Page 1

WHAT’S INSIDE See Shack page 13

Conestoga College, Kitchener 29th Year

— No. 40

November

17,

1997

Enrolment jumps for technology, business

Fun raising

By Rachel Pearce

robotics program and a Michelin training centre.

Enrolment has increased in Conestoga College’s schools of technology and business while it has fallen in the area of health sciences and community studies, according to the latest statistics on full-time student enrolment released by the registrar’s office Nov. 1.

The number of full-time

students

business programs has risen from 1,371 in 1996 to 1,538 this year, an increase of about 12 per cent since last year, and an in

increase of

more than 16 per cent

since 1995.

However, health sciences and community services enrolment has dropped more than nine per cent since 1995, when there were 988 students. This year, there are only

897 full-time students. Enrolment in the school of applied arts realized an increase of

more than

last year’s total

per cent over the 1995

in a

and technology represent a trend, and have necessitated the new 2, 160- square-metre addition and major renovations to the Detweiler Centre currently under way. Conestoga College president John Tibbits told a Spoke reporter the new wing will contain approximately four new rooms for the

i

Ik

challenges Chris Richmond, a first-year training and development student, to a (Photo by l.a. Livingston) raising money for the United Way.

Campus Walk By Rachel Pearce

/

The Walk Safe program Conestoga’s Doon campus is up and running again this year, with just a few at

minor changes. Walkers patrolling

this

'

year are not volunteers, they are being paid $6.85

'

per hour to act as extra

campus, around eyes ensuring the safety of /

students

and

deterring

1 1

Walk Safe

also has a

new

director.

Jenn Beattie, a fourthsemester nursing student, is bringing the new and improved Walk Safe the benefit of her two years experience as a

member of

Western Foot Patrol at the University of Western the

Walk Safe hours have

“At Western

changed since

last winter.

some

Patrollers will

be on duty

ism,”

we

did have

instances of vandalsaid

Beattie,

who

after

a

McClements said the student number for robotics has had

intake

to be increased because of a grow-

ing

number of

applications to the

program and a large demand for robotics graduates on the part of employers.

He said that statistics released in April 1996 showed the college had rejected almost 9 applications for every new student it accepted into the program. He added that all 29 who

robotics students

9

last

graduated

August were employed within

a month.

“We’re

trying

industrial

respond

to

demand

to

for graduates,”

said.

Dave

Putt of Conestoga’s physiresources office, said the changes to the Detweiler Centre cal

will probably cost just under $1

The projected

cost of the

addition,

about $ 1 00,000. The funding will

come from a Canada and Ontario

Works Program, in which the federal government pays one third, the provincial government pays one third and the college pays one third of the cost, he Infrastructure

said.

Putt added that the college’s contribution to the

changes will come

from fundraising done by the lege, staff and students.

The money

will not

come

col-

out of

the regular educational funding.

Putt said.

Safe program up and running added crime

that rate

the

campus

dropped 18 per

cent after the installation of the foot patrollers.

p.m.

Ontario.

vandals. f

6:45 p.m. instead of 7 p.m., and will finish at 10:45 p.m. instead of

earlier, at

named

company.

grant from the

total.

established over the past five years

^ See story page

be

will

new new

about is he said, $880,000 and the changes to the existing building should total

increases in the schools of business

was

but he could not release the name. He only hinted that the centre

be

will

the month, he said,

Students in technology programs now number 1,114, about seven

Conestoga council was told

(right)

The Detweiler Centre renamed within

million.

Sept. 8 meeting that the enrolment

Caird

January.

technology.

1 1

7.

he expects the renovations and addition will be completed by

he

of 1,041. The increase in smdents constitutes a change of more than

race Nov.

of said

almost 0.2 per cent, the difference being that there is one more fulltime student than last year. The school of access and preparatorystudies also increased its enrolment this year to 219 full-time students from 215 in 1996. The second largest enrolment increase occurred in the school of

per cent

Andrew Caird

Mike McClements, dean woodworking and technology,

But Beattie said she has no concerns to express about student safety in

this

teams and carry flashlights and their services may be obtained on any night in three ways. Beattie

wear

said

the

reflective vests

Students

may

ask for a

Walk Safe team

at

the

said, the teams were requested by about two students a night, but on the Thursday, they had five

Beattie

requests.

Beattie

she hopes beginning of a

said

this is the

more

area.

security office in the

main

trend and that

She said the Walk Safe teams, which always consist of one male and one female, have been asked to

building or they can call the Walk Safe dispatch at

dents will start

357 from anywhere on the from or campus

females,” she said, adding

educate people about vehi-

residence.

that

keeping their doors locked and removing expensive items such as cell phones from plain cle

safety;

view.

ext.

Beattie

may

said

students

also approach the teams as they are on patrol. During the first week of the Walk Safe program.

stu-

using the

service.

“We

room

are

.

still

short

Walk Safe still has for more applicants.

Students interested in applying should pick up application forms

DSA office.

in

the

Walk Safe volunteers Dave Anderson and Angie Murray. (Photo by Rachel Pearce)


Page 2

— SPOKE, November

17,

1997

NEWS

Teachers return with

mixed emotions By Greg Bisch Teachers are in the classrooms, but the fight against the Harris government’s Bill 160 continues, said

Tom

Byers, chief negotiator

with

the

Waterloo district for School Secondary

Ontario

Teachers’ Federation. “Our plan of action

is

to

have massive picketing outside

MPP

offices after school hours,”

said

Byers. to

try

“As well, we will that Bill 160 is

prove

unconstitutional.”

Other plans, said Byers, include meetings information

parent

held Nov. 13 at local high schools,

inform further parents about Bill 160.”

the

“to

As

well, signatures are expected

be gathered for a petition to be sent to Attorney General Charles Hamick. Hamick has the power to not approve the bill, and, in

to

'4

consequence, stop Bill 160. teacher Eastwood collegiate David Brohman, the school’s picket captain during the strike said he had mixed emotions on returning. “All the teachers are glad to be

back with

their

students,”

street on the Crossing guard Peter Schmidt helps students across the

said

Brohman, “but I don’t feel we accomplished what we set out to the do with the strike

aware of the extent of control the government plans to take from the

to the

education system.” Director of communications for the Ontario Public School Boards’

parents and the general public to pressure the Harris government to

Association Perry Blocher, said he was very relieved to have the

make amendments

teachers back to work. However, he strongly supported the teachers’

withdrawal of Bill 160.”

Brohman

said

it

is

now up

to

the

bill.

end of the strike, Brohman said a good thing for the teachers is the public awareness

Despite

the

the strike caused. “The general public

stance against Bill 160. “Bill

160 has been coined around

here as

became

Mike

Harris’s

own War

Measures Act,” said Blocher. “It

them

gives

power

the

to

make

we

(Photo by Greg Bisch)

after the strike.

from the teachers go back. However, Byers said he was disappointed by the first getting pressure

should remain fixed

different timing between the unions, but rather get serious about being supportive for the cause

to

on the

to without having consider the view of any parent,

own their even backbenchers.” Blocher said he preferred not to focus on the fact that the teachers’ unions were not unified in their decision to go back to work. “I would like to focus on or

was

timing

all

of

unions.”

was a split unions to go back

“Some

a

just

matter

there

that

between the

“Some Gage. said announced it on Thursday, one on Saturday, one on Sunday.”

early,”

in

the

decision to discontinue the strike “without consulting with the other

leadership,” he said. “It

made

who

unions

three

provincial

the

against

160.” the greater cause against Bill of principal Gage, Ron

MacKenzie King public school

day back

don’t think

decisions teacher

first

teachers were crying in

the parking lot this morning (Nov. 10) because they were so discouraged with the result,” said Byers. “They feel they did all of this for nothing.”

Kitchener, agreed with Blocher. “I

Three phones, better lighting on campus

Provincial grant provides By

emergency phones

pushed dials the security

Erica Ayliffe

office. If

the security officers are out of the

Doon campus

Conestoga’s

has

emergency phones, thanks to a $26,000 provincial grant for women’s safety. One phone was installed inside Door 1 and two were installed on

three

each

new

floor

of

Kim

distance

three

after

these

Radigan, safety and

locations

are

a

from the second-floor

Conestoga has received the Campus Grant for Women’s Safety from the Ministry is

the sixth year

of Education.

Radigan, who is charge of dispensing the money, said the grant is used to support programs dealing with women’s safety, sexual harassment and violence of Versteeg Contracting Ltd. says the Detweiller Centre addition should be complete by mid-December.

Bob Kocher

(Photo by Rachel Pearce)

women. The phones are equipped with a

against

red emergency button that once

D-wing

to travel to reach security staff

had

in

instructing in the

complained about the distance she

to

security office.

This

who was

to

Conestoga’s health, environmental coordinator.

These

Radigan said the college decided phones after a teacher

to install the

time

situations

said

radios.

D-wing

response

increase

emergency areas,

the

office, the call is directed to their

a

student

of hers had a

medical emergency. It takes three to four minutes to reach the security office from the D-wing, said Radigan.

There are few phones in the D-wing and by the computer labs where the other phone was placed because there aren’t a lot of staff

rest of the grant

money has

Pay phones are available, but

to

reach the security office you have to dial the college’s switchboard.

“We’re encouraging people to use the phones for security, safety and medical emergencies,” said Radigan.

“It’s

a faster

way

to

radios for the recreation centre

renting mobile phones for

staff,

who

staff

buying

and

travel

the for material information women’s resource section in the library.

money was spent on and Jack Fletcher Radigan training As

of

well,

student

crisis

in

services

prevention. The two

are

now

certi-

fied to train other staff members on how to verbally de-escalate

someone who

is

upset or violent.

emergency

train

enough teachers

crisis

response

phones

cost

around $1,000 each, said Radigan.

to

to build a

by

team

Christmas 1997. In past years, the grant has been spent on mirrors in the hallways,

security buzzers in staff offices,

supplies

for

Association’s

access security.”

<

been spent on improving lighting putting college, the around cameras in the open access computer lab in 2A11-3, buying

Radigan said the college wants

offices.

The

The

and

the

improved

parking

Doon

Student

Walk Safe program

lots, said

lighting

Radigan.

in

the

i


SPOKE, November

NtWo KICIAIC

17,

1997

— Page 3

Memories not medals focus

Remembrance service at Doon of

By Greg Bisch

Canadian soldier Thomas Dineson Marching. “Every

entitled

Despite the jeans, running shoes casual pants worn by

and

members of

the

Doon

Student Association, and the lone wreath

accompanied them on

that

the

Remembrance Day

the

Sanctuary

Nov.

stage,

service in 1 1

was a

sombre occasion.

petticoat

the

of student affairs Gerry Cleaves, the master of ceremonies for the service.

rusty uniform hanging in the

away

ribbons and medals tucked in a drawer, snapshots in a

dusty album,” he said. “(In the World War,) Canadian

First

soldiers endured extreme physical degradation and psychological

The desperation of

terror.

trenches

created

a

new

the

kind

and soldiers affected by war. Tara Llanes read an account of

who tells a story woman missing her husband.

Rememberance Day

Fianders’ Fieid at the

in

(Photo by Rebecca Eby)

.

McCrae House

to receive auction

L.A. Livingston

until the

The high profile purchase of the war medals of Lt.-Col. John McCrae, author of In Flanders

remaining funds come in

amounts to $460,000 with

which

tax.

The purchase includes a Boer War medal, two First World War

Fields, will result in the

medals

service medals, a volunteer service

being donated to the John

McCrae

medal and McCrae ’s memorial medallion, which was issued to his family upon his death in the First World War.

House museum

in

Guelph by the

end of this month, said the education programmer for the museum. Ken Irvine said he hopes the medals will be on display for the public by Nov. 30, which marks the 125th birthday of McCrae, the author of the the

poppy

poem

as

the

that inspired

international

symbol for Remembrance Day. “We’ve been in contact with Mr. Lee, and the medals will be transferred to us, but he has to clear things up with the auction house,” Irvine said.

Arthur Lee is the Toronto businessman who purchased the medals in late October for $400,000 at an auction and then donated them to McCrae House. Lee has made the purchase of the medals, Irvine said, but has to wait

a time.”

Dave

White read Torpedo, by Allan Easton, a Canadian soldier in the Second World War. The story is a description of his thoughts as he watched the destruction of one of written

“Suddenly, like lightening, a colossal flash leaped from the convoy,” it read. “In a moment, it resolved

itself into a tremendous flame which shot upwards from

the water,

accompanied by a roar

like the passing of

an express

The whole convoy was

lit

“It

was

I

murmur

every hole.”

the eleventh hour of the eleventh

In the First World War, 60,000 Canadian soldiers were killed and over three times that number were wounded, said Cleaves. In the 40,000 Second World War, Canadians were killed. Tens of thousands were wounded.

day of the eleventh month, everyone in the nearly full Sanctuary stood in a moment of silence after a trumpet version of

“We started out men at the beach,

as fresh

young

with howls and and laughter,” said Bryan Bambrick, reading the memoirs of yells

also the first time that

letting

many At

throats.”

the

end of the ceremony, on

the Last Post

Then

the

was played. DSA members,

followed by other students, carried the wreath out to the back of Doon

campus. There, several

staff

burial in

remembrance.

