Page 1

— No. 38

28th Year

November

Kitchener, Ontario

11,

1996

Six-member delegation speaks at provincial hearing

Conestoga recommends reform for student loan repayment plan By Ross McDermott

investment in their

own economic

Conestoga’s

future.”

Reform by the Ontario government to the student loan repayment plan was a recommendation made by Conestoga’s roundtable discussion

participants

during

London on

provincial hearing in Oct. 30.

Headed by college John Tibbits,

member

president

Conestoga’s

six-

delegation presented the

recommendations at the University of Western Ontario to the advisory panel on the Future Directions

for

Post-Secondary

Education. Paired with the University of

Guelph, Conestoga was allowed 10 minutes to present its recommendations. The presentations were followed by a 20-minute question period by the advisory panel.

Psychic Jeff Evason and first-year business student Stella Sava to levitate a table, during a Halloween performance in the

Sanctuary. See Levitation on Page 5

(Photo by Jennifer Dougaii)

In a

document

recommended

Conestoga private funding tops in system, says ministry ^y

Scott

more than $25,000

Nixon

radio station

Conestoga was Ontario’s top

is

Kitchener

funds.

Training.

DSA gave to the learning resource $1,514,592,

equivelent to 2.5 per cent of Conestoga’s total operating budget.

Wayne Hussey, Conestoga’s director of development, attributed most of the fund-raising to donations

to the college’s school

made

of business. Fund-raising began in 1991, said Hussey, and will continue in 1997.

Funds raised for the school of business, said Hussey, are “one of most significant reasons we were rated so favorably.”

the

Of

all

the

donations

made

to

Conestoga, Hussey said the largest was the Keith Pritchard Award, which is an endowed fund of

He

cited the

^^unds

raised

^P^ie from

for

the

be

college

corporations, individ-

\ials and alumni, Hussey said. The majority of the funds, however,

come from

corporations.

Corporations that donated more than $25,000 to the college had

rooms pledged to them and their names appear on plaques on room doors.

One such

corporation to donate

cies

evaluation

qualifications;

program

costs,

quality

she

said,

receive loans for programs

where

link student loan repay-

limited and those

ments to earnings after graduation and analyze program costs to develop a system of differ-

Students,

employment

is

in that situation

could find the re-

payment of loans

difficult.

Advisory panel chairman David C. Smith said, in an interview following the presentations, the consideration of the students’

entiated tuition.

“absolutely critical” in the recommendations the panel will make to the Ministry of Edu-

create an accreditation council to institute a process enabling colleges to grant associate or applied degrees.

well-being

is

cation.

“Our higher education system are

universities

Smith

is

said.

what the colleges and have been established,

largely, to satisfy.”

See Reforms on Page 2

encourage

flexibility in

institution’s use of

an

human and

capital resources.

improve accessibility

to

higher education by changes to the number and variety of institutions, redundancies in pro-

grams, management structures, and streamline the system.

a reasoned

Wicked

jester

Conestoga’s alumni association

One

project to

which alumni

donated money was the Adopt-ATree program, in which over 70 alumni adopted trees. In this proindividuals who donated ject,

more than $50 had plaques in thennames posted in front of trees around the campus. The purpose of fund-raising, said Hussey, is to improve Conestoga’s ability to provide education in the

of government cutbacks. “The funding from government

face

appears to be either stable or in a period of decline. I cannot see any indication that the government is going to provide radically greater

technology

will

increase accountability by developing performance indicators dealing with: students’

also donated over $6,000.

award.

money

be

reviewed.

“They

make

quality

to

reviewed

comparison to available jobs in the field is an area that must be

president

April-Dawn Blackwell said programs being offered at colleges in

tion.

allow students to

comparison

of and teaching methods; measures of placement rates when programs are keyed to job vacan-

question period,

there for the students,”

This, states the document, “would allay current student fears of unsustainable future debt and

quality indicators be put in

place and education costs in

centre last month.

amounts of money for education.” Hussey said most donations go towards improving equipment and

The

DSA

recommendations

$10,000 the

invested risk-free and the earnings will be given out as a student

$70,000.

ments” of the actual costs of program delivery which would force the institutions to examine human resource and capital allotment and form the basis for a “differentiated tuition mechanism.” During the advisory panel’s

student loans be aligned to match a student’s earnings after gradua-

Hussey also credited the Doon

Ministry of Education and raised

the repayment of

colleges to “refine their assess-

KOOL-FM, which

Student Association with donating

according to figures released Oct. 28 by the college. This figure is

Conestoga

calls for

donated $47,000.

fund-raising college for the fiscal year 1995-96, according to the

Conestoga

titled

College’s Response to the White Paper, authorized by college principal Grant McGregor, the college

The recommendation

lege

at the college.

also hopes

money

The colmore

raise

to

for scholarships and bur-

saries.

Conestoga

is

also doing well this

year, in terms of fund-raising, said

Hussey. Since April, the school has raised almost $300,000. “Until the college tells me ‘we have all the equipment we need, we have everything we want’, I imagine we’ll be doing

more

fund-raising.”

of an evil business administration studies student, wears the guise McDermott) Ross (Photo by campus. Doon the jester while attending classes Halloween day at

Thomas

Muller,

a

first-year


He

By Peggy Sue Ironside

Gary

In his address to the students,

Pundsack said

on Oct. 28 as a guest

He Pundsack, 34, said he as a speaker to show of

result

and which he

with

experiences

Bob Baker,

the

required to choose a class research project that will be carried through

to research

Pundsack chose

in their design

gram.

bicycle and went a step farther

Baker said the students

with the project by having it built. He brought the constructed

people

why

whelmed with “Trying

to

I

the research,” he

work through

that

told the students not to

be intimated when calling an engi-

They

are willing to talk, he

said.

“I

still

— Gary

Pundsack, a mechanical engineering technology graduate, displays the (

photo b y Pe 99y Sue lronside >

find that networking

is

very important,” Pundsack said. “It’s not what you know, but who

you know.”

Kickin’

go

balance,” he said, “because you

Pundsack bike was built from scratch using

resistance with the potential to faster.

can’t tip

ten-twenty

He said recumbent bikes have set world records for speed. “I think the recent record is about

know

said

his

recumbent

steel.

A

machinist in Kitchener then cut all the material that a friend later wielded together. Pundsack said with the recumbent bike the rider’s feet are not beside the body, but instead are on

same The result of the

plane as the rider’s torso.

the

recline

is

less air

back

68 miles an hour,” he added.

The

ride

Pundsack time for

very comfortable,

is

said,

although

some people

it

takes

to get accus-

tomed to riding the bike. “You have to rely on steering

for

your weight.” Pundsack said he wanted

Continued from Page 1 He said the post-secondary

Baker said the students put a of time and effort into their

to

any of the students in the audience would be interested in furthering the design of his recumif

bent bike. “I’ve taken the design this far,” he said, “And I would really like someone to take the design farther make changes to improve it.”

Reforms recommended

year

at the college.

They research material and

much

and suggested that

is

of the of no

try

different ideas during the first part

of the year, he said, while the last semester is spent producing a report that contains detailed draw-

and

ings

including

paperwork

finalized all

selected materials to

be used.

repayment

to student loan

research being done

lot

last

addressed

estoga’s

the

entire

post-secondary system.

“The

universities

system, universities and colleges, performs a research function. “There are some very important

value.

Mordechai Rozanski responded

doing a great job and everything

applied research centres in col-

to Tibbits’ suggestion. “TTie role

is fine,”

leges.”

crisis

Because of that, he said, the advisory panel has a dual role

of research in universities cannot be diminished,” he said. “The competitiveness of Canadian

when making their recommendations. They must ensure the

dependant on the research done at universities.”

province has a

first-rate post-sec-

University of Guelph president

question

period,

Tibbits

ex-

pressed

concern

about

the

estoga because

in general

through solid research programs.

During the

advisory

panel’s

Andrea Ryde, a third-semester early childhood education student, enjoys a warm autumn day studying by the Doon

funding of research.

