Issuu on Google+

W/ayne Hussey

Getting the point

let

go without severance

Community

relations director

calls dismissal ‘serious issue’ community

were related. Hobbs, chairman of Navion, said Tuesday that his company had been working with

minated with cause and the col-

the college in relation to

incidents

By Ross Bragg

Ebert

Conestoga’s executive director of relations has been ter-

lege

is

John Tibbits board of governors meeting

said college president at the

“Obviously some of you have heard rumors etcetera in the community, and I just wanted to announce that Wayne Hussey has

He

members of

the board and

yet to receive official is

I

would

which included acting as the

at this point,” he said, members of the public to leave the room for what he said would be a 20-minute closed-door discussion of the mat-

council.

College

1

ter.

“I think

development. Most recently he has worked as Conestoga executive director of

heard Sept. 22 that the college had run up a deficit for the 1996/97

Sharon Kalbfleisch, dean of academic assessment and special projects,

the

During the monthly meeting, Kevin Mullan from administrative operations said the college had run at a deficit of $674,000 for the

Practitioner Development Program Articulation.

“Trying to get those four institutions to work together has been something of a tall task,” she said. received has college The $75,000 from the Counselling

seems nega-

projected deficit for the 1996/97 year was set at $1.7 mil-

tive, the

lion.

Conestoga is not the only college which has been running in the red. Eleven other colleges in Ontario have also accumulated a deficit. Mullan said the deficit is a result of government cutbacks in 1995. A one-time buyout of 105 fulltime staff cost the college around

money

pay for the

to

take

schools ,

full-

time enrolment for the year was up 5.5 per cent to 4,320 from 4,094. Conestoga president John Tibbits attributed the rise, in part, to transferring students to

Conestoga in their second year and a good retention rate. Second year enrolment was up 7.4 per cent to 1,501 from 1,397. The board also approved an

in the future

courses from all simultaneously

the

four

and and

service

appliance

technician program.

The program had been

in opera-

However, enroland in 1996 declining, was ment the program was* suspended. In 1997, the program was revived but

tion for 25 years.

received only seven applicants. The space created by the pro-

gram’s absence

for

Hussey has only made a brief Statement about bis termination. “Obviously this is an extremely

the

University of Waterloo on its fund-raising efforts between July 1990 and September 1993. He also

worked

as

a

Kitchener-Waterloo before coming

director

serious issue to me,” said Hussey the day after the president’s statement to the board, “and as such, I

for

am

pursuing discussions with the college to resolve this matter. I

Oktoberfest

to the college.

Tibbits said Tuesday that on the day that Hussey’s position was ter-

have no

minated, the college suspended a contract with Navion, a Toronto

ate, will

interest in reviewing this

issue in the media, but if appropri-

at

based fund-raising company. He would not say whether the two

provide public statements

key points

in the process.”

see ‘Hussey’ on page 9

l:^>

Conestoga signs precedent-setting agreement with Waterloo school board By Rachel Pearce About 30 people from educa-

at

the

campus might be filled mor? machinist spots.

Guelph by 60

The Toronto Star reported

and a community college to improve education,” he said. The signators of the agreement

August

ment, having released

its

findings

in a confidential report

ered at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 16 at Conestoga’s Guild room to observe the offical signing of a

agreement between the college and the Waterloo County Board of

workplace support services division of apprenticeship and client services at the Ontario Ministry

program

Education.

of Education and Training.

tion

and

industrial sectors gath-

precedent-setting

agreement, The under which the two education allow high will institutions articulation

school students

who

study preci-

sion machining and tool trades in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program to enter the college with

advanced standing.

Mike McClements, dean of the woodworking and technology he believes the agreement between the school board and the college is the first of its kind in the province. “It is the first formal agreement between a board of education schools,

said

included

At

pattern

maker and

and die maker. Students who gain advanced standing in these areas will then be able to

tool

their apprenticeship at

complete an earlier age.

are

now

eligible

at the cost

of about $3.5

million.

report indicated that many Ontario businesses are having

The

trouble finding qualified youth to

employ.

Also taken into consideration were impending cuts to the $70*

million apprenticeship program.

Ottawa has announced that it will withdraw $30 million from the program’s funding in 1997-1998. The province will cut $10 million.

McClements, however, said that by the college was not formed because of the Tories’ plans. The agreement and the announcement merely happened at about the same time. the agreement signed

Students from Galt collegiate and Bluevale collegiate institutes for the

direct-entry program.

new

the

of

ment a revamped apprenticeship

present, the agreement only

mould maker,

on

the in education province, is planning to implestate

allows grade 11 and 12 students to learn skills in high school that will give them the equivalence of basic postsecondary training in four trades: general machinist,

in

that the Ontario govern-

Conestoga president John Tibbits, board of education director Patti Haskell, and Judith Robertson, vice-president of the

articulation.

will allow students

receive a college certificate university degree. In other news, the board voted to

disband

$4.9 million.

Mullan also told the board

of

expects more

The program

and

Canada,

Foundation to help

relations

officer

pended.

and Wilfrid

Laurier will take part in the Career

previous year. this figure

of

universities

Guelph, Waterloo

year.

Although

said

community

to coming Before Conestoga, Hussey worked as a

development

was

said his organization

not prepared as of Tuesday afternoon to discuss what he knew about why the contract was sus-

with

arrangement

three other universities.

Conestoga’s board of governors

owed

an explanation,

but the general public is not.” Hussey has been with the college since January of 1996, at which time he worked as director of

996/97

articulation

you (members of the

board) are

not as large as projected By Corey Jubenville

asking

Hobbs

Team

Kitchener, an economic development initiative with Kitchener city

more open

deficit for

for

representative

lege

col-

suggest that some of you may be in a bit of shock. We cannot be before

that

his position at the college.

is all I

to say at this sec-

word

Hussey had been taken away from

considering fur-

tion of the meeting, but

Amy Sonnenberg)

related to the sus-

pension of Navion’s contract with the college, and added that he has

have been able

(Photo by

the

Hussey’s

termination

ther legal action and that

Anne

was

if,

effective Sept. 15, 1997,” Tibbits

“The college

'

how, or

been terminated with no severance said to

receives a Hepatitis B vaccination trom 22 in the Sanctu^y. « Med On Sept. rBrown of Para

know

said he did not

details about

public.

Ward

current

with Hussey on the contract. “Hussey was not on our payroll. Fortnum was,” said Hobbs.

Sept. 22.

Erica

its

campaign. He said the company provided its own representative, Scott Fortnum, to work

capital

considering legal action,


6

Pa£e 2

— SPOKE,

Sept. 29, 1997

Way campaign

United

ready to go Greg Bums,

ship coordinator

By Rebecca Eby

is

organizing carnival-type games to

$27,500

Raising

in

under

take place outside the cafeteria

a

over the noon hour.

month might seem an impossible

Bums said the activities being planned include a sponge toss, a mini-put, a basketball shoot, a prize draw, a barbecue and possi-

feat for an individual, but that is

collective

the

target

for

the

Way

Conestoga College United

campaign. Eleanor Conlin, co-chair of the Conestoga College United Way

Campaign Committee,

bly a

said this

exceeds last year's achievement by about $2,500. “We know that there's a need out there and we're pretty well blessed goal

year's

here at the college,” she said. Proceeds received by the United Way are distributed to various

Two hundred tickets will be

John Ambulance, the House of and the Canadian

National Institute for the Blind. Conlin said about 1 1 0 people are

involved with the college's United “It truly is

there are leftover tickets.

the scenes. (left),

she said of the campaign, whose theme this year is "the life

may

changing

Though

everybody does

officially

It

features Neil

Oct. 24, Conlin said some activities the college is supporting are

billboard in

She said preparation for the cam-

taking place within the

diffi-

culties.

“Our biggest problem was

get-

community

until

she said.

The

college's

college

Parliamentary

has to be

passed by the board of directors. hasn’t been a

said

of the

OCCSPA

seemed disorganized,” Thomas Muller, the DSA’s education

and communications coordinator. “When they came and saw us (last year), we asked questions that they didn’t have the answers for,” said Steve Harris, the DSA’s entertainment manager. OCCSPA was established in 1975 and is Canada’s oldest lobbying association for colleges.

The group’s purpose is to represent students on matters of common concern to post-secondary education.

According report,

it is

cost around $2,800.

Muller

DSA

considering joining this year because the lobbying group seems more organized and more said, the

is

motivated.

member

lobbying association for two years. “Last year’s council decided not to join

because

OCCSPA is 63 cents DSA to join, it would

cost of joining

to its 1996/1997 annual a student voice to government

OCCSPA was reorganized this past year, with

new people

taking over

new

posi-

tions, said Harris.

“They

are

ing out the

more aggressive and are findanswers before anybody else,”

Muller said. “Being a part of this organization gives us answers and someone to go to if we have questions on issues affecting students. If their

is

a strike or tuition hike,

we

can find out the details from OCCSPA instead of doing the digging ourselves.” Another benefit, said Muller, is strength in numbers.“The more colleges you have together in one organization, the stronger it is to say to the government, ‘Hey, this is the problem, lets solve

it.’”

Harris said he feels one of the benefits of

on issues directly related to students, which focuses on representing students in an attempt to make ^eir education better. According to a Spoke article published Sept. 8 1997, OCCSPA’s membership has dropped in half in the past two year. The article also quoted Brian Edwards, an

joining

OCCSPA

Ministry of Education and Training, the

members who left may not have thought OCCSPA was doing enough for them. One

staff

member,

reason the

DSA

year, said Muller, is

as saying

didn’t join last

because

it

didn’t feel

were any issues that needed reprefrom an outside organization. ‘Technically, you’re paying for an orga-

there

sentation

nization to represent you,

nothing to represent”

when

there’s

is

the

number of contacts

the

group has,

“OCCSPA

has a direct contact to the It has

provincial and federal governments.

a lot of connections.”

A

campaign kicks off

tee

According to OCCSPA’s annual

report,

By Andrea Bailey The format of a one-year-old program at Guelph campus has been revised already, said Hans Zawada, chairman of

years ago when the college was approached by a number of contractors who were looking for trained individuals to do some work

the

for their companies.

technology, trades and apprenticeship.

dents major and minor changes in stmcture

The renovations program, which began in September 1996, has been changed from a two-year, four-semester program to a 48week program, said Zawada. He said, the course will remain a diploma program. “The content of the course will be the same,

renovation.

The program,

“We can garages,

said

build

rooflines,

Zawada,

basically.”

He

said the basic

skills

taught

are

through classroom format during the half of the first

from 25 hours of class a week to 31 hours a week,” said Zawada. "And obviously, as a 48-week course, there won't be a summer break anymore." classes will increase

Zawada

teaches' stu-

bedrooms, bathrooms, whatever is wanted

only the length of the

course.

The second

half of

the course, he said, is

spent doing struc-

tural renovations.

Zawada

said the college

structure

the

said

completion

of

a

which

is

will promote the program change mainly at the sec-

being built for the purpose of class

ondary-school

renovation projects has not yet been completed, as he

level.

Since it is a new program, he said, there is a small risk to such a

But the numbers of enrolment are not as high

Hans Zawada

(Photo by Andrea Bailey)

had

to

do

amounting over the past two years.

where there

is

unemployment

rate in this area

high should push people in the direction is work."

He

said the concept for the renovations'

program was

bom

had hoped it would be by the end of the month.

He

as they should be, so the college

fact that the

of technology, trades

and apprenticeship.

something to attract people. “People have to realize that there is a great need for a program like this,” he said. There is a lot of money being spent in Canada on renovations right now, and the

to 21 per cent

telephone bingo for employees.

recreation leader-

Ontario Council of Regents, the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Training, the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance and the Ontario Public Services Employees Union. One of OCCSPA’s concerns for this year, according to its annual report, is tuition increases

puses for campus kits as well as a pledge card “early bird draw” and

commit-

Guelph campus program changed

change.

the group has built alliances with the

Conlin said

“Everybody is sort of sharing.” Conlon said other events will include a “toonie toss” on all cam-

group of 27 first-year recre-

member and

'let's try

total

of donations.

the direction of campaign

The Doon Student Association has made Community

DSA

keep a running

coffee

the

of Beaver Foods.

Thanksgiving.

a decision to join the Ontario

The

will

to the

ther-

ation leadership students, under

The

still

mometer

this (the luncheon)',”

registrar's

Each

Hedley begins his adventure Sept. 26 and hopes to be home by

per student. For the

Association, but the motion

the

office, said Conlin.

For example, 16 donation boxes be set mostly at campus cash registers in support of the Poster Boy campaign.

