Page 1

POKE

WHAT

Conestoga College, Kitchener

— No.

30th Year

1

January

DSA

5,

1998

hosts

battle of

the bands By Richard Berta

A Doon Student Association (DSA)

battle of the bands is scheduled to run during the month of February. The event is intended to encourage students at

Conestoga

show off their DSA’s entermanager Steve

to

talents, said the

tainment Harris.

The battle will not be confined to bands, but will include comedians, airbands and solo

artists

drawn from

the student body.

Applications for the event

be available in January. Harris is encouraging band applicants to drop off demo tapes at the office and write a one page description of the band. He said that 10 bands applied in September but failed to follow through with their applications by leaving tapes with the DSA. “We want tapes from the

will

DSA

bands, because frankly, we want to weed out those that don’t stand a chance,” Harris said.

The

Cars collide Andrew Benwick a second-year acounting student, examines the damage Dec 1 2. Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre on Conestoga Boulevard

u + to to his car following a collision outside the entrance

students and decided to ban

Eleven students

Conestoga banned are

from

Doon

Student

participating in any

bus trips because of alcohol and drug abuse during the Nov. 2 Buffalo Bills Association

(DSA)

bus trip. These students were drinking in a school parking lot at 9 a.m. before boarding the bus and used marijuana on the bus, said Gerry Cleaves, DSA’s vice-president of student affairs.

“When

they got on the bus they

were quite rowdy and intoxicated, said

Becky Boertien,

director of student

The

organization

Conestoga’s

McGregor

the

contacted

principal

to see

DSA’s

life.

what

Grant

disciplinary

action they could take against the

said though, Boertien, is that a number of these names, false used students addresses and phone numbers and

The

problem

didn’t leave their student numbers, cannot contact them. so the

DSA

Cleaves said that one of the 1 students had evidently planned the trip

for the others, giving

them

aliases to use instead of their real names. Cleaves and Boertien said

they

believe

this

was done

to

escape any disciplinary action. The students that used the correct

had notices sent to the coordinators of their programs and now have this incident on their

identification

some

and

their ticket receipts

this rule, yet Boertien said

students

managed DSA’s

alcohol through the

to

slip

checks.

when

they

bought their tickets that there would be no alcohol allowed on

“On

only had

a certain amount

when

We

it

came down

couldn’t kick

the bus

of rights to

them

it.

off

Gerry Cleaves,

home

vice-president of student affairs

were were already allowed on the bus because the rule stated that no alcohol was to

this

The winner

will

showcase

at

the Canadian Organization of

it

was

fairly

free.

Associations

in Conference Toronto in June in an allexpense paid trip. “In the past we’ve gotten a dozen bands, with a high

National

“They pushed it and pushed it. Then they figured they could do

student turnout,” Harris said.

said wanted,” Cleaves. “They knew we only had a certain amount of rights when it came down to it. We couldn’t kick

home-grown bands

whatever

they

off the bus in Buffalo.”

said

the

DSA

has

precautions take to decided to ensure this doesn’t happen again. They are going to require students

to

identification

intoxicated

from

finalists

University.

As the bus got closer to Buffalo, Cleaves said the students figured

Boertien

DSA

there

The best

bands at a final round to be held at Ryerson Polytechnic

lot

quiet,” said Cleaves.

them in Buffalo.”

The

Campus

way

the

series of “nooners.”

preliminary will, in turn, go compete against the best

be on the bus.

they were

“They knew we

Cleaves said the students that

school record.

Students were told

the bus

echoed

further bus trips.

from business

them

Conestoga

at

bands will face off against bands from other colleges and universities in March.

for drinking

Eleven business students found drinking in a parking at 9 a.m. before boarding bus to Buffalo Bills game. Erica Ayliffe

e

t

of the bands will

place

during the month of February and will be conducted over a

(Photo by Hunter Malcolm)

Students disciplined By

battle

take

show

their

before

cards

loading buses and have

student

made

a

list

of the people that are no longer

allowed to participate bus

trips.

in

DSA

“The

advantage

of having is

that in

addition to getting students draw they involved, groupees.” He added that the

bands should remember that need at least one they full-time student at the college to be eligible.

“There’s some pretty good that’s there, out confined to playing in bars,” Harris said. “This is the opportunity for them to get

talent

some

publicity.”


Page2

— SPOKE, January

5,

1998

NEWS Difficult for

students to get foot in the door

Youth unemployment an increasing concern By Rachel Pearce

A recent Toronto

Star feature on

youth employment found 46 per cent of young people who were not full-time students were living on $ 1 ,000 a month or less or were

unemployed. Half of the 1,000 young people, aged 18 to 30, living in the Greater Toronto Area that were interviewed, still live at home and said they could not imagine ever

owning

their

own home

or being

able to afford children in the near future.

supply the practical work experience employers are demanding, and a student loan debt load at around $13,000. Laurie Christie, a labor market information analyst at Kitchener’s Human Resources Centre, said youth unemployment in Waterloo

feel

are insurmountable:

Cy h

Br ° dha 9 en 's presented with the Alice R.^cfhtn n Oh c t?t A ° bstetncia " Awarcl by Blondina Matheson, program y manager for parent-child health at Grand River Hospital. (Photo by Corey Jubenville)

$537,000 given to preschools

Funding will aid language services By Hunter Malcolm Ontario Minister of Health Elizabeth Witmer announced on Dec. 5 that some 3,000 preschool children in Waterloo Region will benefit from a $537,000 in

speech

and

language services.

A news release from the ministiy announcing stated that

the

it

the will

number

reinvestment

more than double of

preschoolers

currently receiving the services.

disorders in very young children so they are at a greater advantage for

learning

when they Witmer said in

start

the

release. to

the Waterloo Rotary Centre is part of a total $20 million reinvestment

by the government to create and expand speech and language services for preschoolers across entire

province

through

partnerships with social, educational and health services at the

community Part

level.

of

the

barrier

is

an

inability

Barry McCarten of the Ontario

Undergraduate Student Alliance, told the Star that universities and colleges are strapped for cash and

getting

to

will likely increase tuition to the

maximum

force.

working

it

got

their

jobs

through friends or family.

impossible for

Kitchener

s

Human

Resources

Centre, said some university and college courses do not provide

enough job-specific

training, but obtaining a degree or diploma is “I personally believe in educafor education’s sake,” she

is

an ever-increasing debt load.

During his economic statement Finance

tion

said, “it helps you become well-rounded person.”

handicapping conditions, affecting approximately 10 per cent of Ontario’s children. In addition, research has linked to

and language disorders

mental

learning

provincial

government’s broader strategy of early investment in children, this recent funding is set to ensure 3,000 Waterloo preschoolers can

problems,

disabilities,

poor academic achievement, increased school dropout rate, juvenile delinquency, underemployment; services

use

and

of

youth

social

and

adult

crime.

The government has further reported that less than half of the estimated 100,000 children in Ontario with speech and language

have

their

problems

identified and get the services they need before starting school.

The

Ministry

in partnership

of Health, with the Ministry

of Community and Social Services and the Ministry of Education and Training are all responsible for

implementing

Among preschool

access the programs they need.

health

this initiative.

regions

where

the

speech and language have already been

programs announced are

Peel, with $1.4 Ottawa-Carlton, with $800,000; Halton, with $695,000;

million;

Rideau Valley, with $200,000; and Grey-Bruce with $ 1 84,000.

to

obtain a post- secondary education. Patti Disano, a project director at

and language disorders the most prevalent

speech

make

many people

desirable.

Another problem students face

to the legislature, Ontario

allowable amount. The

increase, he said, will likely

among

disorders

The $537,000 being provided

the

are

increased

“The aim is to prevent, identify and treat speech and language

school,”

opportunities,

Laurie Christie,

in the door,” she said.

The Toronto Star report found about two thirds of those who

Lives On Hold, found young people face a number of obstacles they feel are insurmountable: a lack of job

the

labor analyst

“Employers are demanding three to five years experience,” she said. “People just don’t have that very often.

titled

is

door.”

The government has reported speech

reinvestment

feature,

in

rise to

In her opinion, youth

were

The

may

barrier

relied on.

work

$13,000.

It

getting your foot

Christie said lack of work experience works against young people trying to break into the

averaging at around

average for university

tuition is $3,229.

ment in the region’s youth employment numbers is not to be

your foot

student loan debt

will

The

maximum

the

the next five years.

are demanding, and a

It

is

opportunities, an inability

experience employers

currently $1,403.

“The biggest

a lack of job

supply the work

is

student

25 community

likely rise to $1 ,543 next year.

Young women are in the worst position, as 6,300 in the area are currently out of work.

“The biggest

9 9

colleges

$3,551.

unemployment will likely remain at similar levels, with minor fluctuations, for

to

tuition at Ontario’s

slowly fading into the distant past, continued improve-

of obstacles they

the

by 20

per cent over the next two years.

people are still battling the effect of Canada’s last recession.

said even though

universities

to increase tuition

The maximum average

Region has dropped over the past five years, but, she added, young

Christie

Young people face a

and

go-ahead

averaging

recession

number

Minister Ernie Eves gave Ontario colleges

9orilla sits in

,he

wh, (Photo by Rita

a


SPOKE, January 5,

COLLEGE

1998

— Page 3

LIFE

Helping out students

Support

donates to student food bank

staff

By Greg Bisch

in quite regularly.”

a

Students at Conestoga College in

have to worry where their next meal is coming from. “There is a student food bank dire financial straits never

Student

Association’s

of student

director

life,

Doon (DSA) Becky

On Nov.

17, Conestoga’s support union local 238 donated $250 to the student food bank. As well, the support staff union challeged faculty union Ontario

(OPSEU)

“We get a lot of donations during our spring food drive,” she said. “We still need more awareness.” She added that donations by the

as

The food bank,

said Boertien, is

a joint effort between the

DSA and

DSA director of student life, Becky

shows

Boertien,

food bank.

off

the student

(Photo by Greg Bisch)

throughout the college. Boxes are set up around Conestoga’s Doon

DSA and placed in the food bank.

“The students can or as

campus and

DSA office) just once for food and

give groceries to

much

students

who

as they

little

want,” said Boertien.

The food

drive runs year round

students and faculty can donate food. The food is then gathered by the

“Some that

is

come

students

“I feel

Beacon Herald gave a one-hour and showed slides of some of

talk

his favorite photographs Dec.

Conestoga campus.

1 1

at

Doon

College’s

presentation

was

organized by college journalism

Michele Greene who told the class, “This will change your life. It’s an hour well

instructor

invested. Scott

made me

writing

and

decide

go

into

photography.”

Wishart said he was a product of the community college system, a graduate of the print journalism

program at Loyalist College. But in 1983, he became

a

full-time photographer for the small city community newspaper. “It’s a creative outlet,” he said.

to

in

his

do

get paid for

Wishart said keeping motivated

“Then we have some

career

this

kind of

the

tough

capped or potentially terminally

point

children

he’s

been

on a

Magical

called

trip

Journey

enthusiasm,”

end

until after

“I

of

go

on humdrum

was a long work day since

It

said

assignments with the attitude, ” ‘how can I make this fresh?’ Wishart said he hasn’t moved on to the “big time” partly by

of

choice.

take

Working on a smaller paper can be just as rewarding, he said, because you have more input and more control over what goes into the paper.

Working in a smaller community means a variety of assignments way Wishart’s come have over the years.

He

that students

do

my

basket.”

added

student services, took inventory of

that she

won’t even watch

Before the support

staff union’s

DSA,

along with

the students pick out groceries.

the student food bank.

Boertien added that there are no records or statistics kept of names

“We never run we have very

bank

amount of students

the food

aids.

“We want

to respect the privacy

of the individual,” she said. don’t want to

make them

recalled one of his favorites

he

little

to

juices.

“We

have plenty of macaroni and

cheese,” she said.

says photographer

1 1

p.m. but Wishart be a part

felt privileged to

it.

Wishart mentioned a couple of unique perks his job in Stratford provides.

One

is

the opportunity to

photographs of people of Amish or Mennonite cultures who he said have a mystique that

A number

appeals to big city folks.

of his photographs have appeared in

Photographer Scott Wishart told students that simplicity

Toronto papers.

