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Election

Student killed

on way By Lynne Thompson

exam

to

services and Rick Casey

from speneeds spoke to the students about the mourning process and about remembering Semeniuk. Higgins said the counselling was cial

The life of a Conestoga student ended tragically in the early morning hours of Wednesday, Feb. 26, as she was on her way to

especially

the college.

Semeniuk’s death occurred imme-

important

Jody Semeniuk, RR, 4

23,

Waterford,

H

oncoming vehicle around 7 a.m. The accident, which occurred on Regional Road 24

difficult.

near

Students

isolated

the

making ing

second year computer pro-

grammer analyst (CP/A) student, Semeniuk was an excellent student and wonderful friend.

Jane Hutton Perry, who taught Semeniuk’s systems analysis and design course,

woman was

Ten people, seven

management and support

staff employees are being offered buy-out packages for their con-

college

president

John

Tibbits told college council

March

tracts,

10

port-staff positions

in senior sup-

and three

cal workers, are affected

cleri-

by the

cuts.

The Ministry of Education wanted lay-off notices to go but March 14, Tibbits said.

on Trillium Drive. Its employees mainly developed training plans for industry and funnelled government subsidies to office is located

After telling the ministry lay-offs were unacceptable, the college

With a manager involved and “some uncertainty in the budget”, the buy-out package was neces-

was given until March 14 to devise

sary, Tibbits said.

Ontario Ministry of Education to the Ontario Skills Development

a

office, Tibbits said.

He

age will be savings for the college,

was expectannouncement

said the college

ing the cuts, but the

had come suddenly. not totally surprising, but disappointing is the short time-frame. We were given about “It’s

what

is

“human resources plan” instead. The criteria for the buy-out pack-

Tibbits said.

“This

not waiting to retire early and run off with a bundle of is

money.”

,

will

allow

Jody

Semeniuk’s

name

young

the

“always very friendly, very personable.”

Hutton Perry said Semeniuk was a good student who was always willing to help others. She said she

students are in the process of raising money in order

up an award

in her name, classmate Sesheeka Selvaratnam. As it stands now, the award will be presented to a second-year to set

said

CP/A student this year and a thirdyear student next year, said classmate Halina Rekret. Selvaratnam said the award will be given to “the type of person who would be helpful, friendly and have good marks, someone like Jody.”

In deciding who will receive the award, faculty members will give

on the academic aspect and students will give their input on the personality aspect because they were the ones who knew their input

Semeniuk

best,

ting with her classmates explain-

Donna Gross. The first award

ing the class material to them.

at the

frequently noticed

Higgins,

Semeniuk

coordinator

who

sit-

Kristin

described Semeniuk

as a “very, very bright student, certainly

one of the top

five per

was particubecause it was so sud-

cent,” said the death larly tragic

den. In order to help Semeniuk’s classmates deal with their grief,

Higgins cancelled an exam which had been scheduled for the morning of Feb. 28 and replaced it with a counselling session.

Roger Mainland from student

The

second year CP/A

said

classmate

is to be presented program’s awards banquet

on April 1 0. Selvaratnam said the class was also planning on either adopting or planting a tree on the Conestoga campus in memory of Semeniuk. Selvaratnam said he will “miss her as a person. She was a really happy person. She was smiling every day all the time.” Hutton Perry echoed his sentiments: “She was just a great student and we’re going to miss her.”

Although the budget is supposed break even, one per cent is designated for computer systems improvements.

Vice-president of student affairs

Cleaves unofficial choice

to

“There’s another three per cent we’re not sure of,” he said.

“We’re expanding

The offer will be available until March 3 1 he said.“After that we’ll

the

in

business.

The offer is being made to make up for “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in funding cuts by the

.

said

bubbly,

CP/A

All

more

to be forgotten.

Jody Semeniuk

of

driver

ers.

have to consider our options.” The Ontario Skills Development

thus

the griev-

process

not

other vehicle

very

their

CP/ A program

to

escaped with minor injuries. Semeniuk is survived by her spouse Wesley Pasek, her twoyear-old son Shane Semeniuk Pasek, her parents Ted and Lola and her sister Alicia. She will also be missed by her Conestoga classmates and teach-

A

from

classmates,

Oakland,

The

eight days notice.”

She

being away for a week they would be

an

ditions.

By Tim Kylie

break.

after her car slid

be a result of slippery road con-

College will offer buy-outs rather than lay off 1 0 workers

before the

March

said with students

was believed

Alison Campbell (left) and Jason St. Amand take votes for vice-president of student affairs Feb. 24 in the cafeteria. St. Amand is the chief returning officer. (Photo by Matt Harris)

diately

died

into the path of

mm

since

programming areas it,

in a

number of

that will

but even so we’re tight.”

cover

Gerry Cleaves has been unofficially elected as

dent of student

The

official

not be

made

DSA

vice-presi-

affairs.

announcement until after the

will

DSA

board of governors gets a chance to meet on March 25.

Upon results

acceptance of the election

by the board, Cleaves

will

take his post

as vice-president of

student affairs

May

Cleaves

1

a first-year businessadministration management studis

ies student.


Student-industry forum

Teacher says she sees herself

Local representatives cessing program, but business

By Jennifer Dougall Nine local business representatives, including three Conestoga graduates, spoke to a group of about 30 women Feb. 26 to dis-

sentations.

Patterson was asked how someone should update her computer skills she said, when she graduated the program in 1988,

When

and Wordstar knew she Multimate. At her first job, she learned WordPerfect 5.1 for DOS, then upgraded to 5.2 for Windows.

and Karen Electrohome Patterson, who works for 5D Computer Systems and Supplies. Hardcastle and Patterson are office

She then upgraded

ates.

gram

five

systems

literature, the office

administration program combines

human

technical skills with

rela-

microcomputer adminApproximately 57 per cent of the 1995 graduates or found parttions in the

istrative field.

“The best advice

of graduation. The first ques-

the

program

prepared students for the outside world.

still

to

“The

it

is

to

network.”

company and ask She said she

gave her

She answered advanced knowledge of what she would be asked to do. What she learned in school

said,

they give you

interview, an she said it is Dorothy Pflug very important

forum

that

is

If

network.”

asked Hardcastle

how

She

best advice

within six months

tion of the

write a resume in an hour.