Ayllffe

Student’s

building and by

of a

he raises $105,300 for United Way. Conlin said

lobbying group College

in front

downtown Kitchener

get

to

extended, and they said

the

DSA will-join By Erica

KOOL FM

beforehand. will

ting water bottles (to use as loose

on scaffolding

living

“We went

with the posting of thermometers at Door 2 of the main teaching

Hedley of the

their job,” said

paign has encountered few

jars),”

campaign

Waterloo radio station

Conlin.

change

the

runs at the college from Oct. 14 to

together

preparing the meal, will donate

100 per cent of the proceeds United Way.

.

and

comes

just

is

your

be

own.” “It

Conlin said Beaver Foods, which

and Janeen Hoover, early bird draw Dick Parker, United Way presentations coordinator coordinator, count change before making a donation during the Conestoga College United Way (Photo by Rebecca Eby) campaign committee meeting Sept. 1

a college-wide activi-

ty,"

you're

sold

14 to 17 for a lunch of spaghetti with meat sauce, garlic bread, caesar salad and coffee. The cost will be $5 in advance, but $6 on the day of the lunch if in the cafeteria Oct.

Friendship

Way campaign behind

casino.

Oct. 21.

local charitable agencies such as St.

mock

“Everything that's here can be done indoors if it's too cold outside,” he said, adding the exception of a tug of war. Conlin said she thinks this year's highlight will be a spaghetti luncheon to be held in the Blue Room

about three and a half

said

it

will

still

take about a few

which will

is

weeks before the building, located in near the Guelph campus,

be ready for student projects.

Zawada

said the

new

structure

is

the fur-

thest thing scheduled for the program.

He

said he

would

like to

do some work

with Habitat for Humanity in the future, but is certain at this point have to meet requirements of the curriculum, and we have to know how offers from organizations will affect this, he said.

nothing

We


.

SPOKE, Sept. 29, 1997

LASA

campus

Waterioo

instructor returns

— Page 3

Health djDeratiohs

By Ross Bragg

program offered

When Don Douglas speaks to his and second-year law and security students, he says he tries to encourage them to expand their in horizons beyond policing

first

By Andrea

“It was a challenge, but it was a said challenge,” rewarding Douglas, who has just returned to Conestoga after spending two .

program

police

interna-

dictatorship in the country.

functions in other countries, including Panama. Douglas said that because most policing in Haiti

forensic science labs.”

trying to change their attitudes about police. They

Haiti

police are there to control

have a completely new police force and get

opposed

country.

other law enforcement specialists

had

to essentially create the train-

“T^e idea was

to

“People are

are

still

coming from to

— we

the view that

you as what we are trying to

He

said people in the

would have associations with previous governments, particularly those that would have civil rights

the project

major cities and in the academy were less exposed to it. Douglas said the academy

when working with Haitians.

became a place of learning for the North American visitors as well as

violations.”

“The problem with our curriculum was that it was written with a western bias. What we had to make sure of that our instructors

the Haitian recruits.

were able to apply the knowledge

me the opportunity to see criminal

rid

of

all

the

individuals

that

which shares an island in the Caribbean with the Dominican Republic, was invaded by the United States in 1994 in an effort by the American government to Haiti,

then-exiled Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

reinstate

president

He said people in Haiti are still getting used to the idea of a non-

h

Mil

>

1

offered through the

say

are there to serve you.”

Douglas said people working on had to keep their own attitudes about justice in check

as

it

was

in the reality of the

Haitian context. “The Haitian police force is starting with very little so we can’t just start talking about radars and

M,

<r>

A\

Be

“Just being able to

work with so

many law enforcement people from so many other countries gave justice as others

would apply

it.

can come back now and give comparative studies to my students and broaden their view of justice around the world.’’ “I

B PT

.

and

pushing more cleria clerical staff,” she said. “With the downsizing in hospitals, nurses who did a lot of

healthcare

delivery

an

art all its

“With

-

.

to

now needed" fully They cannot

,

was

;

in nursing.

take care of

all

the

w'ork anymore, so trained indi-

viduals are needed. Doctors want qualified people to run

have a course of this kind. “All we offered was a dental tliat

is

work

the

to

the clerical duties in the past are

developed becjiuse of an outcry from the public for Conestoga to

administration program

changes

the

province cal

a high standard of

Torliay said the program

is

cal offices.

own,” said

confidentiality in health care.”

'

demand

healthcare system in Ontario, the

‘definitely

'

the

record-keeping, health terminol-

“It’s

u;

new program

for trained individuals in medi-

Torbay. “Sensitive ethics issues are also taught because there is -

we have our own

the

other topics in the business field.

(Photo by Ross Bragg)

military police force.

ing program from scratch.

and

is

that

30 full-time students. She said the list of subjects focused on include accounting, communications, computers, ogy,

of Conestoga’s law and security administration program returned from training police recruits in Haiti.

Don Douglas

Other people involved in the were said, project, he exposed to some of the violence that remains in certain parts of the

the military, he

“Now

program, there is really no sense in a student spending half the time at one college and the other half at another,” she said. Torbay said another reason for

the course has an enrolment of

program (ICITAP), sponsored by the American government. The program aims to reform and rebuild Haiti’s legal system after decades of military

ilar

dents.

guide. Torbay said, at this time,

ing assistance

The program has performed sim-

phase out over the next new program is more convenient for the stuto

year because the

college’s continuing education

tional criminal investigative train-

was done by

gram

new

Conestoga’s chair of business. The health office operations

recruits at a

academy in Haiti. Douglas was part of the

dental office administration pro-

Waterloo campus that is intended to give people a knowledge of how to successfully run a health Torbay, said Edith office,

A

world.

new

introduced this September to the

totally

our’s

Ontario to policing across the

years training

one-year program was

unique program, but it’s none the less.” Torbay said she expects the

Bailey

their offices.”

,

w’as

Torbay said the instructors for r

tlie

courses in health office oper-

a co-op with Niagara College’-’l / ations come from many departS ments at the Doon campus. she said.

“We fell we could do better by our students to cover more than

healths, sciences

just the dental field.

among -others, who

“There is a broader market at Conestoga, so we asked ourselves wdiy don’t we just have our own that meets all tlic ueccLs of our commuii

subjects,” said Torbay.

as

8

“There‘7 'are

teachers

from

and business, teach

many

Toibay said, because of tlie overcrowding at the Doon campus, Waterloo was the logical


Page 4

— SPOKE, Sept

29, 1997

The Spoken Word

Stretch your wings

Editorial

www.broken hopes.com

By now,

what the teachers are at least

school,

we

we

should

if

we

know

don't

talking about in class,

know how

son will

who goes through it. But ultimately, it mean the most to those who actually

complete

in providing students with top-of-the-

venture?

Since"the project began, problems with the college's computers appear to be #

becoming more widespread. Computers j are freezing up, labs are crashing and

are

much more

than just

time spent learning the practical skills for gainful employment. They are about appreciating one's

own

and

potential

at the

same

time understanding one's limits. Whether you enrolled because you wanted or your parents wanted you to, or even as a condition of your parole, you will be tested in many ways outside of the program to,

printers are failing t« print.

-^^The results^' of these problems go | ^Hjeyond mere inconveniences. Students | ’^"and faculty are being forced to delayi reschedule or even c^bel classes. "Asl ^ every day of the computer crisis passes,”^ the^clients of the school.^fotherwise known as students, are not receiving the education they thought they were paying for. The college appears to be failing the

'

'

'

^

computer technicians for answers Due to the limited number of personnel, they cannot be expected to Vce«p on top of a.\l tKe probleitis. '.pa. The question still remains though; why is the college apparently plagued with inefficient computers? ^= Was the upgrade more difficult than ^ anticipated? Did the college, not hire ^ ,^enough personnel? Should more time I have been allotted to the project? Is the I college’s network too old to handle the ! new computers? Was an error made with j the assignment of login numbers? Without official answers, the questions » will not be resolved with fact. It will be j left in the hands of those affected, using j

It,

of course, takes a certain amount of disand study. It also takes a

certain discipline to

be able

to

go out and

drink with wild abandon for a night, albeit strictly for the sake of the fullest possible

college experience, and

still

meet

the aca-

line.

Just about anyone, all things being equal, can follow a healthy routine of moderation and balanced living, and manage to make the grade.

However, not everyone can manage to accomplish their academic requirements while exploring the various facets of

The arguments

that living hard while at

of your education.

Of course,

there

is

no value

A healthy and perhaps all areas of life, involves the balancing of that which is academic with what is social.

again.

who

does not. Depending on the approach one takes

Indeed, the delicate balance of extremes will break some, but those who are able to see it through will be rewarded.

As a function of their jobs, your instructors you throughout college; but more fundamentally, you will be testing yourselves, stretching your wings, soaring to will test

your college years for what they are. You'll not likely ever get the chance to live like this

What

won't

kill

you, will only

same.

just the

in failing any-

thing, in school or life, but nonetheless, take

lege and

books and the “streets”. An imbalance on either end of the spectrum may bum you out

extracurricular nightlife.

capable of under various circumstances and

It will be this balance, or lack thereof which will determine who succeeds at col-

with them, not against them. We cannot, however, jump on the col-^

who grad-

college short changes one's education is generally well-grounded, but only half right. It all depends on where you place the value

fulfilling college life, as in

Both students and faculty heed a reliable computer system which will work

ones

uate in the end.

The true value of post-secondary education comes as you realize what you are

curriculum.

pressures.

needs of its clientele.

stresses will be the

demic bottom

it.

The college years

^

many

the

cipline to stay in

to get there.

The post-secondary educational experience will mean different things to each per-

campus computers was supposed to be the pinnacle of Conestoga's commitment

this

week of

should all of the college and, even

vide students with access to the Internet and e-mail, and the general upgrade of

But how successful was

the fifth

be familiar with the surroundings

of the open access computer lab, Conestoga College entered the world of cyberspace and high-technology. This lab, which was designed to pro-

line technology.

whether you pretowards their education spend your evenings hitting the books those who can handle or hitting the bottle

fer to

Sept. 15, with the official opening

On

By Hunter Malcolm

new heights and plummeting to new depths. As my Grade 12 summer school math

make you

stronger.

teacher said to

Being able to live hard and hold your own in class can provide an education based on

marked

Good

my

me many

final

years ago, as he

exam, “Consider

it

a

gift.

luck to you, boy.”

lege's

or blame.

<

only the threads of truth within hearsay and rumors, to speculate about the problems and their origins. In the age of technology, time and resources must be allocated for every

Controversy adds fuel

Howard

to

Stem was

Richard Berta

ments of many people.

unsuspecting listeners in order to reverse

bomb Montreal

Yet many others are fascinated with him and insist on listening to his wildly provocative morning talk show. “I refuse to pay a cover charge to mastur-

declining ratings.

launched a suit In light of this, it was a small surprise that every Conestoga student that was interviewed maintained that they despised Stem.

Stem

describes himself as “dis-

recently quipped, criticizing the

on

one of mean, you find a pom site on the Internet, and it takes 20 minutes to download a 10-second flick which you might as well see on video. It's frustrating.” Such are the words of wisdom that emanate from the mouth of the sage Stem.

and students, only aggravates the problem further. If an unrealistic goal was set, then the people in charge should

I

ulty

And

atone for their mistakes.

empted onto Toronto's Q107 earlier this month, Stem has become the focal point of

this is

about as enlightened as he gets.

Ever since

this

progeny of the gutters

Of

SPOKE

course, controversy

isn't

a bad thing

if

O

of

to his nature.

Stem continues

recently,

Controversy draws attention and attention translates into higher ratings for his

morning

.

.

.

— preferably one

In fact, the only reason

why Q107

hired

that infuriates as

as possible and

draws attention

Whether is

the views he holds are genuine or

beside the point. His purpose

Photo

News

editor:

»»«

life

editor: Lori-Ann Livingston;

Features editor: Ross Bragg;

Production manager: Craig Vallbacka; Advertising manager: Corey Jubenville; Bob Reid 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B 15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971.

editors: Ian S. Palmer; Sarah Smith;

Circulation manager: Scott Nicholson; Faculty supervisors: Jim Hagarty,

SPOKE’s address

is

listen to

him?”

said

said.

“His jokes aren't even funny,” said Tim Smaglinski. “If there wasn't all this controversy around the guy, he'd fizzle out and die.” It

also should not

no one

in their right

come

as a surprise that

mind cared

to

admit

that

they listened to Stem.