The

other

the chance to take

is

when

appear in the Shakespearean Festival productions for a broadsheet extra The Beacon Herald

who

have to invest a lot of money because you don’t need the latest technology.

He

told

the

opinion a 24

zoom

class

mm

that

in

lens that will stretch to 135

minutes

to

warm up

equipment. Wishart described

himself

GRAND VALLEY BRANCH

Canadian Institute of Management

Leading The

Way For Over 50 Years

his

for closeups, a

and a longer telephoto lens will handle almost every situation they are likely to encounter and he reminded students that in winter, a photographer has go inside every

20

A

the

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN MANAGEMENT Learn about the CIM program in the next Conestoga College Continuing Education Catalogue or

as

a computerphobe, but said he’s been converted to the Adobe Photoshop software that

naturally

Capturing facial expressions is what Stratford Beacon Herald photographer Scott Wishart told Conestoga students makes a (Contributed by Scott Wishart)

Phone or Write either CANADIAN INSTITUTE of MANAGEMENT

Conestoga’s journalism program

Grand Valley Branch

uses.

P.O. Box 24083, R.P.O. Evergreen

you can save a lot of time with this package that do to operator the allows darkroom-type picture improvements almost instantly on the computer screen. “The computer saves an incredible amount of time for the company and saves a lot of

He

told the class

grief for the printers,” he said.

is

key

(Contributed by Scott Wishart)

taking pictures.

and actresses

portraits of actors

upgrading photographic equipment can be really burdensome but someone starting out doesn’t

picture.

now

choose from,” said Boertien. “We have no fruits at all. We don’t have any

“We

feel like

out, but right

the

puts out during the theatre season. Wishart said the constant cost of

good

said

Orlando,

to

began before 7 a.m. and didn’t

sense

shopping for themselves,”

Walker. “I put something extra into

ill

trip

a

keep the they go

One

Stratford-area events for 18 years. “I try to go out on assignment said.

when

mind

Conestoga class. It was group of handi-

for the

Florida.

he

in

donation, the

outlet,

this

it’s

when

come

“I think people should

drive

travelling with a

it.”

at

that

covering the seasonal rotation of

with

special

honored

work and

Scott Wishart of the Stratford

appears

outnumber those from

students.

not need to feel inhibited about coming in and asking for food. She

or the

in here (the

they need,” she said.

all

Taking pictures a creative By Victoria Long

it

came from

they just

if

faculty far

to carry the

with so that

Walker assured

Conestoga’s student services to require them.

home

very even give

grocery store.”

better that donation.

quit

all year.

cafeteria

them a grocery bag

meet or

local 237, to

we

spring and Christmas are

take

food

Public Service Employees Union

to

set up during the year, Boertien pointed out that the drive does last

students request food

discreetly, ’’she said. “I

staff

The

the drive.

back as often as they want.” “Everything is handled

Boertien.

take as

early

them to a small room off the where the donated food is stored,” she said. “They get what they need and are free to come

don’t meet their needs,” said

different drives in

student services, also helps with

“When

whose finances

set-up for those

stat.”

Even though

Janet Walker, clerk at Doon’s

Kitchener, Ontario

N2M 5P1

(519) 896-3165 or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE National Office

1-800-387-5774

of

MANAGEMENT


Page 4

— SPOKE, January

5,

1998

PnMMCMTA DV IrUIVIIVItN AKY 1

Welcome back and good luck to you all Chances are if you’re reading this piece, and you’re not on Conestoga’s

for this is something many people would recognize as “cabin fever.” Because venturing outside can be such an uncomfortable feeling, people tend to feel much more secure safely flaked-out on a couch.

payroll,

you’re a student enrolled for the 1998 winter semester.

However, even here, a dusty stack of books offers little relief to the perpetual greyness which seems to blanket a students

Getting back into the routine of a new semester, after scrambling to get out of the

last, is

scholarly existence during this time. There are, of course, the arguments that if a person has a goal in mind, it doesn’t matter

never easy.

For many people, the new year has emerged with fresh or perhaps old, resolutions. Commitments to better oneself and avoid the pitfalls that

may have

what has

to be done to achieve it; and that something everyone goes through. That may be true to a certain extent, but the

school

complicated

365 days.

the last

point

For students, many of these resolutions involve

time

management some form higher

As southern Ontario

of

that not everyone

———— it

to

aca-

demies.

No problem. As southern Ontario into

immediacy of today seems to the

settles into the

always

deep

freeze,

warm

than curling up with a thick

what better way

to

keep

ow

only by walks to get smokes and whiskey,

thick textbook

and get a head start on the assigned readings. Because the outdoors are so hostile at this time of year, there should

from the task

at

hand.

Righteous ideals such as this are common at the start of any semester. Flowever, depending on a student’s

good intentions may weaken

as the novelty of a self-imposed, extended

grind wears thin.

Having personally spent some 1 years on 8 the educational treadmill, even more if you include classes during summers and nights, I feel qualified to is

the toughest.

an be

is

The information superhypeway

a rou-

which also becomes old come mid-February. Not to mention how such extracurricular indulgences modify those once righteous resolutions. As Canadians though, we have developed ways of utilizing the environment during this season. Hockey, skiing, snowshoeing, and tine

curling up with a

resilience, the

to

relieved

assigned readings.

way to keep warm than

distraction

in

apartment, rigid

deep freeze, what

little

overshad-

yesterday.

Cooped up

better

be

how

strange

It’s

1

textbook and get a head start on the

the

necessarily

is

right now.

priority

given

settles

is

going through

“™“™

or

is

say that the winter semester of the principle reasons

One

ice fishing are all healthy distractions the stuffy indoors.

No

matter

how you choose

Poor Thomas Edison. think to myself whenever I go to the movies. Poor misguided Edison,

is

on

it’s

your

thought his kinetoscope would be a perfect scientific

‘Absolute power corrupts/

says faculty member .......

saying that teachers “now have 462 hours of actual teaching, or 14.4 hours a week.” This of course is taken out of context. The work load formula which was intro-

duced

in

1

984 should be

the basis of com-

parison and discussion.

Using this formula, the hours worked would in most cases be between 40 and 44 hours per week; these are the figures that must be used. To do otherwise is to impugn the dedication and commitment of college faculty. It

'

......

'

because through the centuries it has been repeatedly shown that all power corrupts and must be controlled. also

that absolute

power

corrupts absolutely and it all starts with one small step of “flexibilty to improve productivity.”

Ask

and educational at last,

What

students,

the horror of Edison,

someone wants you see

likely

who

People schools

be watching racy films of women exposing their ankles than

engrossed in any type of scientific

College faculty

watching racy films of

exposing

their

engrossed

While does

not

itself,

always sometimes it rhymes. In the past, Edison and other inventors spoke about the movie projector as something that would bring knowledge and enlightenment In a similar way, teachers, administrators,

speaking

about

the

Internet

as

a

necessary tool for education.

sometimes speak of its ability to

connect stupeople all over the world to share information and ideas. Please. A walk though the men’s locker room to

be

more

forth

on chat

one

of

lines in

Conestoga’s

Internet labs.

Are we so misguided

to think that with universal access, the Internet would resemble a blackboard instead of a bathroom

wall? Admittedly, the Internet has the potential to bring students within easy reach

of information and knowledge. It is like a card catalogue this way. But like a card catalogue, or skill saw, or a

movie

Watching computer technicians run meter

what

enlightening than what gets tapped back and

history

repeat

is

advertising.

who are makmoney off of it

would of

scientific inquiry.

inquiry.

computer salespeople and students are

member

women

ankles than

any type

in

ing

dents

be

likely

— ergo

support Internet access in

these darkened rooms, young

men would more

that the only

particularly those

___________ In

is

thing that gets put on the Internet

to the masses.

Edmund Sharratt,

or anyone surfing the

Internet, quickly discovers

neighborhoods. In these darkened rooms, young men

to those

itself.

working-class

the Westray miners.

an Internet search will

Pamela Anderson

about the Spanish Armada or kinesiology. Dollar after dollar is funding what essentially amounts to slow TV. Moreover, just because the Internet is easy access to information doesn’t mean the Internet is useful information in and of

and other middleclass reformers of 19th century America, the little flicker box made its way into the vaudeville houses and penny arcades of

-

should also be noted that the hours

worked by faculty are controlled entirely by the administration within the

Workload

Formula (SWF). Why do we have the SWF ? For the same reason that we have the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights and all the other laws governing master/slave or manager/worker relation-

Remember

sites

.

constraints of the Standard

ships

Edison

would more

'

number of

the

we have to look at medium itself. Compare

question

this

find relating to

physics.

Letter to the Editor

.

To answer

and motion. he thought, was a tool that could film an athlete running or tiger pouncing, unleashing the mysteries of

way.

to be asking if access to the simply publicly funded access to

the nature of the

tool for the study of time

Here

is

entertainment.

since

projector.

To

In your article (Salaries remain frozen, Dec. 1), President Tibbits is quoted as

ever

Internet

learning about his part in inventing the movie

energies, as you stand at the threshold of yet another semester, and a long, cold winter, take comfort in the fact that as of Dec. 21, the days have started to get longer and even though it will get worse before it gets better,

spring

think,

I

from

to exert

nobody seems

I

how

projector, as important as to

use

the

tool

is

knowing knowing its

limitations.

S]

PO K]E

SPOKE

Kee P in g Conestoga College connected

SPOKE is published and produced Editor: Rita Fatila;

weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

News

editor: Erica Ayliffe; College life editor: Barbara Ateljevic; eatures and issues editor: Jamie Yates; Entertainment editor: Natalie Schneider; Sports editor: Matt Harris; Photo editor. Greg Bisch, Rachel Pearce; Production manager: Corina Hill; Advertising

Circulation manager: Becky

manager: Dan Meagher

Little;

Faculty supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Advisor: Andrew Jankowski

SPOKE s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room

4B 15,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

mainly funded from September to May by Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph). the

is

Doon

i


mew..

IT’S

V$0\

new

ENTERTAINHENT JANUARY 5o 1998

©What's Inside® Year

in

review

Photographer Janet Smith Broadway production Rent

Reviews

Campus events

60 ahead see

Tor

yoorsef


Broadway production

U

Youthful musical explosion

RENT by

Land

the

York,

is

enjoying phenomenal success since its early in release 1996. the of Winner Pulitzer Prize for drama and the Tony Award for

people and places of the Turks and

Clay.

The photographs taken by local Janet Smith are not amateur

snapshots. Instead, her photographs are

Rent musical, best in opened recently Toronto at the Royal

Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W.

The show opened Dec. 7 and run until continued

means

intended to May 3, but

is

popularity the production’s

schedule will probably be extended. According to Randy Alldread, a publicist with Mirvish is Productions, Rent proving very popular in Toronto, with tickets sold out until March. “People are saying Rent is to the ‘90s what Hair was to the ‘60s and Jesus Christ Superstar was to the said ‘70s,”

Alldread.

Created by Jonathan Larson, who died of an aortic aneurism after the final dress rehearsal. Rent is being heralded by critics as a masterpiece of theatre and a refreshing change from the usua stage fare.

“The youthful, vibrant musical explosion has turned Broadway upside

down

become

New

in

and York’s

hottest ticket, as it brings to the stage a world of diverse cultures and music in a tribute to struggling artists everywhere,” says the press release

from

Mirvish

Rodolfo and Marcello, caught up in the passion and misery of their lives. “ Rent is faithful to the opera because there are distinct parallels all the way through,” said Alldread.

Certainly the themes of each piece are similar, as the issues of poverty, disease homelessness, and relationships are addressed in both. But

La Boheme had

while

characters stricken with

Rent with

consumption,

Rent is unlike the many other productions being offered, such as the Phantom of the Opera and Beauty and the Beast in its gritty look at the ,

social ills of today, and this is part of its appeal. did enjoy the “I

The music was funky,”

pretty

said

Margot Boyd of Toronto,

who

attended a performance. “It also had some highs and lows, so it took you through different sets of emotions during a couple of hours. to the depictions of homosexuality in the piece, Boyd said she did

not find any elements

associated with it, I think that it would be looked as being pretty un-hip to a problem with this musical,” she said. Alldread Publicist said they have received

have

1896.

concerns

the

tortured

lives of artists living in Paris, determined to stay true to their creativity

while coping with the ugly realities of poverty

and

disease.