-

jobs

full-time

Microsoft

She said it is important to courses, taking by upgrade because a one-day class can save a lot of time that would be spent trying to figure the program out. Pflug was asked how people could prepare for a job. She said people should look at their resumes as 30-second marketing tools. She said people shouldn’t think they could go home and

women were Shirley Meyers, Sharon Pinter, Dorothy Fisher, Martha Lewis and Susan Murphy. According to Conestoga’s proother

to

Word for Windows, Word for Windows95 and is now using Word for Office ’97.

gradu-

applies, but,

“You’ll always need extra train-

make

who

woman seconded by

first

ICI Canada

as a labor-relations counsellor. Nummelin said, as a woman,

she has lived her life being the first or the only. There were no role models, she said. She said although she was one of few women through most of she

career,

her

thought about

it

never

really

as being a prob-

lem. If

students are professional and ethic, it doesn’t

have a good work matter, she said.

“If

you portray those

traits,

peo-

ple don’t look at whether you have a skirt or pants on,” she

“You’ve got to do what you want to do. If you are good at what you do and focus on the right priorities, it is not going to

said.

be an

issue.”

Nummelin has consulted in many different male-dominated

a struggle to get

KPL

and the

discuss, in greater detail, software

human

and the program.

resource and

graduating

from

She said it is where students want to be but they have to make compromises to keep all “the balls in the air.” To keep current material in the

26

$ 2 000 books to be used towards tuition, .

.

,

Recipient must have been a Little Brother with the Big Brother Assn, of Burlington and

Hamilton-Wentworth.

Documented

By Tim

MOTOR SPORTS

,

acceptance as a post-

secondary student. Transcripts of last semester to be submitted with application.

APRIL

30,

1997

Kylie

Alumni services has received 26 nominations for Conestoga’s inaugural Alumnus of Distinction Awards, alumni services manager Mary Wright said March 6. The new awards are similar to the Premier’s

Awards, instituted

provincially in 1992 to recognize college alumni for career success

and outstanding volunteer work. The awards will be handed out spring convocation, she said.

Winners around the

will first

Nominees

Demonstrated need.

Wendy Cummins)

classroom Nummelin still consults a few select clients and is completing graduate work at the

going into the workforce. Nummelin said she sees herself as more of a developer than a

University of Toronto. “I want my students to be ready

trainer and she thinks teaching is one of the best jobs in the world because teachers arc making an impact on people just when they are making a very important

now,” she said.

Some students may think she tough, but, she said, the world tough these days. One management-studies

is is

choice in

stu-

Ogg, who is in her Nummelin, or students call her, knows

dent, Krista third

year,

said

“Mo” as how to relate

to the students.

“She puts herself on a personal level and makes herself available for students,” she said.

Ogg said that most of the mateNummelin brings to the class

rial is

relevant material for students

life.

She also sees her job as being an opportunity to mentor young

women

going out into the busi-

ness world. They can’t be afraid of a challenge because they are

women, she

said.

“If that’s the rules of the

game

and you want to play in that game, put the shirt on,” she said. “You can’t change the rules of the

game

overnight.”

at

week of April.

are

for outstanding

alumni in four categories: applied arts, technology and trades, business, and health and community

7,

Premier’s

kinds of community volunteering they do, she said. “It’s very dependant upon what

candidates

the

to

Awards. Conestoga had nine nominations Premier’s the for submitted

Awards last fall. credits Wright response

might work the

greater

Alumnus of Awards to more comthe

to

and different

munity

interest

itation

methods.

solic-

Alumni services sent a brochure faculty,

to all

their individual interests are.

advertised in the

Record, wrote letters to other local papers and announced the nomination call in its alumni news publi-

in

one

field but

They

volun-

teer in a totally different area.”

A nomination committee is being established

to

choose the

final

winners. Wright said the committee will use the evaluation system Premier’s the for established

Awards. The committee will award points to each candidate for meeting certain criteria.

day for

parents and children of alumni,

was March

other alumni, and faculty have sent

Alumnus of

cation.

The last

and she was pleased with the

response to date.

and faxes every day since the nomination call went out in early February. She also received letters. Nominees range widely in the

The system was devised for “lack of a better system,” she said. The winners of this year’s

services.

receiving nominations

nominated

The Alumnus of Distinction Awards are meant to recognize outstanding alumni on campus and create more interest in sending

Distinction

announced

be

Wright said the

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT THE FINANCIAL AID OFFICE

(Photo by

‘distinguished’ graduates

LUBE CANADA and

ST LINE

Maureen Nummelin

Alumni awards

THE JOE LAPCEVICH JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

DEADLINE:

studies,

the

three groups to

research

ELIGIBILITY:

management Nummelin was also in

After the panel discussion, the

Patterson said Microsoft Word was the most popular word pro-

,

around the industry, as well. One of a handful of women to graduate from Queen’s University

chemicals, mining, engineering, manufacturing, automotive, tool

University of Waterloo are good places to research companies.

in business,

VALUE:

has been around the world, travelling to every continent but Australia, and has made her way

and die and pulp and paper. Her background as a consultant is very broad and she said she sees that as a benefit to her students, both male and female.

of software were needed.

L

full-time instruc-

Nummelin, a

questions.

the extra effort.

The next question, addressed to Patterson, dealt with which types

BY_j

classroom.

fields including chemicals, petro

likes people

women formed

SPONSORED

instructor

Conestoga

Maureen Nummelin brings more than management studies to her

to re-search the

Hendley said the

ing,” she said.

From guarded tours through during the Red Brigade era compounds in escaping to

tor,

often

Ltd.