Stem's capacity to provoke and infuriate is what keeps him going. It's easy to envision interest in him dying off as soon as the novelty of his show or the media attention wears thin.

is to

SPOKE

Rebecca Eby; Student

activities editor:Alison Shadbolt;

to

“He's a racist, sexist, ignorant pig,” Ian

Mackie

Whichever comes

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students of Conestoga College. and

Amato

“The fact that he has an audience at all, proves that there are neanderthals in our

enrage not to persuade.

Keeping Conestoga College connected.

Issues

d'

after

naive listeners

to himself.

not

show.

York Senator Alfonse

“Why would anyone Amanda Briar.

he scripted an irreverent

musical about Diana's death entitled My Dead Lady (a Stemian spinoff of My Fair Lady). Stem's ability to make light of what the world viewed as a tragedy is explained away by his statement, “There's no such thing as tragedy it's all a matter of perspective.” things

New

midst.”

it.

Most

Spoke

Editor: Andrea Bailey;

to

controversy and can't get enough

many people

you're Stem.

\ Rttcycla this copy of

Tme

Stem adopts a new and unique angle on

controversy.

kind to the world.

So it shouldn't be surprising when Stem mouths off politically incorrect, sadomasochistic and anti-feminist views which endear him to some people and make him a

attract

ed

Quebec's government to ban him from the air.

centre of loathing for others.

the Internet.

“It costs a fortune to subscribe to

Failing to answer the questions of fac-

And of course. Stem enjoys making the occasional jab at the sensitivities of his Canadian listeners, such as when he request-

Stem compared himself to a nuclear bomb which desperate radio stations drop on

Howard Stem

these [pom] sites.

treated as one.

fire

gusting” and in doing so, he shares the senti-

quality of pornography

problem which could arise. Trying to reconfigure a computer system as vast as the college's is not a minor task. However, it does seem like it was

in order to take the radio station

out of the doldmms.

bate,”

potential

Stern’s

first.

mainly funded from S^tember to May by Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out the

is

Doon Student

of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


.

SPOKE,

Most students By Andrea

Bailey

Despite some

problems at September with

initial

the beginning of

the new student Internet accounts, many students are happy with the new service.

This is the have been Internet

first

year students personal

offered

service.

The

cost

was

included as part of a technology

enhancement fee

in their tuition

home,” said Kerr. “The access here is awesome.” The problems Staub mentioned affected more students as well.

Andrew

Caird, a second-year

business accounting student, said

was

work

the e-mail

the beginning. But, he said, the

difficult to

Internet service is fast once

know your way

in

you

around.

Paulo Pereira of EET Computer in engineering technology said the initial problems should be attributed to the lack of instruction provided by the college. “All the school did was give students one sheet of paper with a

Systems

to the terminals.

month

later,

many

students said the bugs are almost

out of the system.

watched

my friends go on-

line here,” said

Corinne Rosehart,

“I’ve

a first-year general business stu-

“We went into a shopping option and we checked out the

dent.

music scene and different TV shows. I was happy with the amount of detail it had, and everything worked okay the whole

number on it,” said Pereira. “They should have been given a whole booklet of instruction. Plus, the school assumed that everyone knew how to work Windows ‘95, where a lot of students only know

Adam Woodhouse,

Erol, a second-year mar-

keting student, said though she

robotics student, said his on-line

has had no significant problems with her access account, she wish-

effi-

were more people around

cient and easy. “It’s nice to have,

es there

only use it for leisure time. With my program, I don’t have a lot of time to myself, so I don’t

to help in the beginning.

I

have much of a need for it. But from what I’ve seen, the access is extremely fast.” Johnny Staub and Laura Kerr, first-year broadcasting students, agreed they couldn’t be happier with the access, though they had some problems a couple of weeks

“I didn’t

know how

to log-on at

and there was never anyone around to help me. There seems to be more people around now, but it was kind of hard in the beginfirst

ning.”

But most of the student comnow after almost a month into school, have been positive.

ments, “It

gives

students

who

don’t

home

a choice,” said third-year accounting student

ago.

have access

“You couldn’t send or receive email at the beginning,” said Staub.

Angela Each.

“The computer would erase page messages that you spent a lot of

student

Kerr,

broadcasting student

first-year

broadcasting student

first-year

the 3.1 version.”

a first-year

experience at the college was

Laura

Johnny Staub,

Corinne Rosehart, business

first-year general

log-in

Hulya

time.”

but

service

like Internet

friends back

About a month ago, there were many complaints from students that the access was too slow, or it was impossible at times to log-in nearly a

— Page 5

time on. But that has been improved. “They run very quickly. They are definitely up-to-date Pentiums.” “I wouldn’t be able to survive without communicating with my

packages.

Now,

Sept. 29, 1997

I

think

tuition

at

it’s

Andrew definitely

worth the

money.”

Working the cider press

If By

Paulo Pereira,

Angela Lach,

EET Computer Systems/

third-year accounting

engineering student

student

Caird,

second-year business accounting

wishes were changes... more dinky

L.A. Livingston

toys,

maybe

a pet

rock.

had an all-consuming love for horses when I was a little girl. I used to lay in bed at night and pray, “Dear God, please send me a pony.” I thought I had about as much chance of getting a pony I

baler

year-old).

had any would have

her into moving further than two steps at a time, the traffic on the

my

isn’t

a big deal in a family of

We got to choose our favorite meal, open a few cards and blow out candles on a cake. Presents, if there were any, were limited to practical things like

geometry

sets

and writing paper. After

we

opened

birthday,

my

the candles,

my

on this and I had cards and blown out

finished supper

particular

I

waited. Surely, for

ninth birthday, there must be

something more. Mom said, “We got you a present, but it’s not here. something you’ve always It’s guessed out loud what it could be - a Barbie doll (I’d always wanted one, because all my friends had one, and I only played I

with

toy

we bought left

her

her.

name

If I’d

all, I

alone,

but,

not

knowing what Brylcreem was and having patted her once or twice, I changed her name to Dusty. She turned out to be a tempermental, arthritic pony who moved twice as fast when coming back to the

trucks

and

cars).

road suddenly became quite

fre-

quent.

Drivers honked as they passed,

laughing hysterically at the spectacle of two kids, a tmssed-up pony

and a lawnmower. At

least three

people stopped to offer to buy Dusty.

bam.

The only time Dusty would go faster than a trot was when my best friend Jenny came over with Shetland pony, or when she thought she was headed for

her

home. Dusty put up with a lot from my younger sister Lois and I. One day, when our parents had gone to got into some misthe market, chief, as nine and 12-year-olds sometimes do. We found an old

we

wanted.”

(Photo by Corey Jubenville)

turned out the pony was older than I was. She was a WelshIt

imagination at

my

despite

eight children.

,

— who had never been a harness pony — with our

trained as

a pony.

Connemara cross. Her name was Brylcreem when

day

-

spin back the sideroad. We rode the lawnmower and steered Dusty

as I did begging and pleading of marrying Tony Orlando (I had a desperate crush on him as a five-

parents

My ninth birthday came. A birth-

and Elizabeth Weber show Christopher .Kim Hoglund Richmond how. a cider press works at the annual apple 21 schnitzins festival at Joseph Schneider Haus Sept.

a makeshift har-

ness and hooked Dusty up to it. We were taken with our inventiveness, and decided to take a

twine reins. She was not happy with the arrangements. As we tried to coax and coerce

from

(left)

I hardly dared to hope, but it was ... my wish was coming true. There really was a God,Sand He heard me, and I was getting

we made

effort,

push lawnmower in the gravel pit/junk heap behind the bam. With baler twine and a lot of

I

don’t

know

if

they thought she

must be an extraordinary horse to put up with such humiliation, or if they

just

felt

sorry

Anyways, she wasn’t

for

her.

for sale.

Dusty died at the ripe old age of when I was 16 years old. If wishes were changes. I’d go

19,

back

to those times

summer morning

when every

after breakfast

was spent riding and always seemed to shine. Life then was no more

the

sun

difficult

than simple prayers, ponies and riding machines.


Canada goose droppings unsightly

Geese make a mess

Conestoga

at

Persuading the geese to leave is economically Putt’s only solution. “The only way you can clean it up is to get a special close-tined probably attachment to a tractor a few thousand dollars,” he said. “It’s probably a lot cheaper to rent

By Amy Sonnenberg warm

a beautiful,

It’s

afternoon

Conestoga College. You and your friends decide to spend your lunch hour outside by the pond to

at

take advantage of the weather. As you venture out the cafeteria doors

probably a

“It’s

cheaper

Putt said he believed the geese had decided to leave Conestoga for good this past summer. “Their pattern changed this summer. This would have been the third year that we’ve had 100-plus geese here. But early in July they just disappeared. There wasn’t a goose anywhere on campus.”

a rubber

a month

or two.”

Dave

Putt,

The geese returned to Conestoga, though, within six weeks. It’s still a mystery as to where they went

director of physical resources

during that time, he said.

with your books in one hand and your overflowing tray in the other, your steps suddenly no longer feel

uneasy as you check the bottom of your shoe, only to realize your fear has been confirmed. You have stepped in fency-free.

You

Dave

years.

Three years before that the pond only saw about six geese. “The

A

few

had enough

of the 120-plus Canada geese that have raided Conestoga College and messed up the lawn. “We will devise ways to persuade

them to find another pond. wc do that I’m not sure yet.”

How

has heard of several methods,

from training a dog to chase the geese away to throwing a rubber

about health or safety so

Natalie Schneider

^

“There are

The Jacksonville Jaguars and out

for

win

the

it

the

at

Jacksonville Municipal Stadium

another

in

Monday

Night

game at the Roost. small crowd gathered

Football

A

to

watch the event and to root for their favorite team.

The confident

ones placed their bets in the football pool for $5 a block. Sabrina Pierson, a first-year broadcasting student, said she

coming to the Roost and makis it a point to be there every likes

Monday

game. “I think the Roost should adverfor the

all

is

kinds of stories

on

a good area for school activities. does the grass good

“It really

he

because

calling the University of Guelph for advice.** The problem Putt has with the

recreational purposes we have to really think about how to persuade

is the mess they leave on the lawn outside the cafeteria, which

geese

tise

at Roosts A Tot ‘of

more.

first-

know where

years

“but

if

fertilizer,”

it’s

we want to use

By

nobody

Is

Roost to watch it, said Conal Vaughan, a management studies student.

“The idea is great but they need more,” said Vaughan. “The Roost is a good place to go to but they need to attract more people. Most of tlie time it’s just me and two other guys at Monday Night Football.” Jacksonville landed the first touchdown and beat Pittsburgh 30-21. to advertise

Just five minutes sitting in

on

CKWR will conis

much

harder

it seems. Co-hosts Rodrigo Martinez and Geraldo Guerra keep up a rapid dialogue of jokes and observations

than

in

between songs that looks easy you try it. It seems odd then

until

Martinez is only a first-year student at broadcasting Conestoga. “I never took any classes until now in college,” Martinez said. “I that

just did

it

shows

way

the

Martinez

on

I

thought best.”

has

hosted several CKWR, Waterloo’s

multicultural

community

radio

boon Student Association

“Until that

we

it’s

some

serious input

one’s attacked, or someone was last seen heading off into the distance at 50 miles per hour with six geese after him, we’ll leave them alone. But they are becoming a

pain from the mess point of view.”

including

one

Board of Directors Meeting

don’t

simply the uncontrollable numbers. “Five or six geese would be cute to look at on the pond,” he it’s

said.

That was the situation about

six

years ago. “They were a novelty as

we were

far as

were

concerned, so they

fine.”

“I’d pick serious topics like there

some STDs out there and here what you can do to prevent them. I got a call from a mom,” he are is

my daughter have sex!’ Sometimes it was very touchy but I was just telling said, ‘“You’re telling

to

how things are.” He said the more upbeat Latino, started in

Stereo

December 1995,

from that. Sunday night. People are tired and want to relax, not think, ‘Oh here we go again, another moron telling me what to do.’ This is a happy show.” Guerra describes what he and Martinez do as “trying to give is

a change

“It’s

For More Information

see Johanna at the

bSA Off ice

Rodrigo Martinez co-hosts Stereo Latino on CKWR

Sunday’

nights. ^

(Photo by Rita

Fatila)

some

out energy.”

friends the next day, and

Besides playing Spanish pop, like the Barrio Boys and Ricky Martin, the show also features

quent callers have earned their own nicknames. Guerra and Martinez credit their culture more than any specific disk jockey as influences. “We as Spanish people joke around more,” Martinez said. “When I went back to Chile I used

newspaper clippings and

“People love to win prizes,” said

“We put them on the air and make them sing or ask them Martinez.

questions like ‘What color

TBA

six, I

that

contests.

