said Cleaves.

talk

people,”

describes himself

Murphy

I’m seeing where the plan’s

it is,”

representa-

“In a month I was on BOD,” said Murphy. “Only two people wanted to do it.”

going to go next year.” Cleaves said he also learned that seemingly simple projects can take up a lot more time than expected, and that the quality of the finished project depends on the type of person who does it. “You’re the person who makes it

what

it.”

a

as

go out and

Getting

Murphy, first-year computer student and DSA president for 1998Kristin

in

September

like

said.

student,

started

project that required a swift

my

of

three hours a day,

kick the project in the butt to get

One

out

schedule,

on getting a joint committee to do something. It takes someone to going. I’ve learned to be realistic.”

and take

try

time

to

it

be as approach-

“I’ll

Murphy, a firstyear computer programming

of times you can’t depend

lot

said he

will set aside time

to

there,” said Cleaves, pointing to

this is

clique. That’s the reason

“It’s

vice-pres-

(Photo by Rita

I

on

DSA

Murphy

president,

zation.

“A

ident of student affairs.

the elections.”

some

lesson he learned was about

committees.

“I’m not sure how I’m going to do it. I might run it like an ad for

By

One

As

Doon

He’ll

lessons from this year, he said.

said he’ll probably

spent his

Conestoga as chair-

at

board of directors. spend his second as president of the organi-

his job next year after learning

run a campaign, though.

still

up

Cleaves hopes to bring more to

executive posi-

Murphy has

Kristin

“I believe the president this year did an excellent job, but a lot of people don’t know who he is.”

at

Spoke, hey

not.”

Cleaves said even though no one

Cleaves said he used Spoke as his design guide because he felt

it

would catch people’s attention. “I said, let’s do a cover of Spoke,” he said. “People may look it because it is a cover of Spoke, but it’s not Spoke.” Cleaves said he put the posters in at

areas he hopes people will see. “If I can get someone to walk by

and laugh on their way to class that’s good,” he said. Cleaves said he tries to be a person that, when people see him, they think of the

DSA. “I

like

people,” said Cleaves.

“When people recognize you, you know you’ve connected.”

When asked about his relation to Lewinsky, Cleaves said this. “I’m a politician. Bill Clinton’s a politician.

I

feel for the guy.”


SPOKE, February

NEWS Part

16,

— Page 3

1998

of a special report

II

Conestoga programs adjust

changing needs

to

Coordinators react to low graduate employment levels in several programs By Victoria Long Last week, part

I

of this series

in two communications studies programs and four trades and apprenticeship programs to increase the employability of graduates. This week, part II deals with program planners’ reactions to low related employment levels for the law and security administration program

taken

actions

outlined

school of engineering

technology.

dean of Conestoga’s of health sciences and

Bill Jeffrey,

community

the

said

services,

criteria

registrar jointly

mance

for

programs.

Indicators

include the

all

reported

employment bottom

line

expenditures.

into a three-year co-op

and the of revenue minus

100 per cent workterm placement rate and advisory committee members said current graduate placement prospects are

had

Program planners told Spoke that each program recruits an advisory committee containing representatives of potential employers for Conestoga graduates in programrelated fields. The committees

in

the

current

economic

climate. The other engineering technoloprogram with a low figure in

gy

the

1995-1996

report

is

civil

engineering technology, at 20 per cent program-related employment.

The 1994-1995

programming, program-enrolment its

accommodate

virtually a

good

analyze industry trends that determine future job opportunities. The

levels to

per cent

showed 78 graduates had employment in

report

of the

found full-time

the antici-

low

McClements said the building industry was in a decline and engineering-firm hiring was low in the

employment levels are the co-op woodworking technican and civil

year of the later report. Since then, he said conditions in

r engineering technology prog ams. Michael McClements, dean of

the industry have

nology

programs

with

tech-

become more

favorable and preliminary figures

gathered for the 1996-1997 report, to be released in March, show a

engineering technology, said the school has amalgamated the two-

the

program and makes current

McClements

Law and

policing

have affected Waterloo services ambulance Region’s profoundly, Jeffrey said local administrators have told him. Personnel

graduates showed a 34 per cent course-related in

placement

positions in the 1995-1996 report, down from 47 per cent the year before.

LASA

faculty member Carolyn Harrison said budget freezes have kept Ontario police forces’ hiring

low for some time. But, she said budgets are opening up now and with staffing levels so far behind the need, she foresees a return to former levels of hiring in

rates

year co-op woodworking techni-

substantial rebound.

cian program (which showed 50 per cent related employment in the 1995 report and zero in the 1996), and the one-year post-diploma woodworking manufacturing management programs

recognized programs in the college system. Previous graduates have

“Our civil engineering technoloof the better gy program is one

earned an excellent reputation in the industry that reflects well

on

Harrison said Laurie Doersam of

placement services “specifically mentioned in class that she had completed the [1996-1997] LASA the stats and they were higher than previous year.” coordinator Program

Don

overworked and stress and the

are

“maxed out.” Ambulance services’

vehicles are

current

hopes center around the federal budgetary surplus being partially used to replenish some of the past

with

firms

commercial

cuts

Ontario’s

to

transfer

ments, he said. physiotherapy The

or

pay-

assistant

on page 9 of the

program was only offered once,

Feb. 2 Spoke, Ontario attorney general Bob Runciman is expected

Jeffrey said, under a seat-purchase

detailed

announce

a

new

for

guaranteed to

Instituting

start

is virtu-

next

HDRC

therapy, so the next year, purchased a combined physiother-

fall.

mean

will

it

the

colleges.

Douglas said the program ally

arrangement the college made with Resources Development Canada. Placement difficulties arose because the graduates were not familiar with occupational

Human

policing

program

community

Conestoga will

said.

security administration

the near future.

their field.

1994-need if sufficient resources pated 1995are available.

The school of engineering

be acute but the budget hasn’t been in place to hire them. Budget

under a great deal of

province’s

graduates attractive to employers,”

The new technology program has

presi-

the schools involved, Jeffrey said.

maximum

woodwork-

ing technology program.

dent then discusses problematic indicator levels with the heads of

and

his office.

in

(Photo by Victoria Long)

figures,

college revamps

coordinator,

for trained personnel

may

Canadian society, added to government funding cuts, or failure of funding to keep pace with population growth in rapidly expanding communities, mean more opportunities are opening up private

the

said.

The need

now

are

entering

before

Conestoga usually places or second province-wide,

restrictions

foundations

Don Douglas, LASA

graduate

The college

first

demographics

officers

exam

approaching early-retirement age and opportunities for new recruits are expected to increase in the next couple of years, he continued. Douglas said that social changes

to

number of applications

program),

baby-boom

As

(the percentage of students finish-

the

he

residential clienteles.

received, the student retention rate

ing

Police forces have been going through a dry spell in hiring but one factor to take into account is

industrial,

produce a perfor-

indicators package for

industry.

in

program review are complex. Every year, the finance department and the college’s

ing

they receive an offer, Douglas said.

delivery.”

Graduates of the program must write a Ministry of Health qualify-

in

munity services, and two programs

school

unrelated to their career goal until

mean many

school of health sciences and comthe

its

that

in the school of applied arts, as well as two programs from the

from

people as young as 19, the average age for those hired is 26. College graduates may have to take a job

apy/occupational therapy assistant training program from Conestoga.

attract a different

mix of applicants than at present since graduation from a college police foundations a prerequisite to police force.

this program in meeting employers’ needs led to the Ministry of Health approving only Conestoga’s application for a rehabilitative assistant program,

The success of

program will be working for a

The two programs in the school of health sciences and community

Jeffrey said.

services that had low placement figures in the 1995-1996 report

were ambulance and emergency at 32 per cent, and care, assistant, at

physiotherapy

18 per

cent.

dean of health sciences programs have been both said changed since the class in the Jeffrey,

report graduated.

The ambulance and emergency care program has been superseded by a two-stage paramedic program which Jeffrey calls “a very good

program, efficient and effective

in

new

The

certificate-granting its first students

program admitted last

September.

The job market

for

its

graduates

expanding. Jeffrey said their dual-discipline training prepares is

need in the both where marketplace physiotherapists and occupational

them

for

a

real

therapists require their services.

“As health

care

hospital-based care,

demand

to

for

moves from home-based generically-

trained assistants will increase, Jeffrey said.

Douglas said, “One of the things we’ve noticed is that there is often a time lapse of a year or two before the student gets into the field of their choice.” This pattern is

1U ElNtkm 'is

explained in part by the young

age of most LASA graduates,

said

Douglas. Although police forces accept applications from will

All pctiflcn

were acclaimed

t rntin Hiirrtiv. lieskirnt

Fpgg CsicstoPGS Tu&y.

10:30

feb-.

cm

lenn

him Vl

<1

(wratkw

Sot (leaves, VP d Student AHain

24 -12:30

The/ Sanctuary

pm

&

This

is

an

Official

when

unofficial notice.

notice

positions

by the Board

be given are accepted

will

of Directors.


I

— SPOKE, February

Page 4

1998

16,

NEWS

DSA

Parking maintenance almost frozen By Richard Berta

nor even an occasional occurrence, Milner

Freezing rain on the morning of Jan. 29 complicated the plans of Doon’s parking maintenance

making the lots safe. The sand and salt put on

the

by physical resources was being rendered useless by the continuing freezing rain, which simply froze the salt and sand beneath another layer, said Barry Milner, manager of ice

physical resources.

why

“In fact, the only reason

it

didn’t

become a bigger problem

was

that

freezing

rain

changed to rain later in the day,” Milner said. But overall, snow and ice removal in the parking lots has been easier than usual for this time of year, he said. Much of the reason stems from the milder than usual weather and below average precipitation.

“The worst case scenario is start around 4 a.m.

when storms or

5

long

not

a.m.,

before

classes begin,” he said. “That

doesn’t give us

much

time to

react to the storm.”

Milner said the typical procedure in such a situation is to decide whether or not to open the

campus

in the first place.

This, in turn,

conditional on

is

noted.

The

By Erica

time the campus

last

the roads being open.

Ayliffe

The Doon Student Association gave the Ontario Community College Student Parliamentary Association $600 on top of its $2,800 membership fee because of a budget shortfall within the student lobbying association. The DSA joined OCCSPA this year and paid its membership fee

Milner said there are certain problem areas on campus such as the walkway from parking lot 1 2 to the school of business due to its slope.

rely

on people phoning

the (physical resources) office

in the fall.

about a missed area of snow or black ice,” Milner said.

was discovered a short time ago that OCCSPA was $21,000 under budget. The group took

He added

keeping the parking

walkways cleared physical

and

lots

$ 1 5,000 out of its reserve fund and was left with a shortfall of $6,000,

for students,

resources

which

has

also

asked

it

its

members

to

an obligation to keep the routes

make

cleared for Kitchener Transit. as

This issue was discussed at a OCCSPA conference held Jan. 30,

on

31, and Feb.

“The

we

fact is that as long

have

our

bus

a

route

we

grounds,

responsibility

to

He

said

campus has

own

college

peculiar set

of problems. “In Guelph (campus), there are stairs leading up from the

main parking

which

lot,

are per-

ilous in icy weather.”

“In Waterloo

problem

is

that

education

and

solve

the

before

it

DSA

DSA’s

the

communications

OCCSPA tried to

shortfall

asked

its

more money, but

internally

members for still came up

$6,000 short. The group calculated that if each of its 1 1 member schools paid $522, it would cover the shortfall.

(campus), the

If

snow accumu-

part

lates rapidly in the

which two

1

coordinator, said

each

that its

adjacent

OCCSPA

gathered, the

of

$6000

group’s

the

will

pay

executive

certain

many

that there

He

also

the

fault

But closing

the

campus

is

not

or not,” he said.

and five schools dropped out of the group and four new schools joined.