The

McCrae and

gradually

served as a doctor with

Canadian Field Hospital out of McGill University in Montreal. His birthplace, Irvine said, was the house in Guelph which now bears his name as

museum. McCrae worked as a field doctor in the Second Battle of Ypres during the First World War. “He was basically in the surgery a

17 days straight. He wrote letters home saying the shelling

for

Struggling with homework.

deteriorated his health, Irvine said.

McCrae wrote

the Third

Feeling lost during lectures.

residual effects of the gas

affected

precautions have been taken.

will not

that apply

his lungs.”

display the medals until security

museum

Check boxes

affected

also

poem

the day

after his friend, Lt. Alexis

Helmer,

the

was buried on

the

battlefield,

Irvine said.

McCrae

to

$15

“There was such an incredible to

his

poem that know who the

everyone wanted to was, he author so

seemed

to

FOR FIVE HOURS OF SUBJECT SPECIFIC TUTORING.

APPLY AT STUDENT SERVICES

(2B02)

revealed

himself, so to speak,” Irvine said. just

YOU HAVE CHECKED THE ABOVE, YOU COULD BENEFIT FROM TUTORING

magazine

a

called Punch.

“It

IF

test results.

sent In Flanders Fields

anonymously

response

Poor

touch

the

Peer Services aucpotM Cy Doon tedMtMWCicfen

hearts of so

many

hadn’t stopped and there wasn’t a minute when there wasn’t a bomb

was such a good

or a gun firing,” Irvine said.

home and

thoughts of so

people, and

it

reflection of the

many people

in battle,

it

took off.”

at

and

students assisted in the annual tree

Although John McCrae had asthma throughout his life, the gas

its

caught a around me, as of the from of breath out

brilliance.

our nails into the soft earth in the of the trench. I am terrified. I hug the earth, digging my fingers into every crevice,

chlorine gas had ever been used.

chlorine

train.

up by

PEER TUTORING QUIZ

The poem he became famous for was written in 1915, inspired by a friend who was killed by a shell.

Irvine said the

McCrae

“Then she can’t remember what he looks like at all. That is what hurts. That is what is peculiar losing him a little at teeth,” she read.

the ships in his convoy.

heroic author

to help cover the cheque,

a

his eyes, his hands, his

medais

Museum honors By

Then

This message was repeated when DSA president Chris Kroeker read the essay Shelling, written by soldier Charles Canadian Harrison.

bottom

poem

arm vanishes. Then

“First the leg.

of a

of war.”

“Mud and earth leap into the air and come down upon us in heaps,” “We throw read. ourselves upon our faces, clawing

Chris Kroeker, DSA president, reads the ceremony in the Sanctuary Nov. 1 1

of

Several other DSA members read accounts from the mothers, wives,

relics of wars,” said vice-president

“A

greeted with

wonderful mixture Anglo-French salutation.”

Catherine,

“Most of us today only see

attic,

we met was

a


Page 4

— SPOKE, November

17,

common husband or wife w^ still alive.

the

Despite

For

Remembrance Day slogan of

We

Forget, the sad truth is that many of us have forgotten. In Canadian society today,

of

who

us

of

part

Generation X go through life with an incredible ignorance for the past.

Those who are 25 years old and younger spend more time wondering what to wear, what s on television tonight or complaining about not having a car

or enough money. Fifty years and more ago, most

men

and women couldn’t afford to worry about their wardrobe or had little time to complain about the

young

Canadian

ago

every day like for they were

it

was

among

11 ,000 Canadians

taking

day

one

to

their sacrifice hardly

seems enough. During the weeks leading up to Remembrance Day, many of us half-heartedly pinned poppies to our coats without really taking the time to reflect why.

Even on November 11 itself, how many took tune out of their chaotic lives to pay tribute to the men and women who offered

lived

It’s really

the over

fewer

behind,

they were given the undaunting task of worrying whether their son, daughter, brother, sister.

is

short

on

Legion

However, the

tional value.

cuts into

crackFor example, three boxes of high-fat for “special on bought ers can frequently be is which butter, peanut of jar of a the price for the low-cost protein source of choice many who need to stretch a food budget. food Another problem is that stocking the amount certain a bank can only be allocated

results of the recent

food

low-protein of bulky, high-carbohydrate, Doon entire the by donated food, was

ly

student population. the The new food-raising format used by as an experiment this year, time, accomplish two admirable goals at one to

DSA

had drawbacks as well. The usual campaign is aimed at college paycheques staff and faculty, whose regular

need to consciously not forget and instead remember.

mean

the students of DSA staff time. So, targeting brown meant the former strategy of putting an with mailboxes, staff in donation bags not impleappeal for donated groceries, was mented this fall term. to Although it’s probably always good next the maybe check out new approaches, all possible food drive could actively aim at

more likely than students to cash on hand to donate to this good

they are

have the

the

true since sources. This is particularly the supply. exceed may demand for services partly statistics are kept to track usage,

in cause. Their support has been outstanding

Letter

the past.

Reader says Spoke too tough on judge

was a reservoir of generosity among the stuon. dent population that could be drawn Although many students rely on loans, which must be carefully managed to handle emergencies, many are just getting by on

This year, the

As a mernber of the media, I was

disturbed

reading the editorial concerning Gordon Stuckless and the sentence he after

received for sexual assault. While I agree with Spoke on the grounds attacking of an unfair law, I disagree with the sentencing.

Stuckless received the

maximum

sentenc-

He ing under the Criminal Code of Canada. committed a crime, was tried justly in a peers court of law, was found guilty by his under penalty maximum the received and the aforementioned code. It is

the opinion of

myself and others

in the

broadcasting

program

that

their private

systems. The

Spoke

is

in a acting unethically in attacking and, roundabout manner, slandering the judge

and jury

in this trial.

action would be to question the integrity of the Criminal Code, not of those sworn to uphold and administer

The proper course of

it

in the nation’s best interest. I

sincerely hope

that

Spoke

will be

more

mindful of ethics in the future, for a disregard thereof will only lead to a lawsuit. Paul Van Beek second-year broadcasting

possible

to

DSA decided to

see

if

No

there

partly because of client confidentiality and food withdraw to wanting students because DSA from the bank can either go to the adding or to student services. But

office

offices, together staff estimates from the two with some students, 50 it looks like 40 or in bank the used have feed, to children

incomes and parental support DSA reasoned that it might be do a double whammy by

past years.

Doon

to build class spirit

campaign was expected by billing the request for

donations as an

inter-class

Bouquets

number of

competition,

by mainly funded from September to May and Student Association (DSA). The views ^ opinions expressed in this newspaper do not or the l^Areflect the views of Conestoga College the DSA Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by DSA logo. unless their advertisements contain the out SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

the

SPOKE is published ana proauceu wccmj

=

sports editor; Sports editor; L. Scott Nicholson; Assistant

m^

Production manager: Alison Shad Wt; Advertising Photo editors: Barbara AKljertc, IamieYa.es; supervisors; Jim Hagarty, Bob Reid Circulation manager; Matt Harris; Faculty 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Room Dr., Valley SPOKE’S address is 299 Doon spoke@conestogac.on.ca Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail:

is

Doon

paid tor me in advertising beyond the amount sent to the ^ispace. Unsolicited submissions must be are subject to tor by 9;30 a.m. Monday. Submissions wntten or acceptance or rejection and should be clearly Word file would be helpful. typed; a WordPerfect or statements Submissions must not contain any libellous accompanied by an illustration (such as

of errors

Eby; College life editor; Lori-Ann Livingston; Editor- Ross Bragg; News editor; Rebecca Sarah Smith; A^istant entertainment editor: Rita editor: Entertainment Features and Issues editoriErica Ayliffe; Corma Hill,

Fatiia;

.

, Corey Jubenville;

student ser-

break without enough food.

items.

Keeping Conestoga College connected

DSA and

there s donated in the fall could go quickly if term, of end the at a run on the Doon bank in past greatest been has need when time the Christmas years. No one wants to face the

SPOKE

S]PO K] ^

to both the

relieve vices for their voluntary efforts to cartload single the But student suffering.

while also promoting student awareness of their fellow students’ plight. But the concept had an inherent problem. The winner was to be the class that brought in the largest

.

greater.

for those in need.

In the process, the

.

limit This year, with the allowed earning per for OSAP reduced from last year’s $50 likely it’s year, calendar week to $600 per will be the need for food bank services

appealing to students. The recent Student Food Share campaign aimed to publicize both the near-bankrupt food bank and the availability of

on-campus help

items.

small price tags reflect low nutri-

pitiful. drive for the student food bank seem Only one grocery cartload, consisting main-

gotten, those of us fortunate enough to reap the benefits of what the veterans accomplished

large

the

study time.

halls

most

was a

her or his class win the contest would buy low-priced goods whose

They may also find searching out help from community food banks

arid

a student had a

to give, the

Since in the grocery store, as in life, one tends to get what one pays for, student whose aim was to help

scratch.

men

11. Their numbers dwindle, and so too does the memory of the war. So that their sacrifice is not for-

distance.

number of cheap

need extra time money to prepare nourishing meals from

on Nov.

time to reflect, wondered if a sniper lurked in the trees or if a U-boat was within torpedoe

who

student

if

amount

effective contest entry

will often

women march in parades or join their old friends in

and

Doon

a

so

alone fight in a war. year,

set dollar

programs have heavy work loads,

ed the fact that as an entire generation of Canadians we have never had to live through,

pitiful

This meant that

that the col-

Student Association run a food bank for students. College the

We

Each

terrific

lege’s student services office

ourselves of the events of some take for grant50 years ago.

let

drive results

Food

the ultimate sacrifice? As the years pass, it becomes increasingly difficult to remind

their last,

left

1

died in combat this

remember

one million Canadians who took part in the Second World War. These people, when they had

For the Canadians

the

century,

Young Canadians of two and generations

all

who have

things they lacked.

three

Bav

Canada’s young

for

those

ff.orresT-»

Doom

distant notion

War a Lest

COMMENTARY

1997

MS

and

may be

photograph).


SPOKE, November 17, 1997

COMMENTARY

— Page 5

Gambling can be addictive, says survey

Students against gambling By Barbara

Ateljevic

Tanya Krick, a second-semester early childhood education student,

many

Although

Conestoga

agrees.

College students say they have gambled, some said that it was

have any luck.

dangerous.

Lottario,” she said.

an inform.'il survey around campus. Spoke found Aat more than 60 per cent of students had gambled, although all agreed that it had the potential to be addictive. “I gamble to make money,” said

is

In

Aaron Adams, a first-year management studies student. Although first-year management studies student Chris Kuiack admitted he had gambled, he agreed it had the potential to become addictive. “Some people just can’t get enough,”

A

he

said.

first-year graphic design stu-

dent also said

it

was

addictive and

“I don’t

gamble because I don’t I don’t even play

addictive,

On

Krick

whether said,

it

“It

depends on the person, if they can control it. It also depends on their morals and values.” Sarah McCarter, a first-year graphic design student, agrees that it is

addictive but

still

occasionally

gambles. “I gamble, but not often because I have no money,” she said.

Peter

Mogg,

a first-year nursing

student, said he has never

but agreed

gambled

can be addictive. “I’ve never been around the opportunity but I believe it’s addicting like a lot of things that people do,” it

said he didn’t gamble. “I don’t

Mogg

believe in risking money,

So while over half of students surveyed had gambled, most seemed to be aware of limits and

it’s

too

hard to earn,” said Lee Pressey. “It’s better to

earn

and honestly.

I

it

slowly, surely

think gambling’s

dishonest.”

said.

“It

were

all well-informed about the dangers of becoming addicted.

“I

gamble

to

make money.” “It’s

better to

earn

it

Aaron Adams, first-year

slowly,

surely and honestly. think

management studies

depends on

the person; if they can control it. It also

depends on morals and

their

“Some people just can’t get

enough.” Chris Kuiack,

values.”

first-year

management studies

Tanya Krick, second-semester early childhood education

I

gambling’s dishonest.” Lee Pressey, first-year graphic design

“I

gamble, but

not often

because have no money.” I

Sarah McCarter, first-year graphic design

“I’ve

never been

around the opportunity but believe it’s addicting like a lot of things that

I

people

do.” Peter Mogg, first-year nursing

i


NEWS Computer problems remain unsolved

u ^

blame to softwar© says Principal •1

By Corey Jubenville Don’t blame the people servicing computers for problems the system Conestoga’s princiis having, said of computer update review pal at a initiatives

Nov.

given to college council

profound changes since

of

McGregor

the

topics

discussed

Grant

logsuch as establishing user IDs,

ging on and changing passwords.

month

“We’ve got a couple of software programs which,

whatever

90

installed,

“Don’t blame the people

in the last

alone.

Some

servicing computers for

problems the system

changes were using

other

the

of

McGregor

outlined

double-digit

in

putting

^

r

technicians

at

term,

is

having.”

servers, e-mail, upgrading to HP a Macintosh lab, putting in around 900 hard drives

Grant McGregor, Conestoga’s principal

installing

installing

and

new software such and Microsoft

’95

Windows

as

for

literally

the some of U/i

overtime.

ground zero,” 1997 Since the end of the spring computers new 450 around

included

problems students and faculty have been having with computers,

are

last year.

had to begin said McGregor.