Room

only been here five or

Putt’s not totally against geese,

said.

get

health and safety, some-

requests,

Tues. Sept. 30

for 35 years,”

the geese have

triggered angry calls.

vince you radio

at the

be taken, he

station,

the

little bit.”

great but

that area for

Rita Fatila

a

is

“Why

Putt said.

College student learns by doing Stereo Latino on

Football

said,

them to go somewhere else.” However, the problem is not so serious that drastic measures must

Roost is,” said Pierson. “They need to^ ^ organize more events, spice it up

ever

pond has been here

know.”

how you can get rid of geese effectively,” Putt said. “We may end up

don’t even the Pittsburgh Steelers battled

far.

alligator into the pond.

Fans scarce By

120 geese who make Conestoga their home lounge near the pond outside the are making an unsightly mess of the lawn, but there are no concerns droppings Geese

of the over

cafeteria.

Putt, director of physical

resources, said he has

He

There have only been 100-plus geese at Conestoga for about three

feel

goose droppings.

month

or two.”

lot

to rent

alligator for

a rubber alligator for a

was

far off

breaks the third-caller-wins thing.”

we

tape the late-night

show

to play for

shows to see how They did it the way

to listen to the

Napoleon’s white horse?’ That

But Martinez said people listen to the shows for more than the contests and music. “Our biggest accomplishment is that people actually listen to what we’re saying. We’re not just the boring part between songs.” Some listeners, Martinez said,

fre-

did

we it.”

The two “In

are.

the

also credit each other.

show

basically

we

become

one,” said Martinez. “That sounds pretty sexy, huh Geraldo?

“We

never have a dull moment.

We just go out there and have fun.” Stereo Latino can be heard on every Sunday 98.5

CKWR from

1

FM

1:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.


SPOKE, Sept 29, 1997

— Page 7

Broadcasting grad gives presentation By Matt

Harris

Chris Adams, a graduate of the television broadcasting program, was the featured speaker on Sept.

19 for the program’s current students.

The focus of the presentation was on producing mobile remote telecasts. Adams recalled his most memorable experience, telling the students about the 1993 Canada

Day celebration in Ottawa. Adams was joined by Bryce, a video operator

Adams works

there

Broadcasting Corporation, worked

era operators.

there part-time before graduating in 1983. His first full-time editing

cameras, one

hard to find freelancers that

came just days before the telecast and damaged the stage. The engi-

University’s film and television program and currently in his 21st

neers had to rebuild the stage and then we had to replace all the

year

at

explained

the supervisor of

said the best part

meet people from across met people from our French language affiliate as well as others from the “I get to

west.”

Adams and Bryce Scott Bryce the

(left)

CBC, spoke

and Conestoga grad Chris Adams, who work

ticeship

faculty

McClements, who attended the

members Welcome

partici-

campus The barbecue is an annual event and is put on to welcome back the Sept. 18.

barbecue, addressed faculty about any upcoming changes in the trades

and

apprenticeship

“It’S

time

for staff to

said

Mike McClements,

“It’s

a great

way

for people

who

work together to meet socially,” he said.

“At school, everyone is too busy so they hardly have time to even say

DSA website keeps

‘hi’ in

the halls.”

take a

breath and relax.” Mike McClements,

school year. The event gives teachers the opportunity to socialize with each

dean of technology.

and

technology programs.

technology faculty for another

a

went over

dean of technology

erage of Princess Diana’s funeral.

staff. He said the barbecue was funded by the cash bar. “Everyone pays for the liquor,” he said, “and then the money from the cash bar pays for the food.” A smorgasbord was served to

faculty at the event including burgers, sausages, salads, beer, wine

and non-alcoholic refreshments. The barbecue was held outside in the courtyard of the campus. The burgers and sausages were cooked on a permanent stone barbecue in the yard.

“It’s a good time for the barbecue,” said McClements. “The

of the

programs

is

organizing complete, so it’s time for staff to take a breath and relax.” Hans Zawada, chair of technolosaid the event was organized gy,

by

the

aspects

involved in remote telecasts, citing examples from CBC’s recent cov-

time to relax

staff

Back a in pated barbecue at Conestoga’s Guelph

other,

at

to television broadcasting students Sept. 19. (Photo by Matt Harris)

About 25 to 30 school of technology and trades and appren-

at

also

some of the more technical

By Jamie Yates

cooks up burgers

Adams

meeting new

the country,” he said. “I’ve

Barbecue gives technology

instructor,

is

people.

some

changes in CBC’s operations, mainly the modernizing of the equipment. He said at one time.

and sound equipment.”

are

out the aid of computers,

from the

ing a remote Oktoberfest parade this year. Bryce, a graduate of York

CBC,

but

opportunities

Although he admits his job would be next to impossible with-

to describe other

telecast

available,

most of the job postings internal.”

year to get things planned out,” Adams said. “In 1993, a storm

Jim Palmer an automotive

as

as four at once.

are

a technical proobtaining

events, touching on hockey games, the Juno Awards and various parades. The advice Adams and Bryce gave the students will be put to good use; they will be produc-

whom

robotic

controls

Adams became

He went on

with.

Adams, now

“It’s

man

have adequate knowledge of how to properly operate our video equipment,” Adams said. “There

looking after resources for shows.

“In the case of the Canada Day show in Ottawa, it takes about a

lighting

many

Now, with

job came in Regina, and then he followed that up by signing on to work in Toronto for a new CBC show. Midday, in 1985. In 1989, ducer,

Scott

were several individual cam-

studio operations for the Canadian

technology

faculty

and

Zawada

said the court-

yard of wooden chairs and tables

was

built

by students

at the

cam-

pus.

The barbecue was held for Guelph faculty, said Zawada. “The majority of trades and apprenticeship

staff

are

at

Guelph,” he said.

Gemutlichkeit

students informed The Internet has become a valuwith able tool used to keep in touch not the world around us. But why what’s use the Internet to check out going on right here at Conestoga College?

.

.

The Doon Student Association (DSA) website supplies Conestoga with lots of

DSA

information at

www.doonsa.com.

The

DSA

homepage

displays

its

statelogo along with its mission as the such events, big and ment of Welcome. The number of

Week

and visitors (2,750 as of Sept. 22) of the links to get through the rest site are at

the

bottom of the page.

For your convenience, the site’s of links are listed at the bottom

The first link, DSA tell you there’s an

structure, will error,

this is

not yet completDSA ed, said Becky Boertien, is director of student life. Boertien charge of updating the

because the page

is

in

website.

you to meet member Each executive. the DSA and a picture, a brief biography

The next

link allows

has posia job description of his or her contact an can you here From tion. individual

DSA

DSA member via e-mail.

Conestoga Oktoberfest

covered

ships, the health plan

teer

and the volun-

Thurs. Oct. 16

fair.

The events and entertainment link everything tells you anything and current the during on that is going month and the following month. find Click on any of the events to

Queensmount Arena

other out the date, time, place and details of the event. The education link will also tell you there’s an error. Boertien said page is for anything to do with

Tickets $8.00

this

Or

education, from alternative learning Ministry of to news from the

Education. “But nothing has been will going on,” she said. The page education current be updated with T16WS«

every page.

also

services link takes you and details for services to a list of most of them. Some of the services are bursaries and scholar-

The

By Amy Sonnenberg

The feedback

link provides

you

Ticket

On

& T-Shirt $15.00

Sale at the

DSA

Office

the with e-mail addresses within

office address, individual list of addresses, etc. There is also a

DSA

other

organizations

within

the

school and their phone numbers. The final link, which is called

either. One “links”, isn’t completed you will be able to hook up

day,

and othwith the college’s website ers.

to Boertien said she is trying weekly. site update the DSA

Age of Majority Required


Psychic

in

demand Ill

I

i^lllllllll

mil

INI

Cone stoga

at

II

By Victoria Long

fD to

crtiritiiQl spiritual

healing,

when this

situation arises,

tVlP. the

client

whether

or not he decides to reveal his pre-

At er

1 1

a.m., Sept. 8, psychic read-

Dan Valkos

monition.

bantered with near-

Valkos started a half hour earlier scheduled but a lineup formed as soon as he was announced. A dozen or so women stepped forward but it took a while

by students between the private readings he gave 142 students in

than

Conestoga’s Sanctuary. Valkos said he is a clairvoyant, one who receives impressions gift

literally,

of,

Soon

sight”.

“clear

men

before

through an innate and cultivated

started

after the first

joining

one

in.

did, others

Throughout the session, Valkos

along, but the proportion never went over one in three dur-

a large, naturally-faceted clear-quartz crystal in one hand.

ing the two-hour session.

came

held

Werner Martinez, a first-year accounting student, said before his reading his aim was to prove Valkos was a fake or be proved

In addition to private readings,

one-day

presents

Valkos

workshops

at

nity college

16 Ontario

commu-

campuses. The next

wrong

continuing education workshops at Doon will be psychic development

on Oct. 4 and reincarnation November.

student Julie Janecki relax Psychic Dan Valkos (right) attempts to make second-year accounting Sept. 8. Sanctuary the before reading her fortune.Valkos headlined a free nooner in Androa oaiioy)

in

(Photo by

After their three-question private session, most students appeared more animated than before the reading. in faces

just psychology.”

Jennifer Anderson, a second-year recreation and leadership student

The emotions registered descending from the plat-

from Cambridge said, “He knew some stuff no one else knows about me. He was right on the money on the questions I asked

form varied from bemused to uplifted; many appeared to have been deeply touched.

Happy

himself.

Afterwards, Martinez said, “He told me everything I wanted to hear so he boosted my confidence, but I still don’t believe in it. It’s

Birthday,

BRAT

him. He’s pretty good.” Valkos said the most popular questions were those dealing with love life, finances and career concerns. He has no set formula for communicating bad news. When

he gets a sense of serious disease or looming disaster, Valkos said he get a read

tries to

on the person’s

The lineup never seemed to get two hours Valkos said he was mentally and psychi-

shorter. After

and set a cutoff Twice he was persuaded to include just a few more.

receptivity before saying anything.

cally exhausted

He

point.

said

he always psychically

sends white light with love, for

Photo flogging barely profitable By Greg Bisch Jeff Blake said the $70 a day it took to have his Rock Classics the in booth photography Sanctuary Sept. 9-10 was worth it

barely.

“This campus, in comparison to others, is relatively small and I don’t get really busy,” said Blake. “Most people just look, then walk

away.”

Rock sells

Classics

is

a booth which

photos of rock celebrities and

Blake said he came to the beginning of the school year because students still have some of their money left. “However, with the number of dollars it takes these kids to go to

bands.

Doon

at

college. I’ve got

many

of them

saying they are already out of

money. I say to them, ‘How are you going to survive if you are out of money in September?”’ Blake, even though he has been in the business 10 years, it

still

finds

strange that the pictures that

sell

tend to be

much

do

older than his

Rebecca

customers.

Melissa Learn and Jason Kempthorne, third-year broadcasting students, celebrate the launch of the BRAT, Conestoga’s new FM station, on Sept. 19. (Photo by Sarah Smith)

Join our to learn a trade?

and support career opportunities

for

We

in a

proud Canadian tradition.

omen i!l

last

in today's

you

Canadian

a lifetime. Share

For more information, drop by your

Recruiting Centre or call:

1-

said.

“People

is

Nirvana.

- 856-8488 800 WWW. dnd.ca

that

is going to be the band remembered from the ‘90s,” Blake. “They have developed

said

is

a cult-like following that, will

come

I

think,

to represent their gener-

With the ‘60s being so prominant Blake said he has found himself living in a buy, sell and trade world of photography. in his business,

know people, know peoknow people. That is how I

“People ple,

survive in this business,” he said.

Only 10 per cent of Blake’s working hours are actually spent with

Canada National

Defense

Defence

nationaie

YOUR

PRIDE.

YOUR FUTURE. YOUR MOVE.

his booth open. his time

people to help him with his search. With all of the work involved in the profession, Blake said that he

10 years in a business which, on a further downside, is not extremely profitable. “The other night, for example, I spent an hour and 45 minutes in the middle of the night listening to this guy blab about some silly pictures he had. I had to put up with is tired after

it.”

As

ation.”

is

Internet or

He

said

most of

spent either on the

on the phone looking

for photographs.