The

individuals,

main Mimi,

is

beginning to merge people into "People

photographs.

her

compared

different

they have don't.

I

photos

feelings,

find

privacy. But, I'm starting to

now and

that

hopefully

I'll

their

improve

it

seriously.

film,

which is very

When

undiscovered.

the Caribbean natural It's

was

at

like

It's

one time.

and the people are very

a quaint

little

This

It's

friendly.

seventh

her

that

I

The galleries work include

that

this year.

have displayed her

explain

why

At

I

enjoy

to turn

"It's

very

art.

Especially

showcasing Wellington

County.

The

fact that

Smith has had seven

only

began

pursing

seriously

because art,"

else,

I

always

it

really can't

said

obviously, to

on anything dealing with

a lot of

spot-on slide.

people don't think "I

would

You

it's

to

like

can't

dodge and

he

To date, Smith has sold one laughs

when

she explains

was

it

photograph

actual

days ago, I

I

enjoy doing that.

was

and

spent two hours before

I

got too cold,

wandering around looking at leaves

frozen in the snow, trying to find a perfect pattern in nature," said Smith.

Her

obvious

love

photography and her eye

-

it’s

images and putting them on paper have

many

hard photographers would

like to be.

new

On

techniques."

Although she began shooting

now shooting black and

white as well.

ftocfc’n

ages,

youthful cast a

younger

loud, in your

face, saying ‘this is life’,” he said. “That’s part of

appeal.” For ticket information, call 1-800-461-3333. its

Thury Jem/. 8 11:30

am

The/ Sanctuxwy Hcvf!

for

for taking

already taken Smith where

find

storyline. “It’s

definitely

show

all

Two

in the Elora Cemetery.

into

field,

people homelessness.” But Alldread said the to

most

the

is

fulfilling aspect for her, said Smith.

you can expand

such a great

things involved that an older generation might not be too familiar with,

its

sold to

her father. The process of taking the

It's

“Knock on wood,” “There are some

despite

of her

swamp in Alberta - she

photographs of a

continue pursuing photography.

said.

show appeals

bum

you can with black and white."

photography,

with

Smith.

manipulation and you have to have a

"I really

like

said

much

Smith. "With color, there's not as

just

difficult,

and manipulating them,"

prints

so much."

color photography, Smith said she

photography two years ago. "Like everybody

"I just

into a career.

it

also has a display at the Wellington

of

to

guess

photography. Smith said she would

a living

images

it

I

I

way

this point in her pursuit of

make

Museum,

associated with black and white

was one way

love taking photographs.

the Eldon Gallery, as well

photographic

it

thought would be a neat

as local galleries in Elora. Currently she

County

and

it

more darkroom

I'm really enjoying developing the

was because my

it

lot

film.

like

travels a lot

a

this

work

she got the

entertain myself," said Smith.

exhibit, after only recently

beginning to display her work

At

if

really can't pinpoint

think

"I

because there's

film.

to

to

photography,

pursue

legitimizes your travel.

island," said Smith.

is

photography

what

You have

where it came from. husband

time.

difficult.

asked where to

Smith said she

place for Smith since she has been

some

the switch to slide

you're shooting print film," said Smith.

inspiration

a familiar

made

I

have proper exposure as opposed

in

Her photography display on the

"It's

but I'm learning

lot,

and white

because

that area," said Smith.

vacationing there for quite

love color a

point, I'm actually starting to enjoy

do more of

is

"I

about two years ago, 1 decided to pursue

invading

-

you know, when you go

-

very

very difficult taking

it

camera

to like black

and things obviously

people

of

a

on vacation you take photographs. But,

are

to objects

had

offensive.

production involves three

she

,

some people might

Rent is based on La Boheme, an opera

opera

of her photographs

concentrates on objects, but Smith said

complaints no about Rent despite the material

interracial

1,

that.

The majority

is

die-

top of her exhibits, she has also

opened this year,

her

own

studio

which she runs out of her

home.

“As acceptance of gay lifestyle has almost a new vogueness

AIDs, gay and

The

conquered

Smith's

obvious she has

is

it

the

relationships,

on Feb.

Viewing

feat.

photographs,

distasteful or offensive.

like

Italy,

enormous

exhibits is remarkable, considering she

As

Productions.

written by Giacomo Puccini which opened a century ago in Turin,

from

Turks and Caicos Islands

controversial, issues.

and

collection of beauty

To transform photographs mere pictures to art is an

emotion.

deal characters current, and potentially

show.

a

Belongers,

the

of

an immense

New

Queen

N., is displaying In

St.

Caicos Islands of Grand Turk and Salt

Sarah Smiths

,

Public Library, 85

photography exhibit showcasing the

artist

It’s a story of rags to riches. Rent a broadway production concerning bohemia of the

the Kitchener

ntil Jan. 10,

Noooep


SPOKE, January 5, 1998

COMMENTARY -

-tm?

-

y

,

Majority polled support

A global map Canada

of

use of medicinal marijuana

Recently, front

the

page of the

Story and photos by Hunter Malcolm

Kitchener-

Waterloo Record announced

On Dec.

diversity of

10, Judge Patrick Sheppard of the Ontario

Kitchener’s

court ruled that certain

the cultural

Cameron

sections of the Controlled

Heights collegiate institute. As a whole, its students speak 61 different languages

and

— Page 5

Drug and Substance Act

nationalities.

unconstitutional

cases

where marijuana

used

For some inside our borders, the view that Canada is a

it is

in

are

57 different

represent

is

medically

for

approved purposes.

large bleeding heart, taking in

more immigrants than any

In doing so, Sheppard stayed charges of possession and cultivation of marijuana against 42-year-old Terry Parker, an epileptic who was charged in

and allowing them to influence our culture. But immigrants are our culture. In fact, as a multi-

other nation,

there

cultural society

no

is

July 1996. Parker’s

“our” or “us” besides maybe for law-abiding citizens. This some is a hard lesson Canadians still have to learn.

The idea

that

Canada

a

is

is

marijuana

comprised of Caucasians is outdated and untrue. As well, who immigrants former became Canadians before others have no right in this country to pronounce more themselves as

unconstitutional.

is

The ruling does not, however, mean anyone with the flu can toke up. People who are caught may still be charged and prosecuted, but the decision makes a certain precedent for other judges to consider

now

own

when

As a result, we have the wisdom of all religious and

rulings. The issue over the prohibition

non-religious beliefs under one roof and are all justified own. our expressing in

nativity

scenes

Shintos

can

well

as

have

largely is marijuana and Judge Sheppard’s to expected is decision have significant implications legislation future on

as

regarding

“If

society

and culture (made official back in the ‘70s by a Liberal Pierre under government Trudeau, thank-you Elliot very much) is a mini-model of what the world will soon be.

One

helps to

it

The

sick

not?”

viable medicinal applications.

John Naas, computer programming

benefit of this is that in

“If

who

Commons,

in

order

the

to

T

away from the

realities

of

E

R B Y

that

it

be

can

be legalized.

say Canada has no They are wrong. We

have the culture of every person who has Canadian citizenship along with beliefs

True,

and

we

all

her

rituals.

are not one distinct

culture.

But we

country

with

are the first

multi-cultural style.

such

a

Bambrich, in

that

do,”

marijuana’s it

nursing,

of terms medicinal be should

“There are more benefits than harm in what it does for people who are sick; why should it be denied?” she said.

Kim

Ricketts,

believes the medical

of

nursing, benefits

marijuana

HUMANITAR

patient,” she said.

Devin Fournier, general

arts

justify

would actually relieve society of a cumbersome burden. “It would save the courts time and money, which is currently spent on its criminalization. It would also eliminate a whole aspect of criminals,” he said. As the issue over marijuana’s society our in place

continues to gain publicity, the debate over it will likely grow like a

weed.

?

Apply for (he Conestoga

satisfactory A Scholarship of $400.00 awarded annually subject to academic progress

Some

I

and science, said legalizing pot

he said. Sandra said

that

has

FOX

people and do harmony. culture.

necessarily

mean

proven it’s There are other drugs, which are currently far have which used, more harmful effects on the “Research

Not Enough Money For 2nd Scmcstci

What Is the Award?

in relative

beneficial.

legalized.

Canada. The world will soon have to deal with differences between it

think society could adjust to that many people living in a have don’t I non-reality. who people against anything smoke it, but that doesn’t

potential,

abused, but what can’t be abused?”, he said. Alister Haddad, construction engineering, though, said he didn’t think marijuana should

notorious grass should be

United States will never get

fact

its

he

said

legalization.

“It would mean more people would be smoking and I don’t

legalized.

lot of practical value, despite

students Conestoga asked whether they believed the

also

it should be “Marijuana and hemp have a

were

This is why those who have preference toward the melting the of ways pot

sick

thought

rights people’s determine pot personal regarding consumption.

trade.

make someone more comfortable

helps to

is

programming,

laws are unconstitutional, the matter will eventually end up being debated in the House of

it

then why not,” he said. computer Garstin, Chris

Because the judge ruled the

world inside our borders. It will be inevitable for the rest of the world to take care of their economics without taking a lesson from us. German businessman will have to try to understand Japanese language and culture

make

is

reactions

were mixed. computer Naas, John programming, said he believes long-term no are there smoking to implications marijuana and that it may have

more comfortable, then

a growing global economy, we have representatives from every country around the

to

make

someone who

why

Haddad

construction engineering

nursing

it.

legalized.

multi-cultural

Alister

Kim Ricketts

John Naas computer programming

their

shrines.)

Our

their

political,

have

can

making

of

incidentally,

Christians

that

computer programming

best

important.

(Which means,

nursing

controlled with a combination of prescribed medication and smoking marijuana, Sheppard said, and depriving him of

society

Christianity-based

illness

Chris Garstin

Devin Fournier general arts and science

Sandra Bambrich

AWARD

P

8

0 B R

A

M

College Bursary!

WHO CAN APPLY?

Who Is Eligible to Apply? immigrant Candidates must be Canadian Citizens or have Lancet s_ucy_.. = o-atus They must not exceed 25 years ot age and mus_ ne -r.-vers-^/. a Car.acian Collge or towards a diploma or a degree _

.

m

What Is the Selection Criteria? Citizens. 'emorstration of the hichest ideals ate qualities cl Further relevant qualities are courage it. will "be the criteria. a.-.n service humanitarian in overoominc obstacles, involvement participation in sport, fitness and community service.

located Aoolications are available in the Financial Aid Office the Student Client Services Building.

All students

who are

in

good academia

standing and demonstrate financial need. Application forms

now

available in

Student Services or the Registrar’s Office i


Canadian junior team trains By Dan Meagher Canada’s national junior hockey team has found a formula that works in more ways than one.

The squad has convened at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex in mid-December for five

of the

prepare

for

last

this

eight years to year’s

post-

Christmas tournament. Hockey Canada has

complex

is

ideal for the

to its central location

and

its

said

the*

camp due in Canada

three ice surfaces,

two of

Kitchener

in

which are olympic-sized and can be turned over to the team in the peak of minor hockey season. “It

our

for

perfect

really

is

We o°

^

Sr

mini-camp, relatively unhindered by outside influences and have access to prime ice at all

to

times.”

really tests their mettle,” Paiement

who

Paiement,

coaches

the

Moncton Wildcats in the Quebec junior league, recommended a

camp as an assistant to Mike Babcock. coach “We were really impressed with the facilities and the cooperation last year’s

7th Annual Polar Plunge 1

head

of the people here.”

complex rooms

The

features

dressing

well

as

to a

Jilijjj§p.

group of players, who have played with each other,

in

Every year

Register at the

Office

junior leagues of their premier players for an extended period.

The team’s coaching staff has such a short time to put the team together that it helps to have familiar surroundings, Paiement so

process

adjustment

the

that

is easier.

“Besides...” he

universities.

mess with

team has

working.”

it

offered,

when

it

is

leads abuse prevention with its Code of Conduct ByL .Scott

“The committee was formed

Nicholson

To anyone

familiar with the and sounds of minor hockey, there is one ever-present noise that rises above the sound of the sights

The sound of an yelling

own

Elections ‘98

Nominations Cpen January 19 - 28 for the following positions:

child

mother or

irate

obscenities

opposing players or

at

are

slowly

problem implement

starting to recognize the

President

Vice President of Operations

Vice President of Student Affairs

and are beginning to programs to address abuse in minor hockey. One of the pioneers in developing

preventative/awareness

a

available Office

until

November

Conduct

that the

Code of

started to gain popularity.