The problem

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Communicative Disorders Assistant SheUey WUUams, (705)325-2740,

ext. 3065, svvilliams@or-central.georcoU.on.ca

Goldsmithing and Silversmithing Creg MerraU, (705)728-1968,

ext.

weren’t a member and there was something our students wanted

feel these students voices

they shouldn’t ignore the students

The DSA decided to give the group $600 instead of $522 because the DSA, said Muller,

OCCSPA

is

a

good group

they are

to.

should be heard, so

why

just

bone and pay $522 bit

of

money

go if

that

to

we we

and

1287

gmerraU@central.georcoll.on.ca

New Media Communications:

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are wrong, that

should actually listen because we are the ones that will be the future of Canada.” that they

to us

Meningitis scare over, says health department By Richard Berta

Jan. 9, according to Daly. In total, 91

per cent of the

group was immunized, which, Daly said, is an eligible age

extraordinarily high figure.

But,

these

figures

do

not

“But there have been calls about side effects,” Daly said.

account for the people outside the target age group who were immunized through private clinics, catch-up clinics or clinics held before the mass immunization campaign. For instance, there was a

Rashes and hives have been

private clinic at the University

ty health department,

according

to Jane Daly, the department’s

director

for

communicable

diseases.

commonly

side

Pat Loughren, (705)728-1968, ext. 1464,

Consider:

asked what benefit has for Conestoga students, Muller said, “OCCSPA has given Conestoga a voice. If we

didn’t notice any

reported side effects,

which tended to disappear after a few days. The most common

Fall '98

its

to

summer and he

There have been no reported cases of meningitis in Waterloo Region since the mass vaccination campaign undertaken by the Waterloo Region communi-

Mav

make

When

blame one

also lies with the

Put your degree or diploma to work* These programs begin:

was because to

office professional.

difficulties.

figures

the

group wanted

to voice, we would be alone.” Other benefits he mentioned were that the group is recognized by the Ontario government as a professional lobbying group. “I feel our voice is being heard,” said Muller. “We’re able to let the government know the decisions

able to ascertain

was

OCCSPA,” he

The group has one full-time member, the executive director. The rest of the group is made up of members from Ontario colleges. Muller said the budget was sent to him after it was made in the

“We

that the high

cost of the furniture

OCCSPA

result of a lack of

maintenance

are

headquarters in

its

He added

Toronto. the

can’t just

for the day.”

if it

wasn’t

it

person.”

because the group bases its budgets on the previous year’s

executive director, said Muller. Muller said the problem occurred

establishing

shortfall.

that

of one person in the

been cleared, then it’s difficult to justify opening the campus

Transportation and works in other municipalities,” he said. “If the roads haven’t

Muller said these purchases .were when the group was

made

less students,” said

“The members

feels

OCCSPA spent

$700 on a reception desk, $800 on a desk and $400 on a chair for the

organization.

belong

listing the group’s

executive director.

said

“We

document

the years, revealed

on how

into account

Muller concerning the

have a extra

of public

school’s

fee depends

were

group can not raise these funds, they may have to lay off its

by contact-

Ministry

A

office inventory, purchased over

in

students were enrolled in the

he added. Milner said that logs of snowclearing activity are kept to ensure that all areas are cleared. “That way, if an accident occurs in a certain area, we are

the

Muller.

in

previous year.

the bare

find this out

Each

courses.

membership

director’s salary of $31,000. If the

ing

before

because of late drop out dates programs and January intakes

doorways,”

“We

year

the

in the students’ future.”

During the recent conference, the group sat down and went through the details of the budget, said

enrolment

takes

from

figures

said.

members attended. Thomas Muller,

have a keep the

roadway and the walkways cleared.”

up.

can invest

school to school.

“They didn’t take

It

that in addition to

school pays per

payments vary from

student, so

was a year ago, and then only evening classes were affected by the closure.

“We

that each

fact

closed due to inclement weather the

in

the

cover $6000 budget shortfall

common

a

money to

gives group

was a sore arm,

effect

which typically lasted one or two days after the immunization, Daly said. The side effects notwithstanding, Daly said the immunization campaign conducted in January was a success. The campaign immunized 123,000 people in the region between the ages of two and 22. There were 1 ,303 people immunized on Doon campus alone on

of Waterloo for those between the ages of 23 and 25. The difference between this clinic and the one organized by the regional health department

had

that students

to

was

pay for the

vaccine or ensure that it was covered under their student insurance plan.

The mass immunization campaign was launched after two Kitchener residents died as a

result

of

meningitis

December and

in

Conestoga man with the disease had to have his limbs amputated. a

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SPOKE, February

COMMENTARY

16,

1998

— Page 5

TTWA'S EXPERT PAhJEU Otf SALARIES * * * ‘ARUAMElviTARV Pv

Editorial

Girl bullies

need punishment Incidents of teen-aged girls resort-

ing to violence to resolve problems

situations as

liking the

minor as two

girls

same boy can cause deep-

may one

are escalating rapidly.

seated resentments that

In British Columbia, 14-year-old Reena Virk was beaten and murdered, allegedly by two groups

day explode

of teenagers, mostly

may give a false sense of power to those who are most frightened and insecure. Many of the perpetrators

girls.

Two months later, Jackie Visee, a 14-year-old Kitchener girl, was so savagely beaten that her face looked worse than a boxer’s after 15 rounds

championship bout. In addition, her hair was hacked off with a knife by the 17-year-old female assailant in a

The motivation

for this cruel

in

outward acts of

violence. Uttering threats or actually

committing violent acts on others

of crimes against their peers are in their early teens.

Entering high school is a major change in a 12 to 14-year-old girl’s

She is a junior, the youngest and most vulnerable in the

life.

behavior has not been fully explored, as yet. What could the

hierarchy of the high-school population, after leaving Grade 8 in pub-

victims have done that warranted

lic

such brutal retaliations? Convicted murderers are treated much more humanely. Or is that the

problem? When punishment doesn’t seem

to

suit the crime, or criminals are seen

as having it

more

rights than victims,

sets the stage for the emergence

school as a senior.

Most

girls

handle the transition

a few who don’t be on the lower rung of the ladder. They can become the ones who intimidate and sometimes use violence on others as a form of well, but there are

want

to

power.

An article in

the Record on Jan, 24 Repressed anger fuels girl

of a more violent society that

titled

ignores the law. Protests using legal

violence quotes 17-year-old Teresa

methods, such as the one by Kitchener shop owner Deborah Hartley, are seen as futile by an increasing number of people. Outraged that convicted sex-slayer Paul Bernardo is allowed the use of approximately $60,000 of taxpayers’ money to fund an appeal of

Gawman of St.

his conviction (with irrefutable

proof) of murdering teenagers Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French,

Hartley will take a petition with 6,050 signatures to Federal Justice Minister Anne McLellan in Ottawa.

Record article Jan. as saying, quoted 24, Hartley is to get across like “The message I’d In a Kitchener

just myself, is that many people, not justice our don’t agree with how

system seems to protect criminals while the victims are forgotten.” All too often, those victims have

been teen-aged

girls.

possible that what is motivating this growing aggressive behavior in girls against girls is a Is

it

sense that no one else can keep them safe, so they need to present a

tough exterior? Feelings of helplessness over

Click

Mary’s High

School, Kitchener, as saying “Girls

keep everything inside. Everything’s built up. You

and boil and

let it boil

boil.”

And

have enough change for either. So I picked a broken meter to park at. (Note to security: I do not mean to rip you off. I paid for the year. If you don’t want people parking at broken meters, fix them,) won’t start I think the reason that my car over North is that it’s a conspiracy to take

start.”

away someone else’s freedom from harm is not

into taking

an assertion of power. It lowers one to the status of any other criminal feared by some, maybe, but

looked down on

so I have the choice of paying my life savings worth of quarters every couple of hours, or I can buy a daily pass. I don’t

HUMMMMMM dick HUMMMM.

Tuesday morning and I have two assignments due at 9:30. “Dad, the car won’t It’s

“Try jiggling the

Letting repressed anger spill over right to

a car conspiracy

It’s

in disgust

by

gearshift.”

Two minutes later. Dad comes

out.

What

America. time they If people can’t get to work on get Deadlines bosses. their impress do not missed and if it continues people might get

never works for me will almost without fail work for him.

He

thinks it is the battery. think to myself, “Good. Five minutes and I will still be to school on time.” another 10 minIt’s not the battery. After

the

fired.

I

rest of society.

Part of what reduces young girls or anyone else to committing violence might have to do with society’s failure to create a safe

industry.

loosenutes of fiddling and tightening and better ing and more fiddling, he says. You take the van.” This is no ordinary van. This

environment

with swift, powerful deterrents to

is

cars that won’t start, then buses, sitting then trains, and soon all of us will be completely helpless as others take First

one of

on those turbo cargo vans you always see

criminals. Bullies,

some foreign I think it is the wish of country to collapse the North American

America’s Most Wanted. My car knew I needed it to start this morning and it let me down. It has a great time of heater and even though around this

whether male or female,

need to learn that true power comes from being a good leader, not from

begins to look like the inside of a apartment, containing everysmall really war, thing I need to last through a nuclear

year

manipulating, intimidating, or

murdering others.

With the help of people like Deborah Hartley, victims’ rights

like

around cars over our jobs and our lives because of that won’t start. My dad thinks it’s the starter.

it

I

my car.

it’s mostly held togethhope. But it gets me and er with hard work where I want to go in relative comfort.

It’s fairly

might take precedence over criminals’ rights in the future, to a point that there may just be fewer

old and

Usually.

The van has nothing of mine

victims, and fewer criminals.

importantly

my parking pass.

in I

it.

Most

forgot

it.

May by mainly funded from September to Association (DSA). The views and do not ne es ^' y opinions expressed in this newspaper ^ College or the D^A. reflect the views of Conestoga the DSA by endorsed in SPOKE are not

SPOKE the

Keeping Conestoga College connected SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism

students of Conestoga College.

Barb Ateljevic editor. Matt Hams, Sports editor: Natalie Schneider; Features editor: Jamie Yates; Entertainment manager, an eag Advertising Hill; Conna Production manager: Photo editors- Greg Bisch and Rachel Pearce; .ttviser: Audrew Jaukowsk,. Faculty Hagarty; Jim Inager: Becky Little; Faculty supervisor: Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Editor: Rita Fatila;

News

cCuti™

editor: editor: Erica Ayliffe; College life

,

Phone: 748-5366

it’s

is

Doon Student

Advertisers the DSA logo. unless their advertisements contain out SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages ansing the amount paid for the beyond advertising in errors of must be sent to die edispace. Unsolicited submissions are subject to Submissions Monday. a.m. tor by 9:30 clearly written oibe should and rejection acceptance or Word file would be helpful. typed; a WordPerfect or statements Submissions must not contain any libellous illustration (such as a and may be accompanied by an photograph).

MS


Page 6

— SPOKE, February

16,

1998

COLLEGE

LIFE

Graphic design student wins award By Donna

A

Fierheller

Conestoga College graphic

Goderich, said in an interview following the presentation that students had about two weeks of the contest from the

design and advertising student, Tina Hoonaard, was presented

notice

with an award Feb. 3 for winning a

Shwadchuck. “Myron assigned

contest

to

Kitchener’s

design

logo

a

for

Poseidon

future

Her design is a blue abstract that looks like a wave and represents

swimming,

synchronized swimming and water polo. The logo was one of 29 submitgraphics Conestoga by ted students to the Poseidon Project steering committee. Hoonaard was presented with a Uniden Accent cordless phone, donated by Bell Canada, and a quick-snap camera. The Kitchener

diving,

downtown business (KDBA) made a $400 to

association contribution

Conestoga College’s graphic

it

our course called pro-

in a part of

When we

completed it, up and decided who won,” Hoonaard said. It took her four or five days to come up with the idea, she said, and one day on the computer to design the logo. “I found out just practice.

it

before evaluation in I

won,” she

December

that

said.