CampUS pond.

research universities in Ontario

He

we

feel there are

bigger issues.”

questioned the need for 17

he said. “But there is a and a need for change and I don’t think the answer is to pour

on Dec.

thought the University of

“I

Guelph was very focused on themselves and the fact that they need more money,” he said. “We didn’t want to talk about Con-

knowledge of society

that

they’re

tions to the Ministry of Education

“reasonably pleased.”

the

feel

was

point of the students’ learning

must advance

fine

is

In an interview following the

is

presentations, Tibbits said he

it

everything

more money in.” The hearings began Sept. 5 and ran until Oct. 31. The advisory panel will make its recommenda-

society

ondary system from the standprocess, and

(Photo by Doug Coxson)

“They can talk to me and if I feel something is too complicated or too much work, I’ll tell them.” He added that he offers suggestions and negotiates with the students on the projects.

was over-

process took time.”

Pundsack

RIDING

recumbent bicycle he constructed.

industry for his research. “I think that’s

ideas.

LOW

the

in

are wel-

come to discuss their projects with him and that he is open to all

recumbent bicycle to the college on his visit. Pundsack said he was interested in the class project, but one of the things he found difficult, at first, contacting

and be used and analysis pro-

to their last semester

and

design a recumbent, or reclining,

neer.

beginning of their

third year, technology students are

In his last year at the college,

said.

everything.

of the mechanics fac-

ulty, said at the

class.

was

is

years ahead.

completed in his last year at Conestoga, and to share his postgraduate

work

students not to worry

told

about the amount of incom^fc|y will start at, because the e^Prience gained will pay off in the

design

his

analysis program report,

practical experience

in their field of

third-year-technology students the

end

to

wheel.

speaker.

returned

inter-

may want

move the seat back because too much weight is carried on the front

A 1993 Conestoga graduate and second-place winner of the 1993 Mastercraft award for mechanical engineering technology returned to the college

suggested that anyone

ested in the offer

was

roundtable

par-

Tibbits,

included:

ticipants

McGregor, Jacqueline Mitchell, chairwoman, board of governors; April-Dawn Blackwell, DSA president; Walter Boettger, fac-

union president, local 237; and Ann Wallace, support staff union president, local 238. ulty

Tibbits said Guelph’s presentation

15.

Conestoga’s

self-serving while

Con-

College system financially fragile, treasurer warns By Ross McDermott College

secretary-tresaurer

Kevin Mullan said, in his report at the board of governors meeting Oct. 28, that the entire post-sec-

ondary system

Ontario

in

a

in-line with the budget.” Currently,

was

Conestoga has a $66,000 surplus. “Which really gives you very little room for manoeuvring,” he

is in

“financially fragile situation.”

Mullan

said

the

college

operating, during the last fiscal

year (April

1995

$900,000 surplus, but because of down-sizing costs of $69.5 million, was actually operating under a $61 million deficit. Mullan said for the 96-97 period that “expenditures were tracking

March

31,

said.

1996), with a surplus of $582,000,

He

1,

to

but because of down-sizing costs

of

$4.9

was

million,

operating

with

a

$4.3

actually

million

deficit.

In comparison,

Mullan pointed

out that the entire post-secondary

system

was

operating

with

a

said the college has

come

through the previous year quite well but still has another year or

two to recover. The big issue, Mullan is

Funding cuts are responsible for a reduction in first-year enrolment in the entire post-secondary system by 2.3 per cent. In contrast, Mullan reported that Conestoga’s first-year enrolment was up by almost four per cent. College president John Tibbits said the reason for Conestoga’s enrolment growth, while the rest of the system is experiencing a decline, is fundamental restructuring and the college’s policy to

operate cost effectively. said in an

interview following the meeting,

down-sizing. “The cannot handle

system

down-sizing.”

college further

“We’ve

put

in

differentiated

staffing,” said Tibbits.

“We

used to

have almost 100 per cent professors, and what we’ve done over

the past few years is put technician and instructor categories into the

Oct. 15 to 25.

labs.”

campaign had raised $18,516, just $6,484 short of their $25,000 target, and three quarters of the pledges were still to be collected.

Tibbits

said

the

college

has

added some alternate curriculum in which students do a certain amount of work on their own. “This allows us to cut our oper-

Hoover

In an interview following the meeting, Hoover said the United

ating costs and, With the

Way

saved, train

minimum

wise,

we

money more people. Other-

couldn’t

afford

other matters, United

set the

recognition.

Way

year before

“We

campaign co-ordinators Janeen Hoover and Eleanor Conlin presented a report on the success of this year’s campaign. The campaign, The Life You Are Changing Could Be Your Own, ran from

so

we

$25,000

target as a

goal for comer-sto^

the

growth.” In

said, as of Oct. 28, the

achieved

it

last

we were

figured

it

year and the really close,

was a goal we

could attain.”

1994 and 1995, Conestoga the United Way’s Outstanding Campaign Award for the In

won

education division.


"

M'OKE, November

In-line skater

~

*

is far

from

The means by which to travel came after someone dared her to skate to her home in Kitchener from Guelph. She said she used to bike back and forth from Kitchener

over.

to

Guelph,

native finished

biking

across

her 8,000 kilometre trek across ^ Cr Canada in John’s, Nfld.,

daring

and

15

her

19th

birthday.

However, she still spends a good portion of her day trying to raise more money for her Canadian

that

was

And

Cure Campaign. She hoped to $300,000, but ended up with around $50,000. Her ultimate goal is $5 million, which she hopes to

in-line skating.”

difficult

became

sors.

her long voyage.

Her journey began eight years ago when her mother was diagnosed with leukemia. Ichim and

my

reading medical journals, attending conferences and talking to sci-

Their research into the effects of vitamin C on the body’s entists.

immune system

led

gold at the Canadian National Science Fair and fourth place at to

a

medal

Bums,

faculty recreation and

member of

the

leadership program, to help her coordinate her plans

to

skate

in-line

across

Canada.

IN-LINE Christine Ichim, back from her 8,000 kilometre trek across Canada, continues her endeavour to raise money for cancer. (Photo by Peter Marval)

the

International

Engineering

Science

and

Fair.

The Batu Center, named after their mother’s maiden name, has made an agreement to finance a

The two then teamed up with Lisa Smith, a Brantford scientist

small

who

Margaret Hospital

also working

is

ment

for terminally

on a

treat-

leukemia patients, and founded the Batu Center for Leukemia. ill

clinical

trial

at

in

Princess

Toronto,

own immune

using a patient’s

The

trio

want

as an

them she would gladly give them away. At the end of her presentation Ichim asked the students for their help, saying that now is when the fund-raising begins.

Bums

said the recreation and

She said the idea to raise money by voyaging across Canada came

cancer.

to

Bums

sors.

said

of the first-year management and

800 foundations

in

almost $3 billion

in

who

is

now

only

19,

business practices.

He wanted

the

returned to Conestoga and spoke

students to hear first-hand from

about her trip to a roomful of mostly recreation and leadership

the person

students.

somebody who dreamed

a

Using her unique style of humor and emotion, she told the students about the best and worst points of her journey. From being attacked by a Rottweiller in B.C. (she got a donation from the owner) to

and lived

said.

finally

reaching

the

Atlantic

Ocean (even though she had been plagued by mononucleosis since riding through Quebec).

During her presentation she also 700 rice cakes and 150 litres of Gatorade she consumed on her trip. And as she talked about the

— and

her

August.

last

who

fund-raising.

The

that

actually did the

“She,

in

dream,” he

fact,

is

dream

major fund-raising assignment as part of their course and Burns said he asked Ichim to speak to his class because he knew they would want to help out. About seven or eight have already decided to help Ichim raise money by developing proposals for a fund-raising cam-

raised

Ichim crossed Canada, she

money by

through Kitchener,

went and saw a physiotherapist and he told me to quit. The next day, I was back on the road.” Her trip included meeting cancer patients from across the country.

One

of them, whom she stayed with for a few days and got to know well, died two days after she left for the road.

“That was pretty hard for me.

We became pretty close,” she said.

Clowning around

into a trust account for specific

and have

He

says the

Canada have bank accounts

to give at least 4.5 per

cent annually.

The students

that

have chosen to

help Ichim will have to develop

sponsor medical research and then send their proposals out tions

to these foundations.

Bums

collecting from

people or from corporate spon-

figures

there will be well over 100 pro-

posals sent out.

Ichim has applied for foundation and collected letters of support from politicians along her ride to give her cause credibility. status

Even though she has

paign.

the letters

from Gov. Gen. Romeo LeBlanc) Burns said it can take (one

is

over a year to achieve status.