“We

have been

10.

Some

the council

that have been caused by the fact undergone has college the

I

He

said the

changes would mean

for “a jump up in terms of quality benefits of the of One college.” the new technology is that prob-

the

in

reason, are just not

lems can now be dealt with

responding.”

hours. terms of minutes, instead of on spent been has More money computers and more done this year

Grant McGregor, Conestoga’s principal.

than

in

last

the

said

four,

which, for whatever reason, are just not responding,

programs

McGregor. He added some of the problems

said

summer,

hired since 1986. This on a one technician was added basis to help get the

temporary system up and running. he was “It became obvious McGregor. needed full time,” said Another technician has also been total

added since then, bringing the hardware and at Conestoga to four four software technicians.

McGregor.

“We’ve got a couple of software

technicians had been

No new

Office ’97.

McGregor did not blame

the

on

the

working

technologists

system for failing to correct probhe lems fast enough. In fact, praised the software and hardware technicians for their work, telling

Work

is

ancillary labs.

now being done on

McGregor said he didn’t know if be any more technicians would added, but a listing for a management position will be posted in the next week.

Dean discusses changes

cBSgJpfinci^^ on computer problems Nov. communications Pat St. John.

10.

gives council uie lowdown Seated behind him is chair of (Photo by Corey Jubenville)

We want your opinion

_

Applied arts to be reorganized -

CT....

similarity of sinvilarity between old programs could be

By Corey Jubenville

programs,

Courses in the applied arts program will be reorganized in of the near future, said the dean communications during a college council meeting Nov. 10.

identified

Pat St. John explained plans to existing the reorganize journalism, broadcasting and graphics programs. that, St. John told the council by breaking down the core

areas

and new programs

could be developed.

St John showed a video tape about the future of communications

which

explained things like

The former Power Corp. employee saW they

digital technology.

were just ideas at this point, but change was coming. “We have to move more quickly,” St. John said.

Digital “Digiul

building

is

upon

digital.”

m

people St. John added that communications are looking for more skills in areas like sales and marketing.

There is no start date for the new programs yet, but he said he hopes something will be in place

by next fall. “We have generate

the

some

programs,”

St.

potential

truly

John

to

excellent

said.

Correction

Write to the editor

In the Nov. 10 edition of Spoke, promotion assistant Bryan

DSA

Bambrick’s name was misspelled on page H5.

Spoke

Tues. Nov.

4:30

Now you

can send

letters,

comments or questions to Spoke via e-mail.

Keeping Conestoga College connected

pm

Classified

Room 1B23

Spring Break

& New years

Travel free by organizing small groups to Montreal,

Please see Johanna to If you are unable attend the meeting.

New

Orleans, Florida and We also have great

Mexico.

Ski trips! Call

@

.A*

Breakaway

1-800-465-4257 Tours Ext. 310 for free promo kit. www.breakawaytours.com

spoke

@ conestogac.on.ca


SPOKE, November

FEATURES Author,

academic

criticizes Bill

160

Today’s learn to

must

teachers

work with each other and

with parents in order to deal with

demands of

the changing

the pro-

fession, said a researcher and aca-

from

demic

International

the

Centre of Educational Change at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. “Teaching is at its best when we have a clear, commonly shared purpose and collaborate with one another,” said Andy Hargreaves,

speaking

about

to

new

60 people,

academics, in the Blue Room at Conestoga College Nov. 5. Hargreaves is a professor at OISE, an affiliate of the University

among

He

is

Andy Hargreaves, speaking

the author of,

(Photo by Ross Bragg)

Changing Teachers, Changing Times, which books.

other

1995 Outstanding Writing Award from the American for Association of Colleges Teacher Education. Hargreaves’ talk. Four Ages of Professionalism, was co-sponsored by Conestoga Colleges ’s professional development prog/am of and the mid-western branch OISE. received

the strike

the

if

he sympathized with

has nothing to do with sympathy, it has to do with “I told her

it

evidence.”

Hargreaves said one of the worst parts of Bill 160 is how it reduces teachers ’preparation time. He said today’s teachers, and in teachers, Ontario’s particular sometimes deal with classes

wherein more than 50 per. cent of the students are speaking English as a second language. “Teachers

planned the talk before they knew about the provincewide teachers’

need lots of time both individually and with their colleagues to deal

strike.

While introducing the speaker, Lynne Hannay from OISE said the speech and events surrounding the strike were “not a coincidence so as a prophesy.”

Hargreaves referred to Bill 160 and the Harris government frequently in his discussions of how teaching in the 1990s involved so many different demands than in

“Mike Harris-bell bottoms-' was once a teacher’-age” of the

the

1970s and 1980s. He said he was asked by Pamela Wallin during an interview about

with this

By Casey Johnson

reality.”

He used

two stuLanka and one

the story of

from Sri from Japan, analyzing the Kris Kristofferson-Janis Joplin song dents, one

Me

McGee

and Bobby

an

in

English class. “Busted flat in Baton Rouge,” he recited, “waiting for a train.” After reciting a few lines from the song, he asked listeners to consider how much of our language is connected to our places

service

upcoming surge of coming to outlets

students for the

workshop was held to educate students on the problems of gambling and the possible optional

addictions that

come

A

problem that Larry as an important one.

it.

Ellis sees

who

held the workshop, said the increase of gambling instiEllis,

tutions will create gambling problems, not only in adults, but also in

adolescents.

The Wilfrid Laurier will

student,

be graduating in April,

who is

in

the process of obtaining his master

degree in social work.

He

is

the rate of people

ety,

efforts

their

in

for

to

placement

(work term)

at

all

types

of gambling, including the differ-

between ences and substance abuse and gambling similarities

doing

Ed Wilson, who

After the speech,

teaches current affairs at Niagara College in Welland, Ont., said he

agreed strongly with the speaker that teaching is more effective they,

as

teachers,

There was not a very good turn

be expected, he

Not a

lot

is

defi-

bling problem.”

Although current studies are not complete, a 1995 ARF study showed that in 30 days, 69 per cent of Ontarians played the lotteries, 12 per cent gambled on sports and three per cent gam-

is

sion. lltere are also pull-tabs

Lotto 649,

(Nevada

tickets).

Ixjttario,

Pro Line (sports-betand scratch-and-win

ting sheets)

tickets, just to

boards.”

name

a few/’

Casinos get the most press, said Murray, but people have larger problems. There is one situation that

nobody seems

to

nitely

bled in casinos.

Keeping in mind, said Murray, 1995 none of the charity casinos had been installed yet. The study also showed 10 per cent had at least one lifetime gambling problem, which means that in

couldn’t

tliey

identify

ARF

and other counwant to make people aware before the problem

“We

(at

selling agencies)

gets out of hand,” said Murray. There is no doubt that gam-

bling problems and addictions said. he increase, Counselling centres must pre-

will

pare for the impact.

work

the president.”

private reflection sheet.

The Gambler’s Anonymous 20was also provided.

questions sheet

According to the sheet anyone

who answers the

said.

of students turn out for

the event, he said.

The workshop on Nov. 13

optional, the one not.

“That workshop is mandatory for Dick Parker’s second-year social services students,” said Ellis.

of the literature Ellis provided included; a self-test for teens, a gambling-behaviour ques-

Some

tionnaire, a questionnaire to

show

danger signals for teens, an inventory of gambling situations and a counsellor’s attitude and values

‘yes’ to seven out of

20 questions has a problem. of the questions include:

felt remorse after gambling? Do you ever borrow to finance your gambling?; Do you ever gamble to escape worry or trouble?; Have you ever committed, or considered committing, an illegal act to finance gambling?

Have you ever

The awareness of

the situation

is

important, said Ellis.

With 44 upcoming charity casiis bound to be some people who will encounter gam-

nos, there

bling problems, he said. It is education on the subject that will

help

people

who

may

encounter these problems in the future, said Ellis.

the

problem.

together.

Some

abuse,” said Ellis.

was was

what was said, but I I think the main say to want just problem is big government, big teachers’ unions and big school

1995 ARF study

idea of the problem.

stay-at-home bingo on televi-

“I agree with

casinos.

in

has been launched to get a better

also bingo halls, bingo scratch tickets, not to mention the new

comment

three per cent gambled

training in Ontario, said a study

with the casinos,” he said. “It

make.

gambled on sports and

an underestimate,” said Murray. “It does not reflect the amount of people with a gam-

the situation, said Murray. The number being the same is just coincidental, said Murriiy. “I'he problem does not just lie

the

12 percent

“The number of people

also the project

With the 44 new charity casinos, 36 of which will be permanent and eight serai-permanent, 44 centres in the province will implement new gambling-problem workshops to help combat

lege president John Tibbits fielded questions from the audience. Most of the question were by area teachers and were related to the strike.

lotteries,

is

leader for problem gambling

said, there

of Ontarians played the

monetajy

combat the impact one factor.

who is

30 days, 69 per cent

problem gamblers

“The workshop covers

to

Tlie

said.

Murray,

After Hargreaves’ speech, col-

when

he

In

said

increase to just

a greater need for teachers to work with parents and the public to find creative solutions to the new demands of the profession.

to

get into it,”

Robert Murray. “As well as social cost, there are the issues of unemployment and police involvement to consider,” he said. The government may not be considering the additional cost three casinos will have on soci-

is

speaker said, but had one

who

serious problems with

government’s slogan Education Isn’t Working. In a time when the public has a very nega-

what

increase accessi-

you increase the prevalence of the activity and increase

see things quite differently than

how

out, according to Ellis, but this is

Ontario.

with

“When you

particular, the

Tibbits said he liked

reality is people lose.” This year in Waterloo region, 20 to 30 people attended sessions at St. Mary’s Counselling Services to deal with their gambling problem. One hundred and fifty to 200 people sought the same help in Toronto, he said.

bility,

multiculturalism

teachers

his

A two-hour gambling workshop was held Nov. 6 at Conestoga College’s Boon campus to help

The

tion.

more demands on today’s

Conestoga.

gambling

gambling problems and addic-

Wilson said, however, he was not impressed by the comments made by Tibbits. “I am a member of a union and I

culture and

Help available

prepare first-year social

Addiction Research Foundation anticipates a definite increase in

partly

view of teachers, he

1^8, a senior

program consultant with the

blamed the Harris government for “shaming and blaming the profession,” and in

tive

the teachers.

Jane McDonald, the professional for coordinator development Conestoga College, said they had

much

in

the blue room Nov. 5

charity casinos to

hit the province in

stages of teachers’ professionaliza-

He

take into account, he said.

“The

With 44 new

technologies.

tion.

— Page 7

the future

in

By Casey Johnson

“Like never before,” he said, “teachers are facing a range of ability and diversity.” Hargreaves said the public, in recent decades, has had less confidence in teachers than in the first

including students, teachers and

of Toronto.

problems

be inclusive. “There probably is in most areas of learning in society no one cultural context without marginalization,” he said. Teachers in the 1990s are similarly challenged by a greater number of special needs children in the classroom, he said, and by the greater emphasis on having students and teachers learn with

better

1997

ARF predicts gambling

Teachers need more time, says speaker By Ross Bragg

17,

Purchase a Gift for the Child of Your Choice Wish Tree is located outside the Nov. 17

DSA Office -

Dec. 5


— SPOKE, November

Page 8

1997

17,

FEATURES Rainforest

Website aids involvement in Waste Reduction Week By Amy Sonnenberg

The Recycling Council of Ontario’s 12th annuto 9 was a al Waste Reduction Week held Nov. 3

Internet enlisted to save old forests

she said Purchasing habiK and the 3Rs were focused on because,

manager of program development

fiiendly materid, etc.

“Normally, the schools get very involved, but the teachers were

on strike

week,” said Clarissa

ail

Morawski. “That was an uncontrollable problem that definitely took away from the week,” she said Aside from dat, the week went well, she said.

“We

it’s

more than just recycling.

It’s

We got quite a

of media attention.” The week started with a contest

“The

mation

is

much more

can go on the Internet

and get

directly, rather

it

through the mail.That

of

WRW’s

much its new

also attributes

success to

worked out

sent

is

much more

really well

and we will continue

to

into

one up-and-coming the being designer profiles. Ihese new designers showed off dieir envi'r

a^ dyes

that

harm the planet Next was die vintage clothing

will not

diow, highli^ting fashions from Goodwill and stores. thrift Kensington Market, to name a few.

tap into that Internet

efficient

the Wearable Art

Lastly was Students designed outfits out of gartiage, like disposable

^ow.

Clarissa Morawski,

because people can go on the Internet and get it directly, rather than have it sent through the mail,” she said. “That worked out really well and we will con-

about reuse and, more impor-

tinue to tap into that Internet

tantly,

resource,”

said.

