Page 1

8

28th Year

— No. 33

Kitchener, Ontario

September

30, 1996

•Ontario Hydro scholarship Electrical engineering technician student wins By Jason Romanko Maria Muhr, a second-year elecengineering technician student, has been awarded the trical

Ontario Hydro scholarship of a

$

000 To qualify 1 ,

for the award, the stu-

dent must have a high academic

com-

munity, be a team player and have first

Muhr got

interested in electricity

young age and had various jobs working with electricity, but decided to go back to school so she could get a better job in the field.

year completed.

George Woods, an

electricity

“She

on every

qualifies

professor for the electrical engi-

level for

neering technician program, along with the other faculty, nominated

was a

Muhr

deserved

for the award.

She

the award.

great selection and to win.”

“She qualifies on every level for the award. She was a great selection and deserved to win,” Woods

George Woods

Muhr

woman Muhr

said she was nominated award because she was a in a non-traditional role.

said

she

“I like

am

working with

“I used to run into

problems with

electricity,

Bradley in the medium-voltage drive department. It is a whole

new

game compared

ball

old job, but lenge.

had a

lot

my

to

Conestoga

hiring immediately, but

By Bruce Manion

hiring six to eight

A

career fair to be held Oct. 2 will be one of the biggest ever,

future.

manager of student employment services, co-op edu-

Wright

the

cation and alumni affairs. will be at Bingeman Park in Kitchener between 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., said Mary Wright. fair

Students wishing to attend should bring their student cards, as there is a $5 charge for non-students. Wright said there will be over

employers attending the career fair and approximately 2,000 students attending from the 115

about her

Unlike the job said, the

event through a steering committee. Before, most institutions held

By

joining with

the other institutions,

own

events.

they were interested in

found

groundwork for landing a future Wright said.

Muhr

said

go to work or

left, and Wayne Hodges, both first-^ear engineering technology students, survey the land behind the business wing Sept. 1 (Photo by Bryce Wilson)

Sylvia Kulak,

why you have to why you can’t play

fair to be

in the

sity

.

new

talent.

fair.

The

the student

to.

will be there, all of

ment

present themselves at the fair. The student employment ser-

college grads.”

students

that

She also suggests students come down to the student employservices

2A06 and

office

at

Room

pick up a career fair

guide book.

Students should prelist of questions

pare a

to ask the employers.

clear,

recommend-

error-

concise,

free

resumes

fair.

Each

to

the

student

uni-

services displays a career

fair

of student

employment

pamphlet and student (Photo by Bruce Manion)

“A

brief description of

for both

college

employers are looking for in employee candidates.” Wright emphasized that many employers at the fair will not be

students.

detail

“Employers are very specific about what they want in an employee. Some will want univer-

available

at the fair,

and university

90

to 100

of the employers will be available in the guide book, which will the types of opportunities

within each organiza-

tion.”

Other information available

at

Five police Waterloo,

programs.

the

RCMP,

Hamilton-Wentworth and

OPP

will

be attending,

which may interest LASA students,” Wright said. Some other examples of companies attending the career

fair,

Tekologix. If

students need any help while career fair, there will be a

at the

up with members from four institutions to answer

all

communicate in the company they

plete a short questionnaire

are talking with.

Student employment also encour-

services

and act professionally, to smile and establish eye contact with each employer, and to exude enthusiasm and self-confidence during their presentations. For a follow-up, students should obtain business cards and

ask

who

have hired Conestoga graduates in the past, will be S-S Technologies, Mortice Kern Systems, Hostess Frito Lay, ITS Electronics, OSI and Communications Tech

table set

ages students to dress

job

forces

management

their

for

trainee

and qualifications he or she has to offer the employer and interest

Mary Wright

hired business administration stu-

should emphasize the skills

will

placement

also

It is

ed that students take several copies of their

fair is

potential

office or

company.

at the col-

“For example, many of the banks which have

the

calling the

programs offered

Peel,

the

at

lege.

ing the companies by

employment

GET A JOB!

the

guide book, research-

in operation.

competing stuConestoga dents for employers’ attention and

Wright said many employers

dents

student

their

the fair will be perfectly suited for

vices office also recommends dents target potential employers using the employer stu-

visiting

be with

employers when to check status.

students

local

services

pamphlet and detailed information about many of the companies attending the fair. The pamphlet contains a map of Bingeman Park and offers pointers on how students should

by buses offered outside Door 4 every half hour

three

employment

office are a career fair

be able to travel to and from Bingeman Park

while the

Canada

be one of biggest in

grads and others will want

there will

qualities

to find

because of homework.”

see what positions are available in the marketplace and to see what

student a chance to

was harder

five-year-old

Wright said be wide enough variety

“It gives the

it

time in first year because she had to develop a whole new routine. “It’s still tough trying to find as much time as I would like to spend with her. It’s hard to explain