Brawley said depending on which sport people are interested in, they see one of the four equally-depicted water sports in the logo. She said the logo will

reproduce well in many areas of use, such as on letterhead, promoand on the literature tional building

A

design fund.

Myron

instructor,

the client picked

aquatic sports complex.

the four water sports:

graphics

itself.

logo was needed for fund-

the promoting and proposed sports complex, which will be located at King and

Thomas, chairman of the Poseidon Project steering committee, who presented the award to

raising

Hoonaard, said, “We weren’t sure what to expect, but the Poseidon committee was overproject whelmed with the quality of

Victoria streets in Kitchener at the

designs entered in the contest.” Hoonaard’s reaction to winning

Canada, purchased the property and is cleaning the site up to be something useful for the commu-

Bill

was, “It’s good exposure for when I get out there and have it in my portfolio.”

Nancy coordinator Contest Brawley, executive director of the KDBA, said all of the logos

old

Epton

approval

is

Industries

now

called

very proactive,” she said.

developed by the students were excellent and the steering committee had a difficult time selecting a

dents are

winner.

fund-raising event. The winning logo from that project will be printed on 1 ,500 T-shirts.

“We tion to

finally narrowed the selectwo entries that were then

turned over to professionals in the

graphics and arts field, who helped us choose the winner,” she said.

The second year

student,

from

Blyth, Ont., a small town near

a T-shirt

logo for the 10-kilometre Classic Road Race to be held in Waterloo as

a

Asked how she comes up with ideas for graphics, Hoonaard laughed. “You do lots and lots of sketches and learn on demand.”

to

By Corina

The

Hill

Geon

The Kitchener- Waterloo Record and CKCO television were on hand for the presentation. Hoonaard said the graphics stu-

now working on

be creative

Community prevention through environmental design. Sounds like a fancy name for a

security administration found out,

CPTED

activity in

system?

security

Actually,

as

students from second year law and

is

a method brought in by

Waterloo problems

Region before

to

correct

they

become

problems. Const. Robert Davis spoke to LASA students at Conestoga Feb. 4. Davis, who has 20 years of police

works

training,

for

the

Waterloo Regional Police Services as part of an elite group of police officers involved in the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Council of Waterloo Region. of police

LASA

instructor

Davis

with

filled

who

listened to

in the

commu-

and

solve

“We want community.” Kitchener is the best

problems,” said Davis.

An

area in

the

example of putting

CPTED

into

action.

.

in

crowd of about 5C the Sanctuary on Feb. 4. (Photo by Jamie Yates

and

Safety

By Corina BJ

Hill

Barry

an

extremely

of 19.

When she

and

security

is

woman

law

to

was thinking of a of studying law

Sound

dream

far-off

at university.

your average Conestoga student? Think again. Barry has been in a wheelchair since birth, having suffered from a bone and muscle disease that locks her joints and prevents her from moving. like

The arthrogryposis multi-plex congenita has made life difficult for Barry, but she has nothing else.

“Maybe was

it’s

raised.

known

because of where just

I

it,”

don’t

I

pay

live.

ing with “It’s

Davis.

it.”

kind of common sense,” said

of

currently

Davis showed students a video of area and asked students to look past the broken windows and high rate of crime, and instead into the positives coming from the community. the

desperate,”

“It’s

said

“They want a change don’t know what to do.”

Hays.

but they

Students submitted suggestions who brought them back

to Davis,

are the experts,” said Davis.

Her

friends

close friend Brian Bithell, 20.

“After a while

I

didn’t see the

Another friend, Amy Roswell, sometimes forgets that Barry isn’t able-bodied. “I keep thinking she does everything we said she

do, but she doesn’t.”

Barry said she entered law and security

taking

administration a

law

course

after

disability

a criminal defence lawyer. Unlike many people who are confined to a wheelchair, Barry finds

it

difficult to

be around

other disabled people. “I was raised with other ablebodied people,” she said. Instead of letting her disability get her down, Barry uses it to help people. She has worked at the Sunbeam Centre helping physically and mentally

disabled children.

“For them, they’re probably

more comfortable around people like

me,” said Barry.

“The way I see it. I’m no different on the inside,” said Barry. She taught herself how to write and type on a keyboard using a pencil in her mouth.

“When I’m

said Barry.

chair anymore.”

Davis quoted Sir Robert Peel when he said, “The test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, not' the visible evidence of police action in deal-

Council is

looking at an area in Waterloo.

Student rises above

extremely well. Davis’s task force looked at the area not as just an area with bad crime, but instead as to how to place to

to a

Community

had a similar reaction. “At first I was afraid of it. I wanted to stay away,” said

a nice

Region

people that live in the community

The

were 336 calls for police from Mooreland Avenue. Three apartment buildings were considered unsafe and police officers knew the neighborhood

make Mooreland Avenue

Prevention

Waterloo

to the council for review. “The

attention to

In 1993, there

Crime

1993, to 138 in 1996.

administration at Conestoga, she

address

empower

the garden started to gain

applied

“We want to bring

to

As

before

onto the cause of the problems. “Traditional ways of policing are starting to change,” said Davis.

students during a free nooner

crime

of

more interest, the crime rate in the community dropped from 336 in

friendly

problem oriented policing. Problem oriented policing takes the focus away from the crime itself, and puts it directly

to

what can be accomnobody cares who gets

the credit,” said Davis.

said

talk about

nity

if

new

Bob Hays

nearly 80 students

plished

a

of

an unsafe environment.

“Just think

officers,”

representative

breed

Room 2A56 was

Comedian Craig Campbell performed

task force’s

was a community garden. Along with the community and several area service groups, the council built a garden to be run by people in the neighbourhood. It gave residents pride in their community by putting a safe

the presentation.

lately?

result of the

assessment

“It’s

Hear any good jokes

cause

Police put focus on

if

reached, said Brawley.

“B.F. Goodrich,

nity. It’s

site,

Graphic design student Tina Hoonaard (right) was presented with an award on Feb. 3 by Bill Thomas, chairman of the Poseidon Project steering committee, for designing the above logo for Kitchener’s (Photo by Donna Fierheller) proposed aquatic sports facility.

at

home

I

by myself,” said Barry. she

is

in

can eat

When

public, she lets her

friends help her eat so that no one feels uncomfortable. “To me, she’s normal,” said Bithell. “She was bom that

way.”

Her quick wit and fun personof the reason why she has so many friends. “She’s very caring about other people,” ality are part

said Roswell.

By

being able to complete her

at

college education and graduate

Resurrection Catholic high school in Kitchener. She has

in June with her friends, Barry has proved that she is, just like everyone else, a regular human

since

applied

to

Carleton

University in hopes of becoming

being.


SPOKE, February

COLLEGE

LIFE

to student food

focuses on technology

By Barbara

Business Student Association has decided to donate money they raised this year to Conestoga’s student food

Conestoga

The

The developer for health care, began only 15 years ago in Don Mills,

The Bingeman Park Job

Fair

raised

Chamicovsky said the CBSA had made a deal with the Doon

,400

member

association

Student Association to help Conestoga’s students in need with the donation. “We’re helping our own,” she said. Two members of the associa-

$250

that they

used to buy

tion

1

went shopping for the food

Feb. 5 and gave

food with.

CBSA

Ont.

bank

outside source,” she said.

Ateljevic

bank.

By Anita Santarossa

Lia

president

it

to the

DSA to

put in the food bank.

Chamicovsky

CBSA

said the

‘98, held Feb. 3, focused on technology, business and computer programming graduates.

Little enjoys the staff, most under 40 years of age, whom she described as creative and fun to

Chamicovsky said the group wanted to help the food bank

bought things

because of the desperate need for

was most

However, a general arts degree could also get you a job at some of the employers’ booths. consultant Kevin Financial

work

food.

non-perishable food items such as pasta, baby food and over 100

of the Mutual Group said a wide variety of students had and display their visited

company

Dopko

encouraged

students

all

graduating with a bachelor of

Dopko,

myth”

this

is

said

you need a busi-

“that

backbut

ness

ground, personal

and

be De

hiring at least part ' t

!T

attend the

t0

*

Senior architect David

has rapidly expanded to 60 in few months. When asked what kinds of

background

is

.

what we concentrate on

when

to

hiring.”

may a

news wire service, was not looking for journalists but

meet prospective employers from

we

across Ontario.

looking

are

for.”

Camp

manager,

Steve Files Wilderness

of

gathered University droves to take advantage of

explained that his

the

fair.

begun

a great asset. “A student’s

and

education

background is what we concentrate on when hiring.” skills

Among

better-known

the

were

businesses,

innovative looking for fresh

young

several

companies

resource liaison, Julie

Little of Artificial Intelligence in

Medicine that

the

Inc.,

sessions in the summer, where employees live at one of five

around the

camp Wawa,

sites

Wright,

student employment,

alumni services

Mary Wright,

manager of student employment, and alumni Conestoga College,

education

co-op services

at

during an interview. “This may have been one of the best attended fairs,” said Wright. “More people came this year than

said Wright.

The fair is a great place to meet employers. The companies participating in the job fair must be

within

hiring

the

next

six

months to attend the fair. “The majority of companies hiring

for

full-time

are positions,”

she said.

had 128 booths occupied by employers from across Ontario. The fair was

The job

an opportunity for students to see a number of different employers. “It’s like one-stop shopping,”

Employers were also looking

fair

for

summer fill to Most jobs being offered

people

positions.

development.

“The main focus here technology

field,”

is

the

she said.

The fair has been running for about four or five years now, said Wright. A lot of companies have been coming for a number of few are new this year. Wright said that the job fair is a great opportunity for students. She

years, but a

said that students should prepare themselves before the fair.

also

Wright

recommended

that

students research the companies before going, so that they are better prepared and so that they will have a better understanding of the companies they are interested in. “It’s

important to

companies you want

know what to seek out,

said Wright.

based

Ont. area, said

Files.

Files

said

as

a

summer-job oriented company, Wilderness Reforeststion hadn’t

faces with determination.

Human

10-

week the

Almost 2,900 people attended the job fair, said

last year.”

taken down. to

Mary

Conestoga College, University of Guelph, University of Waterloo and Wilfrid in

for eight-

A number of booths were looking for specific training, such as computer training for software

Laurier

means any Ontario lumber company must pay for each tree hire

Wright.

this

manager of co-op education,

Reforestation

14 years ago by two guys from of Western University

They

at job fair

year than last year.”

from

Students

for data

and programming would also be

cans of soup.

were based upon contract, said

not

but

the

analysts.

including

Fickling

enough of what

Ontario. The tree-planting company is government regulated, which

and program

of,

“More people came

British

Representative Leanne McNall said a background in business, commerce or finance was a must

an

The job fair at Bingeman Park gave 547 Conestoga Feb. 3 College students an opportunity to

Leanne McNall, Reuters com an p y

guessed,

Reuters,

By Amanda

students have visited the booth, “All said, he

.

own

to getting

need

food bank

Attendance up

Mack

said that the nine-person firm

fair.

Contrary what one

have

skills ,

,

to help our

opposed

in

that the

at the fair for the first

time.

“A student’s education

All businessto

sells

kinds

skills

had naa

students, as

software to large corporations, was another

are key.”

es

“We wanted

Fast Lane Technologies, which

just a

arts to apply.

“There

with.

develops and

— Page 7

CBSA donates money

Fair ‘98

Job

1998

16,

exp’ained

company, a software

received many applicants, the reason being that this particular fair caters mainly to those interested in full-time career work.