The

Liberia,

easier to create professional pre-

Waterloo; Dorothy Pflug, the human resources manager at

administrations

Lotus and AccPac for Windows. She said knowledge of desktop

packages are an asset. Because of printer quality, it is

Products; Margaret Hendley, who works at the University of

systems

Italy

tion

The forum included a panel discussion with four members from the program’s advisory committee, including Karen Hardcastle, who works for Waterloo Concrete

By Wendy Cummins

still

used WordPerfect and Corel WordPerfect. Other software she mentioned was Microsoft Excel,

publishing software and presenta-

cuss Conestoga’s office systems administrations program.

young women

as a mentor to

offer business advice

results

have been

in their nominations,

positive as

Wright

She said she has received

said.

calls

Distinction Awards

be Conestoga’s nominees for Premier’s Awards. next the

will


SPOKE, March

17,

1997

— Page 3 Mi

nurcpc

H

uncertain future

$1.7 miUion set aside to study role of nurses in Ontario, says dean of health sciences

wmmsm

By Helene Beaulieu

While Ontario Premier Mike Harris does some verbal back-pedalling comparing health-care workers to hoola hoop makers, those immersed in the issue say they’re closely monitoring the future of the health-care system and nursing. Bill Jeffrey, dean of health sciences, says the issue has focused on for

hospital restructuring but hasn’t provided insight into other elements of the system, such as community home care, that are also seeing significant changes.

“The hospital is not the only resource within the health care system,” “You can’t reduce beds in the hospital and have acutely ill patients going home without follow-up care. What you don’t hear about are the types of continuing care going on in various domains to said Jeffrey.

keep people

at a

Jeffrey said

maximum level

it is

now

the province

more

of wellness,” he said.

difficult for graduates entering the

good

to find a

full-time position.

He

going to the United States or entering the international Britain currently has a critical shortage of nurses.

system

in

some are market He said said

Jeffrey said the previous trend may have seen 78 per cent of graduat ing nurses receiving jobs in hospitals but, be said, nurses today have to be more entrepreneurial then ever before.

“Nursing graduates are going to be working part-time and in contract positions,” said Jeffrey referring to

Comcare, Para-Med and

home-care organizations

its

ng program

said Conestoga’

curriculum in resp

has, over the years, adjusted

^

Jeffrey said courses in

j

n health-care

as well as training for

tings

where

expected they will f He said plans are al

program

it

ncate

in preparation

“The average nursing age years of age,” said Jeffrey.

right

now

Jeffrey said

in the province of Ontario fs

43 He said between the years 2000 and 2005

there will be a significant exiting considered to be baby boomers. lot

in a peculiar situation; she had been working at a job she enjoyed for seven years, but she had to

make

when loo

“There are a he said.

Three years ago Linda Goff was

is

chiatric hospitals.

Jeffrey said

By Rick Kew

delivery.

care are being offered

t

1

r»f

m.mc

a change.

With two growing children, Leonard and Lonnie, and being a single parent, she said the job was not going to meet her family’s needs.

of them that will be retiring in very large numbers,”

passed away as a result of heart problems. “He was a very smart man. And he was thrilled about every little detail of my going to college.” She said she then felt even more incentive to succeed in the program not only for herself, but for her father as well. After she began the course she said she became overwhelmed with the responsibilities of being a

Goff said the couple who owned

parent, a student, and a part-time

the restaurant where she worked-

worker and she thought she had taken on more than she could han-

were

he

like family to her, but she

unable to predict what the future of nursing will be. “The only thing we know right now is that we’re under radical and very critical changes in the health-care system ” he said. “My concern right now with the current ministry is that if you ask them for a vision-

realized there

would be nothing

they could do

if

ary plan or strategic planning direction for the next five or six years, I’m not sure you would find one.”

said she decided to upgrade her education through the Ontario Basic Skills program, at

satisfied the needs of her family, her studies and her part-time job.

Conestoga’s Stratford campus. While she was in the OBS pro-

the Stratford

He

is

said colleges like Niagara, Algonquin and Sheridan have

jcesponcied to

mbbut

gg'""' i

Jeffrey said in 1987 first-year intake for nursing at

Conestoga was 240. Today it sits at about 120. He said colleges have a moral obligation to not produce large numbers of graduates if there are no jobs for them. But, this in turn, said Jeffrey, raises

new questions.

With enrolment down and many programs discontinued Jeffrey said he is unsure if the supply of nurses will meet the demand after the year 2000 ,

Jeffrey said he is pleased that Health Minister

aside $1.7 million for

McMaster University

Jim Wilson has put

to study the role

of nurs-

ing over a three-year period.

“We know where

all

would influence human said Jeffrey, “But we don’t know the

the variables are that

resource demands of the future,”

numbers.”

When you

she asked for a

substantial increase in pay.

With

that thought in

mind she

gram, personality tests, job suitability tests and other tests pointed toward a career in management. Looking at the results of these tests and her success in the OBS program, she said she decided to continue her education in a food and beverage program. Goff, investigated the program at

when you look

at

nursing

now it’s not terribly favorable.

look at nursing in the future,

it is,

at best, uncertain, but

dle.

However,

after

taking

a time

management course she was able to structure her time in a way that

She also found time to enrol in YMCA and begin a

program. During the first half of her foodand-beverage program, she said she decided to focus her energy on fitness

getting a job

with a corporate

restaurateur, rather than a family

owned She

business.

Photo by Rick Kew

researched

Corp., which

is

the

the parent

Pepsico

compa-

ny of Taco Bell, and found their management style to be just what she was looking for.

going

1994.

Stratford, she said she set goals

program, one on Goff’s biggest supporters died.

Mac MacGregor,

Goff’s father,

When

she heard Taco Bell was to

food-

and-beverage program she was studying and to secure a co-op

work

her the co-op position.

She said academic goals were always near the top of her list and she completed the program with “As” and “Bs”.

She also won two awards, the Canadian Hospitality Foundation Merit Award and Canadian Federation Chef de Cuisine, which included a combined total of $ 1000 .

After graduating in 1996, Goff

began working for Taco Bell in Stratford as a shift manager and within 6 months had been promoted to assistant general-manager. Currently, she is running the franchise, as the previous general-

manager has been

of

open a franchise

in

for herself; to find out who was going to be running the franchise, to get an interview with that person, and to tell him about the

any new

GM

transferred,

March she has an

in

and

interview

with her marketing supervisor.

She to

is

confident this interview

promoted

general-manager.

As she thought about her possinew position, she smiled and

ble

said, “If

anyone had said

to

me

five years ago, ‘You’re

going to be working in a fast food restauraunt,’ I would have laughed at them.”