Still, Jutzi said,

hoping

to gain

were sent out

to all

registrants

regarding a parent’s information night,” Jutzi said.

“Out of 2,000 parents only about 100 attended.” A separate Fair Play Code has been established for coaches, players,

executive,

officials,

parents and spectators each one

with responsibilities they are to uphold. If,

for

example,

a

parent

or

spectator feels another spectator

is

out of line with what they are saying, Jutzi said they should

an arena attendant

who

go

to

will ask

program has been the Waterloo Minor Hockey Association.

the agitator to leave the building.

Monica Jutzi, a member of the Code of Conduct Committee in Waterloo, said the committee was

the

formed

More information

Although the committee was formed in March 1997, it was not

training sessions for all coaches in Waterloo minor hockey and flyers

whether physical or verbal has been occurring for many years as has been revealed by former NHL player Sheldon Kennedy and the abuse he suffered at the hands of his coach Graham James as a junior hockey player in western Canada. Minor hockey organizations country

occurs,” Jutzi said.

players,

every to

John’s.

the

concerned what the proper course of action should be if a problem

St.

her

distracting

Abuse of minor hockey

to

and others

the committee is more acceptance. “The Code of Conduct Committee set up mandatory

at his or

a

is

annoyance that plagues arena from Vancouver

across

DSA

“Why

obviously

Waterloo minor hockey

father

at the

it

three

alert parents, players

DU

older

Coaching staffs on national teams in the past have often lamented the fact that players only have a few sessions to prove themselves and it is unfair to cut is a sometimes. It players disadvantage that the team can’t get around without depriving the

the proximity

players on the ice.

is

are

said.

is

that the junior

who

players

and stronger than they are and

said,

the

a great

is

go up against some highly

skilled

local

Kitchener three

die

“Playing the university

opportunity, because the boys get

i§|P

Dddn Pond DSA

new system

within a period of five days. Another bonus of having to

2:05 pm

a

never

camp

1

large as

teaching theatre. Paiement said it is ideal for the team’s purposes since he has to teach a

Thurs., Jan. 29

has been assembled to give the high some level

juniors

competition.

return to Kitchener after attending

N

Kitchener, a team of

to

said Canada’s head coach Real Paiement. “It gives us a location where we can run an

purposes,”

effective

Dare you!

come

university players from the area

following

involving

a

showering

in

players

an

hockey view of

incident

coach minor

was brought before

the

minor hockey executive. Although, Jutzi said the incident

was innocent and nothing came of it, the committee was created in order to deal with similar problems in

the

future

and

preventative measures.

to

initiate

Eileen Lobsinger, a

member

of

Waterloo Minor Hockey Support Group said she was happy to see the implementation of the Code of Conduct. She said after watching her son Kevin, who is a product of the minor hockey system and is now a coach system, she in the encountered many a rowdy parent. Jutzi said as the Code of Conduct gains

more exposure, other sport coming

associations in the city are

forward seeking advice on how to implement a similar program.


SPOKE, January 5, 1998

SPORTS

Lacrosse a

— Page 7

‘cult sport’

Local association tries to raise the game’s profile By LA. Livingston

registered at the tournament held in July about 390 boys and girls

don’t

aged seven to 10. Mulholland said

see lacrosse get the level of respect it deserves. “If you’re involved in

In Canada’s cold, snow-driven

climate,

and

year,

is

it

hockey

time of the

at this

easy to assume that Canada’s national sport.

is

hockey has only recently

In fact,

joined the ranks with lacrosse, which has been our national sport since Confederation. Lacrosse high-energy game, at least

is

a

as

hockey and perhaps as that has a low profile in a

exciting as brutal,

lacrosse

was

in Ontario.

until the 1970s,

the only co-ed sport

He helped organize

the

teams in K-W about five years ago, he said. “It’s the only sport they never, ever said girls could not play,” he said.

Lacrosse will never be as popular as baseball or hockey, he said.

country that

“What try

both sports.

live

Ray

we do

to

is

our

means

and

run

president of

very

K-W

a

solid

program. In our town we can accom-

Minor Lacrosse Association,

modate 350 kids com-

“The

biggest

fortably. It’s

problem

unrealistic

with

for

lacrosse that

is

cult to

Ron Hallman

It’s

K-W

diffi-

(left),

president of the

make KWMLA.

way

profile of lacrosse,

a “cult sport”,

(Photo by L.A. Livingston)

is to

to raise the

which he

calls

take the

game

Along with

l

acrosse

>

the indoor sport, ‘box game’, there are

Some

youngsters

who

play

lacrosse also play hockey, he said.

“We have

kids

who come

good athletes are your good hockey players.

also

involved

“They’re

Opt Out or ramily Opt In

Deadline

is

January

5,

KWMLA,

“There’s an overlap in the seasons,

said the field sport

is

outs in August, which

is

Australia and the United States.

kids are just saying ‘Well,

game, but then with the box game, the hockey arenas were sitting empty (in the summer), so they moved it Mulholland.

said are in

it

love

it.”

Hallman said interest in the sport is on the rise in KitchenerWaterloo. There were 26 teams

1

998

1

foregoing

play this year.

the

I’ll

all

,,

Further information

CM

is

available at the

.A

DSA Office

year and

so instead of playing

then

try-

when our

played at the international level, and is popular in England, Japan, originally a field

Friday,

summer

in

provincials are,” Mulholland said.

who

DSA Health Plan

play at the early levels and they’ll play, and once they get to 14, 15 or

Mulholland, past president of the

“People

'

Attention January Intake Students

in to

hockey, roller hockey, hockey

indoors,”

national sport.

he

women and men’s field lacrosse teams who play outdoors. Brad

was

all

kids

16, usually your

outside.

“It

amount of

Yet

at times, I don’t think the rest of the sporting

brings to the kids.

it.

said.

said the best

called a

enjoyment out of

Brad Mulholland, past president of the P lay in§

because all the games are played inside an arena.”

He

their buddies in school,

have

to

Minor Lacrosse Association, and 3,000

visual

it

it

some of

but they get a huge

world looks at it as being acceptable,” he said. Mulholland said lacrosse has now been named the national sport of the summer, instead of the over-

we’re going

sport played

more

to

that

someday

summertime inside.

us

think

a

it’s

enjoyment

you see how much

The kids are competitive, and they might be more aggressive than

within

Hallman,

said,

lacrosse circles,

like to

girls’ field lacrosse

invented

the

make it,” he said. Hallman said he would

provincials,

commit

I

to

can’t

hock-

ey.’”

Mulholland said the popularity of from being viewed as a dead-end sport. “Parents will put their kid in hockey because lacrosse suffers

there’s the

•make

it.

there’s the

NHL,

Then

but they don’t

there’s

baseball,

ON SALE

major leagues, but they

Monday, January 5

& Tuesday, January 7 10 am - 2 pm Door 3 Foyer ON

o0

4 Month Pass $ 64 Photo ID $4 1

Waterloo battles it out with Windsor in the All-Star Novice and Tyke lacrosse tournament, held at the Albert McCormick arena in Waterloo this past July. (Photo by LA. Livingston)

mm


1

Page 8

— SPOKE, January

5,

*

.

1998

SPORTS

Conestoga's hockey team dominates league

Condors expected T~v

1

By Corina

Sinclair, Chris Palubeski

When the Conestoga Condors men’s hockey team takes to the ice, everyone in the arena turns their head and watches them play. The team, comprised of nearly

Goodbum,

30 players, has quickly risen to the top of the pack in the Ontario

Hergott.

team and

tournament

in

Quebec

opportunity

first

will be

for

the

Condors to play against a team from outside of the OCAA this “It will

be an opportunity to play

the coach.

different goal scor-

1 1

ers,” said Hergott.

Goodbum,

the

attributes

Palubeski and Sinclair line’s success to their quest to be on the ice

when

team

the

is

in

losing

a

The next Condor home game

will

be Jan. 21 at the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre. The Condors will face the Seneca Scouts in the Wednesday evening

game

starting at

7:30 p.m.

position.

“If we’re behind, they want to be out there,” said Hergott. But Hergott also said the second of Trevor Uhrig, Chris line

Bumstead and Sean Murray

is

also

a strong offensive line.

Condor players scramble

With having 18, first-year players on the Condors this season, the team has come to rely on the nine veterans

for

net during practice, Dec.

in front of

1 1

(Photo by Corina

James said came from a lit-

Athletic director Ian the teams success tle

more than

just leadership.

“It looks here like

20 minutes a game.” only reason the Condors are at the top of the league. The Condors have numerous players who excel

“It

all

the condi-

is

in the third period.”

The Condors

will return to the

month

ice Jan. 5 after nearly a

into the net.

TEAM

paying off,” said James. seems like we’re really scoring

tioning

penalty minutes isn’t the

LEAGUE STANDINGS T I GP W

Two Condor teammates work

Conestoga

the puck up the ice during a practice on Dec. 1 1

Seneca

(Photo by Corina

without practices.

three individual points

S.S.

Fleming

Boreal Sault

Jan.

28

Feb. 7 Feb. 11

vs

SEN

7:30 p.m

CAM

4 p.m

SEN

7:30p.m.

vs

16

i1

0

12

5

2

1

11

9

4

:1

2

10

9

2

(5

1

5

11

1

10

0

2

8

10

6

8

7:30p.m

vsFLEM vs

0

9

Hill)

CONDORS HOME GAMES Jan. 21

PTS

.

Cambrian

READ SPOKE

LEADING SCORERS TEAM

GP

G

A

PTS

Darrryl Sinclair

CON

9

12

16

28

Chris Palubeski

CON

9

10

12

22

Goodbum

CON

9

9

12

21

Geoff Smith

SEN

10

4

13

17

Chris Colburn

SEN

10

11

6

17

CAM

8

6

9

15

NAME

Matt

Mike Senior

iffs

B

lue

Mountain Ski

Trip, Fri.

,

The DSA

organizing a bus

rental rate of skis

and snowboards An additional

Jan. 30.

Plan to ski white at Blue

Mountain.

is

trip for

who can either snowboard.

is

is

$1

$24.

credit

card deposit of $400 require for

is

snow board

rentals.

Wed nesd

wry

O i

The cost

of the trip is

Students may bring one excur(1) guest on this sion. Sign up at the

$25, which includes an

DSA

all day lift pass and transportation.

21. 1998.

Office by January °S SW0 .

The -id'

-

I«bIi c:> wrm

students, ski or

Hill)

MEN’S HOCKEY

said

leadership,

Hergott.

have only 219 minutes. “We’re averaging about

The top

A

season.

“We have

of 518 penalty

puck

the first half,” said Hergott.

bench, think again.

He

keep soaring

r»™r»rr to rnmp back come hark “They’re going success in their focused because of

a different kind of hockey,” said

penalty

at putting the

to

And you think the other players on the team are kept on the

games. Condor coach Kevin Hergott said the teams winning can be attributed to their ability to keeping their penalty minutes down. “There’s a reason that the one and two teams are in first and second place,” he said adding that the team in second place, Seneca

Low

them,” said

if

in eight

Scouts,

a big

*

“TUrt.r’ra

the

line but they can’t stop

minutes lower than any other team with only 192 penalty minutes in all of their games. impressive compared to is It teams like Cambrian who has total

all

“Everyone knows we have

bringing their total points up to 16. Even more impressive, the Condors have kept their penalty

minutes

and Matt

on Conestoga’s three are on the same

are

line.

Colleges Athletic Association. In the first half of the season, the Condors won eight of nine games

amassed a

.1

Darryl

league,

the

in

leaders

Hill

.

mwIto iiiiP'


-

.

A

HEEPS MAKE SENSE is mentioned in passing. Another problem with The Rainmaker is that Coppola chose to include many of the subplots woven throughout the novel, so the film jerks from scene to completely unrelated scene, leaving issues cloudy and

The sixth of John Grisham’s courtroom dramas to make it to the big screen, The Rainmaker is set in Memphis, Tenn., and revolves around Rudy Baylor (Matt Damon of Courage Under Fire). He’s a newly qualified attorney

solely

Danny DeVito Shifflet,

a

claimed

Ford

They were

totally unqualified to try the case of a lifetime...

but every underdog has his day.