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Page 8

— SPOKE, February

16,

1998

COLLEGE

Conestoga hosts woodworking trade show

New JSA president hoping to get more students involved

Students given opportunity By Barbara

to better acquaint students

industry and

The

The new Journalism Student

word

president

that the

JSA

is

still

9 meeting, “I will do anything in my power to fulfill my role as a

In the

of the

semester, Roberts officially took over the job of former JSA president Corina Hill. Hill stepped down because she

JSA

(Photo by Jeannette Altwegg)

Roberts said that due to that

JSA because

with

who know

seem to care whether it’s there or not. “Obviously there’s something

wrong

there,” she said.

“We’re going to change that” said Roberts. “We’re gonna try

JSA

created the

position of a student liaison to

go-between for students

and teachers. “If

someone has a problem

program, or its teachers, he or she can talk to the people of the JSA or they can talk to some of the senior the

fun

a

raise the

energy level up a few degrees.” Roberts said she plans to

remedy to as

the situation by talking

many

first

such as posters and Spoke ads. One of the main reasons why the

JSA

is

explained,

program

so important, Roberts is

the

faced

problem the in

December

1996, when an entire class of third-semester journalism

some

friends

.

.

.

program, said

were there talking

to

A

former Conestoga student, the from graduated woodworking program in 1986,

La-Z-Boy

represented

where he

“There’s a

is

Canada

now employed. of potential job It’s pretty high

lot

opportunities here. tech,”

said

Derrick Grift.

“It‘s

exciting for students to see there

is

Meagher;

vice-president

“OFMA

vice-president

raising position

is still

of

in

the development,” he said. “There

The

the Ontario were three partners government, the college and the industry.”

Sinclair said the

program now

cannot be compared to what it was when it started because of today’s technology. He said Conestoga’s

woodworking program changes every few years and one of these

changes

the

is that

program now

Trillium trophy. (Photo by Barbara Ateljevic)

outstanding symbols of achievement and excellence. The Summit Award for Canadian Content is judged for the best use Canadian materials. The of Summit Award for Canadian Design or adaptation is given for the most original Canadian design.

are

The Grand

Trillium, symboliz-

Furniture Ontario Manufacturers’ Association was also there promoting its annual

evolved tremendously since the college started,” he said. “It’s very

Trillium

different.”

points

around.”

The

are

picked by a

panel of jurors with international buying experience and represent retail furniture

businesses from

all

of Canada. Entries are

regions

evaluated using a specific criteria

on

based

styling

construction,

marketability and overall value to the consumer, said a

OFMA’s

message from Gerry

president Cockerill, in the Trillium 1998 catalogue.

Awards

from the jury and best the true meaning of

illustrates

Trillium.

Grand Trillium and the Summit Award winners nominated each year by the

The

Trillium are

jury for consideration as the best in

category

their

and

be

can’t

specifically entered as part of the

competition.

The industry displays, from 10:30 to 1 1:30, were followed by a one-hour panel discussion where

opportunity to ask questions.

based on the value of

is

by

represent

significant

resentatives issues

status,

woodworking

Students also had the

industry.

industry

included

important

discuss

today’s

in

Other

the jury.

which, according to the catalogue,

(Photo by Barbara Ateljevic)

the

to

Award

The Trillium Summit Awards, Derrick Grift

presented

is

Award winner who has received the highest number of

students listened to a panel of rep-

points given

fund-

of Show”,

The Trillium trophy is presented which receives the highest number of votes in each category. The Trillium Merit to the entry

of and

student liaison, Jeanette Everall.

executive

George Sinclair. played a major role

ing, the catalogue said, the “Best

Dan

publicity, Anita Santarossa;

The

OFMA’s

vice-president,

addresses apprenticeship training. “The core of the program has

are execu-

vice-president,

woodworking

started the original

a chance to look

them

gives

it

instead of just

JSA

executive of the tive

OFMA was involved in the form-

Some of Conestoga’s alumni, who are now employed in the

association

have it (the program) enslave you for 20 months in a row.” Other members of the new

we can

residential furniture.

program and

Roberts described the JSA as a support group for journalism

journalism students as possible to raise awareness of the JSA. Other ways to promote the JSA will be through various venues,

many

sible to see if

which recognizes

achievements in the marketing, design and production of Canadian

The winners

and second-year

to harass as

in 1974, Trillium is a

Organized

graduate.

students.”

students:

descriptions of winning designs.

ing of Conestoga’s

something out there for them, and

where journalism students don’t have to exclusively concentrate on their classes. Roberts said that the JSA wants to get the point across that: “You can have fun and relax in this program and make

people as pos-

build

to

and

photos

with

catalogues

employer contacts for when they

Ltd.,

classes.

act as a

about the JSA, she said, don’t

of their

one

failed

students

with a two-month work term. Roberts blamed the fact that students aren’t even aware of the

of older students. Those students

good

a

trophies and awards and provided

national award

5.

who

situation, the

of the indifference

Lisa

president

Roberts.

be leaving in March to complete her journalism program

will

chance

a

industry,

New

JSA meeting

first

with the

products Feb.

students and answering questions.

to get

people involved.”

its

show provided

trade

students

alive and kicking. “As president,” Roberts said in an interview following the Feb.

nagging pain-in-the-butt

the

opportunity for students to mingle with those in the industry and gave

Lisa Roberts said she wants to spread the

Awards competition. The group displayed the Trillium

from

Representatives

acquaint themselves with the industry

to

Trillium

Ateljevic

woodworking industry were at Conestoga’s woodworking centre

By Jeannette Altwegg

Association

LIFE

Durham

participants

Furniture Inc.,

Royce-Ayr Cutting Tools Tradewood Industries.

and

Inc.

open.

Achievements by young volunteers CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR THE AUBREY HAGAR

DISTINGUISHED TEACHING

AWARD

By Donna

Fierheller

recognize their

A

open January close

March

5th, 1998

9th, 1998

provincial

many accomplish-

ments and innovations.”

new

annual

award

recognizes outstanding

Nominations

new

recognized by that

achieve-

A

young person who contributes time and service

details contact a

committee member:

Lana Lee Hardacre (ECE x369) Stu Hood - (Guelph 824-9390) Tony Kattenhorn - (Doon x213)

Ruth MacIntyre - (Stratford 271-5700) Jane McDonald - (Doon x719) Alix McGregor (Doon x430) Arden Mertz - (Doon x276) Mark Salmikivi - (Doon x353) Ted Spicer - (Doon x282) Brent Walker - (Doon x209)

sectors, the release states. Eligible

significant

volunteers

ment in the volunteer sector by young people ages 15-24 was announced by Premier Mike

without any pay to a charity, nonprofit organization or an

contribute

Harris’s parliamentary assistant.

award.

Mushinski said in a press release on Jan. 29, that the step is one of many being taken by the Ontario government to strengthen the volunteer sector.

For

being expanded to recognize

volunteers in a broader range of

individual, will be eligible for the

“By

volunteers are able to achieve in our communities, we help ensure the valued tradition of voluntarism in Ontario continues,” she said.

The Ontario Medal Volunteers

at

held

the

in

provincial legislature starting in the fall of 1998, she said.

Lt.-Gov.

“We

Hilary

Weston

said,

look forward to the youth in

communities becoming tomorrow’s leaders, but many are our

already

leading

volunteers.

important that

we

It is

the

way

important that

as

we

who

years of

other

than

personal

Adults are honored for volunteering five to 25 years of work, and

recognize (volunteers’)

youth volunteers for two or more.

many accomplishments

volunteers were paid an average

and

value would be $4.6 billion a year.

wage innovations.” Lt.-Gov. Hilary Weston

will

ceremony

a

“It is

Young

for

be presented yearly by the lieutenant-governor to a maximum of 10 young people,

those

expense.

The

creating awareness of what

are

consecutive

time to a group within Ontario on an ongoing, active basis, for no

payment

Marilyn

Nominations forms available from the selection committee members.

is

award

release also said

if

Ontario’s

for time spent working, the

The Outstanding Achievement Awards will also be expanded. The award honors up to 15 individuals, groups or businesses

In addition to the

two to

others

honor

volunteers

new program,

who

be

society

expanded contributions from from all areas of will

activity in Ontario.

The Volunteer Service Awards recognized the consecutive number of years volunteers serve to an organization from the

citizenship

and

culture

since 1984. In 1998, the

sectors

program

to to

community non-profit tions; boards;

nesses;

has

contribute

through volunteering

significantly

organiza-

commissions; busi-

educational/arts/correc-

tional institutions; or schools.

Awards

for volunteer service and

outstanding achievement will be presented in ceremonies held across Ontario during National Volunteer Week, April 19-24.


SPOKE, February

FEATURE

16,

1998

— Page 9

among young women

Violence

Some students say women becoming more violent By Rachel Pearce

feminist

movement and

this

whole

about how women are supposed to be more dominant. “Since younger women are doing

bit

a

In

informal

recent

survey

conducted at Conestoga’s Doon campus, eight out of 10 students said young women have definitely

become more

violent in recent

years.

Last Monday, just one student violence among young

said

women

is about the same as it has always been, and one said they were unsure. “I’m from a small town, and every-

body

“Young

fights there,”

second-year

said

management

women

are

not

violent

than

Ryan

friend,

second-year

student, disagreed.

“They’re definitely getting more

Kitchener

the

Cameron

4-year-old

who

lives

where

area

Heights

was savagely unconscious by two

student, Jackie Visee,

beaten

17-year-old girls Jan. 17. “I’ve seen one or two (fights

between

in

girls)

said, “but

maybe

my

it’s

time,” he

just the area.

a really bad part of town.” Patrick Littlejohn, a second-year

It’s

electrical engineering

technology

student, said, of the beating of Visee, “I thought that was sick. it when I saw on the news. That’s the second one in a year. We already had that girl, Reena Virk, out in B.C. who was swarmed.” When asked what he thought was

“I couldn’t believe

it

Girls

tend

lot to

do with

this

to attack in

youth

said

liaison

done in Jim Doyle,

officer

for

the

Hume.

“When

it

comes

they

tend

said

Hume. “With

to

fight

to in

girls,

groups,”

the boys it mainly one-on-one con-

Waterloo Regional Police. “The girls will rarely commit an assault if they are not backed by their

frontations, but

friends.”

group of girls versus another group

He

added

that

'

one-on-one

confrontations will not happen

if

friends are not present to pressure girls into

it.

“It is also

done

to

impress their

friends, they get the identity of

being a ‘tough girl,”’ he said. “Then they have their own image to live

up

he said. probably

yeah,”

quite

they’re violent,

due to the influence of a lot of

Morisette

and

“I don’t think they’re violent

by nature. I think it’s just this whole attitude about females becoming more dominant. They’ve taken a lot of shit from men, so now they’re going to be more assertive and aggressive.” Rebecca Watson and Susan

to.”

These thoughts are shared by the principal of Forest Heights Collegiate in Kitchener, John

is

of

still

you often see a

girls.”

As

Patrick

Littlejohn,

electrical

Nicole Lach,

engineering technology

management studies

Rebecca Watson,

electrical Kevin Beatty, engineering technology

Michalek, both third-year graphic design students, said they think

young women

are definitely

more

in-your-face types than before.

“Young

have become quite

girls

aggressive,” said Watson.

“They’re not so passive any more,” said Michalek. Kevin Beatty, a second-year electrical engineering technology student was the only person surveyed who said he was unsure of the real situation of violence

among young women. While they seem more violent than

to

be somewhat

before, he said,

might just be more media atten|on on it.” “I think there

graphic design

than male fights

ments between girls can have a background of up to six months. “Something that happened over the summer can be the cause of a fight going on now,” he said. In spite of this, Hume was quick to point out that fights between young males are still the most thinks frequent, but said he

there is a zero-tolerance policy

among females is becoming more common. Equal rights, said Hume, more

in violent offenses

violence

are

Sgt.

more

groups say police sergeant and principal

high-school principal.

groups,”

have

so.

think

“I

fights different

according to a local police sergeant and a

assaults

become

questionable to him.

month’s beating of 14-year-old Jackie Visee,

“Most

violent than

the real status of things remained

not surprising two 17-year-olds were involved

in last

more

the reason for the surge in violent

By Greg Bisch

It is

are

and echoed Littlejohn’s reasoning as to why they have

crimes committed by young girls, Littlejohn said, “Well, I guess it

does have a

Female

women

graphic design

violent,” said Garibaldi,

graphic design

said

before,

Susan Michalek, feminist women’s music like Alanis

another

management

1

kids

their

Jewel.