The theme of this year’s event was Thinking Outside the Box,

Morawski

reduction,”

and old carpet underlay. events included: Other

plates

Recycling Council of Ontario

WRW

clothing drives, recycled art, essay and poster contests, a collection of expired medication, tours of recycling centres, aluminum foil sculptures and a life-

Particular behaviors

a focus of

were also

this year’s

WRW,

Next Nov. 2

year’s

WRW will be on

to 8.

problems occur if these drugs are used at too low a level or

unit, said

the

and

cause of serious illness lately, concerns on how to control the disease have been growing in recent

research has

responsible for antibiotic resistant strains of the disease

the right

months. According to an article in the Ontario Farmer, a weekly newspaper, animals (including

showing up.

lems may occur. Hunter said, “The birds can carry

Campylobacter

Is

has

been

ment

Dr.

shown

that this treat-

is

Bmce

Hunter, pathologist at Guelph poultry

the University of

too often.

To prevent

strains of

antibiotic resistant Campylobacter,

dmg has to be

right level, otherwise

used

at the

more prob-

the bacteria in their intestinal tract

Your Class Represented?

Mcike sure your class

hcis

a

of future demonstrations as well as past ones, with background

list

been disturbed by people.”

and

results.

Rainforest information gives you

The focus event

of this year’s

was

just that; press releases, reports, books and other rainforest facts.

old growth

The

link called

Tues. Nov. 18, or

forests.

taken Action Rainforest (RAI^, is one of the

many

conscious person options on what he or she can do for the environment: groups to join, where to volunteer, people to contact, etc. Even kids can get involved in the

you can find on

website at

That

quote,

its

from the Network facts

environment with the kids’ comer link. It has lots of stories, artwork, questions and answers and other information to help encourage kids

www.ran.org.

The

colorful

homepage has

to lots of information

links

and organi-

to get involved.

For example, the actionalert link leads you to information on what’s happening with environmental issues and provides plenty of background.

zations.

The

Nov. 20, 330 The Sanctuary

Thtirs.

Information available at the

DSA Office.

sick.”

many

That makes the

disease hard to diagnose.

The

dis-

contain

also hard to is because there are many factors contributing to the spread of it. Hunter said chickens might con-

ease

tract the bacteria

from feed

if

it

contains feather meal from a con-

taminated chicken. Transporting chickens can also contribute to the spread of Campylobacter because chickens are in a very close area and if they have to travel some distance cages get dirty. Hunter said. It only takes a couple of chickens

an entire herd.

If

a spar-

into the chicken house,

it

must clean the birds thoroughly, and temperatures of the chill tank and scalding tanks must be

link takes you to the search engine. There’s the

new

link,

what’s

which

new

The most effective way of reducing health risks to humans is through the consumer, he said. Proper cooking techniques are a must to control any form of disease, Hunter said. 'h,

Z

Campylobacter

can be controlled using the same methods that reduce the risk of salmonella. Keeping cooking surfaces clean, and cooking meat at the right temperature and storing

meat

is

the

same

as the

link near the top of the

page, and a quiz. There’s also a list of updates and merchandise. If the topic really interests you, there’s a link called join

gives you

and

RAN that

membership information

prices.

says

ways of controlling bacterium. Hunter said a federal program

is

help educate consumers on the proper methods of preparing foods. Bill Heimstra, a poultry farmer

available

to

near Listowel, Ont., has about 33,000 broiler chickens. The pullets

(female chickens) that

make

end up at Kentucky Fried Chicken and the males go to Swiss Chalet, he said. The rest go to the grade

supermarkets.

The chickens are brought to the farm one day old, and they stay on the farm between 40 and 42 days, Heimstra said. After they are shipped out, the bam is washed wito a high pressure pump and sprayed down with disinfectant. Marg Heimstra, Bill’s wife, said, “After the bam is cleaned you could throw a party in there and no one would never know it was a

bam.”

checked.

pm

mis-

The search site’s

environmental organizations, websites, e-mail addresses and dates. The campaigns link has informa-

and not get

RAN’s

etc.

back as

to

link has

The about

forests'.

you

are

bottom of the and self-

sion statement, history, awards,

There’s a link with indepth information on World Rainforest Week with background on old growth tribal links lead

smaller

explanatory.

The what’s new link is similar. It has environmental news and headlines dating from as far April 1997 to the present.

links along the

page

could infect the herd through its excretion. Hunter said. Hunter said reducing the potential of disease means processors

430 pm

“what you can

environmentally-

the

do” gives

row got

Next Meeting

link gives a

The demonstrations

intact forest land that has not yet

to infect

DSA Class Rep.

More

Mitsubishi.

event

this year’s

forests: “original,

to easing risks from meat, expert

hogs and beef) that carry the disease can be treated through antibiHowever, feed. the in otics

Little

The focus of was old growth

The

» environment board game.

si 2

Cooking key By Becky

to 26.

three categories, the first

featuring faibrics

distribution of informa-

“The tion

it

resource.”

website.

The show was divided

rcmmentally-ffiendly collections

from Goodwill clothing racks, and the winner received two free tickets to fly anywhere in North America on

Morawski

attended the event held at the Masonic Temple Concert Hall in

because people

than have

Air Canada.

a link, such as the concessions it won from Coca Cola and

18

Oct.

Toronto on Nov. 5.

involving design students. They were required to put an outfit together

Revamp environ-

Between 800 and 900 people distribution of infor-

successfiil

bit

Gardening

and home maintenance were also behaviors focused on. One of the major events was die 4di annual

Week from

Rainforest

made of an enviroomentally-

nteotM fashion diow.

efficient

has a very

kick-off this year.

as in (Mitside die blue box. “We wanted people to realize

Environmental activists, students and concerned citizens around the world made a combined effort to save the rainforests during World

if pro<hict they’re purchasing the material is reusable, smaller,

the

Rainforest

said,

success despite the loss of school involvement due to the teachers’ strike, said the RCO’s

Amazon program, Action Groups and other campaigns, with e-mail addresses to reach them. RAN gives dates and details of its victories over the past decade in on

tion

By Amy Sonnenberg

consumers must consider die packaging of the

Moraw^i

week a global effort

in the firidge, are all effective

The Heimstra

birds are in con-

finement, which means they are not kept in cages. No other creatures can get in the bam. Bill Heimstra said it was not a good idea to have other birds in the house as pets because exotic birds

can carry diseases that are contagious to domestic bir^ Ventilation trolled

as

and feeding.

is

well

coif^uter conas temperature


For 26-year-old Sweet Williams, star of The Hanging Garden, returning home after a 10-year absence is a bittersweet reunion. Arriving on the day of his sister’s wedding, Sweet (Chris Leavins) is soon immersed in the continuing peculiarities of his family while still struggling with old demons of his own. The Hanging Garden, nominated for 1 1 genies and winner of the Best Canadian Film award at the 1997 Toronto International Film Festival, is

now available to Kitchener-Waterloo audiences at the Princess

The movie

Cinema. is

strange and disturbing, with frusimages and inex-

trating characters, frightening

plicable occurrences. Various scenes of the past, present and surreal are woven together, as the characters dance around each other immersed in hate, love, fear

»

and resentment.

photo courtesy of Cineplex Odeon

An abusive father, guilt-ridden mother, confused grandmother and a young

sister

Sweet^as neyer

seen bring dark, unresolved childhoodrnemories flooding back into his head. Visions of Sweet as a young boy and overweight teenager begin appearing in the house and garden, forcing Sweet to face the ghosts of his past. Writer, director and producer Thom Fitzgerald

into the future.

This was one principle theme of the movie, according to Fitzgerald in the notes. “No matter how much you hate your life and yourself in the current

moment,

it

is

possible to

become

the per-

son you want to be, so hang in there,” he said. The characters are fascinating to watch, despite some unoriginal stereotyping (such as the grand-

The Hanging Garden demonstrates that even the most ordinary lives operate on a poetic level. “In my head, I approached the film structurally, hoping to create both a slice-of-life drama and a surrealist fantasy,” he said in the movie’s press

mother), in their interaction with each other. Moving about the constricting rooms of the house or the stormy garden, the misery of their collective lives is amplified through their settings. The Hanging Garden is not a light, fanciful pic-

notes.

ture.

said

Ultimately, a sense of understanding does emerge, not only in Sweet but in those closest to him. The family's haunted past is no longer avoided but accepted, allowing them to proceed

Complex and

unsettling relationships are and surreal world.

in the real

presented both Because of this, it is a movie to ponder long afterward, as the meanings of the visions are left to personal interpretations.

pstory

by Sarah Smith


L

the roll about midway through the evening, tribinexplicable an and was adorned with flowers Park. South cartoon controversial ute to the

By

startled oud, thumping, techno music the King late afternoon shoppers at

Centre Mall Nov.

8.

of

The sounds, emanating from the lower level marked the beginthe downtown Kitchener mall, '91 - Eight Hours for the Out ning of Reaching raised Homeless. The "art, drama and dance-a-thon"

In keeping with the night's

Mary's

client, featuring

with the caption "This

stu-

hours, about 50 people danced, acted

and/or drew themes relating to

up

for

Acting the homeless it

homeless

youth.

fare has to eat rest of

for the

But

was

it

Inside Out, the play written by participants, that

was

most and

the

interactive

interactive the event, with proceeds

Story

and photo by Rita Fatila

informative

medium

Mary's and the Safe Haven Shelter at at the the Betty Thompson Youth Centre. This year, the fund-raiser was a multi-media unlike last year's event, which focused

going Place

on wel-

the month."

dance The music was only part of

my

is all

friend

eight

For

dents.

fridge

empty

awareness and funds for homeless youth through the pledges of high-school

theme was the

photos photo essay by a houses the woman of Mary's Place and abandoned friend's halfhad slept in, as well as a photo of a St.

of the

to

evening.

YWCA

.

Inside

on the floor by

(Steven audience members met street kid Blue

creation,

workshops, said Renee Beneteau, director of development for

co-starred the audience. Sitting the King Centre Mall's stairwell,

Out

After a store owner chased the audience into the stairwell, they

depended on Blue for guidance

"Last year we didn't DJs, just more of a workshop format. It was too education

as they stepped into his world. the

and not enough fun." This year, the organizers seemed to have reached a compromise.

who

dainful passersby.

of

The names of

'97.

local resources for

partic-

the homeless

didn't take

sewn

workshops were the and Toronto six Guelph disc jockeys: Basic, Billy

the

dia-

Reaching Our Outdoor Friends, and other youth

Deeno, Freaky Flow, Marcus and Nitrous.

shelters.

At the end of the play, Blue assured his audience that they didn't have to bunk

everything

Playing

into

were

logue as the actors discussed casually

McBroom,

from hardcore

buskers

and two panhandlers for competing change from dis-

to create the paintings and the play fea-

ipants

invited

titutes, street

allowing participants

The only

with

Blue and the audience bunk for the night. There were also squeegee kids, pros-

in writing,

night

who

blankets

dance and visual arts were held a month in advance,

the

three

way included

girls in the stairwell

acting,

Reaching Out

to hip-hop, the

disc jockeys and their dance floor took up most of the space

him and

his friends for the

night, but could

loaned for the night

go back

to their

had been homes. by the King Centre Mall. Described by Beneteau as "toprest the took up A "Homeless Gallery" notch", Inside Out of the lower level, gteven Holditch performs at Reaching Out â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97. featured skilful perSet up in the abanalso helped write the who actors, its from formances doned food court, the art area displayed a photo play. essay by a homeless woman and several unfinished "I love acting and it's for a really good cause," pieces of art for participants to finish. A large roll of who said he was unsure whether the play Beal, said and paint that

1997

blank paper lined with oil pastels, crayons lay in the middle of the room as well. "It's for people to paint on. At the end of the night, we'll hang it up," said Alison Hargreaves, a volunteer

who

looked after the

Story

and photo by Hunter Malcolm

People they met along

al

tured

Night

Beal).

staff

YWCA.

Workshops

Crimson rocks at Conestoga

art area for the night.

back next year. But a Reaching Out '98

will be

C

attendance, but for those

people who took advantage of the live entertainevening the ment, provided an intimate setting to get acquainted

planned,

according to organizers, as the fortunate are reminded, "Someday your life could be turned inside out."

more comfortable

ent.

Intimate indeed, with an audience that would bare-

and it's a much better way to approach music," said

with some local

ly

new

tal-

comprise enough peo-

ple to hold a decent road

hockey game, featured band Crimson played for the sake of their craft and their enthusiasm showed through. Guitarist John Connolly recognized the audience

"Wednesday warriors" and set the tempo with some hard-hitting riffs.

as

Crimson, who come from Hamilton and have yet to release their first virtually are CD,

unknown

to

mainstream However,

David Aced fDNNV

17

Nov.

INI

TtiE

DEAD!

1

1

:30

am

ST(j^

Indeed, the four-mem-

ber ensemble may hit a chord with the 20 -somewith generation thing their original tune. Kill

Your Boss. Crimson

played

other songs in their

10 set,

including two accompaby Bell with an

nied

guitar and an encore rendition of Neil Young's Cinnamon Girl,

acoustic

which did

justice to the

Perhaps the most outaspect

of

the

dered herd", it is nice to experience music from an uncompromised perspec-

show, was the sincere grit of the band. They looked like they came to play hard, even if it was just

tive.

the sound

Without an established audience to justify their sound. Crimson played their

for

brand of rock

its

own

sake,

'n'

roll

which

is

the style.

dished out their repertoire to date with great enthusi-

to see

man who came

them.