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the

bar exam.

Because of time restraints, the movie skips a lot of background information. The result is not fast-paced excitement, but confusion. Much of the missing information is

unnecessary, but some should have been included.

For example, through most of the movie, the audience doesn’t really know why the family has grounds to sue. All they are told is that some claim was denied, and a 1 ife

strate

impo-

Rick

Broadhead.

men have

efforts.

released the

1998 Canadian

But the book is more than

Internet

just

Handbook,

ings,

writ-

ing

also

and

air

next

director,

many

of

is

idealistic to Claire (

Romeo and

Juliet) battered wife.

DeVito deserves more air time, as does Johnny Whitworth the courageous young

{Bye Bye Love), as victim of cancer and corporate America. I usually recommend watching the movie before reading the book, because casting choices and plot changes are often a letdown when the book is read first. In this case, I suggest you read The Rainmaker before you see it so you’ll understand the

takes on a

cations

tone

Internet

advocacy.

growth

As

the future,

the reader

as well as

handbook

how

to

what you can do to

explain

guide

into

chap-

to protect

ness, media, entertainment

and technology. Chapters are further bro-

ken down into sub-topics, making it easy to locate the information you want. chapter

highly recto people surfing

ommend

I

net concerns govern-

the

ment and

From

say

freedom

and paramount

privacy a

is

make

authors

where

about

and

stand,

no they

their position is

“We

find that the govern-

development of and the technology behind the tool, to the

entertainment

net.

As a bonus to the reader, book isn’t merely a wall

the

of text. It also includes quotes from authorities on issues, graphics to help explain things and charts

and graphs

home

to bring

ments, a nice touch.

handbook

is

also

with e-mail addresses

web

and

find that

has

not yet devel-

of people and

oped

organiza-

sites

the dis-

cipline

to

respect

the

throughout

of

rights

wired

The only

They point out ways in

criticism

have

their privacy invaded,

how

the

such

collection of

seemingly harmless information can be used to refuse credit, build a profile

this

is it

1998

like the

authors are plugging

some

of the software, although they usually give

more than

one source for a product. This book

is

a definite for

everyone, from rank begin-

a metaphorical ton of mail.

ners to experienced users,

if

sell

you won’t supply

information, obtain

it

how

the

they can

by tricking your

They

who want really

and

to

know what

goes on in cyberspace

how

to protect

them-

selves and benefit in the also deal with gov-

ernment attempts late the Internet,

Office E\cx\\

electronic age. Rating 4/5

to regu-

and what

5

for

book

that

sometimes seems

I

and send you

of you to

And

Jan.

the book.

Canadians.”

as

men-

tions

tioned

kids.

DSA

the Internet as a business

The

which regular Canadians and “Netizens” can have

Register at the

dealing with

with loads of information

filled

we

when

on everything from using

absence of any laws, and business

0°hs^

stance

government regulation. The book is also packed

resorts to threat in the

ment

Doon Campus

They do the same thing for junk e-mail, an increasing problem for “Netizens”, and adopt a free speech

the importance of develop-

clear.

8 AM

yourself.

online

legal issues.

the beginning, the

authors

The

4 PM

what can done

be

ters

bones

FEB. 4

also

is

One

is

ened, the authors

an essential

broken six

their

privacy

protect yourself.

The book

well

as telling

threat-

concern for cyber-citizens, and this theme is carried throughout the book.

we DARE you!

of

Internet

brings

film.

by Alison Shadbolt

of

the impli-

which focus on culture, legal issues and privacy, busi-

excellent around, from

lawyer Danes’s

warn-

some

The acting

of

the

down

Damon’s

the

tence

The two

Coppola, of Godfather fame, is on the money. all

— cossmunox » «wiox mnm t»m am

Carroll

and

the

Coppola had

the

to

which

lost in the shuffle.

As

tion

demon-

discusses

choices: make the movie twice as long to allow the stories time to develop, focus on the main theme and forget about the rest, or try to force the entire novel to fit. Unfortunately he chose the third. Thus eve ry thing good is

and Broadhead government’s venture into cyberspace “pretty darned silly,” using cases from the 1997 federal elecCarroll

call the

they

about The Rainmaker

CO!fOlA

not

is

little

three

'>

knows

too

before the scene begins.

of

as Deck self-pro-

because

given

background

t

consists

thing

punch time

Vo g h (M is s ion Impossible) and his vast team of legal minions. Baylor’s team

who

Some moments that have the potential to be extremely affecting or exciting lose their

with

no money and no promising prospects in a city already crawling with lawyers When Baylor is hired by a sleazy strip-mall law firm, he starts to work on the daunting task of suing an insurance company on behalf of a poor couple, whose son is dying of leukemia. In the courtroom, he butts heads with the suitably smug John i

unresolved.

are

have to say

they

flattering.

Jim

to

saving operation

screen time.

new many of us

enter the

according

OF THE RAINMAKER The Rainmaker could have been an excelmovie. But, as the screenwriter, Francis Ford Coppola fails in his attempt to cram the complex and lengthy novel into 2 !4 hours of

we

will be thinking about the future. However, not nearly enough of us are thinking about some of the challenges it may pose,

READING THE BOOK

lent

s

year,

by Corey Jubenville


.

©A

m

\\e*r

u^a are held in

-n. _

The Oscars„

by Rita

Fatila

are surprised at the

tions.

Blockbusters are ignored in

year of blockbusters, flops, comefailures, triumphs, and

backs,

scandal. In other words,

was

it

just like every other year.

starts off tragically for

as his son Ennis is shot and killed Jan. 16 while fixing a flat tire on the Santa Monica freeway. A week later Autumn

Jackson, a

woman who

movie

is

In

is

Tragic

Kingdom

on the Billboard January,

In

to

album number one

their

as

charts

the

hits

charts.

entertainment

the

One

Jr.

July

Carlisle’s

Kisses (Shades of Grace).

Grosse Pointe Blanke.

Burroughs dies Aug.

noted beat poet Alan

5,

Ellen DeGeneres finally comes out in an hour-long episode of

author of

dictions.'

Howl was

The

71

Ellen on April 30.

gives

also

May:

as Mrs. Michael Jackson, birth

boy

a

to

Los

in

named Prince. The 39th Annual

son,

Awards

The Cannes Film Festival is held May. The Palme d’Or is split between an Iranian film. The

in early

Angeles. Photographers scramble to get the first photos of Jackson’s

Taste of Cherry, and the Japanese

Unagi. Canadian

Grammy Among

are held Feb. 26.

the winners are: Celine Dion for best album ( Falling into You), Eric

Clapton for record of the year

for

Bob

Atom Egoyan

picks up the Grand Jury prize for

The Sweet Hereafter. of the number one albums on the Billboard charts for May is Mary J. Blige’s Share My World.

One

is

eventually thrown out

one spot by Prodigy. Their Fat of the Land album stays at the top for August. Famous author William S. of

number

the

of

Billboard

the

charts.

Jackson’s brother Michael, meanwhile, announces the second preg-

nancy of his wife. Babies are also in the picture for Erykah Badu

who

give birth

John Travolta comes back

to the

screen for the third time in 1997

Mad City. John Cusack, meanwhile, who was in Grosse Pointe Blank earlier in the year, appears in Midnight in the Garden with

of Good and Evil. Michael Hutchence, lead singer for Australian rock band INXS, is in a hotel

room

2.

Friends movie watch: Jennifer Aniston co-stars with Kevin Bacon in Picture Perfect. Action

Atom

The

Egoyan’s

Sweet

Hereafter sweeps the 1 8th annual Genie awards, winning eight awards, including best movie, best

and best actor. The Hanging Garden picks up awards for best supporting actor and actress, as well as best screen-

director

Julia Roberts

box

makes

Wedding,

Friend’s

comeback

a

office with

My

and

Best John

crash claims the lives of Diana, Princess of Wales, as well

Travolta continues his comeback

George Clooney, however, might have to think about making a comeback after Face/Off.

in

the

of

performance

dismal

Batman and Robin. The Spice Girls continue

their

meteoric rise in June, with their album Spice going to the top of

(Change the World) and Leanne

Rimes

for

Meanwhile,

new

best

on

artist.

Billboard

the

No

Doubt’s Kingdom holds on

charts,

Tragic at

num-

the Billboard charts.

Also in June, girls in love with Brad Pitt celebrate after he splits with

long-time

Gwyneth

Paltrow.

girlfriend

ber one.

movie

Although

watch:

men

the

of

Friends had an abysmal year for movies in 1996, Matthew Perry sees if 1997 will treat him any nicer in Fools Rush In, released on Vajentine’s Day. At the end of the month, The Empire Strikes Back, the second of the

Star Wars

trilogy,

is

released.

March: On March

Biggie Smalls, also known as the Notorious B.I.G., is killed in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles. Smalls, 24,

was

9,

set to release his

Death,

album

March

July: Hollywood

two legends

the start of July. Robert

dies on July

dies July 2.

at

Mitchum

and Jimmy Stewart Also on July 2, Will 1

Smith saves the Earth in the blockbuster Men in Black. The fashion world is shocked when Gianni Versace is shot in front of his house July

15.

An

recovers

from

the

flop

C Q* 00

Cable Guy with Liar, Liar, and Return of the Jedi is released.

1997, such as

weeks

later.

As summer gears travelling

music

up, several

festivals tour the

tour

nized

by

entertainment

"nooners"

with the

in

The Mike Plumb Band,

Friends movie watch: Courtney reprises her role as a tabloid

Cox

reporter in

Scream

2.

Correction Comedian

Terry

McGurrin’s name was misspelled in the Dec.

a

schedin the

is

Sanctuary on J an. 8. Appearing on Jan. 21 will be the Devil's Advocate, a comedy duo that involves the audience in their acts. Harris has also put in an offer for the Matthew Good Band and Loudmouth Mason for the week of Jan. 29, although it is not cerwhether they will tain appear. “The more students that come out, the more of a success Winterfest will be," Harris said.

“New students should expect to have a blast of snow in the face."

15 issue of Hey!

for

producing

many

Mase and

stars for

Lil

_o°

N

%

Sr

Kim.

also has a hand in reviving Mariah Carey’s career. Burgess Meredith, a serious actor the

who

popularly

is

known

Penguin from the Batman

as

tele-

vision series, dies on Sept. 9.

October:

Up My Life. Uma Thurman bounces

You Light

A

single-engine plane accident

claims the 12

California.

Y\cx\\

DSA

He

Oct.

orga-

Harris,

manager.

tops

charts

back from Batman and Robin with the sci-fi thriller Gattaca, which costars boyfriend Ethan Hawke. Meanwhile, Mark Wahlberg, previously known for pop music and underwear ads, wins the approval of critics with his performance as a pom star in Boogie Nights.

the oldest, features Snoop Doggy Dogg, Tool and Tricky playing to smaller crowds than usual. The media gives a lot of coverage to Lilith Fair, the all-women musical

<D

Way Out

Puff’s

bring out

waters icy of Conestoga's pond on opening polar prize The day. plungers - those that survive - can expect to be awarded for their bravery at a pub night at Stages featuring live entertainment, according to Steve

show.

gunshot wound in a houseboat, near Miami, a few inflicted

fellow deceased musician Selena has a movie based on her life released. Also at the movies, Jim Carrey

Meanwhile,

own

Puff Daddy’s No Billboard the

Teen country sensation Leann Rimes reaches the top of the Billboard charts in October with

continent. Lollapalooza, one of

After

also given her.

manhunt for suspected killer Andrew Cunanan creates a lot of panic and gossip until Cunanan is found dead of a selfinternational

25.

Life

McBeal, Veronica’s Closet, Dharma and Greg, Nothing Sacred and Dellaventura. For some reason, Jenny McCarthy is

Feb. 5 and will include a full day's ski trip to Blue Mountain, toboganning at Roost Hill, skating, a camp out and an interactive college version of The Price is Right. highlight of The Winterfest will be the polar plunge where select group of students will plunge into

folkish rock band, play to uled

television

as Ally

skills

loses

fall

season brings back lots of old shows and a few new ones, such

September.