However, Lach’s

in

do with

Peter Kovacs, another secondyear electrical engineering student,

the past.

Garibaldi,

Susan Michalek,

over

aggressive.”

they have been in

Peter Kovacs, electrical engineering technology

also has to

any control anymore.”

young

said

more

it

“It’s

dent, Nicole Lach.

Lach

think

the fact that parents just don’t have

girls

become

stu-

this, I

than anything else,

behind die change in this behavior. “We see females becoming more violent in the media, with more aggressive female heros,” he

said.

Doyle said he had a

why

of

next day.”

violence.”

However, said Hume, disagree-

different idea

females

he stated that the between female students tend to have a different personality than the fights between males. “The guys will have little an surrounding background incident,” he said. “It might have started at a hockey game the night before, and started a fight the well,

conflicts

the reason

is

are

being

perceived as more violent. “School boards, as well

as

no longer up with violent behavior,” said Doyle. “They are developing a policy of zero tolerance, and I think that is why we have a higher society in general, are

putting

number

Hume

of

reported

cases

said that at his

of

school

and added that society “swinging to general is in the right” as far as being less in place

tolerable.

He

said

public

due

to

this

from

attitude is

the

probably

an actual

rise

by youth. Hume added

that

school

the

at

his

zero-tolerance poli-

cy means that the police

are

when

a

called

student

has committed a premeditated criminal act.

“For example, if were to brush with shoulder another guy and a fight ensued, that would be less of offence, then an if I had been plotting an assault,” he said. I

As

well,

offenders

Hume

who do

said,

repeat

not respond to

school discipline are often handed to the police.


— Page 10

— SPOKE, February

16,

1998

FEATURE

Personal safety seminar

Bad girls

Trust your instincts, says judo instructor

Female

as deadly as male murderers just

By Rachel Pearce “The only people that get away from an assault are the ones who fight

myth

Deborah Kerr told a group of 14 Conestoga students about

~r%

during a personal safety seminar in the Sanctuary, Feb. 10.

MJ

J-«C of

was

her

and

partner,

John a

Control,

Take

Batten,

run

freelance

workshop business that local community centres

travels to

and area schools promoting

self-

run

the

They

defence.

also

Kitchener- Waterloo Judo Club. The seminar, which ran from

p.m. to 5:30 p.m., focused on four aspects of self-defence personal safety awareness, how

£30

victims are targeted, acquaintance defensive and physical rape techniques. Kerr, a graduate of Conestoga’s

recreation

program who worked

Personal Safety Seminar instructors John Batten and Deborah easy Kerr of Take Control Inc. and the K-W Judo Club show an

way they less

choke an

to

(Photo by Jeannette Altwegg)

attacker.

seem more likely to become

targeted by

about an hour demonstrating some physical escape techniques. They showed the students easy ways to get out of wrist-holds. Wristgrabbing is one of the ways an will

test

an

intended

victim, Batten said.

Guelph, opened the seminar by talking about “awareness and avoidance”. Women have to be aware of the potential some situations have for assaults, such as walking alone in underground

holds during an actual assault. Students were also shown how to escape from being pinned down by putting an assailant in a chokehold of their own.

Homewood

down

parking lots or

unfamiliar

city streets.

“Trust your instincts,” she said. “If a situation just doesn’t feel right,

there

really

could

be

a

problem.”

Kerr said that, alone walking

a person

if

is

unfamiliar

in

Some students are reluctant to use a manoeuvre this drastic, said Batten, who was on the Canadian judo team for 10 years. “There are lots of options,” he said. “I think people have a perfect right to defend themselves.

After the physical part of the workshop, Kerr and Batten talked

surroundings, they should keep

about

head up, look people in the eye, and pretend they are fully confident anyway, because then,

They

their

acquaintance

date

rape.

80 per cent of all rapes are committed by people said 75 to

known

their

to

victims.

neighborhoods.

victims’

an assailant. After about a half-hour of lecturing, Kerr and Batten, who are also Conestoga alumni, spent

assailant

determination to

Eighty

Fifty

per cent occur in the victims’

homes. Kerr told her auaience to beware situations in which they might be alone with a man or where there are alcohol and drugs. She told

for witchcraft

and some for murder. According to authors Robert Silverman and Leslie Kennedy of the book Deadly Deeds, the female to die in “Old Sparky”, the scarred oak electric chair, was Martha Place in 1899.

them

to

be very careful not to send

men mixed

signals.

clear

no one has the

right to assault

another person.

“Bad judgement

is

not a rapable

offence,” she said.

After the seminar, Kim Radigan, health, safety and environmental coordinator, handed out plastic

DSA had purchased. Radigan said women’s resource group chose to sponsor the seminar based on a suggestion that it would be informative and useful whistles the

to students. Also, she said,

Kerr

good

received Batten and refemces from area schools. Radigan said that, although student turnout was not as high as

expected, the

Feb. 3, born-again Christian Karla Faye Tucker received a injection

pickaxe

the

women’s resource

may sponsor group seminar of this type in the

another future.

Texas for of butchering in

All

in

35

leaves

that

all,

death row between

women on

of

states

Alabama,

Texas,

By Jeannette Altwegg

learn about

how

and

Hunting Leyton,

believes the most deadly female confinement in killer serial today is Aileen Wuomos, 40. She is awaiting termination at

when being The

Sanctuary could easily have

been confused with a martial class Feb 10.

arts

in

personal safety seminar as John Batten and Deborah Kerr, owners of the Take Control Inc. and the K-W Judo Club, demonthe

some of

the

more physical

aspects of defending oneself in

case of an attack.

Tara Schagena and Terry Garcia were two of Doon’s more curious students

who

joined

the

self-

female

other

who have

more persons and favor

smothering to poisoning quietly end the lives of their victims, this hitchhiker murders like a man. Wuomos killed seven men with a pistol after having sex with them, then stole their

and pawned

cars

their

A

product of abuse herself, she was turned in by her possessions.

and

physical

Garcia said that he had originally been planning on playing foosball with his friends when he noticed were some people that there talking about martial

arts.

“I’m really into martial arts and I just wanted to see what they were doing,” said Garcia in an interview after the seminar.

said that

it

attacked and that

know

good

sexual

dubious distinction in the Guiness Book most the as of Records murderous murderess of all for the femicide slaughter of some

“It doesn’t even have to be a possible rape situation,” Garcia

ociety

was

interesting to

she said.

in

been

has

indoctrinated to believe that

women

are

not

capable of the kind of violence we associate with men. Sexual however, has little identity,

Schagena, adding that there are lot of perverts out there and people can never be safe enough.

of things they can do to protect themselves in situations like that,”

aristocrat

by bathing

finally buried her.

“I have a lot of friends who’ve been in situations like that,” said

that they’re taking the

that

The 16th

home. Rumors abounded that her skin was that of a woman decades younger when they

Even in a normal fight when somebody attacks you, he said, the defence moves can be very useful. Schagena agreed with Garcia. Knowing how to protect oneself is

said.

make a lot of people aware

virgins.

stem the onslaught of years. Because she was a noble, she was beyond legal reproach and the townspeople could not hang the Carpathian killer. Instead, they entombed Bathory in her

to protect yourself at

to get away.

good

the

young female blood, she could

when someone grabs you, it’s know several ways

“It’s

Elizabeth Bathory

wins

believed

very helpful to

steps to

is

it

century .Hungarian

it

one’s options in

any time,” Garcia added, saying that

But

who

to

do with proclivity toward

violence,

Tara Schagena and Terry Garcia practice self-defence techniques in the Sanctuary, Feb. 10. (Photo by Jeannette Altwegg)

as 128

says that whereas

And Leyton the

male

most

killer is

serial

often driven to repetitive acts of

homicide, the female a more complex, subtle anything but criminal widi

sexual

She

motivations.

simplistic

typically seen as overshadowed by the male partner who is

despite

our

outrageous

his

for

lionized exploits.

serial

also killed

or

definitely worthwhile, she said.

defence seminar.

He

to

such a situation. “It’s

About 14 people participated

strated

was good

deaths

Starke Prison, Florida.

three or

many among them.

responsible for as

the male, as cultural bias denies her existence. Even when this murderer is an active member of a serial killing team, she is

of author The Elloitt Humans,

600 innocent

to protect oneself

have heard of Genene Jones, Bobbie Terrell or Jane Toppan cumulatively were who

Oklahoma,

Florida.

Unlike

are instantly recognized heinous exploits. Few

for their

remains undetected longer than

lesbian lover.

Self-defence demonstrations popular with student audience

Bundy

California,

Illinois

Pennsylvania,

murderers,

than their

killer is

two people.

the

your about boundaries,” she said, but added that no matter what the situation,

“Be

On

lethal

kill

male counterparts. Men like Dahmer, Gacy, DeSalvo and

for

first

per cent of these happen within the

assertive and are

the at victims Health Centre in

assault

strange

perpetuated by the press

and popular media. In fact, this crime is replete with dozens of female serial killers who have often been far more lethal their in successful and

of

some

adultery,

Kerr and Batten demonstrated how to get out of various choke-

with

A

death.

executed in the U.S.- some

for any student interested. Students were asked to register in the

Kerr

Angel

sorority

available for free

DSA office.

widow.

female murderers exists that society has rarely recognized. Over 500 women to date have been legally

The seminar, sponsored by Conestoga’s women’s resource group and the Doon Student Association,

lack

is

the

says

O’Reilly-Fleming

By Dee Bettencourt

instructor

judo

back,”

serial killers

the

examination, pon it says Leyton becomes obvious that female perpetrator is on par

with any male. For instance, there is still an odor that lingers over Karla Homolka’s case as

people realized, belatedly, the depth of her involvement in the deaths of various girls, including

own

her

sister.

Silverman and Kennedy say that

women

are

known

to kill

they have loved, often with the precision of an assassin. discounted, is If infanticide those

the

chosen victims are usually

male. Their statistics show that female offenders are generally young, white and one-third are Aboriginal.

usually homicide same-sex and samerace killings by those under 18

Youth

involves

of age. Boys tend to murder strangers; girls know years

their victims.

common

Victims often have

characteristics

and are

readily available, although the killer

will

to take

start

more

an increasing sense of invulnerability through the avoidance of capture. There is no question the crime of a serial murder is unsettling, whether committed by a man or by a woman. These are dark characters who disturb and

risks as she feels

leaving

fascinate,

wake

their

in

fear, of legacy intimidation and multiple levels of victims, says Leyton. All

a

four authors agreed

female

it

killer

who

the

deadlier

is

is

the

often

assumptions, according to Serial

deemed

Murder editor and Mass Thomas O’Reilly-Fleming.

species and she has always lived in society.

of

the


SPOKE, February

16,

1998

— Page 11

SHOWTIME

:th

FINGER EEEVEN photo and story by Amy (Sonnenbcrg

J unkhouse

through Kitchener

rolls

photo and story by

Y

ears of playing an endless

of

list

club

gigs

are

paying off for singer Tom Wilson. His band, Junkhouse, played a sold out show at Mrs. Robinson’s, 122 Weber St. W., in Kitchener, on Feb. 7.

With the success of their third an introspective rock album called Fuzz, Junkhouse has been playing a number of sold out gigs on their latest promotional release,

tour.