Crimson were doing

it

for themselves and obvi-

ously didn't give two bits

how many Conestoga students would come out to take a chance on them.

Rock 'n' roll is about having a good time and

Scott Bell, guitarist and lead singer, said that the

what exactly at had Crimson Conestoga Night, even if so few others wanted to

group has been making

come

asm.

The Sanctuary

his

around

aspects of escapism.

standing

barely one hour, the band

qON

much of

centre

lyrics

are so carefully calculated, marketed and slotted

In a brief set that lasted

1

Bell said

classic.

the essence of

Tues. Nov.

Bell.

where today's hit-makers

for the ears of the "bewil-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

writing

music for himself.

"We went through a time of playing a lot of we've but now crap, developed our own sound

audiences. is definitely

music together for about 10 years. Having made it through a heavy metal phase that all good. Ski Doo-riding Canadians go through, he said he is now

onestoga Night at Mrs. Robinson's on Nov. 5 was perhaps disappointing in terms of

that's

Spoke

Wc\\\

11


(E. \>L'

A story

lool table plus a full

are usually whitevery buildings, angular and conservative in

Banks washed

on the lower same building. This used to be an old Royal Bank building and that’s how the idea came about. The restaurant was

room

style.

sounds of money being counted and checks echo stamped being through the concrete buildings.

initial part and, after that got going, Bruce decided to put in a second-floor Robert said nightclub,

To think that the newest nightclub to hit Kitchener was inspired by a bank is odd, but it works. On the second floor of the building, located at 185 King St. W., is the Banke. You’ll find yourself swept up in a kaleidoscope of col-

the

and lights. A mural of altered $50

ing

manager

Dewar,

of

the

Banke.

Dewar, who was hired in July to manage the nightclub, said the Banke is lean-

more towards the concept of an upscale night-

ors

bill

located

level of the

The

a

length

Elar and a shooter bar. The idea behind the nightclub was inspired by owner, Bruce An, who also owns the Strand and a Karaoke

Natalie Schneider

slightiy

club.

glares

"We’re trying to not neces-

across the spacious dance floor. Tables are decorated with painted coins. Bank

an older crowd

get

sarily

but a

more mature and

responsible crowd - staying away from the teeny hopper kind of thing,” said Dewar.

windows have been painted on the walls.

teller

not a mega-bar

It’s

like

focusing

as

on dance.

"We’re going

by no means bank - it has

own

flair,

happening

to try

and

please everyone, but we’re leaning more towards the dance thing. We want peodancing. But we’re ple going to have a mix of

a place. which will

creating

The Banke, open its doors for the first time on Nov. 20, has a

some

alternative, rock ‘n’ roll and possiretro, dance,

its

concentrate

on

the

prizes.

far

two disc jockeys playing a mix of music, but mainly

is

will

one deejay

thing.

or

entertainment goes, the Banke will have

replica of a

so that

night,

music and the lights, giving the best performance possi-

As

a dry

We hope to said Dewar. have two DJs playing, every

the Lyric. It’s going to be nice and cosy. Everybody’s going to know everybody, that kind of

Stages

This

KIND OF BANK

DIFFKlUilNT

and photo by

A“f

I

We

bly even heavy metal. probably won’t play any

country or at least no more than two songs in a row.

ble,

deals

while the other one with giving away

Most of the

prizes

Now

approximately 200 people. One great thing about the Banke is there is no cover charge. Plus, we’ve got the Strand as well as the Karaoke room, so we can offer patrons full entertain-

Dewar. Right now the only musientertainment will be but the the disc jockeys idea of live entertainment has been touched upon,

cal

"We’ll possible get some nds in later on. Maybe

some

stnff

different

throughout the week, like rhythm and blues or jazz. On Nov. 28, Energy 108

tickets for certain events.

on

a smaller club. The holding capacity for the Banke is

Dewar.

said

sponsored by Labatt s and Molson’s, including everything from T-shirts to free

is

at

said

things,'

different

are

All the prize give-aways are a nightly basis, as well as grand prize give-aways on a weekly or monthly basis, said Dewar. One thing that sets the Banke apart from the countbars number of less spreading over the downtown area is the fact that it

you can hang-out

same place and enjoy

the

will its

help the Banke kick off grand-opening celebra-

tions.

For now, the Banke will be open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. This will likely change in the long-

ment from top to bottom. The owner has always been that.

after

When

friends

seven

you get together,

run.

maybe everybody doesn t like doing the same thing.

Doors open between 8 and 9 p.m.

Comedian is wake up Sanctuary by Rita

and they don’t

friends

their

Fatila

want Although

Thurs. Nov. 1

;00

20

pm

When comedian David Acer comes to Conestoga Nov. 18, he won’t just be providing enterbe jolting he’ll tainment, Sanctuary users out of their

Acer was booked to perform

at

the college after, Steve Harris,

The Sanctuary

Association Student entertainment manager, saw the

Doon

stand-up comedian showcase.

at

a talent

face,” said Harris. “I think that’s the kind of comedian the school

needs.”

Harris said find

it

ly

force an audience to interact,

uses

many comedians

difficult to get

most

said Acer,

prize

in

the

a reaction

out of the Sanctuary crowd. “We have very laid-back students. They come in here and eat their lunch and veg with

touring

southwestern

who lost the television

first

show

America’s Funniest People to a vomiting squirrel, fits this requirement. “He’ll start off loud, stay loud level

above

his head,” said Harris.

Acer, a former improv performer, has been compared to Robin Williams in reviews.

had a make.

Harris, however,

different

comparison to “He reminds me of a smaller version of Kramer off Semfeld, except he’s not paranoid. as

schools in Ontario, student

interaction

Harris said.

and keep the energy

“He’s obnoxious and in-your-

Although Acer, current-

comedians enjoy a challenge, Conestoga needs great comedians who can

He

lethargy.

He’s got incredible stage presence.”

to interact.”

in

advised

Harris

his

act,

against

heckling. “If

someone

in the audi-

ence heckles him, they might as well put a target sign

on their face. “Any comedian can take down a heckler but a really good one will nail

Acer,

them hard.”

who has

appeared on the

Art and Entertainment channel’s

Comedy on

the

Road, Comedy

Club 54 and four times at the Montreal Just for Laughs the in be will Festival, 18, Nov. Tuesday, Sanctuary at

fi-om 11:30 a.m. to 12:30

p.m


Atitholo5Vj mct>$

a11 Comsios^ writers photo and story by Sarah Smith

Fans will ran, not walk,

submit work,”

their

Conestoga students and staff keen to

dependent

con

should

for Trainspotting sequel

anything

talents

ative

contribution to a col

lege anthology planned

If you have the opportunity to get your hands on a

good

thing twice, run, don’t walk, at the chance. That’s exactly what you get with the new release of Trainspotting #2, the follow-up disc to the original movie soundtrack. The cover leaflet explains was released to that the include additional music from Trainspotting, as well as extra tracks that influenced the film makers and the film itself. Included in the soundtrack’s 15 songs is a variety of artists such as David

CD

Bowie, Primal Scream, Joy Division, Underworld and

With such an of different musicians, everything from

Think About the Way, by Ice MC, is an example of a typical song played in the very trendy dance clubs. High on volume, low on

ject

talent.

ative input of others.

Another song

would

that

not have been missed had it been included is not Statuesque, by Sleeper. The song will either put you to sleep or irritate you, I guarantee it. Despite the CD’s downsides,

it

makes up

for

them

in other areas.

disc.

What starts off as a gospel tune smooths over into a grooving drum beat nied by sul-

disc.

try vocals.

The opening track. Choose

To add

Life, by Project, is

mellower

PF

side disc

an

of

the is

in-your-face

Atmosphere,

by

music genius mixed with the lyrics would make any wallflower get up and shake their groove thing. All lyrics in the

song

by Ewan McGregor, who played Renton in the movie.

are provided

17

Nov.

Dialogue-driven lyrics such as, “Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pishing your last in a /niserable

home,

nothing more than a

embarrassment

to the brats you spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. selfish

Choose choose

life. I

life. I

chose not to chose some-

thing else,’’ are mixed into the track. But while the has its share of good songs, there are some bad apples in this

CD

bunch.

Joy

Division. It’s an excel-

digital

compiled by the college. Kinley s^y^ It? hopes to see similar results

For closet writers, poets and artists

reveal themselves, the

and

lent song,

though

it

could

make even

the happiest person alive get bummed out.

Remixes of Iggy Pop’s Nightclubbing and Underworld’s Bom Slippy, which both appeared on the debut soundtrack, surface again on this CD. Simply

put. better

Nightclubbing was left the way it was, but Bom Slippy couldn’t have been mixed better. It’s hard to imagine such a good track could have been improved. All six minutes ana 29 seconds are pure enjoyment. If you’re a fan of the movie then this is a musthave for your CD rack.

Even

new

if

at

unwilling or uninspired to

arts

new literary

anthology offers a chance

them to formally share their work with others. The anthology would provide a forum not currently available for aspiring writers and artists in the Conestoga community to express for

“I see

it

as a need that’s not being

addressed,” he said. “Sometimes

Conestoga.

“I’d like It’s

good

It’s good exerwhole process of being

writing out there. cise

the

it

to

be an annual thing,

rather than a one-shot deal,” he

to get

said.

Students are also being encour-

aged to assist in the and from writing at "Fool!", said my muse production home.” to me, "look in thy design of the anthology* Any poems, short sto- heart, and write." interested Those lies, personal essays. Sir Philip Sidney, should submit their drawings and possibly 1554-1586. work on disk and as photographs from students and staff are welcomed as a double-spaced manuscript, with submissions for the literary and a contact name and number, to David Kinley in room 1B51. The arts anthology. published

is

very differ-

ent

“We

obviously need people to

tentative' deadline is Feb. 27, 1998.

JCIN

r€R

to the

kind of song. The mix of

1997

collection of poetry, essays and art

and are looking for the cre-

instructors,

accompa-

hour-long

the

are currently organizing the pro-

college

people need encouragement to pursue it. By giving people an outlet, it helps them.

Leftfield.

on

is a taught previously. Kairos yearly publication containing a

Two

to like?

track by Primal Scream, Come Together, is another highlight of the

of

always

David Kinley and Bob Bamford,

themselves, said Kinley.

array

classical to dance to rave music fill the

for the spring of 1998.

You definitely can’t go wrong with David Bowie’s Golden Years - what’s not The 12th

is

The idea of a Conestoga anthology was inspired by a similar anthology published at Mohawk College, where Kinley

ting

by Natalie Schneider

quality

input.”

submit-

sider

Kinley.

said

The

express their ere

THE BEST STAND-LIP

CDMEPy Vuk's

Vuk Oinner Show

\A/e.d.

"The

Oec. 3

SancTuary

5:3D PM DOORS OPEN 6:3D PM All You Can Eat Spaghetti Dinner 7:30 PM Comedy

€n

Tickets €nly $1€ Sale at the W)SA Cffi

you are

release worth a

is

not, this definitely

whirl

Licenced Event

in

your boom-box.

C/J

T3

Hcvfl

I


SPOKE, November

COLLEGE

Campaign By Greg Bisch

and

raffles.

One

Conestoga College’s United Way campaign of 1997 has surpassed its goal of $27,500 and is still bringing in funds, said co-chair of the campaign Leisa Cronsberry.

As of Nov.

had raised $28,000 and the campaign was going despite its scheduled end of Oct 24. “The campaign is funded by several people and activities,” said iO, the college

Eleanor Conlin, co-chair of the campaign. “Everything is wonderful. I’m really pleased with the results, especially since it is all for a good cause.”

The whole when some

the

Oct 14

first-year recreation

organized

students

United

thing started the

1997

Way campaign

Doon

kick off in cafeteria. At the kick off,

students had the opportunity to participate

in

activities

big contributor to the campaign, said Conlin, was Beaver

Foods, which is responsible for Dooners, Roasters and the food court in the

Doon cafeteria.

For the spaghetti lunch, Beaver Foods donated all the food.

Ouch!

campuses was Conestoga’s donated to the campaign. Also a contributor, Marie Slater, an administrative assistant at the college, donated her time for the 1997 campaign as she does every year at the college.

keep

“I

of

track

the

all

raised

donations,” said Slater. “I input the

$705,” said John Kast, district manager of Beaver Foods.

donations into the proper files, I organize the cheques and keep the

am pleased, and we sure want do something next year.” Kast said he supports the United Way because he believes in the

co-chairs

of

the

informed

of

what

“I

believe

the

dinner

“I

to

organization’s

way of handling

funds. “I am a firm believer in the United Way. The funding goes to a number of good causes and is considered number one in the region.”

As

well as the spaghetti lunch,

a span of two weeks in October, 10 cents from every small for

cup of coffee sold establishments

Beaver Food all of at

at

— Page 9

1997

LIFE

a success

is

17,

bringing

campaign

we

are

in.”

Slater said she has

been doing

kind of work for the campaign for over six years. Some of the other activities this

included a toonie toss, which was held for three days in October, and a telephone bingo for faculty.

As

well,

Cathy O’Toole from the

early childhood education centre, to raise about $600 through activities in the centre,

was expected

Anne Brown

of

ParaMed administers a

Conestoga College student

in

B shot

Hepatitis

the Sanctuary Nov.