CORRECTION Way

on page 3 in the Nov. 4 issue of Spoke, Cynthia Singh and Cynthia Livingstone were incor-

donations to the United

rectly identified.

tion

Bongani Dube, it was incorrectly man in Botswana trained in program. In fact, the materials management DeBeers has been sending people to Conestoga for the program for the past 1 6 years.

Boettger said only that he was not aware

In a photo

In die story about

stated he

was

not

I

proposals, find out which founda-

students have to complete a

When

“When I came

it’s

“amazing individual” when

Ichim,

the

companion on

corporate

charitable purposes.

Bums

In

too late to get sponsorships because Ichim has already completed her journey. The key area to raising money now would be through foundations. Bums said foundations take private or public money and put it

more

introduced her

30,

to initiate several

cancer related projects, including a pilot study on terminally ill leukemia patients. The cost of the study is over $300,000.

system to slow the progress of

leadership students are taught a unit on revenue generation as part

On Oct.

a familiar

see blood on the socks

passed her skates around the room she jokingly said if anyone wanted

Christine Ichim came to Conestoga a year ago to ask Greg

was.

just a bit, but a lot,” said Ichim.

Students help skater raise funds By Bryce Wilson

it

“Whenever I took my socks off, blisters were so bad I would

promised they

would do everything in their power to save their mother. The siblings amassed a wealth of knowledge on the disease by

wasn’t

bold

achieve through corporate spon-

Tom

thought

middle of her second week, she suffered a vicious fall, having to get seven stiches on her elbow and spending an hour picking rocks out of scrapes and cuts. Pain

raise

her brother

but

Canada

enough. “I wanted to pick the most difficult thing I could think of, and for me

on

St.

Oct.

P;

1

to find a cure for cancer,

The Kitchener

"*

1

Even though Christine Ichim has spent the last six months in-line skating across Canada to raise her work

1996

raising funds for cancer

still

By Peter Marval

money

11 ,

the only

In the Oct. 28 issue of Spoke, a story about

OPSEU

quoted Local 237 pres-

ident Walter Boettger as saying there to

workfare

of any faculty

was no opposi-

among Local 237 members.

member opposing

at that

time

the workfare con-

A figure of 3,000 volunteers working for the United Way, mentioned in the same story, should not have been attributed to Boettger. cept.

Spoke

regrets these errors.

Junior pre-school teacher Nada McKinnon, right, and Brandon Thompson dress up for Halloween festivities at the

Doon

child

care centre.

(Photo by Trish Jackson)


5

— SPOKE, November

Page 4

1996

11,

COMMENTARY Scott

Editor

News

editor

Student

Issues and activities editor

Trish Jackson

Photo editor

Bryce Wilson Rick

Production manager

Sara

manager

Circulation

Jerry

Faculty supervisors

K ew

Maxim

Kitchener,

Frank and Dick Scott

I

just finished reading the article

Jennifer Dougall,

The federal government in Canada recently revealed

The reason, Citizenship and Immi-

levels in 1997.

Lucienne fear of “social

Minister

the Liberal captains of

this ship called

Canada

Look Inside Yourself Any God.

believe

I

am God!

I

Anybody that knows me

backlash.”

Are

1

written or typed; a WordPerfect 5.0 tain

file

may

any libellous statements and

would be helpful. Submissions must not conbe accompanied by an illustration (such as

?

photograph).

fi-

aware of the real threat of mutiny? The economic state in this country is far from stable and Canadians, in general, are growing weary of the rigid competition for employment that already exists without the influx of new imnally

migrants.

cheaper operating costs is drawing big business south of the border, and the tyrannical of Premier rule Mike Harris has Corporations leaving placed much of the for countries with fipopulation on a

is the only one change last and be fulfilling. A person must be happy with themselves and their actions. I do not practice any sort of religion (I

change. The individual

who can make

that

chants of “blasit now phemy” from all over the world) and I

can hear

though).

to practice a religion or

When times are tough and appear to be insurmountable, where is the first place family, someone turns to for help

fore a meal. But,

when they hear

look

my

at

beliefs

close friends?

They can provide

support,

give direction and ideas, (as will reli-

gious belief) but that

is all it is

sup-

And

change comes from

real

individuals true desire to

do not and would not hold unpleasant views on anyone who did have a desire

am

I

inside.

make

a

have a prayer be-

do not ever tell me that walk on the path of dark-

sinful or

ness. I am a firm believer in the Golden Rule, “Treat others as you would have

them

am

port, direction’and ideas.

evil, there is

a difference.

do something wrong is it because I’m weak and the Devil is guiding my actions? As if! Simply put, I erred in my judgement and acted on that judgement, If I

it, but when you and at what Jennifer wrote, people would have thought I wrote it (my grammar ain’t that good

chuckle

The

In Ontario, especially, the enticing, corporate

usually gets a

and

Letter to the Editor

by

My hat off to you Jennifer. My wife says I’m a very religious man

plans to freeze immigration

is

Dr.,

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

Before Turning To

Robillard

amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor at the above address by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly

advertising beyond the

We are gods responsible unto ourselves

has to decrease

said

reflect the

Room 4B Ontario, N2G 4M4

299 Doon Valley

Immigration

gration

(DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements conarising out of errors in tain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages

ation

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected’

Peggy Sue Ironside

Advertising manager

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by journalism students of Conestoga Colthe Doon Student Associlege. SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by

SPOKE

Jennifer Dougall

editor

life

Nixon

Doug Coxson

Does

it still

mean that I

sinful because I don’t practice reli-

gion? I

treat you.”

I

don’t think so!

believe in

good and bad

— not God

nothing more, nothing less. I just plain old screwed up. If 1 am a good Samaritan is it because the grace of God is guiding me? I don’t

made a decision and as Very simply, if you look inward to yourself an individual and find yourself to be honestly happy with yourself and your actions towards others, I can’t see how any amount of prayer or any god will be able to lift your think so. Again, “I”

acted

upon

it.

spirit higher.

As

Jennifer says in her ending para-

graph, “Start looking into our to find out

who we

own hearts

really are.”

— Wayne Derbyshire

lure of

tightrope without a net, the strain of increased competition for

lower operating costs and increased competition for jobs puts an added strain on the

jobs could be

existing population.

nancial

the

rock to sink this to the Liberals’

1997 plan released

Oct. 29, total projected immigration next year will

be be between 195,000 and 220,000

same projected numbers

the

for 1996.

Robillard said the projected figures comply

with the Liberals’ tain

on to start families and lead new lives. These immigrants are now called upon to pay for crimes they have already paid for. Such deportation practices not only

Deportation, develto put a stop to repeat offenders, is unjust, biased and unsympathetic.

oped

Canada may

deport,

example, a 40year-old male who has lived in Canada since the age of four. This is unfair. That man may have learned his criminal behavior in Canada, not the country he was for

floundering ship.

According

Deportation lacks sympathetic guidelines

Red Book promise

to

main-

immigration levels of one per cent of the

bom

in.

But can Canada absorb the same level of immigration it has in the past? Is an attempt to do so fair to the citizens of this country already

no acknowledgement of the Canadian society itself probably contributed to the man’s behavior. Jamaica has asked Canada to stop deporting people who have lived in Canada for extended periods of time into Ja-

struggling to exist?

maica.

population while considering the country’s ability to

absorb immigrants.

Though Robillard and the Liberals insist that 60 per cent of all immigrants next year will be of the economic class (those who are financially stable) and 35 per cent will come from the family class (those who are sponsored by relatives), the fact remains that the already stiff competition for the few existing jobs and opportunities will become even more rigid, and a strain will be imposed on the frayed and tattered social nets.

Rigid

is

a

word

incorporate in

its

the federal

government should

vocabulary

when

setting poli-

on immigration policies are required to reduce the number of people entering Canada. This would relieve some of the pressure on a straints

country whose citizens are already subjected to an intensely competitive job market, dwindling opportunities, and rapidly diminishing social

programs.

Immigration Canada even deports imwho committed crimes in

migrants

Canada

a ship aground with a

crew

that’s

close to mutiny. “All aboard,”

is

young

at a

age, but then

moved

The day A

little

more than

we

As

had

having tainty

whether she

wanted

me

it

me

to

be

uncer-

with her, there.