Wright said she around expects 400 300 to Conestoga stu-

versities

job,

just couldn’t

to find the time.”

opportunities.”

said.

the

first. I

technology

Although many

meet

it

hard to balance

it

everything at

“There will be a better cross-section of employers than last year’s career fair, with good business and

students from the

to offer great

the fact that

garten.

ing are under no obligation to hire, but would likely not attend unless

we can have

The event promises

is

always changing. “There are so many different things you can do, you’re not just stuck in one spot.” As if being a full-time student and working a part-time job isn’t enough, Muhr also has to find time for her five-year-old daughter who has just entered kinderis

cess at the fair by selling themselves to the employers they speak

a bigger event with many more employers attending,” Wright

opportunities for students to with employers and lay

Muhr, the best part

new job

February,

fair in

will

institution takes a certain

together.”

to

employers attend-

University of Guelph, the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid

“Each

months

You

can increase their chances of suc-

dents to visit the

role in the representation of the

may

at Allen-

exciting.

everything you have

come

According

now

have

I

really

Wright suggests

four co-sponsoring learning institutions of Conestoga College, the

Laurier University.

I

of practical and no theo-

Organizers say career

their

learned

to- a

came

I

to

really like the chal-

I

job

is

start to see

I

currently working with Allen-

“When

to win.

The

Bradley

seem

wasn’t upset about being nominated because she just hapshe is a woman piens to be a woman who deserves

says

cal, so the

“I electricity professor

said.

for the

Now I have a lot of theory and not enough practiry in electricity.

a

at

.

standing, be involved in the

my

places that wouldn’t even take

resume because I was a woman. But attitudes are changing, at least now employers are willing to give you a chance.”

award

questions.

Students will be asked to com-

on

the

bus ride back to the college, Wright said. The questionnaire will ask students how many employer contacts they made and how responsive the employers were.

This

will

employment

help

the

student

office determine

and

assess the usefulness of the fair in order to make any changes for

next year’s career added.

fair,

Wright


Page 2

— SPOKE, September

Two

30, 1996

five-week, four country Asian tour to

Before they can do that, Rechsteiner and Brookman have to make Canada an option over the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom and other English-speaking countries,

recruit foreignstudents.

Rechsteiner says.

By Jennifer Dougall Two members

of Conestoga’s

inter-

on

national education office are

a

“Many

Larry Rechsteiner, director of the

Brookman

making contacts which are interested

will be

with industries in

and

Rechsteiner

students,

tional

sending employees to Conestoga

for training.

“We have

of the students from these

several groups that have

contacted us (to say) they

come

may want weeks of

and

countries cannot find a place in post-

to

Joseph Brookman, manager of the office, left Canada on Sept. 18 to attend Canadian education fairs in Korea, Thailand and Hong Kong. Rechsteiner and Brookman will also

secondary education in their own country, so they look elsewhere,”

intensive activities here at the col-

education

international

where

Japan,

visit

office

the

Canadian

Embassy a

fair.

will hold the equivalency of Japan does not have a Canadian

education office.

The education

are

fairs

aimed

at

-

recruiting post-secondary students

who pay

when they study in Canadian institutions to come to Canada to study, Rechfull,

unsubsidized fees

“We

Rechsteiner and

are hoping they will look to

“We’re selling an image,” Rechsteiner

Rechsteiner’s and Brookman’s job to

make Conestoga an

is

In

by

the

training courses for businesses

and

industries

Waterloo

the

in

Region. served by Conestoga. They haye offered some of the courses even in the U.S.,

faculty.

where there are some sub-

sidiaries of plants that are located in

Rechsteiner said. Rechsteiner and Brookman will call and fax the college frequently to

BON VOYAGE —

keep

the

of

office

up

this area,”

programs. We have a We have good students.”

addition to recruiting interna-

education

international

Larry Rechsteiner holds a suitcase Korean-language pamphlets for his trip to Asia.

to date.

full

(Photo by Jennifer Dougall)

Student council seeks an

Debt load

increase in student input

says college financial aid officer

By Diana Loveless

their

concerns to the

representatives, the

DSA through class DSA president said

a recent interview.

“You guys

April-Dawn representatives at one

are the key,”

Blackwell told the

meetings Sept. 18. “Without you, we won’t have any success at all.” Students in each year of every program may elect one representative to act as a of their

liaison

first

between the

DSA

and students.

By Linda Reilly

250 students in each of the six schools make up the college. All major decisions, such as budgets, capital purchases and the DSA’s stance on issues, must be approved by the

Financial aid officer at Conestoga’s Doon campus, Carol Walsh, said she fears for the

that

board.

As

DSA’s mandate

to include educational issues

— such

as

really weren’t

lot of first-year students aware of what they were tak-

ing on, but by their third year their debt-load

responding to the Ontario government’s

hits

two or three years students were becoming more aware, but for most, they don’t have any other

future of post-secondary education

the board of directors will be responsible

on any stand

Ae DSA

upcoming events and voicing

class-

DSA

or the

Blackwell will represent the student bod, along with other representatives of

may

take

on

issues concerning students.