Goff

said,

“Anyone planning on

returning to school should not

let

anything stop them, not age, not money, not anything.”

ANOTHER REWARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Get $750 towards the purchase or lease

position.

Goff said Taco Bell management were impressed with the research she had done and agreed to give

will result in her being

Fanshawe College and Conestoga; deciding Conestoga offered the better program she enrolled at the Waterloo campus in the fall of Just prior to actually starting the

Jeffrey said,

1996.

Student realizes her goals through time management

and health pro-

J*

He

in

like

VON as viable employment options.

Jeffrey said trends in the area of disease prevention

Linda Goff holds her Conestoga diploma, which she received

vehicle.

THE $750 GM GRAD PROGRAM. FOR DETAILS CALL 1-800-GM-DRI VE


5

Page 4

— SPOKE, March

17,

1997

SPOKE

Ellen Douglas

Editor

Tony Kobilnyk

Photo editor

“ Keeping

Helene Beaulieu

Production manager

Jim Hagarty and Andrew Jankowski

Faculty supervisors

No time to An

endless

reflect the

tain the

DSA

in this

newspaper do not nec-

beyond the amount paid for the space. . ° nday a sent to the edl ‘ or by Unsolicited submissions must be u or rejection and should be clearly written or acceptance to subject are Submissions Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contvtied a WordPerfect or MS accompanied by an illustration (such as a any libellous statements and may be advertising

M

-

tain

suggestions

air

improvements to Spoke

list

m

eS

mainly funded

The views and opinions expressed

DSA. views of Conestoga College or die by the DSA unless their advertisers* conAdvertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed for any damages arising out of errors in logo. SPOKE shall not be liable

Conestoga College Connected”

Readers

cloned ewe in Scotland.

is

Association (DSA).

photograph).

stop

of medical breakthroughs and the birth of a has sprung fro

journalism students of Conestoga published and produced weekly by from September to May by the Doon Student

SPOKE

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

cloning around possibilities

is

College.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B 1 Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4

Lynn Jackson

Advertising manager

SPOKE

for

Although criticized as a unethical completely experimentation, cloning could supply an end to

when

anguish

parental

By

In an informal survey Feb. 25, eight out of 10 students said the college weekly student newspaper. Spoke, could use

need of a blood transfusion or marrow donor. their child is in

Guaranteed, the movie Jurassic Park led audiences could be devto believe that such experiments astating to civilization, as most likely not the case.

it

is

known;

this is

first Dolly, the most recently cloned ewe, is the scientific study for its kind to survive such

some improvements. The most common comments involved putting in more crossword puzzles and word searches, and expanding the sports section to include statistics. Shawn Dietrich, a second-year general business student, had the most contro-

recommendation, suggesting that newspaper include a “Spokeshine’

of

versial

any lengthy period of time. Others have failed. Such as the last experimentation at the Roslin clones were Institute in Scotland, in which, 48

the

created and only

two embryos survived

the

as in 1993

when

Jerry Hall and Robert

Stillman, researchers from George Washington University, attempted to clone human embryos

no

to

— a tongue-in-cheek reference

girl

to

the Toronto Sun’s daily photo of a scantily

clad

woman.

Dietrich said

if

the

newspaper featured girl, I d pick it

a weekly “Spokeshine”

experiment.

Such

Trish Jackson

avail.

up more

often.” First-year general arts and science student Jason Snyder said he would like to

see

sports coverage in

more intramural

very best, but no, we won’t have identical twins any time soon. But what if we did?

Spoke. “There’s nothing on intramural sports,” he said. “They also should have weekly

turn into such fictional disasters as

updates and stats.” Brad Martin, a second-year business-

So, yes, this

Would we

science at

is

its

not. the characters in Muliplicity? Probably beings But, the opportunity to create human

donor of dying children around the world should not be banned or

who can match stopped.

the

The cloning of humans

glorification

is

for scientific

of no use to anyone anywhere

and yes, should not be tolerated. So where should the line be drawn?

have created is a way of can not only reproducing marrow and genes that way a also, but world the save humans around produce the right to provide women who do not amount of eggs to reproduce those eggs and betscientists

her chances of becoming pregnant. Understandably, the reproduction of

ter

humans

had only one suggestion, “Put more

in the sports section,

crosswords in.” Brian Straus, a second-year business-

you should put in national standings for hockey, basketball, etc. I know the guys

administration materials management student, also wanted to see crosswords

would

or

national sports news. “If

Forget cloning altogether? Pretend that scienup all the mess tists made a mistake and clean beings in like the supposed extraterrestrial

Hanger 13? No. What

administration marketing student, said he regularly reads Spoke’s opinion page and the sports page, but would like to see the sports section expand to include

you have room

really like

it.”

Steve Vansteendelaar, a second-year law and security administration student, said he reads Spoke weekly but is sometimes annoyed by the opinion columns. said he has found incorrect informafacts tion in some columns. “Make sure

He

are checked,”

he

said.

Alana Mowbray, also a second-year LASA student and weekly Spoke reader,

each issue. Second-year electronics engineering technician student Matt Kreutze said he

word searches

in

only reads the reviews on the entertainment page of Spoke. Of the reviews he said, “I think they’re a tad harsh.”

also said he

would

like to see

He

more

reviews and a comics section. Joy LeBlanc, first-year civil engineering technology student, had no sugges-

tions for the newspaper, but “I read entertainment torials, especially

and

when

commented,

I it

like the edi-

deals with

raising children and going to school because I’m a single mom.”

Darryl Sinclair, a first-year general business student, said he is a regular reader of Spoke and is happy with Uie newspaper. “Honestly, I enjoy reading Spoke. I give it 'A’ for effort!” he said.

Although first-year nursing student Angie Lebert said she only reads Spoke about once a month, she had a suggestion:

that

“You could put horoscopes would be cool.”

in

it,

really into clones is a scary situation that should warbe controlled by government forces and

rants

some

in

Letter

criticsm.

something that two weeks or a month.