Drop us a

line

Got an axe to grind? Write us at room 4b1 5. Submissions can be written out or saved as a WordPerfect 5.1 file. Spoke reserves the right to edit all letters for length and clarity.

boy only moments before

my

A

boy? We were told by the doctors she was having a girl. Doctors make mistakes, but the idea, “It’s going to be a girl,” stuck.

The possibility of it being a boy, for some unknown reason, never occurred me. It was not because it was imporwhich sex it was. It was only important that the baby and my daughter were to

tant

if

Gayle had been deported

to

Jamaica when originally ordered. But not all immigrants are Gayle. Immigration reacted badly to the public outcry that arose from this case and began

making them by

on deportees, deporting

calls

around our cities. An acquaintance was deported after spending a year in prison. He told officials that he was ready to go after numerous appeals, and yet he still sat waiting in prison.

His crimes had been committed when he was younger and he had already served time for those crimes.

So why waste taxpayers’ money and let someone who is willing to be deported sit in prison? Is there any purpose to such

procedures?

These deportees have very little chance of making it through an appeal in a de-

It would appear that Immigration Canada needs to fine-tune such procedures and stop acting on impulse to con-

portation case.

trol

the handfull.

in prison than

necessary while attempting to appeal an

unwavering immigration board. Tremendous amounts of tax dollars are

I

public outcry.

Not every immigrant turns to crime and possibly some of those that do should be given a second chance before more lives are ruined and more mistakes are made.

became a grandmother They were.

you, and you alone, are responsible ;for

my

daughter

The nurse

left

me

alone

with him.

arrival.

a call best left unspoken.

prevented

the nursery.

the trip to

Hospital to find she had given

birth to a

was a

She was so white, so pasty looking. She was exhausted. She needed to sleep. I went to visit my new grandson, wondering what to say to his mother if he really was funny looking. He was the only baby in that area of

was important

made

it

said.

been

was

I

in 1994,

“He’s funny looking,”

difficulties

there

to

Todd Baylis

devastating tragedy that could have been

healthy.

my

years ago

daughter had a baby.

but

lice officer

They spend more time

K-W is

is

five

cies regarding future immigration. Rigid re-

Canada

There

fact that

punish the individual, but also the children of immigrant parents, who may be left without a mother or father. When Clinton Gayle shot Toronto po-

wasted on such lengthy jail terms and would be better spent if used to capture the wanted criminals still wandering

There

must

be

some

thought. Are they sure this

mistake, is

I

the right

this

kid no longer exists.

This time you can share the responsibilities, while bearing the least of them.

A reward for a job well done. You can have fun, and a lot of good stuff that money

can’t buy.

There may be something nicer than a two-year-old climbing up on your knee because he wants to be with you, but I don’t know what it is. Yes, grandkids do play both-endsagainst-the-middle by asking for something after their parents have said “No," and sometimes, when that pleading little face looks at you, it’s tough to support

baby? All three of my kids have blonde hair. My hair is blonde. This child has dark hair, were my first thoughts. The questions were fleeting. But when he grasped my forefinger, there was no doubt he was my grandson, and he wasn’t funny looking. Being a grandparent is easier and a lot

me at the birth of each of my four grand-

more fun than being

children,

a parent. Stress

lessened significantly.

The

is

feeling that

the parents. It really is a miracle. A life that wasn’t, and suddenly is. Those same thoughts also occurred to

Sarah.

Steven,

Scott,

and

Marc,

§


1 SPOKE, November

1996

11,

— Page 5

STUDENT LIFE Levitation, mind-reading By Sara Maxim

crazy?” Evason then asked with a smile.

Jeff

Evason and

Tessa

entertained

.near iiearly

300

ooner l&°°

in

31.

the

Amazing crowd of

a

during

the

DSA

Sanctuary

the

on

He

Evason

began

show

the

by

asking for a show of hands in the

who

had extrasensory perception (ESP) or knew of anyone who did. audience

“Who

of

those

revealed that before the

thinks these people are

show

he had been told there was a student in the audience

who had

psy-

chic abilities. a

first-year

general arts and science student,

was that person. Evason said, was cards and selves.

on

Ferzanovic was given a glass and a piece of wood to inspect. Students from the audience were also asked to inspect both items. The bottle was set on one of the Sanctuary’s tables and the piece of wood was placed on bottle

Rada Ferzanovic,

T)ct.

duo involve audience

tell

Ferzanovic,

Ferzanovic was given two black-

to read

board slates held together by elastics with a piece of chalk between

able

people about them-

He asked

top of the bottle.

her to

come up

them. Evason asked her to think of an event

stage.

in

her

life that

meant a

He

lot to her.

the

crystal

only their fingertips touching the

and think of a filled with smoke,

ball

then to picture in that

month and

smoke

the

table.

One

the year of the event.

Evason

“Focus,”

Then

The

who

itating table.

was asked

to roll the slates

on

the

— July 1984.

inside

Evason asked Ferzanovic to tell what event she had pictured in her mind. She said it was a car accident that she was involved in. It happened in July

a toothy grin,

“We year

at

won

carve

applause, Evason was on to his next act. Stella Savva, a first-year

hand.

first

my house,”

and

allow

to

for

teered to help.

ence, asked the volunteers to con-

Savva was asked to inspect a table Evason said he would use like a Ouija board in his next act. Savva went over the

centrate

surface of the table with a magnet.

In one case, Tessa not only guessed that the item one student held was a necklace, but that it was a Medic Alert necklace and it

wooden

place.

said Marks, a

education student, as she began to carve her winning pumpkin. Sheridan, first-year construction

engineering technology students,

their fingertips

and

Barabas

Matt

and Gerry Cleaves and Bryan Bambrick, first-year business administration

The

Barabas said he entered the contest to get himself into the festive spirit of Halloween. He

scarier.

Evason and Tessa have travelled with their psychic entertainment show to nearly 28 countries and have appeared on the Fox Network’s World’s Most

on the table. began to slide across

Awesome

Acts.

and Full-Time employment

No experience necessary. information

Cheryl education and com-

director of student

available.

For more

call:

life;

(206)971-3550

munications co-ordinator; and Angelene Atwal, a third-year marketing student

Marks received a knapsack with perfume and make-up samples from the Bay, and a

Extension C40701

filled

Oktoberfest

T-shirt.

DIGGING IN - Rachel Marks, a first-year winning pumpkin in the PSA’s contest.

Remembrance

ECE

student, carves the (Photo by Sara Max im)

CCMX Conestoga’s best

D ay

Country, Rock,

A

to

Remember

E

W

W

S

A

Conestoga’s rock radio Alternative,

Dance

H

Rock and

S

E

P

R

-

o

0o*

E

T

11:30

tkt

R [§

Time

music

Wednesdays

and Tree Aantmg Service Monday, November 1 10:30 am the Sanctuary

N

mix

New

9

related to his liver.

STUDENTS NEEDED!

The pumpkins were judged by April-Dawn Blackwell, DSA president; Becky Boertien, DSA

Queensmount

the

Earn up to $2,000+ per month working for Cruise Ships or Land-Tour Companies. World Travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal

added ketchup around the mouth and eyes of his pumpkin to make

DSA

name and what

item was they held.

CRUISE JOBS

in the event.

Jack,

table

One by

their item.

management

studies students also participated

it

student their

A

sheer cloth, inspected by Savva, was placed over the table and Savva and Evason placed

on

one, a blindfolded Tessa told each

There were no magnets or metal hidden in the table. Savva then examined Evason’s hands to make sure there were no hidden strings or gimmicks.

first-year early

Csaba

Tessa, with her back to the audi-

general business student, volun-

pumpkins every

table lifted into

Inch by inch, the table rose

the stage.

After only a brief pause to thank

on Oct. 31. The pumpkin she carved, a small orange and green pumpkin with

air.

After a blindfold was examined by audience students, it was used to cover Tessa’s eyes. Evason selected students from the audience and asked them to stand up and hold a personal item in their

Ferzanovic,

the Sanctuary

faster.

Gently, Evason helped Savva lower the table back to the ground. Afterward, Savva said Evason had not approached her before and that she was surprised and shaken by the levitation. The Amazing Tessa then took

thinking of the

written

move

Evason and Savva each removed one hand. Still, the table floated. Evason let go completely. Only Savva was touching the lev-

the audience

entered the contest in

whole

the audience. still

to

higher.