30

at a consultation

with

college.

the college Oct.

“The graphics department is segregated and we need to get involved,” said Susan Guttin, second-year graphic design and

the Advisory Panel on Post-Secondary Education in London. She and Cheryl Jack, DSA education

advertising class representative.

and communications co-ordinator, will meet with a student focus group at the beginning of October to build a framework for their submission to the panel. The government-appointed panel will be meeting with representatives from Ontario colleges and universities at a

asked if she thought she would have any trouble getting her classmates involved in DSA activities, second-year early childhood education representative Christine Klenot said, “We’re ECE students; we’re excited about everything.” The DSA board of directors will be chosen from the pool of class representa-

loans.

White Paper, a discussion paper on the

for final approval

When

students with the debt load they are taking

on with the Ontario and Canada student

Walsh said a

part of a shift in the

Representatives will be reponsible for keeping their classmates informed about

mates’ concerns about the

fearful for students

Blackwell said. The board is designed to have one member for every

tives,

For the first time, students from all programs will have an opportunity to voice

in

new

“We have good

and English-language schools.

at

department, which can in turn create

said.

good

can be looked

college’s training and development

taking

alternative over

other Canadian colleges, universities

will attempt to obtain training

activities that

and pamphlets they are

said.

of students in those four

They

the

Korea and Hong Kong.

fairs in

“Their reach goes beyond the area

exhibits

to Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong and Japan have photographs of the Doon campus clearly displayed.

lot

will

training days associated with

attractive.”

countries travel every year to go to college or university,” Rechsteiner

"A

Brookman

also be participating in corporate

Canada, look to Ontario and look to Conestoga College,” he said. Conestoga is at an advantage over other Canadian schools, Rechsteiner said, because of three factors: the English language programs the school offers, Doon campus’s school of business and the Doon campus itself, which Rechsteiner said was “very

The

for three to four

lege,” Rechsteiner said.

Rechsteiner said.

steiner said in an interview Sept. 17.

on Asian tour

college staff recruit students

series of consultations across Ontario

between Sept. 25 and Oct. 31.

them.

She said

that over the last

choice. “If they

want

to

come

there’s nothing they can

means

to school, then

do about

it,”

she

ment a financial burden and who are unemployed or underemployed,” she said. She said that in order to apply for the extension, the student must be in repayment. Robinson said the Ontario student loan goes in six-month periods and the Canada student loan in three-month periods. “You must re-apply each time the loan period runs out,” she said. “You must

state,

each time, your financial situation.” Loan default, before 1995, went back the government.

to

“The government paid the bank those whose who defaulted would be in collection,” she said. “The government may even take your tax refund before

you get

it

to help

repay your student loan.”

student loans onto the shoulders of the banks. Toronto Dominion Bank and the

Robinson said the banks were restricted as what they could do. “The government sets the criteria,” she said. “The banks only administer the program.” She said the banks can’t give clients the service they would normally provide clients who had temporary trouble with

Bank of Montreal opted

repayment.

said. “It’s a

to

an end.”

how do the banks go about collecting their loans when that time comes? Just

On August 1, 1995, the federal government dropped the responsibility of defaulted

While

in school,

out.

^e government

pays the

on student loans, according to Jeannie Robinson who handled student loans at the Royal Bank. “At present, the government has in place interest relief of up to a maximum lifetime of 18 months for those who find their repayinterest

to

Robinson said today there is no guarantee any student is going to get a job that will allow them to pay their student loan. She said she urges students to read and understand the documents they are signing. If

they don’t understand, she said they

shouldn’t sign.

New chairwoman confident college can provide strong education By

make her an effective chairwoman. A board member for five years, Mitchell

how we do

For Conestoga’s new chairwoman of the board of governors (BOG), her involvement with the college is an extension of her inter-

can only be chairwoman for one year because board members are restricted to

efficiently.

est in education.

said Mitchell, governs the college

“It’s

Scott Nixon

something

that is near

me,” said Jacqueline Mitchell. that

my

and dear “It’s

to

a value

parents instilled in me.”

Mitchell said the fact she has three children made her want to get involved in the

education process. “It

was almost

of the

initial

a selfish reason,” she said

factor that

drew her

to

educa-

tion.

who was

serving two three-year terms.

The BOG, from a

The

things and

why we do

things.”

college, she said, will have to operate

An example

of efficient management was when 106 college employ-

evident last year ees

“We don’t get involved in the day-to-day running of the college. That’s the mandate of the president and his management team.”

received early-retirement packages. Five

Board members vote on policy matters concerning the college and matters which include Ontario colleges as a whole.