1

to

a

0.

(Photo by Rebecca Eby)

said Conlin.

Challengers beaten every time

Student uses pedal power to raise $700 for United Way By Richard Berta and

Students

faculty

raced

Andrew Caird on exercise cycles by Door 3 as he collected dona-

Way Nov.7. Leisa Cronsberry, co-chair of the also was Way United tions for the United

present.

Caird, a second-year accounting was unbeaten as he took

student,

on

all

Anyone could

challengers.

race Caird for a time of their choosing. Two bicycle graphics would appear on the electronic screen of the bikes

began.

One

Caird’s,

when

the race

bike was, of course,

and

the

other,

his

challenger’s.

No matter how lenger pedalled, Caird’s bike

hard the chal-

was

always in the lead. For most peoseconds of intense pedalling was enough for Caird to

ple, thirty

them gasping for breath. But winning was never the point of this exercise, Caird said. The intention was always to draw

John

manager of the recreation centre. James lent him the bikes from the recreation centre and put him in touch with Leisa Cronsberry, cochair of the United Way. “Without him (James), this wouldn’t have been possible,” Caird said. Caird, who is also a professional cyclist, has participated in the Ontario Cup mountain bike races and other professional racing over

He

the last three years.

Scott,

a business

instructor,

received the most praise for attempting, bravely but futiley, to beat Caird. Cronsberry comforted him afterwards by pointing out that the health office was only a

few steps away. Passers-by greeted Caird with “Has anyone beaten

the occasional

you yet?” and “Kick his

butt!”

Caird encouraged them to try their luck against him, many donations preferred to make

When

said he

without bothering to race. Caird was somewhat disappointed in the end that less people had

could empathsize with his opponents being exhausted after racing him. “I could barely keep up such an (intense) pace for 30 seconds when I fost started,” Caird said. Keeping up the pace wasn’t a

taken up his challenge then he had “Much of it had to do

expected.

with

it

being a Friday afternoon,”

he said. Caird said the next time he would try re-locating to a busier door, such as Door 4, and hold the event in the morning.

problem for Caird Nov.7. Even when he wasn’t racing, Caird kept pedalling at a leisurely pace.

leave

awareness to his support of the United Way. By the end of the day, Caird’s

total

money

raising

was approximately $700. Caird said he had fallen short of his initial goal, but the fund-raising campaign had made him look exercise

more realistically. “Our motto going into this campaign was anything’s better than

at things

nothing,” he said. But Caird had the support of var-

ious

sponsors

going

into

this

campaign. Ziggy’s included Sponsors Cycle, Popeye’s Gym, Chicopee Pro-Shop, East Side Mario’s Kelsey’s North), (Waterloo Restaurant, A1 Cheapolini’s and Exit Realty, who said they would

match whatever Caird made Nov.7

The idea to raise money biking was a first-time venture by Caird, Cronsberry said. through

7 on a station^ money on behalf of the United Way. Caird

Andrew Caird took on any willing bicycle in an attempt to raise raised $700.

participants Nov.

Livingston)

Caird said that once he had the idea, he contacted Ian James,

Remember^^pS^^

#’s to

Phone Fax

519-748-5131

Hotline

519-748-5220 ext

E-Mail

listen@doonsa.com

WWW

www.doonsa.com

519-748-6727

8DSA

pSA Office Hours Monday

to

Thursday 9 am

Fridays

-

9

am

2

-

4

pm

pm

Closed Weekends and Holidays

he Sanctuary Hours Monday to Thursday 7 am - 7 Fridays 7

pm

am - 5 pm

Closed Weekends and Holidays


— SPOKE, November

Page 10

1997

17,

COLLEGE

LIFE

Awards banquet a success

Journalism program kicks up their heels By Matt

Harris

tion to the journalism profession

and the betterment of his or her Conestoga College honored its best reporters and shutterbugs at the annual journalism awards banquet Nov. 7 at Golf’s Steak House in Kitchener. Among the awards handed out was a new entry sponsored by the all-sports radio station from Toronto, 590 The Fan.

own “I

to

this,”

Eby

I

wasn’t

said. “It’s nice

be surprised.”

According to Millman, this award signals The Fan’s beginning of a three-year committment to community college programs that will total around $250,000. “We have to find and develop the talent that’s out there,” Millman said. “Opportunities are so wide

you’ve got

If

worked hard but

expecting

“Opportunities are so

wide open.

skills.

open. If you’ve got the skills then

the

skills

then you can go

you can go almost anywhere.” Journalism program coordinator Andrew Jankowski said The Fan’s support for the program was a big

almost anywhere.” Nelson Millman,

Fan

radio’s

boost to the students. “I hope it stimulates more of the same in the future,” he added. Palmer was also a big winner,

program director

The banquet’s guest speaker was The Fan’s morning host, John

taking

Derringer. Derringer spoke about opportunities for

young journalists

tance of developing interpersonal

“There are opportunities

avail-

From

left

— Rebecca Eby, Ellen Douglas, Lynn Jackson and Ian Palmer were the big winners

“And

interpersonal relation-

ships are very important.

keeps you from getting pigeon-holed as a certain type of person.

It

Those

rela-

you move along

tionships help

in

your career, so it’s important to develop them when you get the chance.”

Derringer also said that even

He

also collect-

journalism awards banquet Nov.

7.

best sports writing. at the

(Photo by Matt Harris)

able like never before,” Derringer said.

Kitchener-

ed the Carl Fletcher award from the Cambridge Daily Reporter for

relationships as a part of defining a

community.

the

best feature story.

today. Also, he stressed the impor-

role in the journalistic

home

Waterloo Record’s Edward J. Hayes award, presented for the

though opinion-oriented journalism is growing in popularity, there is a price to be paid for expressing opinions.

“You have

to

know what

you’re

talking about, especially in something like sports,” he said. “As long as you get your facts right, you’ll be okay. Besides,

you want

people to have a difference of opinion.”

Rebecca Eby won The Fan’s award for the best sports coverage, having had her portfolio of stories and photos picked as the best entry.

by 590’s program Nelson Millman, Eby was

Presented director

awarded $3,000 and an internship the station. Ian Palmer and Andrea Bailey were the runners-up at

in the category, collecting

$1,000

Lynn Jackson was named

opinion piece. Ellen Douglas

Eby

also collected an award for the best sports photo and one presented in conjunction with the

University of Waterloo for dedica-

won

the Southern

Newspaper award for

Ontario

Memorial

for their efforts.

jour-

by the Record and also won the Ross Weichel award for the best editorial or nalist of the year

Guild the

best scholastic record and then claimed the Andy Dugan award for distin-

guishing

and

herself

as

a

reporter

editor.

University of Guelph greenhouse gets a facelift By Becky

Clay Switzer, alumni and member of the project planning com-

Little

The University of Guelph

is

restoring the conservatory

by the University Centre on campus. Built in 1931 by Lord and first

used

said

when he went

to

it

school, the area by the greenhouse was very pretty and quiet. “Where you took your favorite girl.” Before the project began in the

at the university for

spring of this year, the entire area

Burnham of St. was

mittee,

Catharines, Ont.,

the study of floriculture.

It

was

scheduled for demolition in the 1990s but was saved by alumni and staff.

mill” but the project

is

be completed by Switzer said.

spring

The plans plans for

1998,

for the restoration of

greenhouse

the

expected to

includes

itself

thematic

surrounding the greenhouse was overgrown with weeds, Switzer

gardens around it. The themes for the gardens are seasonal fall, winter, spring and summer. There will also be a water garden and a wood-

said.

land garden.

The idea spent

“three years in the

six

Switzer said the water garden

would be dedicated to the memory of Douglas Robinson, an alumnus

Mark November 19 on

^your VIP/CIP day

campus and

calendar!.^

will

be held

will attract

at the

Doon

more than

2,000 secondary students who will be exploring their post-secondary options through displays, workshops

and

tours.

If

you would

like

more

who

passed away. Switzer said the conservatory will not be a working greenhouse. It will be used as a teaching facililandscape architecture and horticulture students, Switzer said. It will serve as the entrance way ty for

for visitors to the university

Susana 473

at

748-5220

ext.

Pellizzari

in

Guelph

front is

due

of

the

horticulture

for restoration.

building

at

(Photo by Becky

the Little)

and

and relax, said Switzer. There will be a sitting wall where

in sit

students can have their lunch over-

looking the water garden. The wall will bear the names of the donors involved with the project.

“The

project

is

a

lasting

power of determined

people with a shared vision,” said Bill Greg, a U of G grad and head of the fund-raising committee.

The

Note: the Condor roost will not open until 1 :30 the day of the event.

University of

information centre. Students will also be able to use the gardens to

tribute to the

information contact

The greenhouse

be

total cost

close

Switzer.

to

of the project will $1

million,

Fund-raising

said

began

in

1995, and $250,000 was raised in cash donations mainly by alumni.

$150,000 worth of materials (trees, shrubs, plants, sod, paving and irrigation

materials,

etc.)

for

The view

of the

gardens from the greenhouse

Guelph. constructing the garden has been business in the

donated by community.

at the Universtiy o (Photo by Becky Little

Wendy Shearer is the landscape architect in charge of designing the plan.


COLLEGE

SPOKE, November

LIFE

Computers help adults with

GED certificates

By Rebecca Eby

of

new computer lab at the Waterloo campus of Conestoga

But Boutilier said the main beneof the adult program is that stu-

fit

whose average age is 30, can quickly discover their weaknesses and set out a plan for dents,

used to tutor high school students and prepare adults for the general education development tests which

achieving their goals.

complete the high

“We live in a society that is looking for a quick fix,” she said. “This is a process that will help

school equivalency certificate.

a

is

new

said

initiative for the

Violet

Boutilier,

people get organized and have a plan for their education. Within three hours, you can find out what

administrator and academic coach in the

programs, about the

GED

preparation course.

their issues are.”

“They realized there is a new segment of the population out

Two

Boutilier said

Ae

students have enrolled in the

program so far, said and serious inquiries have already been made regarding adult

there that needs upgrading.”

GED

is

doing,” she said.

The Star Lab, equipped with 20 new Pentium computers, will be

“This

computers

“The person sitting next to you have no idea what you’re

College will provide an alternative

college,”

the

will

education to students.

to

using

confidentiality.

A

need

— Page 11

campus enters new territory

Waterloo

are

1997

17,

Boutilier,

self-directed

program requires a certain

the next intake, Nov. 24.

type of student.

“You want to be motivated to do things on your own,” she said, “because you have more control over what you want to do (each

Linda Bell, a student at the new Star Lab at Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus, studies a lesson in preparation for the GED. (Photo by Rebecca Eby)

day).”

that

She said students can work on the areas where they need improvement the most. “It brings you back to the basics

said.

you might have missed,” she

“When they taught fractions, you might have been sick on that day,”

The high school program, she said, helps students in

she said.

a similar

way.

Boutilier said almost

work

in the

of the

all

two programs

is

done

on the computers installed with Star Invest 2010 software. “We found this really slick software that is easy to use,” she said. She also said one of the benefits

She said the GED preparation program is usually held during regular school hours and the tutoring program runs mostly in the evenings.

GED program costs $500 for

The

a two-week course and the high

school program costs $75 for the initial assessment, $35 for half-day sessions and $175 per month.

PointCast website has the latest news By Amy Sonnenberg

news, gossip, reviews and

latest

special happenings in the world of

Keeping in touch with the world has never been easier than with PointCast, a website dedicated to news. Besides its regular site, PointCast also has a site directed towards

college students which helps to keep you informed on national and world news as well as music, entertainment and issues students are interested in.

Before you take part

On

#

campus Twenty-four enrolled, said

About 25 students are enrolled for

thU

basic

level

electrical

machine and apparatus rewind and repair program which started Nov. 10

at Conestoga’s

Detweiler

centre.

The rewind program, which

centre

is

students

are

Woods, but

the

trying to

fit

one extra

student into the winter class.

Students enlisted in the proare from all over Ontario

gram

and are employed in cm'eers, said Woods.

electrical

Woods added also

enlist

in

the

can

program

through standard tuition payment. Woods said the rewind program is important because 75 per cent of the power consumed in North

America

The standard

that students

is

consumed by

electri-

ticeship

one month, is the only program of its kind in Ontario. George Woods, a faculty mem-

length of apprenprograms is eight to 10 weeks, but the rewind program

cal apparatus.

runs at Conestoga twice a year

runs only four weeks.

ber at die Detweiler centre, said

(the students

Woods. Jim Peters, who attended the apprenticeship rewind program

for

Conestoga is the only college which runs diis particular elecixical

apprenticeship

jipa.

iffo-

.

said the tj^prenticeship

i^gram, whielt

is

government

because the industries work for) only want them here for that long,” said Woods. “They are obviously that important to the companies they

“That

is

work for,” he

said.

Woods said students eligible for the

program are those employed

with the electrical industry, take

it

who

as a standard apprentice-

ship program.

“These students will build and maintain

the

machines,”

said

Conestoga, will be teaching the rewind program for the month, said Woods. “Peters is a graduate of the at

same

{M'ogram,” said

Woods and Jim

Woods.