1984.

tants

the

the

blackboards

Rachel Marks said she decided to enter the Doon Student Association’s pumpkin carving contest because she loves Halloween and enjoys carving pumpkins. Marks was one of five contes-

began

with

leg lifted off the stage, then

month, the year,” he repeated. The piece of wood fell off the bottle. The table that held both items was not on stage and had not been knocked by anyone in

clearly

By Sara Maxim

It

still

it,

a second leg lifted off the stage.

instructed.

“Picture the month, the year.

back and forth. When the two slates were opened, a date was

carving competition

Evason and

slowly.

Savva moved with

event,

pumpkin

stage

to close her eyes

Ferzanovic,

DSA holds

then instructed her

in act

T S

12:30

on Fridays 11:30

-

12:30

Dance

CRKZ


Page 6

— SPOKE, November

One

11,

1996

Faculty books Roost to avoid noon crush

student beats teacher

20-match chess tournament

in

By

decision

By Eric Whitfield

Trish Jackson

is not getting prefertreatment by having the Condor Roost to themselves, said

The

faculty

ential

conquer mechanical-engineering instructor Stelian GeorgeCosh in a 2 1 /2-hour chess tournament in the cafe-

Only one out of 20 players was able

to

Roost manager Duane Donaldson. The Roost has been reserved for about 100 faculty members from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 13, Don-

teria Oct. 30.

Todd Mclver, a second-year recreation leadership student, said he “did a little dance” upon his victory against George-Cosh, who played up to 12 students

Workshop teachers for the Visitor Information Program College Information Program Day will be

one time during the tournament. “When he lost to me he was only playing two others at the time. He made a mistake and I caught him,” said Mclver. “He (George-Cosh) nodded approvingly when I made certain moves. That actually built my confidence.” Mclver said he took up chess in Grade 9 and just played for fun. This was

game

able

avoid

to

the

lunch-hour

expected because of the 3,000 high school students who will be occupying the cafeteria. If a restaurant owner thinks he or

traffic

in four years.

would

better serve the college

down

(the Roost)

and take

care of our customers that way,”

he

said.

The Roost doesn’t have ities to

the facil^

serve the 100 faculty

men^'

bers and the students, too, he said. also able to

time,

book

Donaldson

the Roost any

said.

“As long as they can guarantee about 100 people and a certain amount of dollars, we have no problem closing for private parties,”

As

he

said.

for the regulars

who come

to

or

the Roost at noon, he said the situ-

make customers more comfortable, they sometimes make the

ation will be explained to them in

make more money

she can

Mclver was the last person to enter the tournament, he said, and had watched George-Cosh play for about 10 minutes before joining. For his victory Mclver won an Oktoberfest T-shirt.

“It

to close

Students, not just faculty, are

aldson said.

at

his first

down, Don-

close

to

aldson said.

George-Cosh has been holding the tournament at hopes of creating awareness of chess for young people. He said chess develops spacial memory and logic. “Over the years I probably lost four or five times,”

a delicate manner.

the college for the past eight years in

he

said. “I

am

always glad when there

is

CONESTOGA

a student

COLLEGE

who

wins. I hope they will continue to play.” George-Cosh began playing chess in Grade 11, and won a scholarship by playing on the chess team at Romania’s University of Brasov. Second-year LASA student Derek Stahle, another tournament participant, said of George-Cosh, “It was a great challenge to play someone like that. It was an honor and a pleasure.”

ATHLETICS &

Mechanical-engineering CHECKMATE! instructor Stelian George-Cosh contemplates his next move in a school chess tournament

RECREATION

(Photo by Trish Jackson)

Oct. 30.

High percentage of trades taught at Conestoga’s Guelph campus now,” Zawada

By Wendy Cummins

an

But by April 1, 1999, there will no longer be financing for apprenticeship programs. The next two years will involve finding ways to

Almost 80 per cent of activity in and development programs is offered at the college’s Guelph campus, the chair of technology trades and apprenticeships

industry

raise funds for apprenticeship pro-

for colleges to offer higher levels

grams, he said. “Apprenticeships will never go away.”

Zawada

the activity

is

in

the

trades or industrial skills areas,

Hans Zawada

said.

Two new

courses, the renovation technician

diploma program and the general machinist program, began in September.

They replaced

three courses

machine shops.”

are constantly used.

said

increasing

there

demand from

is

of technician programs. In

said recently.

Most of

The shops

“Especially

said.

the welding and

training

REPLACEMENT NATIONAL BRAND

some cases

The

used as an workers in the it

is

greatest

upgrading for industry, he said. As soon as manufacturing takes a downturn, activity will rise at the Guelph campus because there will be a greater demand for technological programs, Zawada said.

ticeships

“Apprenticeships are very strong.”

area.

is

demand

in

in

appren-

LENSES 'DAILY

‘FLEX

WEAR

WEAR

from

from

$ 19 .^

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£10

EACH

22

the metal cutter

industry, he said.

The college

is

trying not to lose technical pro-

grams, but

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The Guelph campus technical programs also have great support from industries in the surrounding

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carpenter general apprenticeship

program, building maintenance and industrial woodworking pro-

grams

which were cancelled

this year.

The

renovation

technician

diploma program is designed to cover a whole spectrum of renovation and the history of that field. It will train

people

how

Opt-out Refund

Cheques

to use car-

pentry skills in the field.

“What we

are looking at

nalization,” said

can’t

fill

is ratio-

Zawada. “If you why pay all

for the

the class,

money?” Zawada said there is a great demand in the training and develthat

DSA Prescription

opment area

for computers and computer facilities are weaker the Guelph campus. And there-

Drug Plan

that at

fore, those

courses are offered

at

Doon. Ten shops at the Guelph campus are open to students in training and development programs. These are: automotive, plumbing, appliance-servicing,

industrial

maintenance mechanic, renovation technician, welding engineering technician shops and a

“They are

now

at the

available

DSA Office

• DROP IN TO STUDENT SERVICES

• FILL OUT AN APPLICATION • BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

• CALL YOUR ASSIGNED TUTOR • START WORKING TOGETHER

welder-operator,

welder-fitter,

metal testing

are

TUTORS CAN HELP

lab.

all

near capacity right

Refunds are not available

if

tuition not paid in full

Peer Tutoring Co>*«)utatrCMtbdrtA«ocMfcn


SPOKE, November

11,

— Page 7

1996

Easdale returns from speaking tour in Czech Republic By Jennifer Dougall During his

first visit to

communist country,

a post-

Bill

Eas-

dale, Conestoga’s vice-president

of business, found

many exam-

ples of the Czech Republic’s eme-rging capitalism set against the country’s early-European

Czech Republic was

agement

studies

University.

When

him how

“He

«*

*

-

BLOWIN’

IN

•.•

w

•/

'

THE WIND

removes leaves

;

-V.

'**'

./•

'•

v

;

-

> '

;

'/;>*

><&*; '

/•

-.

cities,

-

:

:

100 kilometres from any other Easdale found a castle and marketplace surrounded by modem department stores. “It is such a strange feeling when you are standing there and looking at the market square where people for centuries have bartered and traded and you look over to your right and here’s the new Thomas Bata shoe store.” Easdale was in the country on a speaking tour of universities and factories where he discussed productivity with educators and senior businessmen. He made three presentations in Prague and Zlin. The Czech Republic was occupied by the Nazis in the 1930s and then by the Soviets until about four years ago. There is a lot of reconstruction in the republic, Easdale said, because properties owned by the Czechs before the occupations are being given back to the original owners, complete with their 65-year-old plumbing and elec-

*

* sj(,

.

— Pete Schlei, a maintenance worker assigned

at the rear of the recreation centre Oct. 31

to the recreation centre, (Photo by Rick «ew)

.