After provincial cuts of $7 million to Conestoga’s operating budget, Mitchell said one

voted as chairwoman

of the college’s greatest challenges will be exercising fiscal restraint. She said provincial

cutbacks have caused the college to

left.

were

Of

The college has

also

become

involved

in

fund-raising this year. This should help with

scholarships and computer equipment, said Mitchell.

policy point of view.

by the other members of the board, said her strong leadership and thinking skills will

Mitchell,

look again “at the organization and rethink

the 106,

99

left

voluntarily and

laid off.

Despite these cutbacks, Mitchell believes the quality of education at Conestoga will not be hurt.

“Students have not and will not suffer,” fact, our enrolment is up this

she said. “In year.”

said

another challenge Conestoga is

being able to meet the

demands of its students. She said the average age of college students is rising. The average student at Conestoga

is about 26. have to constantly be looking at how we’re meeting the needs of the people we

“We

serve,” she said.

All board members, Mitchell said, represent different sectors of the community.

While Mitchell said the college pleased with

She

faces this year

its

is

already

efficiencies, she said effi-

ciencies can be increased.

Mitchell, a market conduct director at ulife Financial, represents the sector.

Man-

insurance


Women

Sharpshooter

group has meeting of ‘96

first By

s

Trish Jackson

health, theology healing, eating disorders and parenting.

The women’s resource group held

its first

Sept.

13

events

meeting of 1996 on

to

finalize

during

the

plans

for

week of

the

Take Back the Night march. The group organized events such as a presentation on Sept. 25 by Priscilla de Villier, organizer of

women

the anti-violence

Women’s Day,

group CAVEAT, and mother of murdered Burlington murder teen Nina de Villier.

The to the

to move de forum from room 4B06

decision

Villier’s

Sanctuary was made

at the

meeting.

“When

I look at who’s coming,” Madeleine Poynter, faculty in the student services program, “it’s

said

V J

already

the converted. To me, we’re going to hit a lot more of the people that we want to catch there (in the Sanctuary).”

The group student, prepares to sink a ball on the billiard table

thTs^n^kiar^^

also decided to pro-

vide an information table with anti-violence awareness broch-

in

and hold a draw for a T-shirt with the slogan, “Expect ures,

(Photo by Diana Loveless)

Respect”.

Czech Republic ambassador visits

Conestoga College Research Assistance Cambridge; Larry Rechsteiner, director of Cones-

Industrial

current instructor

president John Tibbits before tak-

office; Bill Easdale, vice-president

ing a tour recently of Conestoga’s

of business at the Doon campus; John Sawicki of the College’s communications and public relations office and Wayne Hussey, executive director of community relations at the college.

the country.

Czech

republic

Stanislav Chylek

ambassador

met with college

learning resource centre and the

new business wing.

“We

not eastern Europe,”

are

Chylek said during the tour. “We were always a part of the western world.”

Shawky

KAAS

Fahel,

president

International, a local

of

com-

pany, had invited Chylek to speak earlier at the

Cambridge Rotary

Club.

toga’s

in

international

education

Chylek said the Czech Republic is very pleasant to Canadians as

year term as a deputy of the feder-

Canada

al

“We

is

to Czechs.

are closer than

many

think,”

Chylek also said he was coming to Conestoga because he has been instrumental he

said.

interested in

MP

Kitchener

on hand

to

John English was meet Chylek, along

with Tony Martinek, a former college dean of engineering,

contract

position

now

with

in a

the

ject called

in creating future business

oppor-

resource centre. The area includes books on topics such as sexual abuse, lesbianism, femininity, power, gender.

assembly of the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic in

November

By

1989, in the country’s

democratic elections. In 1991, Chylek helped organize

a group of deputies of the federal

assembly to take part

between Conestoga and Vancouver Com-

held at the House of

in

seminar

Commons

in

9

: '

who donated $50 or Conestoga were honored with an Adopt-a-Tree ceremony Individuals

more

to

Sept. 22.

It is

important to be careful in

Ontario

Student Assistance Program loan documents because mistakes cause delays of up to four weeks. Nicole Guitard, in her third semester of the journalism program at Doon campus, said she

completing

applied for

OSAP

at the begin-

May

and since he was in his second year,, only needed the short form. He had a delay in picking up his confirmation, because in order to

pick up the paperwork, proof of

income is needed and his place of employment delayed in supplying him with the needed information.

Adam

Palubeski, a first-year

student in construction engineer-

ning of June and priority-posted it next day. She was also regis-

ing said he applied for his loans

tered last year.

in

“It

took

me

forever to hear

back,” she said in an interview Sept. 18. “I just heard

them

last

back from

week.”

August.

He his

said there

was a mistake

in

so the process

application

“They didn’t let

me know

ment

the

second week of

will

was

rative plaques placed beside the

that

he didn’t fill out

his par-

T

graduated from high school in 1993,” he said. “I’ve been out

of school more than two years.” Palubeski said he’d ^en in touch with the Ministry of Education and Training and they told him to try to find temporary funding somewhere else. He estimates that by the time he has bought his books and instruments, the cost will be about $ 000 For cases 1

,

office.

for the college.

trees.

ent’s income.