Special guests Copyright are

warming up

crowds for the tour, which takes the band mostly through Ontario and Quebec. “I haven’t slept in a week,” confessed Wilson during a pre-show interview. “The shows in Hamilton and Toronto sold out, so it looks pretty good so far.” the

The latest single, Shine, has catapulted the band into stardom once again, a feat the band hasn’t been able

to

debut went gold

effort. Strays,

their

in

accomplish since 1994.

which However,

Wilson isn’t worried about living up to that success. “I only wish we made more money,” he joked. “We set our own goals and try to communicate with as

So

many people

far.

as possible.

Fuzz has sold 20,000

copies. That’s 20,000 people.

consider

it

reached that It’s

fair to

a

success

many

that

I

we

people.”

say Junkhouse was

able to achieve that goal during

Lisa

Roberts

with Pearly White, they quickly

place to exist,” said Wilson.

energized the crowd that

crammed

Cripps toured with Junkhouse during the Birthday Boy tour, and

reminded the

had been friends with Wilson for

into

Mrs. Robinson’s.

The band

also

audience of their earlier achievements by performing Out

“I

found a partner to write with could be honest with,” said

Of My Head and Prayin’ For Rain,

that I

from

Wilson.

Strays.

Conflicts

Junkhouse

within

almost made Wilson

call

it

quits

during the release of their second album, Birthday Boy. Subsequently, there were a few lineup changes; co-founding bassist

Russ Wilson

left the

band

be replaced by Grant Marshall. Colin Cripps, producer for Fuzz, joined after ending his former to

outfit,

Toronto’s

Crash

“When

we

started

working on Fuzz, we co-wrote 25 songs together. It was a very natural atmosphere; there would be kids running around my house

and the phone would be ringing. sit down with a smoke and a cup of tea and write songs. I called

We’d it

the ‘working house.’”

On

the topic of

commercial

competing

radio

with

in

more

Vegas.

established artists, Wilson isn’t too

Dan Aachen and drummer Ray Farrugia remain

kind with his words. “It’s a shame that a band of happy musicians, such as us, have to compete with that poptart culture,” he said. “What I do has nothing to do with that. The media, television

Guitarist

from the original lineup. Wilson has a well-versed reason for band changes. “You try sticking three or four of your best friends in the back of a van, touring for two years, and then see how you feel about each other,” he explained. “There was stuff in the band that caused creases in the relationship, and there was a big power struggle as to who would write the songs,

who would

sing

them, and so on. That isn’t what creating music is about.” Since the band’s changes, Wilson is much happier with all aspects, especially songwriting. “There’s no pushing around anymore,

their

everybody

20s to an older following. Opening

do and everybody’s happy. We’ve finally found a comfortable

Kitchener appearance with a varied age group among the audience, ranging from early

years prior to that.

in

the

found their places band for what to

and the press treat what we competitive with do as commercial radio. It’s unfair to want to compete with Our Lady Peace and Oasis. “It would be nice for people to music for appreciate good what it is,” Wilson concluded. To finish |he show that night, Junkhouse performed a two song encore, including Big Brown Turtle. This

managed

to satisfy the

appetites of everyone present at

performance. Judging from enthusiasm audience’s on Feb. 7, Wilson appears to be closer to his wish than he the the

realizes.

Scott Anderson of Finger Eleven performs at Mrs. Robinson’s on Feb. 5.

S

cott Anderson, vocalist for Finger Eleven, sat sipping

his coffee in a tiny, dingy

coffee shop and wrestled with the

question he and his band are asked all too often:

members

“Why

did

you change your name?” The frontman of the former Rainbow Butt Monkeys explained he, along with bassist and brother Sean Anderson, guitarists James Black and Rick Jackett and then

Rob

drummer

Gommerman,

agonized for weeks over whether or not to change the name that had brought them much success. “We wanted a neutral name, not a joke,” Anderson said.

their latest release Tip, along with

Finger Eleven, the neutral name the entire band hole-heartedly

As Far

agreed upon, was originally a line in their

was

song Thin Spirits, which removed. Anderson

later

explained the line

made

sense in

the context of the song, comparing the eleventh finger to the sixth

sense and third eye. In a way, he said, it was the “eleventh finger”

persuaded them to finally change their name. modified with the Along that

moniker, the band’s musical style has matured a great deal from the days of the care-free, tongue-incheek variety of music found on the Butt

Monkeys’ Letters from

Chutney.

“We wanted we could set Junkhouse members Dan Aachen, left, and Tom Wilson entertain the crowd during a sold-out performance on Feb. 7 at Mrs. Robinson’s. The band is touring in support of their latest release Fuzz.

and Tool.” Perhaps the smooth transition into the new sound can be partly attributed to the band’s producer Arnold Lanni. “We met Arnold and soon discovered he had the same songphilosophy as us,” writing Anderson said. “He helped us out a lot - he would hear our songs and suggest changes that would make them cooler.” The new music is definitely cool, as Finger Eleven demonstrated in concert at Mrs. Robinson’s, 122 Weber St., W., Kitchener, Feb.*-5. They performed all the songs off

make an album along side of our to

Anderson said, “Our Lady Peace, Stone Temple Pilots favorites,”

as I can Spit from Letters from Chutney and a cover of Depeche Mode’s Walking in my

Shoes.

Along with the new music, the band presented its new drummer Rich Beddoe to Kitchener, who was selected from auditions of up to 40 hopefuls. Gommerman left the band on good terms to attend school.

done on writing some new material and

Anderson

said the

band

is

touring for now, and they plan

heading into the studio

in the

near

future.

During the interview, Anderson tell he has had a good show when he can’t revealed that he can

remember asked

it.

After the show,

how

show he could “Not much.”

much recall,

of

when the

he laughed,


— SPOKE, February

Fage 12

1998

16,

Bah<> profile

Bones struggle to jamming

by Lisa Roberts

remembered

together,”

Mollison.

“We wanted to get on tape but we needed

the most about playing guitar?” asked Jeff Dammlier, bassist for

something a drummer, so we called Jim.” The result of the combination of

Guelph band Bones, during a

their

“Do you know what

He

“This!”

rehearsal.

recent

miss

I

talents

released in

was

a

demo

tape

1995 simply called

Bones.

posture similar to the late Elvis

names for the band, and came up

“We were

example of the relaxed atmosphere the group creates when the four-member group is in the studio. The space is Ttiis is a small

cosy,

with

too

but

out orange

worn

a

couch against one wall, a battered personal stereo littered with CDs and tapes, and a fridge containing

were already playing

in Fergus.

After the two went their separate

ways, a chance meeting between Mollison and England in June 1993 led to Bones’ formation. “Matt and I met up, talked about decided

and

educational

suggest anything.

fan of ours said

sounded

it

meets Our Lady Peace, if offered help,” any that’s Dammlier. most the probably “That’s accurate description, and it’s very

like

U2

Mollison

flattering,”

said.

“We’ve

complete the

edge

outfit.

three of us

jam with us

didn’t sound

but the clean melody lines take the off.”

Currently,

session with

Dammlier

Bones has

tentative

plans to return to the recording studios for another CD release, to

be out hopefully by the summer.

The

first

is

band

neutral,

agree

are

their

they

but

introspective

lyrics

positive note, they completed the

was happening

song. Blind, which can be found on the new CD. During 1996 and 1997, Bones performed a series of warm-up shows, opening for bands like the The Monoxides, Gandharvas, Alanis an and Supergarage,

lives during songwriting.

Morrisette

They

tribute

band

called

philosophical,

and

reflect

in the

sound

claim

was, according to the band, the worst in the world. On a more

Jagged

start

to

the recording,

“A

got a non-heavy edge to us. The music can get as heavy as it wants,

The

outfits, various in inlcuding a high school stage band

music,

the

right.”

together

Munich,” remembered Israel. “We performed for a crowd capacity of almost 3,000.” When asked what their music sounds like, the guys are hesitant

experience was invaluable for the guys. However, they were still searching for a bass player to

out to

in Toronto.

Drummer Jim Israel, vocalist and rhythm guitarist Kal Mollison, and England Matt guitarist lead complete the lineup. Israel and Mollison

maintains

jammed for two years before Jeff came in,” said Mollison. “Anyone else that came

demos and a seven song CD, Bones is preparing for a number of area two

much money on

“The

spring water and dark ales. After the release of two

gigs, including

playing around with

with Bones sort of at the last minute,” said England. Mollison insists the band spent

Presley.

year’s Oktoberfest in Kitchener. “It was the largest bash outside

at first to

lunged forward, acoustic guitar around his neck, and assumed a

top

tV»c

the

and what

member’s

“We just want the music to be the “We only hope the people who see us like thing,” says England.

what they With

hear.”

aspirations, such determination and positive thinking, the

climb to the top for Bones be easier than

hopefully

Little Pill.

will

also performed during last

anticipated.

Bones, left to Enqland, lead

right: Jeff

guitar;

Dammlier, bass; Jim

Israel,

drums; Matt

and Kal Mollison, vocals and rhythm

guitar. (photo by Lisa Roberts)

Local music scene

Cambridge gospel singer keeps the Good

faith,

come

alone.

by Natalie Schneider

away. We started working and the music just

“We

patience and a

warm

clicked

heart has brought Lorraine Peters

started

good things in the new year. The Cambridge-based singer takes gospel music to a new level with

back

12

been released, but it’s also been submitted to this year’s Juno awards for the best Gospel experience

bad

a

her

Peters

producer,

first

eventually met up with

Len Grant,

me

was

in

and didn’t told

me

to

sing

anything,

keeping “It’s

had a great voice but

was looking So I asked

for an if

that

I I

he

R&B

singer.

was

R&B

it

She

decided

that in

she

doing

R&B

it is,

because there was already a huge market in that area. “I think there’s just not

people that dedicate their lives God. I’m going to sing to

Even never get paid any money, is what I’m going to do,”

his music exclusively.

Peters.

(photo by Natalie Schneider)

if I

this

said

because

you’re

to minister to

and tap into

Despite different agendas, Peters and Grant eventually met and

from there everything

fell

into

appeared on a compilation Grant produced, then they began focusing on her music place.

Peters

Make know where

their heart.

coming from.” Her music conveys a serious message but delivers it in a light-hearted happy way, said Peters. The fact that her music delivers such a strong message admits that it might Peters they are

Cambridge-based gospel singer Lorraine Peters.

listen.’

Peters.

said

followed,”

is

Total silence “I’ve

a struggle.” that entail a career in the

happens

most

the it

music

fulfilling

seeing the joy that people’s lives, said

all is

in

Peters.

real.

difficult

the connection and

enough

your time to

aspect of

young The music all the same but how you is go about it is different. You have to look at a person, no matter who

was

God. You think this world is made of nothingness? If you I would take this I were now while you have time

before

She approaches the simply by crowds

“You have

strictly

have laughed. I just stopped in the middle of the show and said, ‘You can laugh now but there’s a day where you’re going to stand

industry,

kids a different way.

Peters

a risk she has to

“There’s kids that are probably going to make fun. I’ve had situations where young people

from prisons

the heart,” said Peters.

gospel and he said ‘No’,” said

not interested

it

many

to

going into different worlds. To me that thing is important the people see you as real and not an act. What I’m telling them is from

that

some guy wanted to hear me. So sang Amazing Grace. He told me

schools.

different

feel like singing but she

to

is

run.

Despite the obvious struggles

played

has

different audiences,

on the phone. I bad mood that day

a

but said this

discovered that anything worth something in your life comes with

Peters

to sing

as if she’s telling to live their lives,

Everybody has this label, to me all music belongs to God. You can take it either for good or bad,” she

,

told

how

the opportunity to listen, this

said.

the producer of Knock and things rolled along from there. my cousin remember “I called me from Toronto and she

off

people

of them are going ‘Well that’s not Christian music.’ Well music? Christian is what

“Some

of the Year.