Groundskeepers prepare for winter On

By Rick Kew

those occasions they col-

lected the leaves in barrels and

them

Once

The Maple Leaf

is

and

the middle pole

.

flown from flies

higher

Just like any family makes changes to the landscaping surrounding its home and prepares for the changing seasons, so does the college. That includes planting trees and getting leaves off the

carried

the college to plant trees, found

tion’s

grass.

himself pushing a blower, clearing

the college.

pathways and grass between the registrar’s office and the col-

Higgins said when he was told to take down the United Way’s flag

lege Oct. 30.

and

Head groundskeeper Peter Higwest end of Parking Lot 9, said eventually gins, planting trees at the

to the grove.

the leaves reach the grove, nature

takes

its

course and the leaves

decay, he said. Similarly,

Ryan Barron,

hired by

the

He

was

would act as a windbreak against the snow that blows into the lot from the top of Pinnacle

that job because the groundskeeping staff was concerned the

Hill to the southwest.

leaves

the trees

Pete

a

Schlei,

maintenance

worker assigned to the grounds around the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, said if the college does not get the leaves off the

lawns they will ruin the grass and create an eyesore. He said the maintenance staff use mechanical blowers that they

said he

transferred to

would become wet. Barron said blowing the leaves when they are wet is impossible, so maintenance wanted to remove them before any bad weather arrived, he said. Higgins keeps tabs on things

.

wind

is

so high

that

blowing the leaves

is

not pos-

the

sible, said Schlei.

fund-raising campaign at

to raise the college flag,

he

replaced the Maple Leaf and provincial flags since they were starting to tatter.

He

said he usually changes the

flags twice a year.

He

estimated the total replacement cost of the flags to be about

$300. Higgins said the college used to fly one flag at a time until 15

when

.

.

tricity.

Easdale visited many nist countries during

the three flag

poles were installed.

nism’s heyday, but his

commucommu-

trip to the

said’That’s coincidental,

because

1998

in

we

will

be 650

years old.’”

Since

communism

republic,

fell in the

unemployment

has

become a concern, Easdale said. The country can’t move too fast into democracy because of the many people who would be jobless.

As

a result, the government

has been creating unneeded jobs to keep everyone working.

The country

is

very aggres-

sively trying to catch rest

up

to the

of the world, Easdale said.

The Czech people

see them-

selves as being oppressed by

centuries of marauding armies.

“They’re behind and they it

know

and they know what they have

to do.”

In the new capitalist society, an automobile is seen as a status symbol. There are foreign car dealerships, like Toyota and Hyundai, in the cities. However, most of the rural

area cars are very old and pollute the environment.

When

the Russians

left,

they

abandoned ammunition dumps and chemical spills that needed to be cleaned up. The environment was never considered in

any of the Soviet satellite counEasdale said.

tries,

For example, he monitors the

lawn between the registrar’s office and Doon Valley Drive. Higgins said the college normally flies the school flag, the provincial flag and the Canadian

Sometimes

rep-

Recently, however, the college had been flying the United Way’s flag to symbolize the organiza-

years ago,

grounds into the grove of trees across the road from Parking Lot 12

it

resents Canada, said Higgins.

college grounds.

condition of the flags that fly, year round, from three flagpoles on the

like

than the other flags because

other than just the condition of the

lawnmowers to blow the leaves from the recreation centre

push

of about

city

20,000, located approximately

5 v•r^*-

one small

Charles dean asked old Conestoga was, at

the

Easdale replied that in 1998, the college will be 30 years old.

buildings. In

his first to

any post-communist country. During his time in Prague, Easdale spoke to the dean of man-

flag.

dsa walk safe

C^liristmaS 'IAJlaL 07 ci/

ree

'iJif

lOlflCJf/

(j/iild ci/

(j/i/H&trtUiS'

to fy?

SERVICE Purchase a Gift for the Child of Your Choice

November 11-29

Walk Safe Volunteers

Required

Wish Tree

is

located in

The Sanctuary

Gifts will be donated to Children of

Conestoga College Students who are experiencing financial difficulties

Applications Available at the DSA Office

Students

may

Wish Tree by November 15

register their children for a

at the

DSA

Office

'£>^1

Gift


— SPOKE, November

Page 8

11,

1996

Natural windbreak

Low-cost fine dining available at Waterloo campus By Wendy Cummins

Although there has always been of moving the program to Doon, Esenbergs said she is happy at Waterloo and the finantalk

The food and beverage management program at the college’s Waterloo campus offers those

who

to eat out with

like

fine

room

dining

licensed

requires reservations and

Monday and Tuesdays

is

open

for dinner,

and Wednesday, Thursday and seating

for

up

is

C

the

and a regular clientele dining

room

are just

in

some of

ther develop their skills once they

benefits.

gram, both first- and second-year, have four hours study lab in the kitchen as well as four hours in the dining room. Each section alternates every other week, she

Beth Esenbergs, the

nestoga school of business, said.

the

are in the field.

are kind of the forgotten

part

program co-ordinator. Food and beverage is the only college diploma program offered at the Waterloo campus. And it is also the only co-op program in Esenbergs

the

at

jewel.” Every student in the pro-

of the learning experience provided for food and beverage students, said

the

Instructor

of advantages

35

to

room

patrons, the dining

lot

bergs said.

Diane Cudney said program shows students the basics of food and beverage management. This allows them to fur-

high.

Waterloo, she said. Easy access

“We

Friday for lunch.

With

involved in moving to

There are a

dining at low cost.

The

cial costs

Doon would be

dents to gain hands-on experience while developing the business skills behind food and beverage management,” Esen-

“You

learn by doing, but

you

have to have the basics,” she said. By teaching students the basics, they are prepared for most still

work

situations in the industry,

whether it be in fast food, roadhouses or high-class dining estab-

said.

lishments.

Students are also involved in two co-op placements during their two years in the program. “The best part about the pro-

Esenbergs said 75 per cent of who graduated in 1995, found work in the industry. “It’s a great field. The sky is the

gram

limit for opportunities.”

is

the opportunity for stu-

the students

right, head groundskeeper, and Ryan Barron an ash tree behind Parking Lot 8 in an effort to create a natural windbreak for the lot. (Photo by Rick Kew)

Peter Higgins,

plant

Health fair focuses on prevention

IS

BEING REPRESENTED?

By Colleen Cassidy The

semester Conestoga nursing students held their biology and health fairs, respectively, during the last week of October at the college. fifth-and-sixth

On Oct. 29, the sixth-semester students’ health fair included displays about quitting smoking, aro-

Does your class have any suggestions, ideas, complaints or concerns? Elect a Class Rep. to act as the voice of your class.

matherapy, vitamins and minerals, foot care, stress, drinking and driving, AIDS prevention, fitness and health, naturopathy, heart disease,

sexual

health

and

YOUR CLASS

street

drugs.

The aim of many of the displays was to make people aware of preventions to health problems.

At some displays, people particin quizzes and experi-

ipated

ments.

At

the sexual health

prevention

displays,

and

AIDS

condoms

were given as prizes to people who gave the correct answers to questions about sexuality and

ORGAN LESSON

— Teresa Roberts, a fifth-semester nursing

student, holds a pig’s lung, which tation at the biology fair.

was

part of

an asthma presen-

For more information and meeting schedules see

Becky

at the

DSA

Office.

(Photo by Eric Whitfield)

AIDS.

Denny Bauman, whose display was heart disease, said not as many people would have heart topic

problems if they ate the proper foods and exercised.

The focus of some displays was promote a new, healthier

to

lifestyle.

A naturopathy display invited people to sample a small selection of foods with no additives. Bill Matthews to look at

living,

said, “We want people naturopathy as a way of not an alternative

lifestyle.” It was a different focus for the fifth-semester nursing students’

biology health

fair Oct. 31. It targeted

problems including iron

Todd Mclver

Board of Directors Notice of Meeting

Recreation Leadership Student

Of 20

students

Todd was

who

participated

the only student

to defeat Stelian

Tuesday, November 19 4:30 p.m.

George-Cosh

Room 1B23

dif-

ferent types of cancer, myocardial infraction,

CONGRATULATIONS

deficiency

in the

DSA

Simultaneous

anaemia, asthma, peptic ulcers, anaphallactic shock and tuberculosis.

The

students

whose display was

about lung cancer used a cake to a healthy and an unhealthy lung. The myocardial represent

infraction

and asthma displays

made use of animal organs visual aids.

Chess Tournament

as

You

will

have a chance next

semester to challenge Stelian

If you are unable to

attend, please see Krista at the

DSA

Office


SPOKE, November

Aerobics demonstration

11,

— Page 9

1996

Determination

promotes women’s fitness By

Trish Jackson

Junghans, a fitness instructor and consultant, said they were there to

customer service representative, and Poppy Ruetz, a fitness consultant and promotions agent, ran an

Kitchener women transformed the cafeteria into a stepaerobics class during lunch Oct.

promote the club encourage overall

women.

between workouts.

30.