But,

It

it

isn’t

is

going to happen

Student objects to apathetic label ’

has taken scientists years to

come

as far as

they have. the So, instead of complaining and throwing most disastrous situations that could arise into the airwaves,

it

is

what humans can

time to

sit

back and watch

create.

apathy ramlike to address the editorial, Students’ issue. 24 Feb. the in McDermott Ross by pant, written apathetic or uncaring! I find this statecall I

would

Please do not

ment

to

me

does not be an insult and a gross generalization that

address the real issues. I would like to provide

Spoke welcomes

Drop us

a line.

personal perspective as a fourth-

semester nursing student. During my time at Conestoga,

I

have continued to address anatomy course from

the issues of the self-directed learning

was first proposed. observe and listen to the comments of my fellow stuThe adminisdents, the typical comments are: “Why bother? the nursing within Specifically isn’t listening.”

the time

your comments.

my

it

When I

tration

the program, the further I am on the road towards graduation, more I have a vested interest in completing the program. jeopardy. Therefore, “rocking the boat” would put me into

The

autocratic “top

ages dialogue

down” management approach discourasking many needed questions.

or even

as I Therefore, I have experienced my voice being silenced that I risk impression the get I semester. each progress through voice. The being “turfed out” of the program if I exercise my

power

differential that

I

have experienced on many

different

to occasions forces me to gather extra energy and strength make my voice heard. a diaMr. McDermott, please encourage students to begin the logue with one another and with management, addressing manof attitudes the and differentials issues of the power real

agement.

Thanks again for your opinion. Marion Willms


^

^

SPOKE, March

rm

^

sy

vy-">y

-v

-

v

.

STUDENT LIFE Paul Holowaty

in

17,

1997

— Page 5

charge of residence since 1993

Manager with Rodeway

Suites since

By Sara Maxim Paul Holowaty has worked

Rodeway

Suites since

it

at

opened

four

Now

years ago. ager,

he

on in from the basement

man-

a general

responsible for every-

is

thing that goes floor

He began his post-secondary education at the University of Waterloo in the general arts and science program, but transferred

that

is,

the residence, to the fourth

until recently.

Holowaty is now also the regionmanager for Rodeway Suites’ parent company, Campus Living al

Centres.

As

dences

being

regional manager, he consults on a number of new resibuilt

across

the

province.

Because of this, Holowaty is out of the office a couple days each

Guelph

one year because the course wasn’t what he wanted to

after

to do.

Holowaty ’s first managerial position was at the Holiday Inn in Kitchener where he worked as the dining room and lounge supervisor. He worked at the hotel for nine or 10 months while attending the University of Waterloo.

When he decided to transfer to the University of Guelph, he quit his job at the Holiday Inn because

tant manager, is taking care of the day-to-day operations of Rodeway

he couldn’t devote the time needed to the job. Two months into the school year at Guelph, Holowaty got bored and applied for another job, this

Suites.

time

week and Jason Buick, an

“Jason and

I

assis-

at Cliff

and Mario’s Place, a

opened

it

restaurant in Kitchener. After six

months at the Holowaty became

restaurant,

the manager.

He stayed at the restaurant until January 1993 when it went out of business. In February of the same year, he applied for the job of assistant

manager

Rodeway

at

Suites. In

June he got the job. By September he was the general manager. During the summers of 1983 until 1 996, Holowaty worked at a golf pro shop at Rockway Golf

Course in Kitchener. For the past few years he has worked at both Rodeway Suites and the golf pro shop during the summer. He said the job at Rockway was more of a hobby because he loves to golf. Holowaty is married. He and his

wife, Angela, have a one-year-old son, Benjamin.

share responsibility

for this building,”

Holowaty said. keep my hands in it because this was the first property “I

I

still

had.”

Holowaty

Paul Holowaty, general manager of Rodeway Suites, graduated from the University of Guelph in 1993 after studying hotel and food administration.

(Photo by Sara Maxim)

graduated with a bachelor of commerce from the University of Guelph in April 1993. His major was hotel and food administration.

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Page 6

— SPOKE, March

17,

1997

MS mWKmSm

STUDENT LIFE

m

College cabinet makers spend Saturday

woodworking contest

in apprenticeship

certificate

gift

By Colleen Cassidy

from Lee Valley

Tools.

“You can’t

win

all

De Sousa

a prize, but

could win the contest but decided

each of you worked on your prowith pride,” said Hans ject Cullman, when he announced the winners of the Apprenticeship

Woodworking

Cullman, one of the judges of the the by hosted Woodworking Centre on March 1,

between

certificate

this one for the challenge and to see what other woodworkers were

this type, there are

doing.

that

said he

De

five fin-

was pleased

AWMAC

cabinet

cabinets.

nology apprenticeship contest on March

1

(Photo by Colleen Cassidy)

.

5:

15 p.m.

apprenticeship

Students are being challenged to redouble their recycling efforts as

both a cost- and environment-saving initiative.

Barry Milner, manager of physical resources, says the challenge was given to the school of business which was the recent focus of a waste-audit report. Issued Feb. 12 the report states D-wing diverted 56.7 per cent of

waste from landfills, a figure it says is “on par” with the college as is a whole. This is above what required under guidelines from the Ministry of Environment and Energy.

Milner said three Rs legislation (reduce, reuse, recycle) brought per forth in 1988 requires that 50 cent of total waste be diverted

by the year 2000. “When we compare D-wing with

from

landfills

other areas of the college,” said

closely aligned with

its

is

American

counterpart.

He ship

expects to see the apprentice-

woodworking

contests

become

office

(519) 748-5131

fax

(519) 748-6727

hotline

(519) 748-5220

e-mail

listen@doonsa.com

WWW

www.doonsa.com

ext.8DSA

We want to hear from you!

bump up INCOME TAX

efforts for recycling By Helene Beaulieu

competitions, but the association

student

Simon’s Home and owner Improvements in Cambridge, was $300 the first-prize winner of a of

D-wing challenged to try to

AWMAC

complete their

Simon de Sousa, an intermediConestoga’s woodworking techCarl Smith, a recent graduate of during the woodworking figuring some does program

now

right

sponsored contests are Canadian

contest started at 8

The

a.m. and ended at ate-level

in

the

good job.”

perfect for the

contestants had nine hours

and 15 minutes

entered

will

a

said

at the

contest. to

and did

IMPORTANT DSA NUMBERS

was given a

Woodworking Centre, said the cabinet was not designed to be

The

and

no clear-cut

winners. All the guys worked hard

North American competitions.

package of materials and the plans for a cabinet that was designed especially for the contest by the Architectural Woodworkers and of Association Millworkers

it is

Sparling said, “In a contest of

He

Sousa’s cabinet became the

Each

up when it became clear they would not complete their project by the time the contest was over. Nine men spent their Saturday

functional, but

might enter next

be sent to Edmonton, Alta., to be judged in a national competition on May 29, 30 and 31.

to see

Canada, the contest sponser. A1 Sparling, an instructor

said he

property of

none of the contestants gave

building cabinets. Each contestant

He

year’s contest.

ished projects were so close a second tally had to be taken.