“They needed a connection to let them know where the money is,” she said. “Basically,

I

keep track

of the various grant amounts and their use.”

Other members include student counsellors Joan Magazine and Barb Kraler, health services

nurse Carol Nelson, and vice-president of student

Bev Cutone. The women’s resource group

affairs

will hold

on Oct.

next meeting at 3:30

it’s

3, at a location to

be determined. Students interested in joining the women’s resource group can contact any of the group members for

more information.

The names of

where money

immediately, there

is is

poor weather responsible. “Some people came early because they thought it was going to rain,” he said. Hussey also said the Adopt-aTree program will become an

the donors, along

He

said the college

donors will donate again next year. Peter Higgins, Conestoga’s that this year’s

groundskeeper, said the 69 trees planted were mostly a mixture of different

types of maples and

oaks.

The

were planted in two Doon campus. Trees donated by retirees were planted in the area between the day-care centre and the student client sertrees

areas of the

with their relationship to the col-

vices building.

on the plaque. Hussey said the 69 donors consisted of Conestoga alumni and

three years ago, said Higgins.

lege, appear

retirees.

One Conestoga

retiree

who

attended was Clarence Hope, for-

mer

co-ordinator of the graphic

technician program and photogra-

Those

trees

were planted about

The

other trees were planted about a

year ago on the west side of the school of business. In addition to being able to visit their

adopted

trees,

donors and barbecue

their families attended a

Tree ceremony was slightly lower

main cafeteria. They were also able to take guided tours of the campus. Conestoga president John Tibbits and board of governors chairwoman Jacqueline Mitchell also attended the ceremony and thanked the donors for their assis-

than expected, Hussey held the

tance.

phy

teacher.

Hope said he was money to the col-

glad to donate

.

according to the financial aid

out until

program

by

September. The mistake, he said,

Palubeski said he didn’t find

neering program, said he applied

the group’s funding needs.

annual event.

the Adopt-a-Tree

emergency funding available of up to $500 through the school,

the mistake,” he said.

Radigan became involved with group two years ago, to fulfil

the

hopes

provide scholarships and equip-

about

Rob Songhurst, in his second year of the construction engi-

college’s health, safety and envi-

ronmental co-ordinator.

relations for the

Donors were able to choose which program their donation went to. In exchange for their donations, trees were planted and commemo-

required

stoppied.

in

post-secondary institutions grant program, said Kim Radigan, the

executive direc-

community

college, said the $4,000 raised

r;

for cash-strapped students end of

Scott Nixon

Wayne Hussey,

Ottawa.

OSAP form mistakes create at the

Training’s violence prevention

thanks college donors

first free

"^

By Linda Reilly

Events and speakers arc funded by various grants such as the Ministry of Education and

Annual Adopt-a-Tree

tor of

woes

women

is to “Raise of issues affecting which can affect men

Chylek was elected for a two-

tunities in the Republic.

In 1991, a joint effort

The women’s resource centre was established in September 1995 in a comer of the learning

for International

said Dietz.

as well,” said Dietz.

DSA

said

media

The group’s goal

office

centre,

in

awareness

resource

member and journalism

munity College resulted in a prothe Program of Cooperation Between Canada and the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (CSFR). The project includes employment education and English training in the Republic. There have also been numerous teacher exchanges and workshops with

Program

tion clinic, a date-rape awareness program, and speakers such as Rose Simone who spoke about

The college’s former employment equity co-ordinator, Marg Smith, formed the women’s resource group in 1994 with the purpose of creating a women’s

Sharon Dietz.

By Jennifer Dougall

Following the opening of the the women’s resource group has continued to plan events such as a breast examinacentre,

lege.

“The college was very good me,” he

said.

to

“I’m just reciprocat-

ing.”

While attendance

at the

Adopt-a-

outside the


-

— SPOKE, September

Page 4

30, 1996

COMMENTARY Diana Loveless

Editor

News

Student

Sean

editor

life

SPOKE

5cott Nixon

editor

S. Finlay

Doug Coxson

Issues and activities editor

is

SPOKE

published and produced weekly by journalism students of Conestoga

essarily reflect the

Advertisers in tain the

DSA

in advertising

Production manager

Bruce Manion

Advertising manager

Eric Whitfield

manager

Circulation

Jason Jerry Frank

Faculty supervisors

mainly funded from September

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Kitchener, Ontario,

May by

the

Doon

Student

views of Conestoga College or the DSA.

SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements conSPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

beyond the amount paid for the space.

above address by 9:30 a.m. and should be clearly written or typied; a WordPerfect 5.0 file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

Room 4B15 N2G 4M4

Monday. Submissions are subject

at the

to acceptance or rejection

photograph).

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

Scott

to

logo.

Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

Romanko

& Dick

is

Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not nec-

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

Peter Marval

Photo editor

SPOKE College.

I

Simpson circus begins again By Dave Luymes Forget about the

month.

this

It’s

drama show

new

shows premiering

fall

time for the O.J. Simpson

again.

second trial, despite being a civil trial without courtroom TV cameras, will be no less O.J.’s

of a media circus than the

one.

first

The differences between

the

two

trials are

numerous, and although there will not be fulltime afternoon television coverage of the actual trial, talk shows and news stations are gearing up for the rate-boosting event. The lawyers from the first trial, Marcia Clark, Christopher Darden, Johnnie Cochrane and Robert Shapiro are busy cashing in on the tragedy with book and movie deals, or lecturing to huge crowds. The civil suit is being launched in Santa Monica, Calif, against

Simpson by

the victims’ families,

who

are

seeking compensation for a wrongful death.

Superior Court Judge Hiroshi Fujisaki will trial, and he must remember media frenzy of the first one. As well as banning cameras from the courtroom, Fujisaki

preside over the the

paid their new, jacked-up

The civil trial will include much of the same evidence used previously in the criminal trial.

registrar’s

office.

have waited

in traffic

make

will try to

a case

and planting, as of Los Angeles detec-

By Jennifer Dougall

parking

An

decision required in a criminal case.

important difference

is

that

Simpson

will not

be able to use the Fifth Amendment to avoid taking the stand. If he does not testify under oath, he loses. The difference is that unlike criminal cases, civil

penalties consist only

trial

of money, not imprisonment.

One more important unlike a criminal

They

is

that

United States, where only the defendant can appeal a decision, both sides of a civil lawsuit may appeal in the

my desk

in

Room 3B 4 for a 1

whole

life in

general,

get into

When we

And

lots.

up

they have

waded through

Letters from students

was

There

is

ball to the

Sure, there are things in that

it

finally disappeared.

It

room

that

numbers and addresses for verification.

the dust can go.

Students are

same

still

Letters

being taught with the

quality of education as ever before, but

has time to pay attention to a teacher there are critters scurrying across your desk?

Send your letters to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley

Although I’m sure there are people in this school who look after this, I have yet to see

Dr.,

one.

Maybe

just too big.

Last semester, there were fingernail clip-

they were

dust ball in

be edited and

clarity.

when

was

will

for length, style

who

there the

time

they teach. All letters should include phone

place?

shouldn’t be thrown out, but I’m pretty sure

week after. no way that room could have been

still

complained, housekeeping came why should we have to

them, but

call in the first

busy hallways to get to their classes. And for what? To sit in a room that hasn’t seen a broom in months? Conestoga College is in need of a really good vacuuih. Last January, a friend dropped a hair ball on the carpet in Room 1C26. \^en we went to class the next week, it was still there. It

to clean

Spoke

letters.

must be signed with the author’s name, program and year. Faculty must identify what program

dow.'

jams overcrowded

cleaned from the time he dropped that hair

difference to note

trial

an overburdened

tuition to

well as the racial slurs

mous

or

And I’m not even going to mention the enormous spiders, who up until a week ago, were making babies in the Spoke office win-

Conestoga students have

to

Mark Fuhrman. The jury’s decision in a civil lawsuit must be only more than 50 per cent, unlike the unani-

you have anything to say about Conestoga,

month.

for evidence contamination

tive

pings in

LINE

If

welcomes your

has ordered lawyers, witnesses and others involved not to speak about the case. This gag order, while being well intended, will not stop frantic speculation and hype by the media.

The Simpson defence

DROP US A

Could somebody please clean up this dirty mess?

Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4; phone

7485366; fax 748-971.

swallowed up by the the comer of the room. all

the verdict.

A little help goes a long way

This would bring on a third wave of lawyers and jurors eager to become instant authors, talk-show experts and celebrities after the trial,

becoming It is

drama of same channels.

the continuing

time,

of works when writing an essay, won’t work on Spoke. Marian Mainland, co-ordinator of the special needs department, and Rick

By Colleen Cassidy

instantly rich in the process.

It

but

a safe bet to say tune in next season for O.J. Simpson.

Same

This is not my first semester in college.

But

In the Sept.

23 issue of Spoke

"Wrong book

I

listed in

was quoted

in

bookstore

mix-up’’ by Jennifer Dougall.

Unfortunately, the

way

the article

was

first

Casey, a counsellor in that office, have both been encouraging. Their help in

semester on Spoke and it isn’t easy coming up with ideas and

Letter to the Editor the article

my

is

it

appeared the Conestoga College Bookstore was responsible for a textbook mix-up. In fact, it was the marketing program that created the mix-up. The bookstore is not involved

getting a fledgling, foundering reporter

enough. beats (that’s what journalists call

the areas

we

are assigned to write stories

it

in specifying texts,

specified by

it

program

merely orders the books faculty.