“Everyone makes time for food, school and social activities,” she

The booth provided information brochures and guest passes for a

Wom-

said.

free

performed

“If

Lanee Junghans and Melanie Capling, of the Exclusively en’s Fitness Centres,

two three-minute step-aerobic roupromotional demonstra-

tines in a

tion for students.

as

well

fitness

you don’t have your

as

for

health,

information booth in the cafeteria

you have nothing. You can’t enjoy those other things.”

any of the Exclu-

at

Women’s

Fitness Centres.

They also collected 65 ballots in draw for a free one-year mem-

a

Junghans, along with Capling, a

workout

sively

bership at the club of the winner’s choice.

Ruetz said the equipment Exclusively

Women’s

at the

Fitness Cen-

was designed in California woman’s body. The equipment, she said, was made to help shape a woman’s body the way it’s supposed to be tres

specifically for a

shaped.

Exclusively

Women’s

Fitness

Centres chain has six locations in Ontario, including the Waterloo

Women’s Club, and

clubs

Kitchener, Cambridge,

in

Burling-

Brampton and Windsor.

ton,

READ SPOKE

Trevor Koenig, third-year mechanical engineering stuin the recreation centre.

dent, works out

(Photo by Scott Nixon)

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.

Page 10

— SPOKE, November

11,

1996

STUDENT LIFE Tears of a clown

Students discuss ups and downs of resident By Sara Maxim Although Melissa Wilken has had a lot of fun meeting new people at isn’t sure

Rodeway

much

of parties. You sleep,” Wilken, a

first-year early

childhood educa-

“There are don’t get

lots

tion student, said.

too

said Paul Holowaty, general

.

a Beaver Foods employee, gets (Photo by Ross McDdfinott)

urday

would probably

live in res-

Blokzyl,

would not

ness administration marketing stu-

a first-year

dent, said living in residence

it is

first

“There were a

lot

examples

of extra ex-

didn’t

too expensive,

room comes

considering

the

fully furnished.

Davies said the part she

likes

best about living in residence

have a guest stay over.”

and

is

that’s a fact.

talk to.

showing more responsibility than any generation

So now

to get the

message across about responsible use of

Because some

people

still

What would you if

in

to get the

it

our efforts

it”.

them

Speak OUt.

word out on responsible use of

And

if

alcohol.

our panel selects your message,

you’ll be participating in the production of the it

very rewarding because there

cash rewards for chosen submissions.

could earn up to $15,000.

And

is

a

a total

campaign.

of $100,000

the top submission

And every submission

Polygram "Sound Oul" CD, fcalurinq It’s

to

in

alcohol.

could be part of a national campaign

part of that campaign, too. Because

You’ll also find in

don’t “get

say

newspapers? Or radio?

Submit your message to us and

you’ll be heard.

gone before you

you could put your message on national TV?

Or

And you could be

that’s

time for you to stand up and play an active role

it’s

will receive a free

compilation of Canada's hottest bands.

time for you lo stand up, speak oul and be heard. But you need to hurry.

The deadline

for entries

is

December

31, 1996.

Submission information and brochures can be picked up at

any Sam the Record Man, Music World or Cineplex Odeon Theatres

OR BY CALLING 1-888-BE HEARD (234-3273) or at - www.brewers.ca

stand up speak out be heard

is

always someone to “You’re never lonely.”

that there is

to

GET INFORMED. READ SPOKE!

Your generation

I

know

Davies doesn’t think the cost of which works out to be about $420 a month, is

to live

why we would have

derstand

I

living in residence,

Rodeway has always had an

money

in here

people.”

the

the night, she said.

paid a lot of

moved

anybody,” she said. “Living in residence is a good way to meet

$5 fee charged to guests when they spend is

is

good for first-year students. “I’m from Brampton. So when

live in resi-

penses involved that I didn’t have a clue about,” she said.

to

month,”

think that’s

“I

pretty reasonable.”

too expensive.

pay

said.

Liz Davies, a second-year busi-

Amanda

An

each

night,

Holowaty

here,” Blokzyl said. “I don’t un-

administration accounting student,

stay

phone, table, fridge, microwave, sink and full bathroom. Cable and telephone voice mail are also in-

“We

Chris Bach, a first-year business

may omy

in a row, 10 nights a

month.

overnight charge, Holowaty said.

ager of Rodeway.

said he

two nights

fully furnished with

dence again next year because

man-

HolowatAjid.

the time,

all

to dissuade

“Basically guests could stay every weekend, Friday and Sat-

said she

There is basement level available for students to use. There is also a common room where students can smoke, drink or play music. Students can file a complaint if they feel too much noise is being made,

meant

a bed, closet and desk for each roommate as well as a television,

early childhood education student,

is

enough.” a quiet lounge on the

Seyler,

room

is

Further, guests

in-

student, said the residence

quiet, it’s not quiet

Spirit

Rodeway. This

at

cluded.

“I’m only here to study. Sometimes when I want it to be

loween

over

costs a student $1,675 a se-

Clarence Lenting, a first-year ambulance and emergency care noisy.

Jeanne

college.”

cludes a

she will live in residence

The charge

students from having gues_ts stay

mester to live

again next year.

Suites

idence again next year. “The price is reasonable and it is close to the

It

Suites, she

Rodeway

at

life

PolyGram

Music World If*

•verythlng you wont to boor


SPOKE, November

Coach blames By Eric

surprising

end of the

was

the worst he

against Centennial, the Condors

,|een in 26 years, said Geoff

won 1-0 in overtime. One Centennial player handled

field to the other.”

game Nov.

In Conestoga’s first

«

iTstone,

coach of Conestoga’s

box, resultig

teams for Conestoga’s second-

the ball into the top comer, he

place

finish

in

provincials

the

The Condors

lost to

making nine

said played superbly,

volleyball teams.”

who

stopped

Kesselring,

During the play which lead to Fanshawe ’s goal, Fanshawe was offside two separate times, and neither was called, he said. Despite the bad officiating and

penalty shot and several direct

team didn’t play and passing game, which they had all year, the team worked hard and battled, Johnstone said. “They should be control

the

proud.” Also, the conditions affected

games

four

weekend, he “It

was

played

on

all

the

like a gale

wind from one

players per team, she said, but the

a

recreation

OCAA

The gymnasium

is booked for from 7:30 p.m. to p.m. on Wednesdays, which allows each team to play about two games, she said. “If there were 24 teams, they would only be able to play one half-hour game.” 1

1

The other

Conestoga’s hockey team has a head coach Tony

lot to learn, said

SPIKE! Marlene Ford, Conestoga’s said she was surprised by the number

athletic

of

program

people

murals.

assistant,

who joined

intra-

(Photo by Eric Whitfield)

when he scored the first goal for Conestoga against Seneca at the 7:01 mark of the first period.

Conestoga’s

Martindale.

The Condors, who lost their first game of the regular season 5-2 to 1 in Toronto, have a of young players, including

Seneca Nov. lot

There are eight contact hockey teams with 20 players on each team, 12 ball hockey teams with 10 players on each team and six soccer teams with 10 players on each team. The second session of intramurals will run until the second week of December.

potential

Whitfield

other

came

goal

from defenceman Jason Snyder who joined in on the play and scored from close in on the net. Snyder’s goal was scored at 8:26

sports offered are also

well attended, she said.

all

game

doesn’t

volleyball

stars.

in penalty-filled

staff

to run a league of

that size.

Conestoga’s other all-star from the tournament was fullback Stephanie Den Haan. Johnstone said Den Haan was the best player of the day and her performance was the best of the weekend. Johnstone also received accolades when he was named coach of the year. Joanna Mills and Claudette

Youthful Condors lose By Eric

centre

have the time

kicks.

Amaral were named

said.

The volleyball league could have had close to 24 teams, with eight

The all-star goalie for the tournament was Conestoga’s Amanda

Johnstone.

the fact that the

athletic

who Johnstone

or 10 really good saves.

game. linesmen was drinking coffee and talking to the fans while the play was on, said

Marlene Ford, the school’s program assistant. “I can’t remember the last time we had 18 said

just out of reach of the

One

the

The second session of intramuon Oct. 28 with a lot more people than were expected, rals started

said.

was

away four or

five volleyball teams.

Forward Jodi Brezinskie booted

1-0 in the gold-medal

of

centre had to turn

in a direct kick.

Centennial goalie,

Whitfield

Attendance for intramurals was high enough that the recreation

the ball just outside the penalty

It

Fanshawe

By Eric

1

women’s soccer team. Johnstone blamed referees, bad weather and mugging by the other

held in Belleville on Nov. 1-2.