He

also hires

Bressette, first-year social services student, browses in the Sanctuary Sept. 9. (Photo by Rebecca Eby)

through photos at the photo sale

still

go for the ‘60s material. It is the most popular.” A large number of ‘90s pictures are sold as well, he said. However, the only band of this decade that can compare to the popularity of Led Zepplin, Jim Morrison and the “Nirvana

ha\e operational, technical

men and

Forces. Join our team and learn skills that u

‘70s and ‘80s never

happened,” he

Beatles

workforce. Need a job now? Want

“It’s like the

it

turns out, the reason Blake

tolerated the “blab” that

individual

also

was because

owned

the

Jim Morrison photograph. To buy the rights to the photo would cost Blake $ 1 200 “To have a Doors picture like that would be gold,” he said. “I wouldn’t even put it on display. I would put up a sign just stating that I had it and that only serious buyers could view it.” Blake said there are still more rights to a classic

,

.

with his profession. He that often his customers are impatient and want service immediately. When he has a difficulties

complained

line-up,

it is

everyone

at

impossible to serve

once, therefore,

possible buyers said.

Blake said

customers

this is

many

regrettable that

take

many

walk away, he

why

it

is

non-serious

interest

in

his

booth.

As well, many who view his booth have trouble believing that some of the photos are authentic, he said. “Some people think I have simply taken a picture of a photo in a magazine or a newspaper. I don’t operate that way, it’s unprofessional.”

As

a result of this concern, Blake

carries

information sheets with

documentation for some of his more notable photographs. These sheets tell a buyer when, where and by whom the picture

was

taken.


SPOKE,

By Greg Bisch

New

special needs students

who

neglected to inform the special

needs department that they were coming to Conestoga have made things unusually busy this September, said special needs advisor Marian Mainland. In the first two weeks of the fall semester, special needs has received 22

new

said Mainland,

intakes in total,

and there are

still

more coming.

“We are still quite amazed at how many new intakes we are doing. These are people who knew they had special needs and who could have identified in June or They get a letter when they get accepted that if they have special needs, it is very important to get in (to special needs) to book an appointment as soon as July.

possible.”

When

make an could delay the special support he or she needs, said Mainland. She said each of these new students have to have a one hour meeting with either Mainland or special needs advisor Rick Casey in order to get the accommodation a student

fails to

early appointment,

Hribal,

a second-year

during the Athena

electronics engineering techniciamstudent flips through posters poster arid calendar sale in the Sanctuary Sept. 1 5, (Photo by Rebecca Eby)

Youths give ‘thumbs up’

Annual protest march in K-W sparks enthusiasm and spirit By

event, read at the beginning of the march, stated that Take Back the

Rita Fatila

Perhaps the most impressive moment of the local Sept. 1 8 Take Back the Night march happened at in Centre King Value the

Night

believe

are devalued in a

women two thumbs up. women started cheer-

language

women

march

interpreter,

come up

to

Most of

Many

invited

to the micro-

given

their reasons for

taking part in the march. Several did, talking about women they

women cheered.

knew who had been harassed and

cheers.

they are.”

set of traffic horns began. “When people honk they make me feel this is going somewhere,” said Yantz. “I’m not walking for no

The Take Back

the Night march,

started in 1991, is

an annual protest

Chant sheets, candles and signs were offered as the march began.

towards violence against women The mission statement for the

reached the first lights, the honking car

.

,

that.

.

1

The other side of it becomes sensitive if

We

we

start

saying

c^se

s

came up

many

“It is possible that

new

many

(of the

intakes) got accepted into

college late because a lot

come

to

us as soon as they get here.” As well, she said, some of the students truly believe that they do

they need.

not need help and they can do

Sometimes, the a new student has to come back for a second

on

own, or they are afraid of being prejudged like many were in

meeting.

high school.

“This time should not be for new students. It should be time for meeting again with students who we did intakes for in June, July

However, the prejudice associated with students who have special needs at the college level is better than in the past, said Mainland.

it

their

men

another reason

it

take

this

to

back

year’s

be the

slogan:

“No more

patriarchy,

no

t”

march

hit its stride as

it

On women

to Kitchener City Hall.

not just soime two-person oper-^ atiori without ta^ public board. I

Ontario Street, some pounded on a vacant buildings’ windows, while on King Street women marched beside the downtown traffic, all yelling at the loudest volume of the evening. Once at City Hall, the women were congratulated on a successful march by the event organizers and

can’t just decide, well that’s

headed inside for refreshments and

,;^^

it,

I

^jThere is no way af a'public ^am getting rid of someone. You have to have reasons to do this, itution we can just terminate

m. We can’t do

and

ness, the

could prejudice

j

that

getting this

in the past.

weren’t as popular but were still enjoyed by some. If success is measured in loud-

is

n^C saiy/what

remember ever

march usually had

unite,

chants of

^

,

feel

to

The most popular seemed

“Women

'

was.

to

Mainland. She said she wanted to be clear that new intakes are still very welcome to special needs and the advisors are happy to help them. Every year special needs always gets new intakes after September, said Mainland. However, she said she can’t

them going,” said Yantz.

sections of the

could not say when the college J"‘;to take.” He said the collie is not neces-^!;'2 would be ready to discuss the matter because college lawyers ^sarily taking further action, but as what discussing was of Tuesday are involved. /“All statements would be coming from the presi-^^furthej action it might consider. we% “We had to have cause, or dent’s^officc.” w^ld hot be able to do this. This Tibbits said there was definitecould

want them

“Unescorted, uncontested, unharassed, unmolested.” Impromptu

John Sawicki, the college’s^ the reasons. director of public affairs/ said

ly

don’t

“I

guilty,” said

different chants going.

more '

show

their teachers.

When not cheering, the women chanted. Since no one person led the chants, the front and rear

women

‘Hussey’ ^ continued from page

report for the students to

the

to

people see reactions

really gets

night”,

^

documentation of their disability to the advisor, which can sometimes be 10 pages long. The advisor then has to read* through the documentation and make out a one-page summary

positive.

of the honkers were

“When

violated, including themselves.

the

bring

to

march. Every gesture towards the women was greeted with

“That happened last year too,” said Heather Yantz, one of the marshals for the march. “It gets people excited to hear just how loud

Once

needs

special

are 'Tequired

right

the

reactions

the

many women

way, the the louder the sound became, the the

students

npw

wave. One man gave the finger as he drove by, probably not realizing he had just to

more

for

— women tended

phone and give

its

well,

reasons.”

way underneath the walksound became louder, and

made

honking

march were

response, the

1

'

As

was when

part

favorite

Waterloo-Cambridge march started at Waterloo Park. The mistress of ceremonies, aided by a sign-

In

the

“My

they’re

12-year-old boys watching approaching march from the the Centre’s covered walkway gave

As

women

Mainland.

people would honk their horns,” marcher Roberta Harvey said afterhope just “You wards.

who

Men are not allowed to march, but their support is welcomed. Kitchenerthe year, This

Two

ing and whistling.

the result of feminists

it

and August,” said Mainland. New intakes have to complete, with an advisor, a whole intake file, which consists of six different forms to be filled out, said

reason.

patriarchal society.

Kitchener.

the

is

— Page 9

Special needs office backed up, advisor says

Poster boy

Ben

Sept. 29, 1997

obviously.”

j ^

^

music.

“We’re trying to make the

streets

safe for everyone,” said Harvey. “Not just women and kids.”

October 10

-

18,

1997

For ticket information call (519) 570

-

HANS

or www.oktoberfest.ca

,


— Page 10

— SPOKE, Sept. 29, 1997

TRANSITIONS Welcome

The low-down on roommates noise in the morning - the one morning you get to sleep in.

much

By Amy Sonnenberg

He

All your life you have waited for tfie moment that you move out of

or she

makes lunch with

two pieces of bread, puts your on the shirt you planned to wear that day and slams the door on his last

your parents’ house. You’ll have no more rules, no ,more curfew, no more meatloaf

or her

way

out.

to put up person until the end of

And, yes, you have

and brussel sprouts. You’ll finally be able to live your

with

this

April.

without worries of pleasing anybody but yourself. Think

own

life

didn’t

iliis scenario doesn’t strictly apply to two people who have just met. It could happen between you

your parents thought you were cool, smart, studly or what-

and your best friend. However, some relationships

again.

Growing up, you probably care

if

survive the long haul, as long as you’re understanding and have a really long fuse. There is one simple solution to avoid all the problems brought on

ever.

you’re going to be liva peer ing with someone new

But now

who you

probably will want to

think you’re cool, smart, studly or

————

by phone-time conflicts, bathroom-time conflicts and TV-time

whatever. Enter roommate.

You’re in a new town where you know probably few, if any, peo-

conflicts.

Respect; respect

yOUYe a

'4>le.

Of course first

respectable, responsible

the

going

try

to

-

others’

space,

privacy

person, but your

If

few

gg^g g

|j^^|g

you respect

each other, this leads to compro-

roommate suddenly So, after a

each

and property.

person you’re to

mise

^qo

don’t

weeks of getting

you

mind miss-

established a rapport.

ing the X-Files - so your roommate can ’watcVi the Sunday night movie, because you respect each

are finally relaxed.

other,

know

each relaxed, to other and being on your best behavior, you’ve

true qualities

come

Now things Now peoples’

respectable, a you’re responsible person, but your roommate suddenly starts to get a

too relaxed.

He

or she starts

and you compromise.

And compromise

out.

Sure,

little

class reps

making too

you

to

be happy

allows both of most of the

time.

Who would of thought that cohabiting peacefully with someone could be so easy?

ciass Johanna Stevens (right), DSA vice-president ot operations, laiKs to Sanctuaryjwenty-llve ^about upcoming DSA events during their first meeting Sept. 16, in the (Photo by Enca Ay e) ^people signed up for the positions,

Road Rage You are stuck behind a slow car. Your knuckles grow white, your face turns red You are are so .

angry you could

hit

someone. Sound familiar? ahead of you,” he said. Webster added that he never shows his anger towards other drivers, and

By Rachel Pearce Road rage is defined by the Oxford English dictionary, as: “Violent anger caused by the stress and frustration of driving a motor vehicle; especially an act of committed by one violence motorist against another provoked

that impatience is the cause of

road rage. It could be avoided, he said, if people would only allow themselves enough time to get where they want to go. student, technology Stream Wojtek Komorski, said he drives to his home in Markham on weekends and is bothered most by drivers who change lanes without

the supposedly objectionable

by

driving of the victim.”

Vancouver Sun reporter Sean

Correction

O’Neill wrote in 1996 that the dictionary researchers

In the Sept. 22 edition of Spoke Jeremy Hmrower’;|^pame was

misspelled in a photo cutline.

^

4

Hotline 1

E-Mail

WWW

8DSA

-

4

pm

he Sanctnary Hours Monday to Thursday 7 am - 7 -

5

cannot pass, tailgating or cutting another driver off. Only , about cent, does

it

involve phys-

ical assault.

Now

you have a working definition of road rage, have you had some experience with it? Most of us have, some have had more than their share. that

Just a short drive to school can be the most frustrating part of the

Closed Weekends and Holidays

“Bad drivers are the

cause

of

Amy

Haertel

agement

,

who

studies

at

takes

man-

Conestoga

it

takes her

10 minutes to get there. The worst part of the trip, she said, is the daily lineup of cars on

Homer- Watson Boulevard waiting to

make

the left-turn onto

Boon

said he lets

feels

cause of road rage. Dr. John Voss, a psychologist at

road rage.”

said he and as a result, has seen many examples of dan-

Grand River Hospital, rides a motorcycle

gerous aggressive driving.

who

cut her off.

But Haertel

admitted that she can be quite pro-

voking as well. “I cut people

off,” she said. “I

don’t care what they say.”

Dan Cockle, a mechanical engineering technology student, said he drives to school every day from Dundas, near Hamilton. The drivers on the road ly

make him fume

who realwho

are those

drive slower than the speed limit.

school, but sometimes

pm

them know how by honking at them. Komorski said bad drivers are the

He

he

Wojtek Komorski,

College, said she only lives a fiveminute drive away from the

pm

looking or signalling.

mechanical engineering

someone the

day.

Closed Weekends and Holidays

am

and

bird,

flipping

one per

listen@doonsa.com wwTV.doonsa.com

Fridays 7

select

swearing, pounding on the horn, speeding up so that another driver

ing:

519-748-5131 519-748-6727 519-748-5220 ext

DSA Office Honrs Monday to Thursday 9 am Fridays - 9 am 2 pm

who

to

widespread use since 1994. Acting on road rage can mean displaying anger or hostile feelings by doing any of the follow-

pSA #’s to Remembei Phone Fax

new words

be included in its newest editions added the term its of because rage’ ‘road

define

recalled one time, on Highway 8, when a driver in front of him was only travelling at 60

Cockle

kilometres per hour in an 80-kilo-

metre-per-hour zone. “I couldn’t pass him, so

I

started

wailing on the horn and tailgating

him,” he said. Robert Webster, also a mechanical engineering technology stusaid

he

Valley Road.

dent,

Other things that annoy her, she said, are slow drivers and people

aggressive drivers.

gets

mad

at

“They’re always trying to get

He

said he was recently travelon Highway 8 near Fairview Park Mall when two men in a beat-up pickup truck drove up and began to tailgate him and to honk the horn when he did not immediling

ately get out of the way.