He

winner of a $100 gift from Lee Valley Tools.

He has entered other woodworking contests and said he entered

contest

AWMAC

design. John Alves, a level-three apprentice from Toronto, was the secondprize

to try.

Contest.

said the scores

said he wasn’t sure he

the specifications of the

Milner, “It ranks very favorably.

we’re doing.’

recommendations included in the report Milner said have 18 additional recycling bins

for the gusto”

In response to

installed in

been

D-wing: six for

newsprint, five for glass, five for aluminum and two for fine paper.

The

report says the recycling rate

could be pushed to over 60 per cent

if

current

programs

are

enhanced. Milner said $27,750 was spent over the past year for waste man-

agement (excluding sewage ment).

He

said

this

treat-

figure

represents the cost to haul what people typically call garbage” from the college to a landfill or costs less per tonne

Milner said send waste to be recycled than to send it to a landfill. “We are achieving beyond what

to

we

are expected to achieve

by the

year 2000,” said Milner. “It doeswhat n’t mean we should stop

when

it

comes

TIME!

to

recycling and they can start by of using both sides of a piece paper.

Fine paper ranked third in the 1 4.6 per cent of

audit comprising overall waste.

34 per waste of amount cent of generated for D-wing is comprised the of old newsprint. This makes it the largest single component in report says just over

The

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TO HAVE YOUR INCOME TAX DONE IN STUDENT SER VICES

(2B02)

the total

audit.

Glass was the second highest 25.7 per cent. This year’s audit

addendum

recycling centre. it

Milner said people should “go

is

at

considered an

to the original

that time the college’s diversion cent. rate was found to be 55.4 per

The

report says

MARCH 17TH AND 24TH

one car-

1994 before construcof D-wing was completed. At

ried out in tion

ACCOUNTING STUDENTS WILL DO YOUR TAXES THE WEEKS OF

DONATION TO STUDENT ASSISTANCE FUND $10

D-wing accounts

for a 3.5 per cent increase in generating waste college-wide.

PERSONAL INCOME TAX ONLY


1

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mascot?


SPOKE, March

— Page 9

17, 1997

Disney disappoints:

Dam Cat

That

dam bad

that

By Lynn Jackson For producer Robert Simonds (Happy Gilmore, Billy Madison), and British director Bob Spiers That Dam Cat, Spier’s first American feature film, is nothing

Addams

Unfortunately, the characters they play and the lines they must deliver do not allow them to demonstrate the quality of acting that

short of a disappointment.

Christina

(“Faye” from Wings) who owns and operates the town’s Candy Cane Soda Shop.

Family)

stars as angst-

ridden, 16-year-old Patti Randall, who is bored with the small town

her parents have

moved

sleepy,

Conestoga

Room

humdrum town

Randall ment.

serves

little

in effect, boring.

vinaigrette. I wasn’t sure if I like this;

On

Feb. 26 never thought

I

did something

would do.

I

my liver, and I actually

I

lentils

of my

favorite courses.

I ate all

liked

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday each week. first

I

at

arrived

Conestoga’s Waterloo campus; I wondered what kind of dining experience I was about to have.

The main when Randall’s

and judging from the poor

the only one

I finally

found

room I was pleasantly surprised. The servers, also food and beverage management stuwere very professional and welcoming. The room was cozy, with the lights dimmed and

dents,

Vivaldi’s

Four Seasons playing

in

the background.

what really got my approval. Only $5.25 buys a quality full meal made with fresh, ingredients, prepared with care by But the food

is

the students and presented with style.

The Conestoga Room

is

real

After dinner ty

The main course was sauteed calf’s liver. This is where the surprise comes in. I thought I hated

room made me even more nervous. the dining

expresso.

to

I

had the opportuni-

speak with

Miller, the teacher

attendance at the meal,

who

I

wasn

t

way. seven people

felt this

There were only

were

have to admit that by the time dessert rolled around I was too full to eat much of it. I have a personal bias against the taste of coffee but I’m sure most people would have loved the tiramisu parfait with

right away.

liver

roasted pota-

parisienne,

chef Tyrone

who was

kitchen helping the students prepare the meal. He said that next

room serve more

year the

dining

expanded

to

dents, are often filled

are 35 to 40.

advance.

apples and drunken prunes which had been soaked in red wine until they were sweet and chewy and delicious.

Along with the liver there was a mixture of zucchini, squash, carblend rots and peas that was a nice crispiness. and tenderness color, of

be

people.

Right now the lunches and the dinners, served Monday and Tuesday stuat 5:30 p.m. by second-year

there besides myself; usually there

The amazing thing is, I enjoyed the dish. The meat was tender and the red-wine sauce was tangy. It was topped off with caramelized

in the

will

up well

in

Miller also said that the $5.25 for lunch and $9.25 for dinner covers

only the cost of the food.

He

cat,

D.C.

Once

scene which seems to never end. By the end the criminals are caught, not by Kelso and Randall, but by D.C. and about 50 other cats.

Novice FBI agent Zeke Kelso, played by Doug E. Doug (Cool Runnings), is assigned to investigate the clue found by Randall’s

Let’s get real, please!

Also unbelievable, D.C. and a female cat manage to have kittens within a couple of days, and who was an outcast at Randall sudthe beginning of the movie denly has tons of friends. Time and time again members of the audience are forced to stretch

cat.

Kelso, basically a bumbling idiot who is not taken seriously by his colleagues, is sent with a team of other agents to cover the case on location in Edgefield. at first the

predictable

lines

lengths.