— Page 11

for volleyball

Whitfield

e officiating

1996

Enrolment

officials

gold-medal defeat

for

11,

N

Conestoga

^

i

t

at

of the second period.

twelve rookies.

Goalie Devin Steubing played well against Seneca, despite the five goals, which Martindale said were because of a lot of break

aways and out-numbered

situa-

“The game was said Martindale,

full

of penalties,”

“which

is

usually

when we play Seneca.” What made the difference in the game was the Condors were the case

Tll?e

L$t ic

playing as individuals and Seneca

tions.

Chris Palubeski

showed

his

was playing

as a team, he said.

Sat. Nov. 16 '

FREENOONER FEATURING

TICKETS

Shannon Lyon Pop Explosion THURS. NOV. 21 12

NOON

$1.00 or

$3 with Bus From Rodeway Suites Tickets at

VIP Lounge

Will

DSA

be open for Conestoga Students!

Come Ready

THE SANCTUARY

im

Office

Broadcast Live on

to Party!

ENERGY 108


— SPOKE, November

Page 12

1996

11,

ENTERTAINMENT Michael Collins an epic

an end to a truce that, for a short time, had brought peace into Ire-

the roots of the Irish Republican

half-decent version of the Irish

Army and

that

force his guerrilla tactics along

land.

tionary country.

with his companion Harry Boland,

The

was subsequently

jailed

and upon his release began

to en-

By Wendy Cummins

Collins

Michael Collins is a compelling and riveting drama about passion and betrayal in the heart of the Emerald Isle.

The movie as

tionary attempting to free Ireland.

Michael Collins

the story of a

is

who

film

is

able to portray the pa-

through

played by Aidan Quinn ( Legends

triotism

Of The Fall,

blood of the Irish while still telling the tale of the violence and con-

Frankenstein).

After a violent beating during a

Liam Neeson

stars

Rob

Roy, Schindler’s List) Michael Collins, a revolu-

(Nell,

of Ireland’s revolutionary hero

tale

that

runs

the

land that focuses on Irish history.

historical events in the history of

Although, at the beginning of the movie she is able to carry off a

movie

played by Julia Roberts

Woman, Mary

who

Reilly), a

(

The

Pretty

woman

was written and

film

rected by Neil Jordan

A

(

di-

not impress the leader of the Irish

orated with Jordan in Interview

nationalists,

begins during what has

been called the Easter uprising in Dublin in 1916, when Irish revolusurrendered to British

tionaries

forces after a six-day stand-off.

With

captures the hearts of both

Collins and Boland. Collins’ revolutionary tactics

Eamon

de

With

Valera,

played by Alan Rickman ( Sense and Sensibility, Die Hard). Valera was Collins’ mentor until a dispute about the future of Ireland tore them apart and brought

A

The

Vampire,

Vampire.

film

is

soning behind the violence that

It

Michael Collins

the

is

& &&&

for you.

Review Guide fcfc&toto

Classic

fctofcfc

Excellent

not consumed by vio-

lence but rather depicts the rea-

still

Ireland,

Interview

British rule. tale

you have any “fighting Irish” you or are interested in lea^Vg about one of the most devastating If

in

troversy in Ireland and accurately

Ireland forever by releasing his

The

easily pulls off the role

of hero and has audience support.

depicting Ireland’s history.

Boland Kieman,

country from over 700 years of

tempts to change the history of

Neeson

The only disappointing performance in this movie is by Julia Roberts. Her American accent is distracting in a movie based in Ire-

are introduced to Kitty

do

at-

lilt,

soon fades.

protest rally, Collins and

The Crying Game), and was produced by Stephen Woolley who also collab-

hero and devout patriot

the history of a revolu-

is

Good

happening in Ireland today. aims to invoke curiosity about

Poor Turkey

Concert Review

Young and Crazy Horse rock Hamilton’s Copps Coliseum Neil

By Doug Coxson

It

When Neil Young and Crazy Horse rolled into town for their Halloween gig in Hamilton, two things were evident to the near-capacity audience:

Good rock

is

age-

and bad rock can never sound when book-ended by a surprisingly competent unknown and a rock ‘n’roll legend. Copps Coliseum, filled with freaks who were either dressed for Halloween or wearing their everyday costumes, proved to be a great venue for the 4 1 /2-hour show. There wasn’t a bad seat in

less

good, even

the place.

Of

course, with free seats near

the floor,

brother,

I

really didn’t care if

whose $40

the balcony, or

damn

seats

anybody

my

were

in

else could

up

for Young and Crazy come on stage and wipe

was time

Horse

to

gone on beThe coliseum darkened

With tars,

My My

solid rock, highlighted

Petty’s

it

by pow-

and tongue-incheek lyrics. It almost seemed too bad that, by squinting hard enough, you could imagine Petty on stage. Droge played for 45-minutes, stopping only twice with some obnoxious plugs for his CD. The audience was pumped and ready for Young and the Horse after hearing Droge, but Canadian favorites Moist had yet to play. The band performed a few of

clude,

Conestoga College

and

among

others.

C

C

.

.

S

K

.

.

Sport Karate

Powder-

Young’s latest album Broken Arrow, and the closer Roll Another Number.

Mondays and Wednesdays 4:30 pm in

\Sr)e

Rec. Centre

-

6

:

00 pm

Weight Room

Young three times now was his best, most re-

I’ve seen

and

this

laxed, energetic and thoroughly enjoyable performance. Since he

Crazy Young and

tapped

that spi-

Welfare Mothers, the 15-minute-long Slip Away, from

Pocahontas,

Young

Flexibility!

finger,

After wrapping up an electric

Child,

Up

World, during which the audience was showered in red, white and blue lights while fans waved Canadian flags from the balconies. The encore lasted an hour to in-

quickly forgotten.

A

Tom

Fitness!

feedback, and Rockin’ in the Free

started the

started things off with a set of

Pete Droge, a musician with vocals so similar to

in’

ralled into a fury of guitars

descended on the veteran rocker and his band. Fans on the floor fired up sparklers, among other things, and began waving them in the pungent air. Ripping straight into Cowgirl in the Sand, Young and the Horse set the pace for the evening and the night’s earlier embarrassment was

of

F

version of

set as spotlights

version

Fun!

Highlights included a 10-minute

the familiar grind of gui-

Hey Hey,

Crazy Horse reGirl and The

Cinnamon

Loner.

and silhouettes of the band moved into place amid the glowing light of huge candles that were scattered around the stage.

will probably limit his success,

thing.

turned for

the crap that had

fore them.

Horse left the stage to his harmonica and acoustic guitar. Playing The Needle And The Damage Done, Helpless and I Am

see a

career before

doesn’t play from a set

most wish

^Cancellations will be posted in the

Student Lounge and

DSA

Office*

list, I al-

could follow the tour the songs he neglected to play here, but I’m sure to hear

the

he’ll

I

some of

be around again soon.

acoustic core of his 31 -album solo

erful guitar solos

their forgettable hits

while the lead

and the whining vocalist postured for the five people who guitarist

Toronto Maple

presents

Leafs

Throughout

was

really

the

and gaping it

I

/

Tickets $35 Draw

iNcludEs Transportation

Bus ckpARTS

LiM*rr 2Ticl<ETS

TickETs

think,

judging by the stares around me, no one else could, either. Has Neil heard the garbage that’s opening up for him?

at

5:00 pM

rental car provided

two breakfasts included

in the third period. Ticket holder

must be present new

Billie Jean.

couldn’t believe

/

OTTAWA

great

music they were playing what a load of crap. Moist’s inept grasp of the audience’s taste in music was unmistakable when they began playing the opening riff from Metallica’s Enter Sandman and segued into Michael Jackson’s I

IN

Tues. Dec. 3

their entire set the

moved by

WIN A TRIP rCR TWC

Louis

vs. St.

cared.

keyboardist jumped around like he

CONESTOGA’S VARSITY HOCKEY

Tues.

Nov.

1

2

per stucIent

on

SaIe

at iUe

DSA OfficE

CAsh ONly!

to win.

Ncv. 14 Genders Vs. Sault Geuears at 4:3C Nev. 22 Genders Vs.

Gambrian

Gelden Shield 7:3C

Digital Edition - November 11, 1996  
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