Friends

LO

of the

start

festivities will contin-

until

sanctuary.

play.

Confidential.

The

The ue

bands and comedians

Dodi Al-Fayed and their driver, Henri Paul. Elton John sings a revised version of Candle in the Wind at Diana’s funeral and the single tops the charts. All proceeds from sales of the single, which at present is over $32 million, go to a foundation set up in Diana’s name.

LA

Jan. 29.

include

as her boyfriend

George Clooney attempts to recover from Batman and Robin The flick action the with Peacemaker, while Kevin Spacey gains more critical acclaim with

Student

Foundation Stroke and through Winterfest activities, such as the plunge. also will Winterfest

car

September:

Doon

The

Winterfest Association’s *98 is scheduled to begin on

Money will be raised for charities such as the Heart

movies and thrillers are big at the box office with the release of Mimic, Steel and Spawn. The world is thrown into mourning at the end of August when a

June: at the

by Richard Berta

the

December:

August: Carlisle

one

found hanged Nov. 22.

Butterfly

who was

noted for her yearly pre-

is

Billboard charts for April and May. Also in music, U2 embarks on their Pop Mart tour in April. Friends movie watch: Lisa Kudrow imitates Phoebe in Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion. Also at the movies in April are Volcano, Anaconda and

On April

one

albums

Ginsberg dies of liver cancer.

known

of

number

world loses Jeanne Dixon, The Star tabloid’s annual astrologer

February: On Feb. 13, Debbie Rowe,

and

controversy along the way.

to

Jackson releases The Velvet Rope, which sits at number Janet

to sons.

protests

Life After Death by the Notorious B.I.G hits number the on one

trilogy to

rule

attracting

Plunge into

Winterfest

November:

and Cyndi Lauper,

Billboard’s

the First of the altered

come out. music, No Doubt continues

actor

across

rolls

North America,

the

April:

Star Wars. Improved with new special effects and extra footage, the

is

nine

Cuba Gooding

claims to

released theatrically, as

is

One of

porting

be Cosby’s daughter, is charged with conspiracy to extort $40 million from him. At the movies, the long-awaited Evita

up

awards.

The nomi-

as

few nods to a major film, Jerry Maguire, is the award for best sup-

January: The year Bill Cosby

picks

artists

critically

acclaimed films, such English Patient, which nated 12 times and

the. \yfr>T irrhlan A mnno the Among McLachlan. playing on the bill are McLachlan, Joan Osborne, Jewel and the Indigo Girls. At the opposite end of the musical spectrum Marilyn Manson’s Dead to the tour World

Q oroV« Sarah

March. nomina-

Many

favor of independent

1997 will be remembered as a

entertainment

of John Denver Monterey Bay, The singer was 50. life

in

Tuesday, January 6 11:30

am

The Sanctuary


J1A SPOKE Supplement

A

vision of

PSA

ARE

TflftTOtffe

Conestoga's

Doon Community

services lacking student interest teers prevented the

Seven university graduates. This is who we are. Journalism 1A class

worked

together

“Who We

Our

“That’s generated in the

Doon campus is different from community? Community, according to the defintion in the 1994 Oxford the outside

common and

1

.

a group with

a fellowship,

2.

alike in

The main

is:

interests or origins,

being

DSA

some way.

was our focus. We wanted to dislatter definition

cover not only the differences, but similarities of the individ-

who

uals

Our

merely

acknowledge

also

programs

like

Walk Safe and Peer

DSA

members of administration say they feel students are not taking full advantage Association, but

that

many

other groups have not been represented. Page limitations restricted our scope.

We

do hope, however, that the stories that have made it to print will entertain, inform and above all educate. Concerning students and faculty, we are all here for one of two reasons: to educate, or to be educated. This separates Conestoga from the outside community, but indicates our uniqueness, and that uniqueness lies in the diversity of the people chosen to work, study or teach at Conestoga College.

tried to

have brain-train-

of other programs and services provided to aid student survival at

ing things but they just don’t go over well,” said Kroeker. “But students should pay attention to

Conestoga College.

them.”

The Sanctuary

is

near capacity

afternoons with students enjoying

video

games and watching MuchMusic, but the most benefiprograms and services are going unnoticed or are rarely cial

used, according to Chris Kroeker and

DSA president DSA vice-pres-

There’s more to school

Road

lems facing the DSA in attracting volunteers and participants. “They just don’t want to get

trips

to

trouble attracting interest. Safe, a volunteer

that provides

someone

program to escort

female students who don’t feel safe walking to their cars or to

Rodeway

Suites alone, began last

year during the second semester after a lack of interest from volun-

—j Pakistan during the year are mere-

R\/ Anita A n to Santarossa QonforAeeo By

:

i

_

ly for practice, said

international

who

students

attend Conestoga College

are

a

small group who contribute immensely to the college’s diversity.

“You must

to

retain

Chaudry.

what you have

learned in nine months for one final test.”

Though Chaudry level to

According

Of 30 students questioned in the Sanctuary by this reporter, nearly

senior student tutors for a nominal

all

students

is something should definitely take

in

much

program, says she thinks the

as they should.”

Student Foodshare, a program that provides donated, non-perishable foods to needy students, has

been successful, but better with

still

could be

more input from

stu-

advertising

know

“I

their

says Kroeker.

“It’s

DSA

they have ads

over-

all

you are so inundat-

because you

effectiveness

ignore them,” says

start to

Turkalj.

one of those things that doesn’t get promoted enough as it proba-

a problem

bly should.”

improved.

Stevens says accessing the Foodshare is a sensitive issue for

“Some things are just hard to advertise for,” Stevens said.. “We

some students. “Some people

don’t really

rassed,”

are just

Stevens

said,

embar“even

though we encourage them to come in and just take whatever they want. People have car payments and kids and it gets tight.” Kroeker, however, said he is hoping for a big turnout of food

Stevens says

DSA

advertising

is

area that could be

know how

to

go about

some of them.” Lisa Allison, a graduate of the early childhood education program, says she didn’t know about

any of the survival services provided by the DSA during her time at Conestoga College. Continued on page 4

finds the stress

be the same, he prefers the

Canadian college

Canadian

system where tests throughout the term are assessed as well as the final exam. “You retain more and it is much more practical learning,” he said. Chaudry said the education he is receiving here

is

much

better than

the education he

would receive

in

Pakistan.

life

more advanced.” Chaudry chose

to study here for the hands-on education, however,

“There is more chance for me to advance when I go back home

he suggested

compared

would

to

the

students

who

have studied in Pakistan,” he said. “The technology here is much

that a

co-op option

greatly improve the exist-

ing program.

“Some

colleges in Ontario

offer co-op accounting it

students

and

I

do

think

a necessity for Conestoga,”

is

Chaudry

“We need work

said.

experience.”

Chaudry

mentioned the between women and

also

men in his country. He said women and men rarely mingle, at

Noshad Chaudry, a 23-year old is

and leadership

ed with everything that’s pasted all over the hallways that they lose simply

it,”

year student

first

is ineffective.

the school, but

“A lot of know about

students don’t really

a

the recreation

dents, according to Kroeker.

student office.

one such

social events.

student.

now

The most difficult thing for Chaudry has been the social

in his third year,

comes from Jhelum, Pakistan. He ventured to Canada by himself,

adjustment.

His friendships were more closeback home.

three years ago, to seek a better

education.

coming

Before

knit to

“My

Canada, he completed one year of college in Pakistan.

He

is

more

current-

studying accounting at Conestoga and intends to get his B.A. in accounting after college.

He

Chaudry.

in

also

amazed

at

between teachers

job.

Accounting student Noshad Chaudry says his Canadian education write

was

Chaudry also tutors accounting and economics as his part-time

tradi-

from where I come from,” he said. “The students wear unitional,

students

are

and students at Conestoga. “It’s not normal to call a teacher by their first name,” said Chaudry. “We must address our teachers as ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’.”

eastern countries, Pakistan studies under the British system, said

tests

said he

the informality

education systems. Like some of Europe and other

forms.”

Canada

find the atmos-

Chaudry

explained several differences

much more

I

better

between Pakistan’s and Canada’s

life is

friendships in

limited, but

phere more relaxed and there is a standard of living,” said

ly

The

Anna Turkalj,

social barrier

accounting student,

way of sur-

advantage of,” said Kroeker. “but a service students don’t use as

comprise the number of students enrolled through the international

“College

to offer students in the

vival services.

it’s

28 international students currently attend Conestoga’s

He

said the DSA has a problem informing students about all it has

fee.

Harris,

Chaudry,

ing Foodshare.

^

Fred

registrar,

Doon campus. These

to

traditional than in Pakistan

International student praises The

than

Buffalo Bills games and Toronto Raptors games are popular with the student body, but other programs such as Walk Safe and Peer Tutoring have had

Walk

Stevens says student apathy and lack of time are the biggest prob-

life

the Sanctuary, he said.

ident Johanna Stevens.

involved,” Stevens said.

System less

Offering information seminars as an alternative to comedians, bands and other forms of entertainment has not drawn student interest, according to Kroeker.

“We’ve

still

“(Peer Tutoring)

Ken Groulx

hoping

“Around the heavy times, we want to let people know that it is there,” Kroeker says. “But we want to let them know it is something available throughout the year whenever a student needs it.” The DSA does not require any forms, ask any questions or take any names from students access-

interest

we

but

is

need more females in need of the service. I think we’ve only had about four,” said Kroeker. Peer Tutoring, which is co-sponsored by the DSA and Student Sendees, matches students experiencing difficulties in courses with

Tutoring. photo:

Entertainment is one service provided by the Doon Student

scratches the surface of the diversity present at Conestoga.

We

DSA

By Ken Groulx

attend Conestoga.

supplement

president Chris Kroeker says students should take*advan-

tage of

more

way of walkers,

and

peak holidays.

paid.

Conestoga College. We asked why Conestoga’s

Dictionary

for Christmas

expand Foodshare beyond the

is one program he would like to promote more now that its volunteers are

has

Are,” a supplement the diversity of

defining

program from

beginning in September. Kroeker says Walk Safe

create

to

January 5,1998

he returns

to Pakistan.

will

open doors

for

him when

Photo: Anita Santarossa

His part-time job not only helps it allows him to review his studies, he said.

other students but

i


Page S2

— SPOKE, January

1998

5,

School can be different the second time around By Michael

For many students college

“At 50, you don’t retain new knowledge as well,” she says. People like Sid and Judy experi-

Hilborn Conestoga,

at

ence a different kind of pressure than that with which most students must contend. Since both

a natural progression

is

from high school. For Judy Roe and Sid Nolan, high school

is

but a distant

go to school, must maintain satisfactory grades or risk having their incomes cut off. Both said they take their studies more seriously as a result.

memo-

are being paid to

Both are mature students who have more than 50 years of work experience between them. ry

they

.

Sid Nolan, 50, is a mechanical engineering student from Bell Island, Nfld. Like many of his

*

neighbours, Sid worked in the

Journalism student Linda Wright and daughter, Shannon, 10, study

home,

at

Dee Bettencourt

photo:

Don’t bother phoning journalism student Linda Wright when she is doing her homework, because her 10-year-old daughter Shannon screens the calls so mom can get

students look forward to

Most

dent in a male-dominated program, is determined to use her age and experience in house building

away from

getting

when

moms

their

they go to college, but Fran-

Lago

takes hers with her.

to

nie

receive respect from subcontrac-

Lago’s daughter said that it is really fun attending Conestoga College with her mom and she

pursue her career. Lago said she often did not

tors

when

she

participated

in

own home because

they thought she lacked education

expects to graduate with her. A lot of her friends told her they

in a trade.

thought

She has actually had years of experience owning and maintaining two student rental properties in Waterloo and has completely renovated two century homes in the Elora area. However, one

their

revealed strong family ties, with commitment to school a close sec-

excavator she hired called her a

her backpack walking

ond. Linda Wright, 35, and Pat Lago, 45, live with the demands of

subcontractor would not talk to

nie.

her directly, taking his orders from

There are no negatives to her mother re-entering the education

her

homework done.

building her

Wright and her daughter seem to have their roles reversed. The Conestoga College student said she

is

“What

often asked,

your daughter make

did

your

for

lunch today?”