Fitzpatrick, a

construction maintenance teacher, also

teach the rewind program

M fee centre.

link.

The student advantages

link has

on post graduates, free time and campus survival, as well as a grab bag and discount feature articles

Keep in mind this website comes from the United States and most of the articles are targeted to American students. To keep on top of all the other links.

news, there’s a

CNN

link that fills

US

news experience, however, you have to download it from www.pointcast.com and save it on

news, world news, political news, show business, fashion and sci-tech news.

your hard drive. automatically PointCast also replaces your screensaver with

ward, with scores, game highlights and feature stories on your favorite

active

Students enrolled in the apprenticeship rewind program

By Jamie Yates

in this inter-

entertainment on the E! Online

you

on

in

The

sports link

is

straight for-

and players.

news updates. The homepage is where you’ll find all the news and features of

forecasts of several major world

sports

The weafeer

link gives

cities,

current and following

the page.

complete with

The

first

one

the viewpoint

is

changing picture. Click on it to read what’s going on behind the scenes at PointCast; news, features and other information. The U-wire link fills you in on news from American colleges and universities. Read: top news, campus life, news to use, careers, administration, research, the offbeat,

cartoons,

cyberfun

and

opinion.

The music zone has news features,

reviews,

dishes,

events

and

you can keep track of the news on your favorite

the

including Toronto, for the

the site. All the different links are listed along the left-hand side of

link, but it’s not labelled, it’s a

you

satellite

two days images.

Get the Canadian side of things news link, with national, business and interpolitical, in the

national news.

The Globe and Mail

link

is

also

purely Canadian with business, sports,

the

arts,

features

and

editorials.

Below

all

of these links you’ll

box labeled “update”. Just on it and all of these links

find a click

will be updated constantly with up-to-the-minute news until you

log

off.

A ticker runs along the bottom of page at all times featuring the found throughout the web-

charts so

the

latest

stories

musicians.

site.

Wired esc has feature stories and information on the Internet and

the

other computer-related topics.

you’re not on the Internet to keep

You can keep

up-to-date

on the

This ticker can also appear along

bottom of your page even

you updated.

if


Page 12

— SPOKE, November

17,

1997

Trio tearing the ieague apart By

L Scott Nicholson decision to carry four goaltenders and three extra defencemen.

They’re not quite Ted Lindsay, Sid Abel and Gordie Howe, but the forward line of Darryl Sinclair,

some

Matt Goodburn and Chris Palubeski are definitely turning

work hard

He

compared to last year’s squad. In his sophomore year, Palubeski said last year’s coach Tony Martindale emphasized a defensive style of play, while this year

Hergott

was a whopping 24 trio

five

in

While Sinclair, Palubeski and Goodburn have been basking in

the

offensive

Condors’ 7-4 thumping of Seneca, Nov. 5, and was responsible for three goals and two assists in the Condors’ 8-4 thrashing of Sault on Nov. 7.

When asked if he was concerned about only one line producing the bulk of the offence. Condor head coach Kevin Hergott said even when other teams put out their top line, his team is still outscoring the opposition.

Hergott said he has been impressed with the offensive pro-

Harris

White, four

oSrP

discusses strategy and the practice agenda with his players at

a Nov°10 "

(Photo by

duction from each of his forward

but are aware of the potential for a

lines.

downward

The

Condors, whose season record now improves to 4-0 (good for top spot in the league), are enjoying their early season success

teams.

Different result. In a rematch of the

place.

women’s

world hockey championship goldmedal game at the Dorn Cardillo arena Nov. 10 in Kitchener, the United States beat Canada 3-2 in exhibition play before an

room ready to mix it up, but it was the American squad that proved it could play that game better than the home team on this

announced crowd of 3,817. Gretchen Ulion potted the winner past Canadian netminder Danielle Dube’s glovehand just past the

midway

point of the third period. Ulion took the feed from linemate Shelley Looney at the

Canadian blueline and went

in

alone to net the winner.

The

was dominated from end to end.

third period

by the States

1

exhibition

night.

Several minor penalties were assessed to both sides early on. At the 10-minute mark, A.J.

MIeczko

capitalized

on a power-

play opportunity.

Taking

a

feed

from Looney,

MIeczko snapped home a shot past Dube to bring the sides even at two. Dube had kept Canada afloat with supurb goaltending earlier in the period, but the States managed

wear her down with a growing barrage of quality shots on goal. “Our last two games with this team have been close,” MIeczko said. “This one was more physical to

anu inerese erisson aetend Danielle Dube

game against the

Uhited States.

cess

is

attributable to a great

in

work

and great team chemistry. Hergott echoed a similar reason

ethic

in

and

Sinclair

!

memories of the game, they were much gone after practice.”

far as the

(gold medal) pretty

that

comes

to win,

positive

and with

thinking,”

Hergott said.

Another players

added incentive for has been Hergott’s

has

won

the

three of the

Condors have

this year.

Without playing again until Nov. 22 at home against the Cougars, coach Hergott said for the interim, he would be working on improving the player’s conditioning in preparation for the Dec. 4 and 5

tournament in Lindsay. There the Condors will play three games in two days.

Olympic preview

.V and not as dirty as some in the past have been.

“As

Scott Nicholson)

for the 4-0 start to the season.

“The guys want

Sinclair said the team’s early suc-

Canada

Both teams came nnt out of of the the Hrecc_ dress-

Same

spin.

L.

who

games

played

^

ing

Same

glory,

Palubeski were quick to point out the great play of goaltender, Darryl

U.S. clumps By By Matt

some big

in

offence.

had two

assists

giving players more

is

freedom resulting

responsible for points amongst themselves.

and

the time.

seem to be adapting well to a change in style of play

included stops in Niagara Falls to play the Sencea Scouts and in Sault Ste. Marie to play the Sault

Sinclair, in particular,

all

Players also

heads in the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association hockey league. On a recent road trip, which

goals

thereby forcing everyone to

tition,

some

Cougars, the dynamic

said the extra bodies create healthy, intra-squad compe-

came out pretty confident Dube said. “It’s hard to accept a loss when you feel like “I

tonight,”

you

are capable of a win.” For much of the early part of the game, Canada displayed the fire that won them the gold medal. Strong forechecking and steady

from its defensive core allowed them several opportunities play

The crowd thought Canada had taken a two-goal lead just minutes later, but the score was disallowed

Sobek established control over tl neutral zone for the Americans.

Canada struggled

for the rest

advance the puc effectively, encountering oppos tion right from their blueline.

put Canada ahead 2-0 off an assist from Nancy Drolet, but the Americans replied in kind less

throughout the game,” Wickenheiser said.

than

three

minutes

later

when

Karyn Bye scored in close. With the donut off the scoreboard, the States went on the attack. MIeczko and Jeanine

the

game

“We

to

“You

didn’t

really

play

can’t play poorly again;

We have to move the puc and support the defenc better if we want to wi the U.S.

better

next time.”

the opening stanza. Jayna Hefford opened the scoring just three minutes into the game when

she

jammed home a lose puck past netminder

Sara

DeCosta.

X

the Canadian aoal durindTh e, gJni

Z

we

Hayle

in

American

(

due to a player in the crease. The teams traded goals in the second period. Tammy Shewchuk

U.S.torward A.J. MIeczko cruises through the neutral zone dui the closing minutes of her team’s 3-2 win over Canada. (Photo by Matt Hs


SPOKE, November

SPORTS

17,

1997

— Page 13

Clear the track,

Eddie Shack is back to tell his personal story Hockey legend

Waterloo

visits

By LScott Nicholson

Decked out

cowboy boots, leather pants, a black t-shirt black cowboy hat, a large man with a Fu Man

in black

and a 15-gallon,

Chu mustache

recently strolled through the doors of a Waterloo

bookstore like a character from a spaghetti western.

No, it wasn’t Clint Eastwood. Hockey, Eddie Shack. Shack, along with author Ross Brewitt,

was

It

the

had lost his confidence, but was traded to the Maple Leafs he knew/ he would have to work the Rangers, he

Waterloo’s Wordsworth Bookstore Nov. 8 to promote Brewitt’s book Clear the

by

the time he

Track: the Eddie Shack Story.

his

way

was

at

Within

five

minutes

the friendly giant

of

his

arrival,

Shack was behind the

front desk kibbitzing with a nose-ringed store clerk.

“What, did ya lose a bet or somethin’?” Shack asked, pointing to the young women’s nose. Shack then asked, “Woulda ya do when ya wanna blow or pick your nose?” The woman, though slightly embarrassed, laughed at the slightly obnoxious but funny former hockey player.

Clown Prince of

up.

what I had to do to, whether it was to get big Frank (Mahovolich) going, fight or score goals,” Shack said. Shack said the idea for a book about him and his career came after he had been asked by a number of hockey people if he had “I did

considered “I

knew

I

it.

had a

little bit

of

humor and a

he said. “Ross knew how to do the writing so that’s why he’s the chosen one. That’s why he’s little

bit of fun to put in a book,”

my arthur.” (Throughout the book and the interview,

“Publishers are a pain

They don’t know s

in

the ass.

— from

Brewitt refers to Shack’s mispronunciation of words as Shackisms.)

who to this day caimot read and can name at best, was comfort-

didn’t really

able with having Brewitt as the author of his

daily basis.”

Shack,

putty.”

write only his

Eddie Shack, retired

NHL hockey hero

Shack, whose journeyman career spanned

life story.

Ross at the the f— he wanted spewing Shack said. “I told

start

of this to do what

to do,” the profanity-

Despite knowing each other for 28 years through their affiliation with the Maple Leafs, Sabres and the Pop Shoppe stores, Brewitt said he was still learning things about Shack. “I thought I knew Eddie fairly well but the

career goals.

problem is when you know somebody that long, you assume you know them and I

Shack said when he started his career with

“I

know

off his

Stanley

Cup

from the 1967 Toronto Maple Leaf

ring

(Photo by

Eddie,” Brewitt said.

Brewitt said he also used the insight of Norma Shack, Eddie’s wife, and

Scott Nicholson)

Shack said he enjoyed the book-writing process but was bothered by some of the complexities of the publishing business. “Publishers are a pain in the ass,” Shack

people like

Norm Ullman and Bobby Hull, both friends

L.

for so long.

was learning things about Eddie on a

and former teammates of Shack,

in the NHL with the New York Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Boston Bruins, Los Angeles Kings, Buffalo Sabres and Pittsburgh Penguins, was known as both a tough guy and as someone who had the ability to score as evidenced by his 239

some 17 years

Eddie Shack shows team.

said.

“They don’t know

s

— from

putty.”

to help

him write the book. As the interview proceeded. Shack had a sudden revelation: “You didn’t even need

“I

was

EcJdie

me to write the book.”

learning things about

on a

Brewitt admits he could have written an unauthorized biography, however, he said he doesn’t think the book would have been as insightful had he not known Shack

daily basis.”

Ross Brewitt, author o/Clear the Track

“We were

trying to get a half decent

contract written up and the publishers were

'X

fighting about this, that

Shack

and the other thing,”

said.

Once the interview concluded. Shack seated his large 6’1”, 235-pound frame behind a table with Brewitt beside him to face adoring fans.

Like an elementary school teacher talking Shack told the crowd, “OK everybody get in line, give the book to Ross to address it. I’ll sign it and feel free to ask to children.

me

anything you want.” While Brewitt was busily obliging address requests. Shack was like a comedian on A Night at the Improv, shooting out one-liners at an incredible rate.

Michael Schnarr (far right) ' ® ' talks with author

Ross

Brewitt (centre)

and Eddie Shack

(left),

while Schnarr’s son Eric looks on. (Photo by

L.

Scott Nicholson)

“Somebody once asked me how far I went in school. I told him three miles.” The crowd laughed. “My wife tells me every morning to write ‘think’ on my forehead, not ‘drink’.” Again the fans uproariously laughed at the former hockey-player-tumed-business man-tumed-fuimy-man, for Eddie Shack will

always be the entertainer.


1

Page 14

— SPOKE, November

17,

1997

SPORTS

Francis Xavier coach Steve Konchalski talks strategy with his team during a timeout at the Naismith tournament at UW.

St.

Waterloo’s Derek Maat (43) and St. Francis Xavier’s Kevin Stach (30) battle for the rebound during the gold medal game. (Photos by Dan Meagher)

University basketbaii tournament

Waterloo By Dan Meagher

falls

short

annual Naismith basketball tournament, held Nov. 7-9.

The St. Francis Xavier X-Men sunk the host Waterloo Warriors 95-79 in the final of the 30th

The Antigonish, Nova Scotiabased champions rode the 35-point effort of forward Fred Perry to

victory.

in

Naismith Ciassic

The 6’5” Perry held

hot hand

all

the

afterhoon for the X-

men, who won

for the first time

“It’s great to

St.

be back on top,” said

Konchalski. “This tournament

since a string of three champi-

good measure

onships ended in 1991.

terms of

how we

ourselves

a

is

Lindros

X-Men, with

key shots going errant going.

Successive three-point buckets

stack up against

by veteran guard Mark Chisholm, and all-star forward Mark MacKay

Konchalski was quick to acknowledge the hard work of the Warriors, who rely on the ballhandling and speed of 5’ 10” forward Canadian guard Mano Watsa

with under four minutes to play the Warriors

removed any chance had of a comeback.