“TTiey were so close that, if the guy ahead of me had hit the br^es, they would have squished

me,” he said. Voss said he simply got himself out of the situation, exiting the highway before he had wanted to. He said road rage is caused by a combination of aggression and pent-up anger and the general problem of crowded highways. Voss said the people who are

most affected

are those

world

who

feel

of idiots” and who take it upon themselves to police the world.“Putting this type of person in a car,” said, Voss, “is a very lethal combination.” that “the

is full


SPOKE, Sept. 29, 1997

— Page

ll'

SPORTS PROFILE National gold medalist

speed skater started

In-line By

Erica Ayliffe

that

I

had the

capability.”

Clarke’s dad

Canada’s fastest female in-line speed skater for her age category (27-34) didn’t start skating competitively until three years

Beth

36-year-old

did

Clarke start so late in life? Life circumstances and her husband leaving her, Clarke said.

“When he

my

would go

left I

regular roller-skating every

student

brother and two sisters,

Bobby, Bonnie and Becky, when she was

only 10 years old. “At that point

I

to start

vive.”

Because of these

responsibilities,

Clarke didn’t have a lot of time to

at

dedicate

would get on

“I

had

mediator, housekeeper and mother. I just learned how to sur-

to

Thursday,’’ said Clarke, a second-

accounting year Conestoga.

her and her

taking care of a house, laundry and a garden because my mom worked full-time. I don’t know how, but I ended up being the

ago.

Why

left

to

sports,

and nothing

although she did participate in base-

existed.

ball, skating,

just

floor

the

I

would get music go

and

fast.

It

like

I

was

Clarke has

been

skating

for

recreational

purposes

Beth Clarke may go the World Roller Sport Championship.

was

since she

12 years old.

She never

(Photo by Erica

of competing until

one

night

when

speed skater approached her and told her to a

of

parent

a

join the in-line

speed skating

club at the Cambridge Forum. “I

had never thought of

said

it,”

“And I thought, ‘Yeah, would be cool.’”

Clarke. that

and think, ‘Man,

I

know how

didn’t

me

to stop.

It

took

a year to get control of the

From

skates.

there

it

was

just

sheer determination.”

But within three weeks of joining the 8 Wheels Rollersports

Club, Clarke qualified for the 1995 provincial in-line skating

champi“I’m in the best

Cambridge. the At event, she won gold

medals

ever been

in

I

in

Now

I

back

look wish

I

could

at the

Cambridge.

While

in school, she received

Clarke was thinking of finishing her

OACs and moving on to teach-

ers’ college but she met her husband and her goals changed. “When I met my husband,” said Clarke, “I was in school. I got pregnant a couple of months after we were married and decided I was going to

shape

cate

1,500 m.

tem.”

and

the nationals for the past three

years and has helped to

medals

gold

and

three

win 14 silver

medals for relays.

The she

is

mother of two said trying to make up for the

single

time she’s

lost.

have been in something competitive as a young person. I’ve always had the “I should

but I’ve never, ever had the chance to prove to myself ability,

my

all

efforts

I’ve

my

life.”

my

life to

children with a

into

family.

come

money

Clarke has no

the championship starts

She said

there’s

on

always next^

admits she’s getting older.

years

As

left.”

well, next year will be her

if

and she

she can afford to

“I wish I could turn back the clock 15 years,” said Clarke. If you want to sponsor or make a donation to Beth Clarke, please contact Erica Ayliffe in the Spoke office at 748-5366.

Beth Clarke, 36, a second-year accounting student, has

and

silver

medals

in provincial

won

gold

and national competitions. (Photo contributed by Beth Clarke)

I

schooling

to

be a stay-

mom my

good value

sys-

children.

want them and circumstances beyond our

“I

to see that adversi-

control should not

make us depen-

dent on others, and that dreams

can be realized to

make

if

we

are willing

the effort.”

Clarke says the philosophy she lives by is, “Good comes out of bad.”

ffiKi

Sept. 28-Oct.3

CONDON HUNT

mm

HAT DAY

IHINK YOU

KNOW EVERYIHING?

to dedi-

bringing up

In her portfolio of accomplishments, which Clarke hands out to potential sponsors, she says her motivation has always been her

ty

w miin

gave up

So

my

and

Classic Ladies age category (27-34) for and the indoor 500 m, 1,000 in those

before that dream can

third year in accounting

was

home

gold

But she needs $4,000 from corporate sponsorship and donations

doesn’t know miss school.

working full-time nights

Beth Clarke

won

the nationals in Calgary this year.

back to Preston high school when she was 25 years old. During that time, she was also

the

Clarke has

Championship in Argentina. She qualified for the event at

pointing, but

Clarke dropped out of school by Grade 10, then ended up going

in

categories in the provincials

can.”

I

Currently, Clarke’s goal is to go to the World Roller Sport

money

have.’”

my whole

m

best

“I’m getting technically better on my skates, so I may have a few

put

onships in held

driven and he couldn’t handle that. Yeah, I am driven. If I’m going to do something. I’ll do the

teams, but

awards for top marks in chemistry, math and business law and a overall achievement award.

I

ex-husband said one of problems was that I was

year, if she qualifies again, but

skates.

on them,” move.

“My

my

asked to join the sports

Petro Canada on Fountain Street

“I couldn’t even stand

shape I’ve ever

my whole life.

9.

Before she -joined the club, Clarke had never tried skating on in-lines, only four-wheel

said Clarke. “I could hardly

in

Nov.

tant.

thought

in the best

far,

more impor-

Ayliffe)

I’m been

So and

was high I was I

was working. At that time, it was disap-

roller-

in a competitive sport, finally.

as a child.

school,

running away.”

alive.

in

felt

“When my husband left me I was devastated. All my goals were right there my life, my family. But now I’m in school, doing the things I want to do. I’m

gymnastics

“When

very

fast,

and

cycling

the

into

late in iife

BE PREPARED TO PROVE

IT

Looking to get involved in this

or

any Awareness

week?

Come on office,

ask

into

the

DSA

for Gerry,


Page 12

— SPOKE, Sept

29, 1997

SPORTS Team loses

first

two games

Poor defence team’s

is

achilles heel By L.Scott Nicholson

Falcon’s goalkeeper.

The experienced and skilled Falcons forwards began to pick apart an already suspect Condors’ onion bag are defence, and by the numerous all the end of the first time. After a disaphalf, the Falcons home pointing ggj-j ^jgg ^|-,g |ggg were up by a score opener and a road of 5-2. loss to St. Clair as 3 valuable learning The Condors’ secCollege, the men’s ond marker was soccer experience for our Condor scored in the first team have surrenre 0 CO VOUng half by Sasha Ilic, whopping dered a who was one of the only 14 goals defencemen” few Condors’ two games. The bulges

Condors’ growing more

in the ole

m

On

Sept. 17, the Condors hosted the

George Papadakos, Condors’ goalkeeper

provincial 1996 and champions national

i^—

finalists,

Fanshawe College Falcons. The game started off well for the Condors as team sparkplug, the

Dwayne

Bell,

penalty

shot

hammered behind

a the

bright

on

spots

what proved

to

be

a dismal day. Veteran goalkeeper

George Papadakos was pulled from the net after the first half and was replaced by Kevin Borges. Borges was also unable to stop the

Falcons

onslaught

they

as

Goalkeeper George Papadakos watches the first

ball sail

past as the Falcons increase the score during (Photo by L.Scott Nicholson)

half action.

scored another three goals in the

second half to make the

said.

final

The Condors’ assistant coach and

little

former captain Patrick Barnes said the team wasn’t dedicating itself to fundamental

score 8-2.

Papadakos admitted he had

he

position due to a lack of players,

defensive help.

“We

can use the loss as a valuable learning experience for our young core of defencemen,”

and managed to score a brilliant goal from 20 metres out from the Clair net.

St.

______.

He

Th© guyS ar©

said the team’s

conditiomng

“The guys

1 4

*

f

*

^

^

nets

the

is

also

HOt

are not

for

including

conc©ntratlng on

minute

which

playing SOCC©r

in

the

game,

entire

suspect.

m

Papadakos was

a

five

span

in

Clair

St.

scored four goals. on concentrating said Johnstone playing soccer and Patrick Barnes. Papadakos played are more concerned Condors’ assistant coach well but had little with breathing and help from his running,” he said. Lack of defence was also at the defenders during the last 20 minutes of the game. root of the Condors’ second loss of With a week before their next the season in Windsor against St. game, Johnstone said he hopes to Clair College on Sept. 20. reposition players with the intenAfter 70 minutes, the game was '

knotted

at one apiece until, coach Geoff Johnstone said, “The roof

tion of solidifying the defence.

fell in.”

friendly

Nick White, who is usually a defender was put in a forward

College

The Condors’ next game is a match "Against Felician from

New

Jersey

on

Sept. 27.

Women Condors earn their first point, on the road By L.Scott Nicholson Assistant men’s coach Duane Shadd tends to the injured knee of Derek Castro. Castro will be out of (Photo by L.Scott Nicholson) action for an indefinite period of time.

A

Johnstone said Thcker didn’t have a lot of difficult saves to

performance that drove College opponents into the ground resulted in the Condor women’s soccer team gritty

their St. Clair

Grad Photos Class of *9R

stealing a valuable point

Coach Johnstone said he was come away from the Sept. 20 road trip to Windsor with pleased to a nil-nil

This

Sign

Up

is

the photo that will be used for

your

class

composite/yearbook.

Don ’t Be Left Out!

Starting Oct.l

At the

DSA

Office

Photography by David Smith Conestoga’s Official

Graduation Photographer

on the

road during their season opener, said coach Geoff Johnstone.

tie.

“The girls worked very hard in what was a very entertaining game to watch,”

Despite

he

lack

of scoring,

Johnstone said his team controlled the flow of the game for most of duration.

its

He

said playing St. Clair to a

draw had a great deal

to do with performance of goalkeeper Nancy Thcker, defender Alycia Punnett and forward Ivona Sop.

the

but she was very consistent

approach to the position. Punnett was given the job of shadowing St. Clair’s most dangerous player, Tammy Page, Johnstone said. “Not only did Alycia successfully cover their best player but she also set up some goal chances,” he in her

said.

Johnstone said he now knows he can go to Punnett in future games when he needs an opposing team’s star player covered.

said.

the

make

Sop, one of the many rookies on also impressed team, Johnstone, he said. “Ivona’s a very inventive player and she gave St. Clair’s defence a the

lot

of trouble.”

The team’s next all

to be played

five

on

games their

are

home

pitch at the recreation centre.


SPOKE,

hockey gets a

Varsity By Corina

were pushed

Hill

facelift

to the limit.

is

The coach

is

not the only

new

them bent over like said James

This

the team, regardless of past expe-

practice Sept. 22.

“I like

He

head coach Kevin

said

is varsity,”

said

when competing

“They have

show me what

to

need developmental

played

they

if

here

Tony coach Martindale at the beginning of the season and said the players have had a hard time

you have to be heads up, all the

came and scrimmaged

Despite the hard

to

coaching

style.

Conestoga

Ian James,

manager of athletics and recreation

Ian James said he

coaching styles of Hergott and Martindale.

“They had nothing like this last They just came and scrim-

year.

Now they’re getting

conditioning.”

And

conditioning

is

what

they are getting. Students trying

out

for

the

competition

on

the

Hergott said he has been impressed team,

noticed a difference between the

day.

stiff

for places

ath-

letic director

all

they’re

getting conditioning.”

his

adjusting

and

practices

Now

team have faced where they

gruelling practices,

Football

by

the

make

after the

One member from

time.”

day.

will

team roster

the

game

onships.

Since the team has already been

effort

put in by stu-

at

dents.

there

Hergott said he is looking for dedicated, hard working players that have a positive attitude. “At this level, if they’re not out here practicing, they’re not on the team,” said Hergott, adding that he feels school is also

the varsity

squad will receive a scholarship, but not because they were recruited, said James.“They have to earn it. All these guys are competing for a scholarship, one scholarship.” The scholarship is not what is on the mind of Hergott, however. He said his goal for the season is to win the Canadian champi-

playing hockey,

just

all

tried out

Sept. 27.

you’re

They

Hergott replaced long-time varsity

final

skills.

like

this last year.

said Hergott.

who

Hergott

still

“They had nothing

year,”

last

maged

at a

at a col-

“When

they can do, even

who

two teams remain, leaving the Condor coach with some tough-decisions. “We’ll see what happens when it comes to the exhibition,” said

this.

lege varsity level, the players

Hergott.

the 57 players

for the team,

handling.