Interviews

who

are

children,

with

students

two mothers at

Conestoga

work and school

since

was

a

She moved to Ontario the younger of her two

dropout.

with

daughters following her divorce and began the road to re-education with hairdressing school. “Hairdressing paid minimum

wanted to be a hairdresser with Grade 12. Then I wanted more.” With the help of provincial funding, she graduated from grades 10, 1 1 and 12 within one year. Along wage,” Wright

find

it

so hard

do

to

at night.

It’s

at

a.m.” says Lago.

ran

reading and writing.

sportswear and trophy business servicing the Elora area. “I sold that business so I could

Wright said she was encouraged to do reporting by her English

go back to school and not be bogged down,” she said. “Now my

the

way, she realized she loved

really

is

at

home.

new and

can really

Mass., where he worked for six months. While living in the United

Worchester,

work permit, the green card, made him eligible for military service. He was given two weeks to agree to report States, Sid learned his

to

an induction centre or leave the

He

country.

left

and moved

to

Cambridge, Ont., in 1966. Today, Sid says he has no “I lost a friend,”

he

for-

He was

from Bell Island too. Quite a brave he won the Purple young man

when her daughter

is

feels

home

through the Workers’ Compensation Board. Sid upgraded his math and English skills and graduated in June 1997 from Conestoga’s general arts and science program with an average of 87 per cent. in the first

Wright said between time spent Guides with Shannon, doing in her crafts and clipping hair

enjoying the challenge. Judy Roe, 50, was born in Con-

she’s fine.”

at

estoga and raised in Kitchener. Today, she is a first semester student in accounting. She worked as a press operator at Lear Corpora-

teacher at the Wellington Centre

kids are old enough,

Continuing Education in Guelph and was published in the Guelph Mfercury newspaper. She still keeps a hairdressing chair in her kitchen and frequently

pursue

personal benefits as well.

house,” she said.

clips hair to earn extra cash.

Shannon, Wright’s 10- year-old daughter, is used to her mother being in school, again. Shannon said she is proud of her mother and agrees with her that they are

However, her daughter interrupted at this point to remind her that she makes meals too. Wright agreed. Mother and daughter pull

fibromyalgia, a chronic condition

together as a team.

was

Lago now has only four of her children at home, but still spends time taking them to hockey, driver-training lessons and other sports. She said life is hectic

permanent position became

for

Pat

Lago

said she has

wanted

to

be involved in architecture since completing a building project in high school. She also wanted to stay home and care for her large family. Twenty-five years after the birth of her first child she is actively pursuing both dreams.

my

I

spare time, she

career.”

The two mothers

said they felt

going to college not only had long-term benefits, but short-term

both conscientious about school

is

often tired.

would be nice to be a student and go home to have mom make “It

meals

at

have a clean

night and

tion in Kitchener for 17 years.

that ity

makes

heavy, repetitive activ-

impossible. She was temporar-

ily

assigned to lighter duties, but let go when no appropriate avail-

able.

asked what the mothers of

just

children ages 25, 21, 19, 16, 13

her friends do. Shannon said some

and

and 12. She said she is in the position of attending unusual Conestoga with her only daughter,

of her friends’ mothers work out-

With the help of the company and the Canadian Auto Workers, Judy became eligible for a Workers’Compensation Board disability program. Like Sid, Judy says she was subjected to a variety of psycho-

Lago

studies construction engi-

neering while

single parenting six

19-year-old Frannie, first

who

is in

her

year of business accounting.

Lago, the oldest

first-year stu-

“Mom

has more

homework

than

me,” said Shannon. “She does all

it

night long.”

When

side of the

home, some

stay

home

and make good cookies. “But I don’t care what my mom does. She’s happy in school. Just ask her,” said the

1

0-year-old.

dealing with all their

the

telephone

friends.

their still

assignments done and they

think they can pass with 90s.”

When asked what they

like

most

Judy Roe studies accounting. photo: Michael Hilborn

about being students at college, both Sid and Judy mentioned the people with whom they work. “It’s nice to have the routine,” says Sid. “It’s nice to have activity around me again. It’s nice to

belong, to be with people who different things than I do. I

know like

being around people.”

“I like talking to the teachers,”

1994 she was diagnosed with

In

six

work.

come to They don’t get all

party, they don’t

class regularly.

semester of the

Sid says he finds the workload and schedule demanding, but he is

I

Sid Nolan said he agrees. “I see young fellows. They go out

Unemployed, with a permanent Sid learned he was eli-

come home,

“Then when

(younger students) screw up, they can do something else. They have their whole lives ahead of them.”

disability,

need me?” she

“I worry, does she

ones know we’re

given two chances. If we don’t make it the second time around, our income is cut off. If they

dle.

mechanical engineering program,

said.

next year.’

tion

Now

alone.

this

will

When Sid was injured on the job in 1991, he found that the physical demands of his occupa-

benefits

students

will

years at Preston Metal.

gible for job training and other

are

me back “We older

send

have

Heart.” Sid worked in Cambridge as a die setter for 28 years, the last 17

said.

who

We

The kids say, ‘Well, I didn’t make it year so Mommy and Daddy that responsibility.

and they

recalls.

“Baxter Warren got killed in Vietnam. A brave young man but nevertheless, he’s dead.

have homework to do.

these

regrets about that decision.

eign for her, but she has guts,” she

Conestoga College. Wright said she sometimes successful

a

it

to

until the plant closed in 1995.

guilty

also

until

moved

since her mother tries to spend

address different concerns than their non-parenting colleagues at

4:30 or 5

mine

then

system, said Frannie, especially

Mothers

said. “I

Lago

the

He

were more than he could hanHe moved to the company’s sales department where he stayed

time with her big family

easier to go to bed early

and get up

down

She’s haying fun,” said Fran-

hall.

“School

homework

is.

“Besides, she looks so cute with

a third party.

“I

over them, Fran-

proud of her mother as she

school

high

mom watch

port her mother gives her. Now, she said, her friends are as

their return to school.

Wright

would be a drag having

it

nie said, but she enjoys the sup-

Another

‘fly-by-night’ contractor.

iron ore

closed in 1965.

Conestoga moms embrace their kids and their homework By Dee Bettencourt

Dosco

local

“We attend every class,” says “We don’t party when we

Judy.

said Judy. “I think they enjoy the I can talk to them an equal and they seem to respect an adult’s opinion.” When asked what they didn’t like about school life, both said they found the workload to be

older students. as

quite onerous. “I think there is

of

homework

an awful burden

— of

responsibility

put on us,” says Sid. “Between homework and school I’m putting

ing.”

and aptitude testing before to college. She says the pace and workload of college is a

in between 85 and 90 hours a week. That means no social life, no late nights” “When I worked in a plant, I didn’t bring my work home with me.

continued on page 4

considerable challenge.

continued on page 4

“A

lot

of kids work hard outside

of school,” she said. “But having the responsibility of a large family is

definitely

more time consum-

logical

she

came


SPOKE supplement, January 5,

Teacher defeats By Amanda

Fickling

post-secondary education in the

pre-business

One Conestoga College

teacher

began her post-secondary educa-

become the IBM, but an unwill-

tion with a desire to

president of

ingness on the part of employers

women

to hire

field

made

in the

marketing

that a difficult task.

Shelley Frangos, who teaching word processing

campus

started at

Doon

September, began her

this

program

at

the

University of Western Ontario in 1966.

She

enjoyed her marketing most and after first year, Frangos switched her major to economics with a minor in English and psychology. When Frangos graduated she course the

number of companies, including IBM and 3M. applied to a

resumes Frangos was

letters,

called for an interview with

3M.

stocks and bonds, but a position in sales.

then told that the company had never had a woman in their mar-

said Frangos.

department

and

weren’t hiring women. It was acceptable then to discriminate against women when

me off,” said Frangos, decided to change her focus and applied to female-oriented

ticked

like

Noxema

result

was

and

the same.

but

alumni

no longer

the college’s hallways daily,

many keep some connection

to

the college.

Sarah Todd, president of Con-

Alumni

estoga’s

Association, recently talked to Spoke about her

what she has done what keeps her alma mater.

college days,

since graduation and

her tied to

The talks

3 1 -year-old Kitchener native

enthusiastically

about her three years in the accounting program. She says there was a definite sense

of community

when

she

was

at the college. She recalls that the students in the business pro-

gram were a close-knit group. She also credits a strong economy and plentiful opportunities with encouraging a good academic

atmosphere.

we knew when we were done most of us would get jobs in “I think

our related field,” she explains, “so that created a really positive environment.” Sarah says she has

many good

memories of Conestoga, but convocation is the best. The day was beautiful. Friends and family were there

to share the excitement. Everyone was full of hope and a sense of accomplishment. “It

was

the final hurrah.”

Sarah’s career has moved quickly since her graduation in 1988. It

began with a position

at

staff

accounting

Touche Ross, now

Deloite

and Touche. After five years there, Sarah went on to become the comptroller at K-W Optical Ltd. for four years. She then took a job as a comptroller

August, she changed companies

become

yet again to

the financial

statement co-ordinator with Versa-

Care Ltd. Sarah says she chose accounting because it reflects the way she thinks. She likes numbers and organization.

She also thinks she chose the because finding work has never been a difficulty for her. This is partly because of her perright field

sonal traits and the way she has looked for work, but it also has to do with the nature of accounting. “I’ve been very fortunate to be in

a field where

can go anywhere,” always going to be accounting no matter what changes. It evolves as we’ve become more computerized, but the fundamentals stay the same.” Sarah learned these fundamentals at Conestoga and thinks her program prepared her well for her career. She jokes that she forgot I

.she says. “There’s

everything she learned in school during the first weeks of her first

But once she got into it, she says her employers were pleasant-

job.

ly surprised at her range of skills. “I don’t think they realized

the college

was producing

what

in terms

of accounting grads,” she says. “I was one of the first college grads hired by the firm. And they were really surprised at the calibre of

person they got.”

Her performance

Prudential In 1971 Frangos finally found a

job related to her degree with the Canadian Manufacturer’s Association but ironically, she ended up it.

Frangos says the hardest part about having her own business is not knowing when the next pay

side the

home

Four years

where all the female employees were either broker ’assistants or secretaries.

became

0 years

later.

to parent full time. later

a single

when Frangos

mom with

a fouryear-old son, she undertook another job search.

Hoping to find a job where she wouldn’t be replaced by a computer in 10 years, Frangos returned to school to take computer training.

Frangos says she passed the

tests

From May 1985

to

May

1986,

high’

ied,

cheque will come. An outgoing and high-energy person, Frangos will make an excellent teacher, said Jan and Dave Mullock of Stratford, friends for 20 years. Perseverance is Frangos’ most apparent

trait,

says Jan.

“Anything she gets her teeth on she just goes for it,” said Jan Mullock.

myth

There is a view in the general and business communities that Conestoga is simply a technical school, says Sarah. She adds that she has battled a little with this perception throughout her career,

though

and less over time. chose to come to Conestoga, people called it ‘coconut high’ and it had all sorts less

“When

of

I

connotations,”

“Friends of ing,

my

she

says.

parents were say-

‘What happened

to Sarah. she going to Conestoga College?”’

Why

is

She says she chose Conestoga because she wanted a job. After researching post-secondary programs, she learned the college had a high rate of employed graduates. This impressed her.

“To

me

that sent a clear

wanted a job

message

could come here, get an education and start working.” that if

I

Despite

the

I

Sarah asserts that her college education has not held her back. She also mentioned that the high placement rates for 1995-96 indicate that Conestoga’s reputation is improvattitudes,

ing.

“Perhaps I may be earning a higher salary if I had gone to university

days.

photo: Yallena Cica

accounting program. She has been asked several times about her ongoing interest in the college.

Her response tends

that her years at

to

be

Conestoga were

good. She admits her involvement during her college days was limit-

and got

my CA accounting

designation,” she says. “But, for me that’s neither here nor there.

I’m satisfied with my career and I’m happy with who I am.”

No

one

she says. There are many programs from which to choose. “It’s not a failure if you don’t like (a program),” she says. “Look for something else and keep mov-

ating students that jobs only

thing back through her time so others can also benefit.