We

were very pleased with the helpful response of the bookstore in removing the incorrect text from the shelves and in dealing with the marketing students who came to return the text.

Steve Finlay, co-ordinator, marketing pro-

gram

about) are the bookstore and special needs.

Vanda

Kelly, the bookstore

manager

is

helpful.

Together,

to

come up

with

longer.

I’m talking about the kind of informayou add to a 1,000- word essay when you only have 900 words. tion

accurate story. Jerry Frank and Dick Scott, journalism

and faculty advisors for Spoke, have both listened to my woes and have offered understanding supinstructors

port.

we stmggle

enough information to write a story long enough without padding it sticking stuff in the story that makes it just a little

is much needed. They’ve been able to provide the information needed to write an interesting,

through the course

writing interesting stories that are long

My written,

sort

it

Classmates, too, have listened sympaand have offered good sugges-

thetically tions. It

make a per-

Some years ago, I studied at the colOne of my former instructors used to say: Ask more questions. lege.

But little heed was paid to that advice. The needed facts were gathered. I figured if I was willing to wait long enough a lot of information would be offered.

But I can’t wait anymore. Questions need to be asked. There is no doubt it will all work out, though.

By

the

end of the semester,

this

reporter will be as seasoned as anyone

would be nice to land “the story” all dream about, but it’s not that

reporters

easy. Right

Hard-hitting questions that

son squirm while the reporter stares waiting for an answer are not one of my strengths. It would be me who would look away.

now, there’s a long way

go, and unless

I

hit

to

a good luck streak, a

story won’t just fall in

my

lap.

can be after four months. Meanwhile, if I’m walking down the hall and my pace suddenly quickens and you see a glint in my eye, start heading in the other direction, quickly.


COMMENTARY chnngc women in strange, mysterious ways

Rings

B^Ross McDermott

after receiving the ring she

seemed to transinto a controlling force which, like a dictatorship, rules over the affairs of

was my intention to write a column about the sudden dominance exIt

hibited by

my

fiance wouldn’t

my

but let

have first-hand experience of this phehaving recently become engaged. But I’ve got to warn you fellas, I

tear this

not an isolated occurrence. The woman of my affections (who, for the sake of my own well-being shall remain

nameless) was and, for the most part, a

kind,

caring,

sensitive

But

more often than not, are two of my assigned responsibilities. These duties are not so bad.

As

that’s

if

matter of

a

not bad enough,

have

habits

been

altered. Star Trek, she says,

is

my own

drastically

life,

too unrealis-

bad habit. Every driver has taken a driving examination. Turning and lane changes are

Changing By Wendy Cum mins while

down my

while driving to school

basic driving skills tested while taking

recently.

the road test.

Without warning, a blue Topaz pulled out of its lane and into mine. I had to hit the brakes and swerve out of my lane just to avoid losing my front end.

Had I missed the Topaz’s signal lights? No, the driver hadn’t bothered to signal his lane change.

wondered how the driver expected me to know he wanted to move into my lane. Was I supposed to know what the driver was thinking? I can’t read minds. I need to see a signal I

indicating

light

before

I

a driver’s

intentions

can know what those intentions

test if

You cannot pass a

you do not signal a turn or a lane

change.

be done

in

a safe manner, which means

some places in which signalling can seem a little redundant say on an empty stretch of will admit there are

road, or in the left-turn lane. However,

doesn’t hurt to do

The driver of the Topaz had nearly caused an accident. If he had signalled I would have had enough warning to

make

down and let the car in. Both our vehicles could have been damaged one of us could have been hurt and all because the driver couldn’t spare the two seconds it takes to flip a

signal light on. It

is

poor driving education that leads to the drivers on the road who have

number of

it

anyway.

Signalling whenever you plan to turn or

a lane change

is

second

it

a good habit to get

into.

The

split

signal

lights

on

is

takes to flip the

more than worth

it.

Drivers are not always paying attention.

light

either just plain laziness or just

it

The advance warning of a

may just preserve

What ever happened

As my 23rd

birthday slowly approaches, it time once again to reflect upon these wonderful words of wisdom my mother is

signal

the appearance of

your vehicle and maybe even you. Don’t be lazy, let fellow motorists know your intentions use your signal lights.

in

my

my mind as a child. knowledge has increased, but

I’m not Albert Einstein. I am now technically an adult yet I am still not respected by my peers, especially by my parents. Why does age go before beauty? Beauty can provide a youthful glow to even the most ancient civilizations. So why not change that phrase to beauty before age? Robert Redford, Sean Connery and Paul Newman, each past the retirement age and certainly not collecting pension cheques, are respected and extremely talented actors. But, so are Brad Pitt, Winona Ryder and

Tom

TAMPONS.

The

fact that

purchase

I

this

cery store has one advantage: to ask for them. All in

all, I

not that bad.

item in a groI don’t have

must admit, being engaged is It does have some redeeming

factors..