Despite

to us in four

Peters.

CD

with

come

Public reaction to her music has been for the most part celebrated. While some people enjoy her twist on gospel music, some have taken judgement on her, said

the look at ability vocal mesmerizing of Peters. Songs range in style from R&B to haunting Irish type harmonies. Not only has her

uninterrupted

Album

I

days,” said Peters

an

is

went

together. I

to the studio just before

eight songs

disc

track

coming

graduated from teacher’s college, which was in May. We had about

Krsyck, her debut release.

The

right

faith

Her grounded view of what’s to sets Peters’ apart from an industry filled with dreams of fame and fortune.

come

?I believe if something is for you in life, nothing’s going to change that. If Lorraine Peters is supposed to be some big ol’

going to I’m supposed to stay local, well there’s no problem with that. There’s probably some lives that will have been touched

gospel

star

nothing’s

change

that.

If

here and that’s enough me. Plus I want my kids see an example in me. That’s

right

for to

the biggest thing.

“When

I’ve

passed

I

don’t

want them to look back at my and feel shame,” said Peters.

life


)

)

SPOKE, February

16,

1998

— Page 13

The Replacement Killers on action, not on

big by

plot

Amy Sonnenberg

Movie flewevv

with Great Expectations

Calling

all action movie fanatics: you love non-stop action, guns, blood and violence, The Replacement Killers is worth your

if

more

in the

mood

for a

deep, meaningful and thoughtprovoking plot, you may want to consider spending your time and

money

Rooker) killing the son of mob boss Mr. Wei (Kenneth Tsang). Wei hires hitman John Lee (Chow Yun-Fat) to get even with Zedkov, but eventually backs down. Furious that Lee didn’t follow orders, Wei sends his goons to kill him. Desperate to get out of the Sorvino),

forger,

to

passport.

make

(Gwyneth Paltrow), receives

version

of

original

with the

first

Chow Yun-Fat and

Yun-Fat,

who

United States to make

this film. Fortunately, his inexperience with the language was hardly

noticeable. Well,

no more than any

other foreign action

star’s.

Sorvino, a great actress (she has the Oscar to prove it) and all around cool chick simply didn’t

have a

The to

work with in this film. of Cobum had potential

lot to

role

be

women’s

an

awesome liberated comes down to

role but

merely shooting guns and a couple of tough-broad one-liners. Antoine Fuqua makes an impressive film directorial debut in The Replacement Killers - a far

executive producer for this film, was probably responsible for at least half of the ticket sales simply

by having

name

with

in art.

New York and

Finn finds Estella

friendship that sends the viewer on an

his life greatly in the future.

emotional rollercoaster from happi-

who

little

Finn

affect girl

The

named

three

are

a

Estella

who

is

strives to revive their

childhood love.

The remake of Great Expectations

ness to sympathy.

novel,

but

unexpected

The

loose

The conclusion

modernized film

the

does

lead actors are

fiance left her at the altar; and an

exquisitely eccentric

escaped convict, Lustig (Robert

Hawke does

De

with his

Maggie (Kim Dickens) and her

live-in

boyfriend,

Uncle

Joe

(Chris

whom

few

all

equal in their

Bancroft

plays

film

an excellent job portray-

Finn,

Later the movie flashes to the ’90s,

All in

AA,

is

all.

Great Expecations, rated

a film worth seeing, especially

for those

who

that are not

enjoy romantic stories

sappy or corny. This mod-

ernized

version

could

become a

classic in

its

own

definitely right.

in

When you walk out of the you may feel like you’ve

theatre,

seen

The

before,

award-winning Gangsta’s Paradise by Coolio. John Woo, who was merely an

to

or

Replacement Killers simply a hundred

movies just like the

fact

typical action action,

it.

This

that

it

is

only due

follows the

movie mould:

little plot.

lots

of

Fair warning.

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across from McDonalds

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beside Harveys

A

CAMBRIDGE (

)

an

Ms. Dinsmoor.

Paltrow’s character contrasts nicely-. with his character.

Finn calls

Cooper).

a

ing a naive yet determined Finn and

life of.

artist, lives

to

not unlike the

contain

performance.

Finn saves the

is

twists.

a few screws in the brain after her

whom

is

so strongly

the

to

meets three people who will influence

in

advertising.

from his roots in directing music videos, including his cry

his

associated

York

big apple,

a romantic film of love and childhood

throughout his childhood, is paid by Ms. Dinsmoor to come entertain her and Estella every Saturday.

Mira Sorvino.

has starred in over

70 movies throughout his career in Hong Kong, makes his American film debut in The Replacement Killers. Amazingly enough, Yun-Fat couldn’t speak a word of English before coming to the

the

starts off

Finn, an aspiring

Lee taking place within the first two minutes of the opening

New

to

in art. In the

and a career

sister

murder committed by

and goes

source

pursue a career

somewhere in 1970s Florida (the original story was set in 19th century England). A young Finn Belle (Jeremy James Kissner)

Niro),

immediately,

Estella a large

Dicken’s classic justice.

Bancroft), Estella’s aunt

shoot

credits.

but

story,

(Raquel Beaudene), a phoney playmate of Finn’s; Ms. Dinsmoor (Anne

document him a fake

with

Finn finds everything he has always wanted, but never had: wealth, dignity

snobby

a

relationship

sum of money from an unknown

all.

starts

lose

classic

reinvented version does the Charles

characters

up Cobum’s office, she and Lee become partners in bringing down Wei and his empire once and for The action

Finn (now played by Ethan Hawke) who is caught in a erratic win-

literature.

The movie

Meg Cobum

When Wei’s goons

modernized

of the

The Replacement Killers begins with Det. Stan Zedkov (Michael

(Mira

and

,

”3 The names of characters have changed as well as minor aspects

elsewhere.

country, he turns to

Romeo and Juliet, Great Expectations directed by Alfonso Cuaron, is a creatively

<0 Like last year’s

m ^

while. If you’re

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Gracious hosts

Condors lose ugly Conestoga’s penalties were of the

By Michael Hilborn

which seemed

retaliatory nature,

hands of their opponents. The second period ended with Cambrian leading by to play right into the

There is an old, rather stale joke that goes something like this. “I went to see a fight and a hockey game broke out.” That could

six.

The

probably apply to the recent game

third period

was

to all intents

between the Conestoga Condors and the Cambrian Golden Shields. Conestoga lost 8-2 in a game that penalty nearly 190 featured

and purposes a non-stop brawl. Even though the outcome was a foregone conclusion, Cambrian persisted in its goon tactics and the

game including minutes not misconducts, of which there were six, including a coach misconduct to Conestoga assistant coach Gary Thiel. He will be suspended from

frustrated

game

next

team’s

the

Condors seemed unable At one point, was an incident on the

to resist the bait.

there

benches that required the officials to stand in the doors to keep the

on

teams separated.

Wednesday. The Condors entered the game with a 9-3 record against a team

After the game the two coaches offered their individual perspec-

the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association in penalties with 677 minutes. Conestoga is the

intimidate

to

Conestoga is

athletic

Feb.20 and Boimomme said he “warm a guarantee could reception” for the Condors. “They’re a bunch of idiots,” said Conestoga coach Kevin Hergott. When asked if he saw any bright

aggressive,” James said. “Cambrian has been reported by the Boreal team for this sort of thing.” The Boreal Viperes are

Cambrian’s cross-town rivals in Sudbury. They are second in the league in penalty minutes with

spots in the game,

“The

385.

Hergott replied,

A Condor forward the game Feb. 7.

is

sent flying by a Golden Shield defender

in

(Photo by Rachel Pearce)

did acknowledge that Darryl Sinclair had played well.

coach Condors performance. Kevin Hergott said his team didn’t match their opponents level of

“He was the only guy who was playing both ends of the rink,” said Hergott. In fact, Sinclair

made what was

probably the prettiest play in an otherwise ugly game when he took a pass at centre ice, turned the

Cambrian defenceman inside-out at the blue line and went in all alone

final buzzer.”

He

team’s

the

tried to

Cambrian

I

very

assessing

said

Conestoga was taking runs at his star player, Sheldon Weber. There will be a rematch in Sudbury on

typical

of Cambrian. “They’re very dirty, very rough,

In

us,”

coach Doug Bonhomme. “We have 12 players over 200 pounds and nobody’s going to intimidate us.” Bonhomme also claimed that

least penalized with 269.

According

on the events. “They

tives

that leads

director Ian James, this

Cambrian

to

—only

to

be poke-checked

by the goal tender, Darryl Whyte. Sinclair

figured

also

both

in

Conestoga goals, scoring one and assisting on the other... Statistics showed that Cambrian outshot the Condors 59-37. The Condors have the best road record in the league, (7-0) but are a dismal 2-4 at home. There was a

noticeable lack of fan support at

noise

the

by Cambrian outnumber the

game.

Saturday’s

levels,

fans

seemed

home

fans.

to

Judging

the

intensity.

“We he

come “We had

passengers.

play,”

to

didn’t

said.

too many out hustled us.”

They

That was not the case throughout most of the first period. Conestoga opened the scoring at 5:07 on a power-play goal by Sean Murray, but the Golden Shields replied with two goals in a span of one

minute, including a short-handed effort by Ken Pagen. Cambrian scored another shorthanded goal late in the period to lead at the end of the

first

by a

score of 5-1.

Conestoga appeared

to

comeback when Darryl

make

a

Sinclair

scored at 7:08 of the second while

Cambrian was playing two men short, but the Condors were unable to

maintain the

momentum. From game deteriorat-

that point on, the

ed into a slugfest. In fact, all 10 goals were scored while someone

was

in the penalty box.

in the Darryl Sinclair (21) gets ready to rush to the aid of goaltender Darryl Whyte (1) Pearce) Rachel (Photo by scrappy affair against Cambrian.

Condor

Most of

c

Drugs are no cause By Matt According

Harris

to a recent article in

Sports Illustrated, several players in the

National Hockey League are

became exposed in the NHL. “I think it’s more psychological than anything else,” he said. “As far as

I’m concerned,

issue with

my

team.”

it’s

concern, local coaches say

for

not an

He added

the

athlete a “pick-up”,

consequences of drug abuse.

The component of Sudafed which triggers the desired effects psudeoephedrine

called

is

(a

decongestant). In

some

cases, the effect of this

drug

its

even though he acts as the team’s trainer, he is not allowed to dispense medications. This is in

use does not violate any current

accordance with minor hockey’s

level

NHL regulations.

policy.

The article in Sports Illustrated suggested that some players who

using the drug Sudafed to enhance their on-ice performance. The drug is

available over the counter and

questioning

After

some

area

that

Kitchener Rangers coach Geoff shared Hergott’s partly

coaches on the subject of using

Ward

medication to enhance performance, the results interviewed coaches indicate think there is next to no cause for

sentiment.

over-the-counter

concern.

of coach Conestoga’s men’s hockey team, said that nobody really heard

Kevin

much

Hergott,

about' the subject until

it

“We

don’t

that

on

the

Rangers,” Ward said. “If the circumstances are a player is sick and he wants to take medication so he can play, that’s fine with me.”

He

Rangers take their players through a drug education course every year, showing them said the

were

may do

is

much

shot

a a

of

players

of energy.

to participate in the test

which

positive is

International

Neither the

Olympics

for the

drug,

the banned by Olympic Committee.

OCAA nor the Ontario

Hockey League drug

like

boosting

adrenaline,

require

regular

tests for their players.

Dr. Robert Lee, of the Waterloo

Medicine Clinic, psudeoephedrine helps give the Sports

said

much

like the

effects of caffeinated drinks.

“The problem with this drug is it shows up even in minute traces in a urine sample,” he said. He added that caffeine becomes a banned substance when there is more than 12 micrograms per litre in a test

“There should be random testing in minor hockey. If a player is using drugs to enhance his performance, it should be stopped.”