Every player on the Condor squad is vying for their place on rience,

Of

to drills to

incorporate speed as well as stick

Conestoga.

at

move on

skating and

projected to be the starting

goalie for the varsity squad.

Practices start off with hard fast

aspect of the varsity hockey squad

— Page 13

Sept. 29, 1997

of provincial

top

the is

no where

else

play,

to

aim

except for the highest standing for college teams in the Canada.

Condors’ hockey coach Kevin Hergott discusses team strategy. (Photo by Rita

Fatila)

He said before the national championships, he would like to beat Cambrian. Last year, the Sudbury team defeated Conestoga in the provin-

important.

but have since dropped to seven.

year’s team.

cial finals at the recreation centre.

Goaltending will be one of the key focal points for the varsity squad this year, said Hergott. Tryouts began with 14 goalies

“We’re not lacking goalies. The goaltending is going to be strong.” James agreed that goaltending is an important aspect of this

“We’ve got the offensive players, but to beat teams like Cambrian, we need good goaltending.”

Cambrian went on

Last year’s goalie Darryl

Whyte

to

win the

national championships.

“We want to beat them on own ice,” said Hergott.

their

Varsity softball

dreams

Condors cream Canadore By Corina

hitting strength led the

Hill

victory

The Conestoga Condors softball

team

varsity

obliterated

the

In the

down

19 Canadore Panthers Sept. and Sept. 20 in North Bay. The mercy rule for having over 10 runs by the fifth inning was instituted in both games, with the Condors having scored

Sept. 20 score was 11-1. Conestoga showed great team effort, scoring 19 runs on 16 hits to defeat Canadore Sept. 19. Out of four at bats, Cassy Chilton had three hits and scored three

to

first

the

inning, line

Kuntz singled to

drive

in

Kerri Quipp, Susie McCutcheon,

Ten had

of hits,

Conestoga’s players with Babcock and

,

Karri Nicholson having double

three runs.

Panther’s starting pitcher Karen

Bailey walked the first three batters and allowed four hits allowing the first inning, in

Conestoga

to score seven runs.

Bailey was relieved by Virgin in

runs.

scored Canadore’s only run in the game.

Conestoga 19, Canadore 5 Conestoga 1 1 Canadore 1

over 10 runs. The score for the Sept. 19 game was 19-5 for the Condors.

The

team

when playing Canadore.

the

first

inning.

Bailey

later

hits.

The team’s record was three wins and one loss before the Condors faced the Durham Lady Lords Sept. 24. Durham is the only team to have defeated the Condors this season.

Amy Smith and Jill Kuntz had two a piece. Extra base hits were made by Heather Babcock, who hit a dou-

hits

ble,

and McCutcheon, who

hit a

triple.

Condors

Female hockey players wanted By Corina

Starting as early as Sept. 30,

Calling

all

female

hockey

Whether you are a superstar or an average player, the Conestoga recreation department

just

is

Conestoga may be offering the opportunity to students, as well as

players.

looking for you.

Starting within the next couple

local residents.

The centre hopes to run games on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1

p.m. to 2 p.m. that will cost $3. them a chance to

“It will give

up

and

down

the

ice

of weeks, the

skate

shinny hockey for females looking

and shoot on net,” said James who added that there may be

for a little ice

scrimmages.

Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre will be holding iime, said athletic

Jill

Kuntz

1 1 batters with only three hits, for her second win of the season. Canadore pitcher Lee Ann Virgin

one strikeout in the game. Condors acted as the home team in the game Sept. 20

•had

The

CONSIDER HIRING A TUTOR!

against Canadore.

director Ian James.

Hill

pitcher

shone in the game, striking out

Condors and hitting, Conestoga to apply the 10-run mercy rule. She struck out seven players, walked one and allowed three

Kuntz

again in allowing

players to

led

the

pitching

8up(iortid

byDoon StudMtAnocMon

hit.

had an awesome weekend,” Ian James, manager of for recreation and athletics Conestoga College. He said Kuntz’s pitching and “Jill

said

Peer Services PICK UP AN APPLICATION & BOOK AN APPOINTMENT IN STUDENT SERVICES (2B02)


NHL season wide open

is

By Dan Meagher

Colorado the favorite

in

the

west.

The outcome of

NHL

season

is

this

year’s

a tough one to

As always, there

are your obvi-

but

there

ous no-chancers, appears to be a slew of teams with a legitimate shot. An informal poll of hockey around taken enthusiasts

Conestoga College places the Colorado Avalanche at the top of the Stanley

Cup favorites list and

After re-signing Joe Sakic, the to take another

Avs look ready of the

Cambridge True Blues, shows some

of his

Hanger memoraoiiia. rPhoto bv Ian S. Palmer)

Cambridge soccer club By

Ian S.

from Glasgow

Palmer

school year, many students deal with bouts of homesickness. Loved ones and friends are left behind. It’s sometimes hard to meet people who share the same interests and they

Throughout

feel a little

the

down and

question.

club,

is

known

as

the

who

meet people

shared his passion for the

game. “Football (soccer) is a way of life in Scotland and the club

“You don’t have to be a

member

to enjoy

yourself.”

cer season and watch the team play via satellite television at

Roadhouse

in

Cambridge,

John Brown, member of the

Cambridge True Blues

gives us a chance to keep in touch

with our heritage. It keeps the tradition of a Saturday afternoon

match

alive.”

Brown

the club’s headquarters.

John Brown, 68,

view games that take place 5,000 kilometres and three time zones away, many of them starting at 10 a.m. EST. He said the club purchases a package deal from satellite dealers and charges $10 to $20 a person to watch the games, with some

who moved

said

for free.

members have been

gathering at Ernie’s for the past

He

said Ernie’s

is

an ideal place to see the games because it has a seven-foot screen and three televisions situated around the bar.

Brown

designed for Rangers fans

to get together throughout the soc-

Ernie’s

ideal opportunity to

lonely.

Cambridge True Blues could be the cure you need. The club, which has been operating in Cambridge for the last 25 years,

years ago, said he joined the True Blues because he thought it was an

“I like

five years to

shown

Well for soccer fans in general, and for those of the Glasgow Rangers Football Club specifically, the local chapter of the Rangers supporters

to

Canada about 30

said

all

the

run at the title with a talented and experienced crew. The runner-up in the poll is the Philadelphia Flyers, who may have a chance to succeed if general manager Bobby Clarke finally addresses the goaltending

has a cure for the blues

money

raised

goes back into the club to allow them to purchase the rights to the games and to operate other activities throughout the year. “We hold an annual Christmas dance and party, golf and bowling tournaments and each

member

used to keep

is

it

Philadelphia and

Colorado

all

around,”

New

amongst the

will both be

Jersey leaders,

but the rest of the conference

is

very close.

The New York Rangers could contend

they overcome the

if

Mark

loss of

Messier, while the

Pittsburgh Penguins and Buffalo

Sabres should

Ted Nolan,

fall in

the ranks

Mario Lemieux and respectively.

A dark-horse pick might be the Montreal receive

Canadiens

some

they

if

consistent goal-

New coaches Alain Vigneault and Dave King should right the defensive ship and the tending.

offensive tools are there to blow

teams out. Kitchener Ranger centreman Tim Verbeek thinks the league is too early to

says local hockey coach Bill Davey. “But if Philadelphia were to get some decent goaltending,

too close to

they could be hard to stop now Chris added they’ve that

pick a favorite.” Locally, the Toronto

Gratton.”

Leafs will struggle with the noname crew they have assembled. Unless Mats Sundin plays all five positions and perhaps does a bit of coaching, it will be a long year for the Carlton Street gang. Predictions are also hard to come up with given the number

Gratton, who arrived from Tampa Bay, should fit nicely

alongside Eric Lindros, but the nicest fit for the Flyers has to be

between the pipes.

The

defending

champion

Detroit

Red Wings

will contend

but will feel the loss of Norris

Vladimir nominee Konstantinov, whose off-season car accident has left him unlikely to ever play hockey again.

Trophy

That, coupled with the question

of whether Chris Osgood can handle the load in goal, make

call. “It’s

I’m going to have to see some of the teams play before I say.

Maple

of high profile hold-outs. By the last week of September,

names such Kariya and not in

as Bondra, Fedorov,

Modano were

still

NHL camps.

Nevertheless, it should be an interesting and entertaining season.

is

automatically entered into a draw for a trip to Scotland. The club is a non-profit organization so the

money

much less clear-cut who stands out at the

is

after losing

with good reason.

member

east

top.

figure.

John Brown, a

The

in terms of

The club scene

going and

allows each person to get the most out of their membership.”

Buffalo

He said the club membership presently stands at 54 and costs nothing to join, but there annual fee of $35.

People

Bills

who

is

an

are interested apply

membership and need to be seconded, which is just a formali-

for a

ty,

he

said.

The club has a

president, vice-

president, treasurer and a board of

vs.

Miami

six directors

who

are voted

on

The True Blues are also member of the North American

annually. a

Rangers Soccer Association, with Hamilton and in affiliations

Bus Trip

Sunday, Nov. 2 Tickets on sale Friday, October 10

Information the

available at

DSA Office or call

748-5131

www.doonsa.com

Toronto as well as throughout the United States. Brown said there is an annual gathering of all the clubs in North

America. “A commitee votes on where to hold the meeting. It could be a cruise or held in Las Vegas, Scotland or even Hamilton.”

Brown

said

anybody

interest-

ed in joining the True Blues can contact him at 519-7400100. “Any soccer fan is welcome to come out and watch the games. You don’t have to be a

member to

enjoy yourself.”

Dave White, a forms during

DSA promotions assistant,

campus

club

holds club sign-up

week Sept. 15-19. (Photo by Erica

Ayliffe)


.

.

SPOKE, Sept 29, 1997

— Page 15

ENTERTAINMENT Book review:

DiQirnsnriG

Royals subjected to Kelley’s brand of truth

bands ,;m area By Barbara

By Sarah Smith of intense research, American author Kitty Kelley has produced yet another essential look at the personal lives of the rich and famous. Her latest literary effort (if such words are taken lightly) concerns the British royal family. Despite The Royals release date coinciding with the fatality of Diana, Princess of Wales, Kelley needs little publicity. Her past biographies of years

four

Kennedy

Jacqueline

Onassis,

Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra

and Nancy Reagan have each enjoyed considerable success, along with controversy. The Royals is no different in its glaring examination of the intricate details of the House of Windsor. Readers unfamiliar with the more colorful episodes of the

You don’t have to drive to Toronto to see a good concert. Many bands are coming to the Kitchener area in October. .Some big name acts and some up-and-coming bands will be Fsure to keep you entertained. Big Sugar will be at the Lyric . fin 'Kitchener Oct, 2. Tickets in'!

But Kelley’s 500-page biography provides

little

news

that has not

already been reported in reputable

and sensational newspapers. She writes in length of Prince Philip’s

with her weight. Prince

battle

Charles’ affair with Camilla Parker

t'**

suicide attempts.

-

There are some moments of as the

young Queen’s for

appetite

Princess

University

Kelley’s approach is definitely American, as she often disparag-

attoipthe nij^tshow, you nnist^ have a college or university IDl or be 1 9 years of age or older.

ingly refers to the British class

system and snobbery while mar-

monogrammed

Kelley’s character analyses are ability. The shown as a overweight woman, for

of Kelley’s writing is

The book is not without merit,

Kelley provides a glimpse of the

Calls for Elton

swamp at

HMV

the

in

ringing since the interview with

Domnech

Smith, a full-time employee, began. “You’ve heard the phone ring about six times since I’ve been sit-

and

it’s all

about Elton

was announced

it

across the country placed orders exceeding one million. The irony of the situation, said Smith, is that it’s the biggest CD to hit music stores, but nobody makes any money because all profits go to the Diana, Princess of Wales, Memorial Fund.

Polygram actually loses money,

John,” said Smith.

Since

prophetic in her mention of the prying media. However, the

and

is

claim that The Royals

“most iconoclastic,

that

John’s tribute to Princess Diana,

Smith

receives at least

day about

said,

he

said,

for this store and we’re not

was

at the fimeral,” said Smith, “the Eaton Centre

HMV

Sept.

end of the week.

“It’s

unprecedented,” said Smith.

been working here for five years and I’ve never experienced anything like this single.” said Polygram,

who

is

company making the single

the in

making

Smith said the single can be compared to the mad dash for the doll last Christmas.