Although it is meant to be a movie for both children and par-

and

ents, the slapstick

forced slapstick humor. strong actor, Ricci gives a solid performance which is one of

seem

A

the

few redeeming

more than

movie.

John Ratzenburger (“Cliff” from a Cheers) who plays mechanic, and Rebecca

at

range (a Big Mac McDonald’s, for exam-

ple.)

When freshly

I first

made

was given Covered in

arrived, I rolls.

sesame seeds, the rolls were crispy on the outside and soft and warm on the inside. It was a perfect way to

poppy

and

pumpernickel

start

My

have

it

all

NOW for

Need

a job?

of what is yet to come. Better luck next time.

local

Shull

Board of Directors meeting

Looking

for a career?

Tuesday,

pm

Room 1B23

available Canadian Forces. Opportunities are share in and team Canadian men and women. Join our

more

March

4:30

You can

in the

For a proud Canadian tradition.

few scenes.

information, drop by your

Recruiting Centre or call:

my meal. server,

to learn a trade?

a

quarter of the cost.

Learn a Trade. Want

Lindsay,

quickly

brought me cream of cauliflower soup. The croutons were the highlight of this

1-

800 - 856-8488

www. recruiting .dnd.ca

the first course

Our

happen to you. Team. The best thing that could ever

dish, floating like garlicky islands in the soup.

barely had time to think about the soup before I was given the a lentil salad second course I

^

elements will

the grown-ups,

said a

meal like the one I had just eaten would cost $20 in a restaurant. would I thought to myself that I a such for $20 paid have gladly meal if I had been in a fancy restaurant on a special occasion. Then I patted myself on the back for getting the same meal at only a

price

Combo

to

Hopefully, for Simonds’ sake, this production is not an example

recognize

value for your money, especially if you consider the alternatives in that

idiotic

while the younger audience may not understand the dialogue in

qualities of the

The audience may

their imaginations to unbelievable

movie seems

promising, from this point on, it becomes a mixed-up mess of cliches,

to a close.

escape almost immediately and what follows is a ridiculous chase

onto a clue

case.

Though

worse as the movie

are caught by Kelso, Randall and her cat, but due to Kelso’s clumsiness they

she realizes what her beloved pet has found, Randall contacts the Boston FBI, who is handling the

I

and green salad leaves, but I didn’t have much time to notice - 1 ate it all

pommes

unbelievable

ridiculously

draws

movie

for a missing-persons case.

also good.

vinaigrette was made with garlic and cider vineroasted fresh gar and the salad contained walnuts which gave the dish an interesting contrast in texture. It was attractively presented on red

fact that there are no signs pointing the way to the dining

The

However, when

toes,

The

it.

The location of this amazing feat was the Conestoga Room, the restaurant where first-year foodand beverage-management stuon lunch prepare dents

When

I’m not the biggest fan of but it ended up being one

that offers

begins

The accompanying

would

The

plot only gets

The criminals

(“Dam Cat”), stumbles

By Ellen Douglas

whose

actions are easily predictable and

in terms of excite-

action of the

lovely liver for nice price

stereotypes

unrealistic

Boston. Edgefield, a fictional town located in Massachusetts, is a Shull.

taken to

is

develop the characters, including Randall as the lead, they become

from

to

representative of them.

is

Because no time

Ricci (Casper, The

Please contact Krista at the

DSA Office

you are unable :

if

to attend

18

.


2

Page 10

— SPOKE, March

17,

1997

STUDENT LIFE

Drug Education Centre seeks support — By Bryce Wilson

op

students.

Irvine has

from the Family Awareness and Drug Education Centre were promoting their programs in the Sanctuary Feb. 26. Volunteers

Donna

Irvine, fund-raising pro-

motion and marketing coordinator, said the group set up a display during the Safe Break Awareness Week activities to let people know about programs offered and to look for volunteers or possible co-

It

worked

at the centre

for about a year.

could have been better

I’m

satisfied.”

Irvine said she sets up displays about three times a month at various colleges, high schools, malls

She was joined by Kris Raby, a co-op student with the Ontario Business College, who has been working with the centre for approximately two months. Irvine said there were plenty of

possible through various organiza-

students looking at the display but

tions.

programs

The

little

interest

in

the

offered or in volunteering.

“I’m not displeased,” she

and markets in the area. She said the goal of the centre is to try and help as many people as

centre has four organizations

to help different people: said,

Awareness

&

Family

Drug Education

Centre, Youth Against Substance Abuse, Parents are People too and Street Kids in Preventative Programs. There is a $75 annual fee to join

a group, however,

Raby

money

someone

and Raby were also selling coupons for $3 to students in the Sanctuary.

She said the centre is beginning to get busier and is currently starting a new youth group at the Cambridge facility. The centre was formed about 1 years ago in Kitchener and Irvine

local merchants.

said there are currently about 10

SI

for the centre.

Irvine

is unable to pay, they ask for volunteer services instead.

people on

staff.

The coupons were

valid at 12

But Irvine said they didn’t

Irvine said they had originally planned on staying two days at Conestoga but decided just to leave pamphlets for the various programs in the lounge for stu-

of volunteers for fund-raising and anyone interested can contact her

licensed as charities and

at the centre.

Raby

said

dents to pick up. Irvine said the centre

is

YOUR CLASS

suggestions, ideas, complaints or concerns? Elect a Class Rep. to act as the voice of your class. For more information and meeting schedules see

¥ 2^: Promotions assistant Steve Harris displays one of the posters given away Safe Break Awareness Week.

in

the lounge druing

Becky

at the

DSA

0>* J,

0

Office.

(Photo by Bryce Wilson)

DSA’s Safe Break Awareness Week

common

By Bryce Wilson

sense for students

awareness week just an effort to promote

although few students participated in the games, which included a prize for the best drinking story. “We always have a hard time getting the people to get up and actually participate,” he said, “Once you get a few people actually doing it (participating), you get a few more.” More people want to be entertained than taught, said Harris. Students are taught all week.

sense for students during the hiatus. Students were served free non-alcoholic beer and mixed drinks and various prizes were given out.

Bev Cutone, vice-president of student affairs, organized the event this year and set up the pyramid of 50 empty beer cases in the cafeteria.