On a personal level, Sarah remains close with a friend she met at Conestoga. She says they get together and reminisce about

actively tried to keep in touch with

days and wonder about

their classmates. Still, neither has

is

past choice,

Nonetheless, she says she benefited from her education here and she now wants to give some-

member for five

advisoty

some

ing forward.”

college

She also serves on the committee of the

and experience.

was focused on the academics rather than the social activi-

continues through the college’s alumni association. She has been a years now; two of

ities

stuck because of

ed; she

ties.

those as vice-president and two as

1

company

a position in a field she has stud-

president.

uates almost

insurance

life

where she worked until 1994. It was bought out and the majority of its employees were fired. Unemployed, Frangos turned to her own knowledge and created a job for herself. Frangos is now self-employed and operates her company, Personal Computer Support Service and Training, out of her home. Finally content with

Frangos resigned and took a position as a restaurant manager for two years, got married, had a son and then stopped working out-

recruiting for the firm. In fact, the

hiring Conestoga grad-

v

ing shifts with the association.

firm

is still

life skills.”

woman. She was told that the men in the office would have to watch their language, and that the company would have to book a separate hotel room on business trips if

Sarah’s connection to the college

opened the door for future Conestoga grads because she has done some also

the route

Frangos took a job with the

Alumna cracks ‘coconut stroll

is

her Friday night shifts as a waitress more than her Monday morn-

In May 1 969, Frangos received a job offer from a brokerage firm

Conestoga’s

college

in terms

At an interview with Noxema, Frangos says she was told it would be too much of a hassle to hire a

direction.

Communica-

go

gives you

industries

The

and

of career preparation,” said Frangos. “University to

Meanwhile, Frangos took a parttime job as a waitress, and she found herself looking forward to

Once more Frangos changed her

with MarketForce

“Community off,”

hating

they hired her.

tions Inc. in the spring of 1997. In

me

who

Playtex.

programming

in

operations.

they

“It ticked

By Yallena Cica

diploma

“It

keting

Frangos was enrolled at Seneca College where she earned her

sell

was refused

She completed an aptitude test and was told that 3M had never had anyone score higher. She was

hiring.

Shelley Frangos (right) instructs Michael Hilborn (left), a journalism student, during a word processing class at Conestoga College S Doon campus. photo: Amanda Fickling

gave her a license to

that

— Page S3

obstacles

life ’s

After sending out 75

and cover

1998

Meanwhile, she reminds gradu-

come

people look for them. At the same time, graduates must be flexif

They may have to start in a is somewhat different from what they want and build ible.

job that

towards their goal. Sarah says she does not consider herself to be particularly special. She simply enjoys what she does. “I think if I’m happy with who I am, the people around me will feel

the others.

that as well,” she concludes. “It

Sarah has some advice for firstyear students concerning possibil-

makes

me

for a better

and others.”

environment for


— SPOKE supplement, January

Page S4

1998

5,

1

for future

Graduate has better vision By Dawn Matheson owner

including

Everybody,

Carey Ruby, thinks seeing-eye dog Winston is a lot cuter than a cane.

So

Carey

cute, in fact,

“Oh

having to say,

always

is

please

no,

At Conestoga, Carey accessed the services provided for special

the doctors.

needs students which allowed him

By

it

the time a visit to the doctor inevitable, Carey’s hydro-

became

cephalus had worsened and the buildup of fluid had damaged his

causing his visual

nerve,

optic

other students with partial visual

months, then levelled out to its current capacity of about 10 per

impairment are currently enrolled

‘97 graduate of small

more challenges throughout

their

Books on tape are provided by the Ross MacDonald

“When

think of suc-

I

cess,

School for the Blind in Brantford, in addition to those recorded by

look to Carey

I

his

years at Conestoga than the aver-

and how much more he

age undergraduate student. nice to have a good-looking

guide dog, says

it

sure

is

many people would come

right

diploma,” says Rick

Since Carey’s sight

his is

is

more lim-

scans written text and converts

independence.”

result of hydrocephalus, or water

it

tors

handicap, Carey says the instruc-

Diagnosed

age of four,

the

at

Carey required the use of a shunt to drain

when

excess fluid from his brain

Until the age of 21, his vision

by

significantly affected

the disease;

who

he did not wear glass-

es and he had a driver’s license.

much,” says

sees silhouettes.

‘You’re

say,

“It’s

visually

But

You’re blind?

impaired?

you’re looking at me.’”

Conestoga College

work

to

in

a

capped

experiencing extreme anxiety.

The support Carey received from the Doon campus special needs

shunt used to

from Carey’s brain stopped working fluid

creating

properly,

buildup of

a

in

the

for

facility

handi-

London, Ont.

provided Carey with the con-

staff

fidence he needed

to enrol as a

At the height of his phobia, Carey dreaded ending up

in the

Moms

Carey had not attended

time.

life

as

much

as her class-

mates do - an opinion also shared dren’s activities, the maintenance

of

her

and

properties

Lago said she is process of a messy divorce ment for asset division. courses,

“It’s

a

easier to at

writing

in the

her and

it

so hard to do she said. “It’s

find

go to bed early and get up

4:30 or 5 a.m.”

Lago

said she

is

first

many

I

thought

many

would be

I

with

so

children to look after on

my

alone for

years

own, but fortunately

it

didn’t

work

out that way,” said Lago. “It’s surprising,

but

enjoy family

you might

I

think life

realize.”

choosing words other than

‘this

here’

more men

and kids than

and

‘that

there’,

and

by visually impaired students,

who read

But Carey himself admits he sometimes forgets to be more verbally

Lago

that

to write for hair-

magazines

when

she

“Carey

how

to

a person

is

show

friends, like pointing to

one of his

eyes instead of specifying the

left

or the right.

who

experience with classmates

helped him clarify things in class. students, in fact, overdid

strength in a disabil-

who

has had a long-term

relationship with Carey since his

Conestoga.

arrival at

“He

repre-

hope and encourto instil in soci-

ety.”

continues to

make

the best of his

by accepting the nature of

abilities

talking

calculators

talking

household

watches,

and

other

it

gets out there, it

it’s

up

to the

and take the

time to look at the boards,” says Kroeker.

more

DSA

in-your-face

will try

advertising

mately up to the students to take

through student radio and plans to

the initiative.

send recruiters to Rodeway Suites in an effort to create interest, but

can as far as

customer service

in

and low-pressure

sales.

“But I’m not sure “Things

says.

came

that

Carey

me

up, have kind of left

spinning a

bit.”

Casey

Rick

yet,”

at school, barriers

doesn’t

doubt

Carey’s capacity to be successful. “When I think of success, I look to

Carey and how much more he

has gained than a diploma,” says Casey. “He has gained his inde-

pendence.”

He

hasn’t done

by himself,

it

Carey admits. says he has relied on the staff

He

needs for more than just He sees them as being

his studies.

instrumental in his acquisition of his dog, Winston.

“Nobody up

to

me

at school

used to come

and say, ‘Oh, what a cute

cane’,” Carey laughs.

aids.

Kroeker says the ulti-

work

like to

these days anyhow.

about

people

Blind in Waterloo

students to absorb

it is

in

Kitchener.

teaching other visually impaired

volunteers at the Canadian

once

Kroeker, however, says

the

Centre

in the technical aids department,

He

Institute for the

putting out the information and

Turkalj.

Living

“It was funny,” Carey says. “They kept teasing and nagging me, from 1992 on, to get a dog.” Carey gets much more attention

his limitation.

continued from page 1 “I honestly couldn’t tell you about anything they even do,” says

of

involved with

is

March of Dimes and

ihe

at special

DSA

admits it is difficult to types of students.

attract all

“Those who are here

strictly for

class,

know

or commuters - I don’t if we’ll ever be able to reach

them,” Kroeker says. “It’s all in the attitude of the students. If they

pay attention, they pay attention and if they don’t then it won’t

how much we

matter

put into

it.”

who

Second time

been good for her

what

it’s

like

to under-

for

going to college and

am showing them

continued from page 2

into to I

put in

my 40

can lead to something you

jects that

me more

ways - even if you don’t young at the end of the day.”

time

Kids

feel

is

required to take,

“They’re throwing

and

doing.

it.”

such as physics and history.

school keep you young in a lot of

enjoy

hours, that’s

the subjects she

I

I

It’s

sub-

giving

do with what

little

have.”

Sid and Judy have

will

some advice

make

sure that the

be there

still

you’re going

in

demand

two or three

“Give

you

it

all

you’ve got and hope

will not

When

end up back here

asked where she thinks when she gradu-

she will be going

Judy

ates,

They I’m

years,” says Sid.

that

in extra

don’t need. to

younger students today.

“Test the field that

Judy says she dislikes some of that adults

have a zest for learning,” Lago said. “It

to give to

her

university, she said.

really

who knows

rather than weakness,” says

Casey,

member

a

said school has extended

are students.

“I

with his blind

“We do what we

her empathy for her children

stand

descriptive

“Some

the ques-

tions aloud.

Since leaving Conestoga, Carey

says Carey.

a natural expression for

hopes

teenagers

someone. “At

is

dressing

It’s

currently seeing

be more descrip-

to

tive,

graduates in three years.

at night,”

lot. I

homework

by Wright. Wright said she now knows

school

agree-

needs services,

ity,

They need

school since he had lost his vision.

a social

In addition to dealing with chil-

sight.

Carey said he had a very positive this

She said she doesn’t worry about

continued from page 2

as not to exclude students without

student in 1992.

School would be different

pressure.

vocabulary has to change so

proctor, Rick

by a

agement we need

could not leave his house without

excess

his

was

Casey, a counsellor with special

sents the kind of

training

the

accommodate

to

at the

special needs office, or he

any gestures that would be missed

developed a phobia whereby he

this time, the

tors’

tried

speech scanner

they must take into consideration

experienced any loss of vision, he

At

on disc which he hooked

to the

also

is

For employment, Carey would

Carey received

tests,

Carey came to

placement position organized by a

drain

For class

He

Toastmasters and

Independent

adds in his laid-back fashion.

After being out of high school for almost 10 years,

had

In Carey’s teens, before he

so

sometimes misleading because people

the pressure built up.

was not

“Sights vary Carey,

or nothing.

it,

Carey doesn’t mind though, he

tested orally

ment

can get

I

anyways.”

it

a tape recorder.

While most of Carey’s instruc-

say-

get the door for

them

I tell

up

the brain.

all

me

where students with sight took notes, Carey used In class,

Carey says people often have the misconception that visual impaireither

and

you,’

working with master Carey Ruby. photo: Dawn Matheson

is

“You know,

says Carey.

ing, ‘Oh, let

the test

on the brain, a condition where fluid does not drain properly from

is

it,”

to speech through a voice synthesizer.

a

Guide dog Winston

but they get

he used a computer which

ited,

Casey. “He has gained

what a cute dog’,

and pet a Dobermann.” Carey’s visual impairment

on-campus volunteers. The three students currently on campus use one of three readers provided by the college to enlarge the print in textbooks.

a

visually-

the

has gained than a

impaired 32-year-old. “I mean, say, ‘Oh,

on

technical aids depending level of sight.

computer applications has faced

up and

Doon campus.

at

Students can use a variety of

cent vision.

business development and micro-

not

Including Carey,

for the last

By

years at Conestoga.

drawback,’

visually impaired students who have attended Conestoga College

deteriorated over a period of a few

the halls for the past five

lab, but as a

sight.

one of 10 blind and/or

is

who has

couple of months, replacing the white cane that guided Carey

“It’

Carey

seven have graduated, while three

Carey depends on Winston, a

The spring

designed for students with

1986, Carey’s sight rapidly

golden Labrador retriever acted as Carey’s eyes

regular classes

in

participate

to

over the years.

impairment.

don’t touch the dog.”

down

off for as long

as possible and stopped going to

hospital so he put

said,

treated

me

on the

still

“Back

CAW recall

For Sid, the situation

The

plant in

closed down.

Judy agrees. “Stick with it and try for the highest marks you can

maybe

get,” she said.

very important to me.”

“When I

I

is

list.”

different.

which he worked has

at

50 or 55 years of age. “Get it right the first time.”

Lear.

to

well there and

come

can finish

one company,” he

out of

my

said.

this,

career at

“Loyalty

is

Digital Edition - January 05, 1998