“Our

society

is

so consumer-

based,” said Smith. “They jump on the bandwagon. I’m sure there’s a lot

“I’ve

He

repercussions.

In

Germany, wax museums moved the mannequins of Charles and

“I

know

all

the

money

is

doubt, Kelley will capture a wide readership for her latest release considering America’s

enormous fascination with the British royal family. But those seeking in-depth reporting and a credible account of the Windsor family will be disappointed. The made-for-TV movie that will inevitably grace our screens will probably provide greater insight,

shari'ig in that goodwill. It’s

need

like, I

it

talking ^bout

HMV

for free.

nsM a

is

it.

about getting

it.”

First

Time

Offered In

popular Pioneer Park.. .for sale

by

o\v

ner'occupant. Bright, spa-

cious. three-bdrm

end unit condo

townhouse with finished rec rm.

New

paint, vinyl

Comes off

li\

and broadloom.

with 5 appliances! Sliders

ing

rm

in closet in

to large patio.

Walk-

master bdrm. Covered,

Conestoga College and Hwy. 401 Immediate possession,

Owner

know who

748-9748

and they

Foo-Fcst comes to town Oct. 14 at the Lyric, featuring the Foo Fighters, Talk Show and Treble Charger. Tickets can be bought at TicketM^ter, in Kitchener, Waterloo and Guelph and Dr. Disc in Kitchener. £?|>c)rs open at 7 p.m.

more

because everybody

number

is

>oui iickets.

“I had someone call and ask for John Elton’s Candle in the Rain song,” said Smith. “When you start taking calls like that, you know it’s not about what it is, it’s

of calls where the person doesn’t even know the name of the song, they just want it. They don’t even don’t even mention Diana.

London, Tickets

can Jb bought in London’s Dr. Disc, Music World, hifoSource' BizBooth (UWO) and Fanshawe)- Out-of-town fans,' ' i.590“to”bfaer

going

back door parking. Minutes from

intentions, but I’ve taken a

To

Club Denim on Oct.

to charity, but a lot of people aren’t

of people out there with good

the artist

apart.”

No

lortil oi

to

a cent.”

Elmo

call.”

22 the Fairview Park HMV store had sold close to 1 ,500 CDs and expected to sell 3,000 by the

going

in probably the history of this mall

it.

phone

“It’s great that it’s all

charity, but the biggest sales event

done singing

By

far-

description

the cost of making the single.

store

“Basically the minute he

got a

seems

because they are covering

calls a

the

100 phone

Kelley’s

fetched.

.

Candle in the Wind, was being released.

work

significant”

is

historically

Diana suitably

John single

Canada, estimated sales to be around 500,000, but CD stores

Fairview Park Mall hasn’t stopped

ting here

royal family during the world wars

local record store

Erica Ayliffe

The phone

as

Waterloo."^

9.^Tickets can be bought at the^

to tl&;:Nac in

revealing not only of character but

Queen Mother

bf

cluh -at 166 Wyndham St. Ocf. 10 brings the Gandharvas

with

the royal coat of arms.”

national

closeted

homosexuality, womanizing and

By

'

objects.”

children,

-

In Guelph f^^Alanbah Myles will play at

actresses like fish to shiny metal

pages with scandalous accounts of illegitimate

“butter pats

deceptive,

'

as

'

the

fill

t

of sweets.

Anonymous

officials

that is all'ages Oct. 3, as

a bight € show Confederation Hall ^ at^The"'

Consider Kelley’s of the break-up between the Prince and Princess of Wales. “The separation had inter-

her writing style, Kelley often conveniently leaves out specifics on her sources, while filling her book with scenes comis

show well

“few people ever see the iron frame under the marshmallow.” Prince Philip and President John are matched in F. Kennedy womanizing tastes: their “Extraordinarily handsome and witty, both were attracted to pretty

Andrew.

and

;/

Margaret’s preference for pornography and the Queen Mum’s love

racy seated on gold chairs eating

friends, family

Age ^ of " Electric and ^ J i^Zuckerbaby will play a matinee j

insatiable

sex.

Corey Hart ^ will be rocking I Centennial Hall in London on J Oct. 2>'-^'"

“enlightenment” from Kelley, such

according to Kelley’s particular brand of truth. Described as a comprehensive and balanced look at the House of Windsor since 1917, half of the book’s pages are devoted to the first six decades, while the latter half focuses on the troubled marriages of Princes Charles and

plete with dialogue.

iJndvance ate $ 12.

Bowles and Diana’s bulimia and

velling at the habits of the aristoc-

as

'

Queen’s Elizabeth’s cold stoicism, Sarah Ferguson’s infidelities.

famous family will find everything

Of course,

|

Ateljevic

alcoholism behind the walls of the royal households.

After

!

if desired.

transferred to Niagara

Peninsula. Asking $85,900. Call

mmm Wednesday,

Oef. 1

X X :30 -X :30

In The Sexuary

'

,

,

^


Page 16

— SPOKE,

Sept. 29 , 1997

ENTERTAINMENT

DSA

pulls plug

Comic

Movie review:

relief

and Out a welcome In

on Days craze

change

of the volume.”

By Casey Johnson

(the students) kept turning

Between 20 and 30 students

will

Student Doon (DSA) decision to plug on the popular Days the

endure

Association’s pull the

of Our Lives soap opera, which students requested they show the in p.m. everyday at 1 a lounge to

sit

and

talk,

not

dents watching the soap opera can said Gerry

it,”

Cleaves, president

of student affairs. gotten crazy,”

“|fs

Days,” he said. Cleaves said he didn’t want to disappoint anyone, but the logic is

moviegoers lately with films about that taboo topic, homo-

gotten Crazy.

Days

isn’t

on then

run for your

Days

_

,

yOUr

life.”

was

the left

room

DSA

to the television,”

president of student affairs

said Cleaves. “This

was another reason

to

to

of the stage

Days was

However, it was two reasons. First, the DSA needed room for their annual book sale and second, the DSA thought it would

he

to the stage for

week

for the

said,

The

it

back.”

dominating the lounge,

and he

DSA

move

felt that

wasn’t

fair.

doesn’t usually put any on activities, except

limitations

during the nooners entertainment.

provide entertainment during orientation

designated

room, he said. “There was also some damage done

in the lounge.

moved

sexuality. After all the socially

tearjerkers and conscious closed-minded portrayals masquerading as comedies, Frank

its

lives.

Gerry Cleaves,

the

in

television

on, then run

the

Originally,

big-screen television

isn’t

when

there

Then they display

while they waited

in lines,” said

Cleaves.

Students would line up for their student identification, drug plan

women.

cards, etc. “It’s really

Even

said.

gotten out of hand.

the people in the

DSA office

couldn’t hear themselves overtop

school principal, S. Palmer)

Harrison Ford

40s

who

is

ing fun at the audience for its to categorize

with his

may have the most

relatively content

life.

Or, at least he

is

people.

Values),

until

estranged brother Conrad (Penn) shows up to present him with a birthday present.

He tells Nicholas that he should have more fun in life and, to help him toward that end, gives him a from a company

gift certificate

Consumer

called

Services (CRS).

Recreational

CRS

specializes

in entertainment and, according to

Conrad, playing the game most fun he’s ever had.

is

the

begins. After filling out the paperwork. Van Orton waits for

So

the

it

game

to begin but nothing hap-

pens. Thinking he has wasted his

your opportunity to get

involveid in

the con^munity.

Who

YW-YMCA, Humane Society, Habitat for Humanity, Big Brothers, Sunbeam Centre,

same spot where the clown is. Van Orton comes to the realization that the game has begun, although he is unsure what the game is, as is

Friendship Group for Seniors, Association,

Lung

Canadian Mental Health

Association, Alcohol & Drug Recovery, Heart & Stroke Foundation, KW Right to Life, Notre

Dame

CNIB, ROOF, Core

and Children’s Services, Big Sisters, City of Kitchener Leisure Support Services, Volunteer Extend A Family, Hospice Action'Centre, Host Program, of Waterloo Region,

KW

YMCA

ACCKWA, Community Opportunities, Community Justice

Initiatives,

KW Access

Ability, Depression Association,

and YOU!

is

Unger steals the spotlight away from both Douglas and Penn,

ling

Rebhom

defense

Game moving

call

woman

(the snivel-

secretary

in

keeps

The

Fincher manages to reproduce suspense that was key in

As

movie progresses, I I knew what the final outcome would be. And, to my pleasant surprise, I was miles off what actually happened. Seven.

the

was convinced that *5 .

^

'k.

of his other movies, including A Fish Called Wanda and French Kiss.

His soon-to-be-disappointed

Emily Montgomery,

fiancee,

flock to the town,

The media

between clash causing a Brackett and his stammering principal, Mr. Halliwell (Bob television’s of Newhart Selleck Tom Newhart).

(Magnum PL)

plays the particu-

larly persistent reporter Peter

Fincher maintains the suspense to' the end, and that makes worth the price of admission.

right

Brackett

it

a self-help tape

tries

Your

Exploring

Masculinity,

which

instructs

him on the finer points of being a man, such as real men never is at

this solo scene, if

his best in

a must-see even

you skip the

rest

of the

movie.

What film

briskly along.

the

748-5131,

town

and is about to be married. Kevin Kline plays Brackett with a comic flair seen in many

dance. Kline

Independence Day)

For more information see Becky at the DSA Office or

Brackett, lives

in a small conservative

entitled

really on.

from James

Literacy, Family

Howard

the

case,

fictional

this

In an effort to prove his heterosexuality to himself amid the gossip and media frenzy,

A strong supporting performance

of St. Agatha, 4c’s, Regional Addiction

Council,

In

teacher,

Malloy.

throughout.

resume!

— when Tom Hanks

thanked his gay drama coach in 1994 Oscar acceptance his speech for Philadelphia.'

Deborah Kara Unger (Crash) plays Christine, Van Orton’s unwitting companion and foil. The audience is left to guess which

playing a perfect mystery

looks great on a

Awards

the audience,

side she

Volunteer Experience

have

ly-

house, landing in virtually the

Will be There!

to

significant, except for the fact that

Van Orton watched his father commit suicide by jumping from the roof of the

Tuesday, September 30 10:30 am - 1:30 pm, The Sanctuary

rumored

is

a conceived the story idea gay drama teacher is outed by a former student at the Academy

house with a CRS key hidden in its mouth. Normally, this would not be so

Van Orton returns home to a clown doll in front of his

as a small boy.

Volunteer Fair

screenwriter,

and wedding-obsessed mother, Bemiece, are portrayed perfectly by Joan Cusack (Grosse Pointe Blank) and Debbie Reynolds (Mother) respective-

find

is

movie’s

'The

Paul Rudnick (Addams Family

time.

Here

makes for moments, while pok-

technique

own tendency

The Game’s suspense is worth every penny Harris

a stereo-

is

type.

Movie review:

By Matt

small-tovra

celebrities to the

This

late

Other than that people can do what they want, within reason. Cleaves said men were watching the soap opera too. “We had people complain about the women watching Days,” he said. But Cleaves said he set them straight and told them it wasn’t all

courtesy, he

and audience member Mike

hilarious

solution.

for various reasons, in the lounge. “The television was brought out

the

(left)

Train entertain students in the Sanctuary Sept. 2. (Photo by Ian

Cleaves said he wants everyone to be happy and thinks this is the

games out of common

week of registration to give students more atmosphere

Comedian Rick Bronson

bang for a buck in his latest movie and Kevin Kline may get more laughs being outed as a homosexual in his, but the only new movie this fall that is worth the steep $7 admission is The Game. Directed by David Fincher (director of Seven), The Game stars Michael Douglas, Sean Penn and Deborah Kara Unger. Set in Francisco, San present-day Douglas plays investment banker Nicholas Van Orton, a man in his

returning students, waiting in lines

for the

Oz’s In and Out is a refreshing change. Instead of basing gay characters on stereotypes, every character in the movie, from the

is

signs asking people to refrain from

new and

inundated

room

vision, but only in

“If

has

needed to go

the big-screen tele-

If

“It’s

said Cleaves.

Hollywood

back into the television where it belongs. The lounge is used for a wide variety of activities and everyone needs to feel comfortable there, he said. Days of Our Lives can still be seen on

for people to be quiet so the stu-

hear

By Alison Shadbolt

that the television

Sanctuary. “It’s

“They up the volume to drown out the was surround-sound it radio,

is

is

unusual about

this

a kiss shared by two

men. Most movies

skirt

the

issue in fear of offending audi-

ences, showing a

minimum

of

physical affection between gay characters which often amounts

few NFL-style bear hugs. However, Oz and Rudnick have put great comedy first in

to a

In

and Out.


Digital Edition - September 29, 1997