The Doon Student Association held a party in the lounge Feb. 26 with an “open bar” for students as part of the Safe Break Awareness Week. Steve Harris, promotions assistant for the DSA, said the

DSA

promoted

the

prior to the spring break in

common

Harris said the

DSA

wanted to show that students don’t need alcohol to have a good time, but the events in the Sanctuary dealt with more than just alcohol awareness.

With many students going away for spring break, Harris said the DSA wanted to promote common sense and responsibility. The awareness week also dealt with such topics as sun protection and safe sex. “Spring break kind of ties all of these elements together,” he said. Harris said the open bar was a crowd-drawer that had some students confused because posters didn’t indicate the bar drinks would be non-alcoholic. He said he thought the event was fairly successful

need

Does your class have any •-•••“TV';'

promotes

in

BEING REPRESENTED?

rm.

Cutone said she

set

up the equivalent

tuition in beer cases to

Health Eair March 24, 1997 Time: 9:30 Place

:

a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

cafeteria, Sanctuary,

library,

of fee shop

one year’s make people think about to

money being

spent on alcohol. She said she had no problem finding enough empty cases, which came from three student households on the spur of the moment. Cutone said many people think school is really

expensive but don’t think about spent on alcohol.

how much money

is

DSA president April-Dawn Blackwell, who organized the event last year, said last year’s reception was “pitiful” compared to this year. The DSA raised $17 from donations given open bar. The money will go to MADD.

at the

sell

any.

Other facilities are located in Cambridge, Hamilton, Mississauga and Ottawa. All of the organizations are

IS

ssss

Laurier University help to raise

said they

don’t turn anybody away. Irvine said if they find

they don’t receive any funding from the government. Fund-raising events such as the Synergy fashion show at Wilfrid

Purpose

:

to prorate

student awareness of health issues Organized by Conestoga s Department of Nursing

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Page 12

— SPOKE, March

17,

1997

Students skate in national competition By Pat Craton

t4

Q rp r* r\f The hours of tminino training are not inconvenient because the team

March break is a week most students look forward to for rest or an opportunity to go off to wanner climes. For three Conestoga stu-

r

dents, it was neither of those things because they were participating in the National Precision

Skating Championships from March 5 - 9 in Halifax. The three are members of the

KW

KWeens on

precision-skating

Ice, the senior

team and

this

year’s defending national champions, from the Kitchener- Waterloo

Skating Club.

The

students

are

Chigdem

Sherifali, 21, a first-year student in the early childhood education pro-

works around the school schedule,” she said.

Gardiner has no problems accommodating precision skating with her school work.

"You have

be organized,” she

Like Kerr, Gardiner

tomed

is

accus-

to fitting in sports into her

school schedule. Last year, her year at Conestoga, she did no skating, instead, she played soccer with the Condors as a half-back. first

She said she missed precision skating too much so decided to return to it. She tried out for the

KWeens

because they were the

nearest local team.

gram; Nancy Gardiner, 20, a sec-

Sherifali finds

it

more

difficult to

ond- year student in the business administration marketing program; and Jenni Kerr, 19, a firstyear student in the

she also has a part-time job. “I have to be organized. I need to work to help pay for skating; I also

micro-computer programming program at the Waterloo campus.

need to go to school. I love precision skating so I am willing to

This the •

to

said.

is

Sherifali ’s sixth year with

KWeens

but

the

first

for

Gardiner and Kerr. In fact, this is first year skating precision.

Kerr’s

She was a single skater up till a year ago. Gardiner had previous precision team skating experience with her home-club teams in Glencoe.

The three skaters train nine hours a week with the team. Gardiner and Kerr do not have trouble fitting the activity into their school

schedules.

The courses

aren’t too

demanding, said Kerr of her program and besides, she’s used to putting in

1 2 hours a week of pracof figure skating both at Listowel and Wingham skating

tice

clubs

prior

precision.

to

her

joining

keep up with everything because

make

the

effort

to

accomplish

both.”

All three are thoroughly enamored of the sport. Kerr said she will definitely return for a second year with the KWeens, regardless of whether she will be returning to

Conestoga next year or not (the micro computer program is a oneyear course).

KWeens

like to

next year but

a question of whether or not she can afford to. If she can’t, she will concentrate on school. Sherifali plans on making next it’s

season her seventh in a row. She she was accepted at the

said

University of Guelph for fall ‘96 but chose Conestoga because of the

ECE

closer to

The

th th

na t

home and

nal pre

dsiclS

th°

skating.

three students were

all

excit-

ed to be in Halifax. Even though was Sherifali ’s sixth year par-

this

Gardiner said she would return to the

3

program and because

it’s

ticipating at the national level, she was as excited to be there as Kerr

and Gardiner. In an interview in Halifax prior to the start of the competition, Kathy Mackowski, coach of the KWeens said, “For Nancy and Jenni, the job is to keep their focus on the skate rather than the event because it’s their first Canadians experience.

As

for

because she is experienced at this of competition, she is a help

level

to the

newcomers

in this situa-

tion.” If the KWeens place in the top three in the senior category, they will represent Canada at the World

Challenge

Cup

competition from 7 in Finland. Kerr and Gardiner said taking the

March 29

week

to April

off school to participate in

that event will not affect their school work. They have it worked out.

Chigdem,

Sherifali also has

been organiz-

ing her work. She said the instruc-

have given her extensions where necessary. “They were all proud to know that I am to repretors

sent Canada,” she said.

Precision team skating is a specialized branch of skating distinct from free skating, ice dancing and pair skating. It involves teams of skaters (from 12 to 24) performing a variety of types of footwork,

group formations and skating manoeuvres. Heads, legs, arms and bodies must be synchronized and in unison.

Hearfs of Hafe The

Battle fo

I

Young Minds

A frightening documentary filmed inside Canada’s growing

racist

movement Thurs.,

1:00

March 20

pm

The Sanctuary baton championships in the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre. Chisholm, who is a recreation-leadership student at Mohawk College, is training at Conestoga because it is convenient for her coach. (Photo by Rick Kew)

Screening and discussion with award winning documentary filmmaker Peter Raymont Investigative Productions, Toronto


Digital Edition - March 17, 1997