Ward

said he has never

come

across the situation of requiring testing but did state the Rangers

would help

to educate the player

sample.

against using drugs to boost his

coach head Storm Guelph George Burnett doesn’t believe its an issue for minor hockey. “It’s (Sudafed) not used by the Storm, and I don’t think there is

play.

cause for concern,” he said. He added that the issue of drug

either way.”

may

on people’s rights, and that he was unsure of the OHL’s policy on the matter. “I’m not aware of any testing

testing

infringe

requirements,”

Hergott

said.

doesn’t matter whether it’s physical or psychological

“It

a

Ward said. “The player depending on the drug

addiction,” still

is

Both Hergott and Burnett said more research is done on

that until

the matter, they don’t believe there is

much

of a problem.

See Drugs page 15


3

cnn mro onjn o

SPOKE, February

16,

1998

— Page 15

i

Rec Centre builds history Building

was named after former Conestoga College president

By Dan Meaaher

However, the college has since been reduced to having teams only in soccer, men’s hockey, and

For those of you who walk by the massive rounded building at the west end of the campus everyday and wonder who Kenneth E. Hunter is, wonder no more.

The

state-of-the-art

women’s softball. The building was

also several outside events,

complex that was erected at Doon campus opened in 1980 and was initially called the recreation

Feddema

tre.

the school, the building

building,”

this

Feddema,

the

was

re-

in getting

Paula coordinator of said

administrative services at the rec centre.

“Hunter really pushed for

this

building during his term as president and he was the driving force

behind

The

it.”

building’s construction

was

funded by the Wintario draw, which supplied 50 per cent of the grants, and has since endured despite budget cuts that have seen its staff fall from 12 fulllargely

time people to just

Feddema

five.

when

to

hockey team that boasted the likes of Sue Scherer, who went on to for

the

occur

that several events

still

venue, including such college annuals as V.I.P. day and convocation. at the

While the use of the building has remained somewhat similar over

Feddema pointed

the years,

out

complex might not get as much use as it should from its stuthat the

dents.

was

“It

built for the students,”

“We

she said.

are focusing on trying to be profitable while still

being available to the students.” The attempt to be profitable involves year-round rental of the ice surface for various recreational

hockey leagues and other ventures, as well as renting out the

national

When

the

varsity

teams in sports such as basketball, volleyball, badminton, tennis and golf. There was also a women’s

play

admitted.

She noted

gym

area

for various events.

recalls a time

complex was home

to

gymnastics and dog shows, which I’m glad to see the end of,”

cen-

After former Conestoga College president Kenneth E. Hunter left

home

some of

which no longer take place. “We use to have shows such as the Lipizzan Stallions, provincial

recreation

named in his honor. “He was instrumental

a hurry

in

team.

asked

sometimes

why

the building

(Photo by Dan Meagher) is

Feddema was

left idle,

a bit mystified.

suppose the college community is made up of a lot of mature students, many of whom have fam“I

and don’t have the time to the facilities and

ilies

make use of

a bit of a shame.”

constantly

Currently, use of the

in funding.

it’s

complex is about 60 per cent community and 40 per cent by the college, and Feddema said that they would like to at least

college

maintain that record of but the task is

use,

complicated by cuts

“When money

needs to be taken

out of the college’s budget, the first to be hit since

we

we

are

are con-

sidered a ‘soft service,’ in that we don’t provide educational

Feddema

services,”

said.

Despite the difficulties in maintaining the building with such a small

staff,

Feddema

for the centre

way

best

to

keep

running

it

the students to use

said the need

there and the

is still

is

for

it.

Drugs continued from page 14 The Rangers, said Ward, use mental preparation as much as anything else in getting ready for games.

He players

added

that

some

drink

beverages

with

sport

Lee

athlete

varsity basketball

season

in

team

1992-93

left

at

the

Conestoga college is starting to surface. Conestoga’s team in fourth place in the OCAA West division.

officer for the

Conestoga’s hoop history Matt Harris

ers,

10 of which were rookies.

midway

Haines had two 24 point perfor-

consecutive

SPOKE, men’s varsity basketball may be returning to

Haines proved to be the lone

Durham

mances. The first came against as Conestoga dropped a

TEAM

bright spot as the losses piled up.

close one, losing 84-79.

Conestoga

He

Cambrian

As

reported in the Feb. 2, 1998

in time for the

new

season beginning in the fall. The last season that Conestoga played hoops in the Ontario College Athletic Association was 1992-93. Here’s a look back at

scored 15 in a 77-62 loss

to Sheridan.

Haines

proved

to

be

at

the

Kenneth Hunter Recreation Centre Oct. 29 against Hamilton’s Mohawk college. Reserve player David Haines

came off

the bench to score

29

points in leading Conestoga to a

97-82 win. That team, coached by Marty Kings, carried 14 play-

losses piled up.

season with a 5-11 mark, good enough for fourth place in the

Canadore finished at the top of the division with a 13-3 mark.

The team dropped two more 87-59 by Canadore and dropping a 85-62 decision at the hands of Seneca.

As

the

season

reached

its

“The a

problem

player

comes

“Unlike blood don’t

take

They

show

being

the

present,

athlete took

tests,

that

when

medication

takes

for legitimate purposes,”

Lee

into

account.

stimulant

not

said.

urine tests

why

as the

it.”

W

L

13

10

2

1

21

Conestoga 13

9

4

0

18

Seneca

9

4

0

18

6

6

2

14

3

10

1

7

1

to finish the

OCAA’s West division.

within a week, getting blown out

educate them on what

GP

again, this

time winning 85-77.

The team went on

the lone bright spot as

required to attend a drug to

are acceptable medications.

said every

to claim

second victory of the season

by beating Mohawk

segments of that season.

The Condors opened

The team rebounded its

Universities

point,

The Condors then struggled through the next few weeks.

issue of

the

rules.

MEN’S HOCKEY OCAA STANDINGS

(Photo by Dan Meagher)

By

OCAA,

Ontario

is

seminar

According to the rules set down by the Canadian College Athletic Association, asthma and respiratory ailment drugs and caffeine are classified under Section Four as restricted drugs. John Sharpe, media relations

a new

CCAA’s

Athletic Association. Each varsity

of caffeine just before competition to get an extra amount of energy.

last basketball

national

under

said that similar rules apply

the

in

a

to

falls

jurisdiction of the

lots

Talk of

leads

that

championship

S.S.

Fleming 14

Boreal

14

T PTS

Algonquin took the East division with a 15-1 record.

Haines finished the campaign with a scoring average of 19 points per game, placing him fourth in league standings.

*Condor/Cambrian statistics updated to Feb. 7/98


7

1 Page 16

— SPOKE, February

1998

16,

SPORTS

Not your ordinary program

Cliff the

Recreation grads: what do they do? By Becky

As

Little

for plans for the future. Price

says he

The

at

400 - 500 students apply for the program each year, so it is that

always

Kuhl .be

“We’ve been able

said,

where

the with only program

the

It’s

alternative methodology works because the program

three years.

He

said he has been

the City of Kitchener since 1981.

depends on the student rather than

program He started out as supervisor for summer programs and camps and after some

is

the teacher.”

Michael Price, manager of

arts,

a

culture and special events for the

restructuring

City of Kitchener, graduated from leadership recreation the

became

program

1976 as a mature

in

City

Hall,

he

the area supervisor.

After more restructuring, he is now manager of ACE. Price said

teaching

featured in the recreation leader-

“Working

an being psychology at

after

undergraduate in university.

university

coming from prepared him for the

He

self-directed

ship program.

said

style

He

of

said he liked the

experience

<-

in

enhance and improve and special events to give people a positive view of the city. When asked what he liked best

student

-

working for

Learning

self-based learning.

the

that

his job

is

to

cultural events, arts

about his job Price said employer that has given

for an

the

grow an employer

opportunity

to

me and that

program offered instead of sitting down and listening to lectures. He said it was a much better way to open up doors to employment and

working for

learn in environments that are real.

he works with and the products they come up with. He gave the Festival of the Night as an

Ten years ago. Price became a

member

of

the

Recreation

me

supports

with

life-long

He

said he also likes the groups

example. As a family oriented, non-licensed event, around 15,000

employment

but the good feeling he gets from helping to put on a successful

in

therapeutic

in St.

Agatha.

He worked

there for

in

campus

recreation

people came out to celebrate New Years Eve together. Price said successful events are a lot of work

event

is

worth

it.

in

finished his schooling at night. In 1975, he became the director facilities. “I

of

was

in

charge of and

pools

parks,

arenas,

cemeteries.”

Student employment and co-op education

1985. “It

next

the

five

years.

were added to the office three years ago and all the departments were combined. Wright said the best thing about the program was “working with other people in the class and developing close

ties.”

This is possible because of the emphasis on grcfcp work in the program. been has segment “Every always fun, and interesting challenging”, said Wright when asked to pick out a highlight from her career. for future plans she says she

Conestoga and there are plans to expand the co-op education section which will give her something new to work on. Meanwhile, she is currently working on a Bachelor of Adult through part-time Education is

happy

at

Wilfrid Laurier University. Chief Administration Officer for Grey County, Norm Gamble said the thing he liked best about the

recreation leadership

program was

says,

1973, Gamble became the sports coordinator for the new City of Cambridge. He graduation,

was the In 1980, Gamble Commissioner of Administration Cambridge personnel for the department, computer needs and

D5A bus trip

administrative services.

He became

the deputy

was a pain

CAO

in

in the butt. It’s

kind of like being a vice principal, you have to handle all the So,

problems.”

in

1988,

he

recommended that the city do away with his job. Gamble moved to Owen Sound 1990

in

the

as

for a

new

Now

Read

Chief

Administration Officer for the County of Grey. “It was good timing personally, my son was moving to Toronto and I was ready

Spoke

challenge.”

he’s

retirement. “This

ready

all is

for

for

a great place to

There are five golf courses in the area and you don’t need a tee time, and they still allow beer in

live.

OCAA

the arenas.”

While he was at Conestoga, he was elected C.O.R. (Council of

playoff

Representatives) student council it was because I was a year older than everybody

president, “I think

else.”

In

September 1990, Conestoga

asked him to be the convocation speaker in November and he was career with a presented achievement award.

hockey news!

Corrections Spoke Riccardo Colaianni’s and Sesheeka Selvaratnam’s names were mispelled under their photos on page 1 6. Steve Andrade is a management studIn the Feb. 9 issue of

TORONTO RAPTORT Vs. Chicago Bulls

ies student, not a

marketing student as reported

2 issue of Spoke. Spoke regrets the

in the Feb.

error.

PlayStation

March 22

in.

Ballentine’s

She also ran a day camp program out of the recreation centre during the summer. Three years later, the college alumni office the established where she worked exclusively for

As

learning.”

Leadership Advisory Committee and he said it was a way to contribute to the college and the program. After graduation. Price found recreation at the Children’s Village

is.

officer.

to

inventive

quite

really

own Mary Wright

ation centre as a

full.

program.

quite happy where he

alumni services, student employment and co-op education, graduated from the recreation leadership program 12 years ago in 1986. During her second year in the program she started working full time at the Kenneth E. Hunter recre-

Conestoga College is a two-year program only offered at Doon campus. Only 28 students are admitted each September and faculty member Denis Kuhl said

program

is

Conestoga’s

leadership

recreation

Condor

bad jokes. “He was a terrific fella.” said Gamble. A couple of months before

Bob

and

aravcm .

March 3

Tues. Feb.

each game) Tpkpts hjsale Mon. Feb. 23 Limited tickets available. 2 tickets per student 'ousro-

1

2:00 pm The Sanctuary %

9:00

am

-

,on s


Digital Edition - February 16, 1998