Waterloo had a 36-35 lead half

on

some

attack.

gave him the team point

and

lead,

is

shot

and

play,

second place be ashamed

he

downfall

nothing to

of against this

Wednesdil^^MlKber 26 vs cuflaie Stores ^

/

///A

^

-v

very

much its

Complex was

on several occasions.

The Warriors were seeking first

title

at

the Naismith

their

since

good

bench but

Tom

boss,

team put up a

felt his

fight,

the

three

St.

Francis

In the bronze

wilted

in

the

stretch. “In the end. Perry killed

“But we came to play, and second place is nothing to be ashamed of against this cali-

medal game, which

took place immediately before the

game, the Western Mustangs Newfoundland’s Memorial Sea-Hawks 94-83. final

defeated

The

1985.

Waterloo Kieswetter

MVP

57 points

Xavier.

into the tight affair, ris-

feet

over

for

UW’s

ing to

Tick^ €n Saleliiday iBie DSX Cffe

Kieswetter,

hundred

Physical Activities

/

// ^//^/

Tom

named

of all Waterloo Warriors head coach games, which were wins

The crowd of at

After the game.

for his

the

the half.

tournament

all-

game. several

in

Perry was

calibre of competition.”

after

their

to

second

tournament star

decisions

led

was named a first-team

ill-advised

passes and poor

I

poTr\ jy “We came to

at the

the heels of a 15-2 run, but

to control their

& the Flyers

several

in the late

in

for

the competition.”

Eric

defense of the

Francis Xavier coach Steve

‘Stangs,

last year,

game

who won

the event

used an effective passing nullify

to

Memorials

constant full-court press.

Fourth-year

forward Nat took top

us,” he stated.

Graham’s

bre of competition.”

honors in the contest. The tournament, which is always hosted by UW, also featured teams

Perry attributed his clutch perfor-

mance

from

23

Wilfrid

points

Laurier,

the

good

University of Toronto, Concordia

out there today, and the ball kept finding me out there.”

and the University of Ottawa. WLU defeated Ottawa 77-73 in the consolation final held earlier on

to “luck,

1

guess.

I

felt

The Waterloo offence crumbled the tight man-to-man

under

the final day.


I

SPOKE, November

SPORTS

17,

1997

— Page 15

Nike puts spotlight on female athletes

Sports gambling a problem By Matt Harris Joe F. likes sports. Baseball,

He can talk any aspect of nearly every major sport today, including what the latest odds in Las Vegas are on Monday Night Football for the entire month of December. But, according to him, he doesn’t have a gambling problem. “Just because I lay down a bet on ProLine every now and then

football, hockey.

By Gorina

about

doesn’t mean I’ve got a bling problem,” he said. according However,

In order to get

women interested in

the case with

many is

an ad campaign featuring female

to

athletes

Some

and Gabrielle Reese. Yet unlike Michael Jordan or

was at die 7-11 andT thought it would be cool to try I

he

“Being a sports

said.

thou^t

I

could probably

make a couple of bucks

witii

whatiknew. “Over the past few years. I’ve had good runs of luck as well as some bad ones.” Some of the bad ones have seen Joe lose upwards of $100 in a single week. That may not | seem like much, and Joe admits doesn’t bother him

to

that

it

lose

money, so long as he has

the chance to get

Mia

Hamm, Lisa Leslie

government Anyone who is old enough to buy lottery tickets is eligible to play. That is how Joe said he got started. “I saw the form sitting there

out,”

of those

athletes include

a problem. ProLine is a sanctioned option monitored by the provincial

fan, I

who excel in

a particular sport.

other dis-

a part of the

At their website. Gamblers Anonymous has a list of 20 questions people can answer. If Aey answer yes to seven or more questions, they may have

it

started

gam-

problem.

when

Nike

sports,

Gamblers Anonymous, Joe may very well have a problem. As is eases, denial

Hill

back. Dean Rodgers, a resident of London, Ontario, says that he it

women

Eric Lindros, these

will

not be able to collect the same amount of money as male athletes. In their annual advertising report, is reported that Nike spent $138 million US on advertising with only 15 per cent of which going it

to ads targeting

women.

Marlene Ford, assistant athletics for director recreation and Conestoga College, recognizes funding as being one of several

women

for

barriers

getting

involved in sports. “It’s not evening out,” said Ford. Ford has been involved in sports for nearly 20 years playing baseball, soccer,

basketball,

field hockey, golf

volleyball,

and numerous

other sports.

Ford admits that male sports bring in

more money than female male sports have

sports because

sports before the introduction

more fans. Another barrier facing females

of Proline.

is

used to gamble frequently on

“A friend of mine used to take bets for me,”

he

said. “I’d bet

the lack of professional play available to females, said Ford. “It’s not a realistic goal when there

26 some odd hockey teams and

mostly on foodiall. Sometimes

is

we’d go to die racetrack and bet

a boy can say ‘Oh ya, I’m going to play.’ There’s no such thing as that

there, too.

“I knew it was a problem when I wouldn’t think twice about betting more dian half my

paycheck in one night.” Rodgers said he started going to GA meetings a few years ago. The help he got. fihere, he said, enabled him to quit bet* ting altogether. “I had to stop. Otherwise, I would be in serious trmible today. With the way companies lay off people now, I can’t be sure how long I’ll have a job. You don’t want a huge gambling debt over your head if

you’re unemployed.”

Anyone who help can visit

need the Gamblers

Anonomous

website

feels they

at

www,g^bIensanonymous.com. Local help is avail^le throu^ Mary’s Hospital counselling services at 745-2585. St.

women.” Feminist The

for

Majority

Foundation’s task force on women and girls in sports suggests some strategies

to

“People have a hard time seeing a male and a female athlete at the

Male teams always get better

for drawing attention such as sports

same

level.

female teams.”

ice time than

Marlene Ford, assistant athletics and recreation director for Conestoga College

women’s

speaking out about gender equali-

and publicizing sexual discrimination at your school or university.

men’s games.

competitive

player

Another factor curbing women from entering sports is the level

book written by Mariah Burton Nelson called Are We Winning Yet?, she stated one of

many

Ford has been able

ty

of

play

in

organizations.

female

Ford

said

sports

many

females who are capable of playing at a higher level have no chance to compete unless they play with men. “People have a hard time seeing a male and a female athlete at the same level,” said Ford. “Male teams always get better ice time than female teams.”

Ford said a lot times, women’s teams play before men’s games so by the end of the night there are

more

spectators

for

In a

the major barriers homophobia. In the

“Female

being

by the former player, it he said,

book

basketball

in sport as

written

athletes in traditionally

masculine sports challenge the proper about dictates social behaviour for females; therefore, the reasoning goes, there must be something wrong with them.” Ford said homosexuality should not be a factor in sports but admits

that

it

is.

Being

a

sports.

involved

in to

meet a wide variety of athletes. “I don’t think it should be a factor whether you’re gay or not gay, you’re still on the same team,” said Ford. “You’re working toward the same goal.”

Homophobia

isn’t just a barrier

for entering a sport either. Some homosexuals are afraid of coming

out for fear or

their

it

will disrupt the

chances to play

team at

a

higher level.

A well known example of where declaring

one’s

homosexuality

was not a good idea was when

tennis player Martina Navaratilova openly admitted that she was gay. Navaratilova lost advertising

contracts after the

announcement

damaged her chance for making money in the sports and

advertising industry.

“This a

little

is the 90’s. You have to be more open now,” said Ford.

“Everybody’s equal until they prove they are not, whether they are gay, black or hispanic.”

In a report prepared by the Feminist Majority Foundation, it is stated that in 1993 only 5 per cent of televised sports news coverage is

on women’s

sports.


Page 16

— SPOKE, November

'

17,

1997

O OrMTTO O n o 11

Jock Talk

Preston Rivulettes prove hockey is for girls, too When

discussing the

younger players who were also known for

hockey team ever, some would choose the Montreal Canadiens or the Toronto Maple Leafs. I would argue something greatest

their great play.

important aspect to the team. Defensively,

different

Ranscombe ’s sister Nellie was the backbone of die team. As a goalie,

Even Gretzky’s Oilers don’t compare to a little-known local team that graced die ice in the 1930s.

Condor goalkeeper

Bill

Johnson makes a save during practice Nov.

10.

(Photo by

L.

Scott Nicholson)

Canadian football real life, real drama, real entertainment As

yet anoth-

CFL

er

draws

In the west, the

season

Roughriders’

Saskatchewan

upset

a

Edmonton Eskimos

perhaps few peple will notice. Perhaps even fewer still

nail-bitting fashion,

to

close

entertaining

dogs

pull

it

over

in the same showed how

that perpetually supports a team like the Maple Leafs, whose

can be to see under-

it

out of the hat.

Junior

In

However, for

who

those

watch

the traditional angst

games and take an interest ..in Canadian football, the 1997 play offs offered the faltering league

often-unrecognized

integrity.

The

and west division championship games were the stuff of TSN commercials - real east

life, real

In the

a sport that articulates

western regions of it

the

is

it’s

sad that

becomes news when

the

SkyDome

is

excitment of play

.

which makes the

CFL

.

Argonauts

the Toronto

and

40 seconds remaining, sent the largest crowd in SkyDome since the 1991 Grey Cup ballistic.

just

why

better

in

the

thriving

market. The Argos’

game

sports

against

fight for their right

to play against men who thought women telonged in the kitchen.

The Schmuck

sisters

went on

goal

line.

articulates the

the excitment of play

-a

direct

How many goalies out there can say they are responsible for keeping their team to only two losses one decade? reign of the Rivulettes ended with the onset of the Second World War.

The

The Preston

who

Rivulettes,

collected

348 wins

and only two losses 10-year-span,

made up

TEAM

GP

along

with

entirely of

women.

Hilda

Ranscombe, were feared on and ice

as

some of

the

toughest players in the game.

punch and

shtsft' pTayers

tried to take the

When the

the

who

puck from them.

team took to the

Ranscombe/Schmuck

was not Another

ice,

line

the only’ one feared. line

W

Conestoga

Cambrian

Boreal

S. S.

Fleming

0

T PTS 0

110 110 110

0

2

12

Seneca

Sault

L

4

0

4

LEAGUE RESULTS

8

Nov.5

consisted

of

So far, no team has been able to compete with the Rivulettes because they were able to go where no women’s team-trOT^ been before. The Rivulets filled the seats every night.

Women and children everywhere should look not to the Rivulettes as something that was, they should look at them and see what could be again.

Lace up your skates and grab your stick. Hockey is for girls, too.

Nov. 7

Conestoga 8

Sault 4

Nov. 8

Sault 2

Cambrian 9

0

TEAM

GP

PTS

Darryl Sinclair

CON

4

16

Chris Palubeski

CON

4

13

Goodbum

CON

4

11

Trevor Uhrig

CON

4

5

Geoff Smith

SEN

3

5

JeffKilb

SEN

3

5

Rene Tache

BOR

2

4

Tadum Neuman

SSF

2

4

Casey Martin

SAU

3

4

Chris Colburn

SEN

3

4

Fleming 5

Matt

1.

2

0

S. S.

National Rankings (week of Nov. 11)

2

2

NAME

Seneca 3

2

LEADING SCORERS

Seneca 4

1

Nov. 7

2

0

Conestoga

.

Cambrian Golden Shield (ON)

SAIT Trojans (AB)

3.

NAIT Ooks (AB)

4.

Conestoga Condors (ON)

5.

Mount Royal Cougars (AB)

a

was

MEN’S HOCKEY LEAGUE STANDINGS

in

to create a potent offensive line.

They,

more violent than the Flyers could ever be. Helen, Marm and especially Hilda were known to

line; it’s at the

result of the unpolished precision compared to its American counterpart - which makes the CFL stand out as our own.

mind, it is a mystery the CFL does not fare far

Both had to

bottom

between the east and western regions of Canada, it

this in

Schmuck came learned the great Canadian game of ice hockey.

Historical accounts depict the Rivulettes as a violent team, far

is

With

and Helen

Nonetheless, the entertainment of sport doesn’t lay' on the financial

traditional angst

Montreal

Alouettes, the 58-yard touchdown by Mike (Pinball) Clemons, with

Marm

sisters

off the

In a sport that

stand out as our own.

chance to play. It was on a make-shift ice rink that

she kept the puck from entering the net, having shutouts in many games.

in

The Preston Rivulettes, who collected 348 wins and only two losses in a 10-year-span, was made up entirely of women. The team contributed greatly to hockey by allowing women the

cially strongest team, the state of the league itself is far from secure.

drama.

game between

it

opened for unexpected fans at a football game. Although the Argos are the finan-

between the east and

Canada,

ing to watch as paint drying,

500-level deck at

the

some

B -calibre performances and

pace of development are as excit-

will care.

The team from Preston, which amalgamated with Hespeler and Galt in 1972 to form Cambridge, is far from being &e Leafs or Caiadians.

Montreal offered more action than the entire Leafs season to date. That is not saying much. In a city

the

They

were aged 14, 15 and 16 and were considered an

Digital Edition - November 17, 1997  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you