The woman becomes more secure which allows

the

man

to

feel

some

relief.

Vocalized jealousies are fewer and, as a result, the relationship is more harmonic.

Committing

to

important step

in

one you love is an life and when all is said and done the love and affection makes it all worth while. the

anyone’s

Cruise, but are they given the

same

respect? Probably not.

So when, then do we reach that age when are respected for our mind our talents

we

“college

kids”,

respect

we have been

elders?

It is

ever gain the

same

taught to lavish on our

doubtful.

Are children today not given the same tures

we

received at their age?

Do

lec-

they not

hear the same overused cliches that haunt our every waking hour?

to the old sayings:

Respect your elders! Age before beauty! With age comes knowledge! These are all things we seem to be told from the time we can walk. Why? Who knows.

Sure,

1 noticed, but it’s there now, capitalized and underlined:

the

curb yelling obsenities and toasting the world with their middle

cemented

signalling your intentions.

Now I

I

fingers.

So, that leaves laziness. Drivers who fail to signal are accidents waiting to happen. They rely on the driving skills of those around them to compensate for their dangerous habits. Under the Highway Traffic Act, motorists are required to make sure that any turns or lane changes they make can

are.

slow

driving

that

and our independence? If the youth of today have changed their own attitudes and increased their use of foul language aimed at their “elders”, will we,

was

I

street

a certain item began to appear on the list: feminine hygiene products! It was never on the list before, at least not

attitudes^ rules for respect

was disturbed to notice five young children sitting on the edge of the

call

enjoy

food.

driving

had a close

actually

However, since the acquisition of that ring

this

I

I

grocery shopping. It’s peaceful. The air with soothing music and I’m surrounded by one of my favorite things in

Recently,

By Sara Maxim

fact,

filled

Signal lights have a purpose; Didn’t you take driver’s education?

When we ourselves have children, will we teach them to respect their elders and all the manners we learned as children. Granted, I am still nowhere near the age of retirement, nor have I exceeded any IQ records thus far. Yet, I too have developed bags under my eyes the size of pillowcases and just recently identified a wrinkle growing near my eye.

How is it that 10 days can make a difference between being asked for identification at a local bar and being passed off as an age of majority card holder? Does a birthday really make us look that much

older?

all it is only one day. At midnight you can’t drink and by 1 a.m. you can. Does the stress of that one hour bring wrinkles

After

only bouncers can see? Is

it

that magical 19th birthday that

gain us respect?

made

it

Or

“over the

is it later

hill.”

is to

on, once we’ve

When do we deserve

respect?

reviving

again those suppressed memories

we were

I

suppose

it

depends on us

imbedded with self

as children: “Respect yourand others will respect you.”

Conestoga students divided on lack of Internet access in classrooms By Shawn Leonard An

informal survey on campus has

shown

students are divided over the college’s lack

of Internet access in computer classrooms.

Most other colleges and universities are line which helps students in their studies, and teaches them how to use the syson

tem. Conestoga does have limited student

access to the Internet in the library, but the librarians are the only it

to gather

ones allowed to use

Aaron Watchorn

Andie Henouffer

John

B.J.

Mark

Marinovic

Barry

Wilson

information for the students.

Students will miss out on gathering

some

administration student, said she feels lucky

would not help

me

won’t affect students’ studies much, said Aaron Watchom, a first-year business

because her course teaches her how to use the Internet. “I don’t have it at home and

student, also feels

have no experience on how

accounting student.

other students

information over the Internet, but overall

it

I

I

As

viewing

and the purchasing of

bills

these groceries,

I

the screen.

still is

individual.

paying of these

have no choice but to concede. This concession would not be so bad, except shows like Oprah, ER, and feminine hygiene infomercials keep showing up on

is

have also fallen under

affairs

What was once my money is now “our money,’’ while her money remains “her money.” Most of “our money” is distributed among bills and groceries. And the

She,

channel,

nomenon,

vetoed; and simply out of the

her juri.sdiction.

in all her glory, has proclaimed equal rights and privileges to the use of the remote control. Though I shudder every time her delicate fingers punch in a

me.

However, at the risk of losing some great in-laws, I’m going to write it anyway.

I

My financial

picking.

Football

that’s

question.

TV, for instance, is no longer the haven it once was. Now I am taunted and haunted by shouts of protest and undaunted nit-

once they receive an engage-

ment ring

Baywatch, well,

life.

women

Monday Night

tic;

form

^

“I

have never been on

the library

is

it

before, but

good enough

I

think

to get the infor-

mation needed for projects.” He does admit that it would be useful knowledge to have later on. Andie Henouffer, a second-year business

who

to use

it.

are not taught

in

my

program.” law and security wouldn’t be helpful

B.J. Barry, a first-year it

I

feel

with her studies in her program. “I don’t

it

are

even use the computers here at school. The law and security course doesn’t actually have any computers in the classrooms.”

missing out.”

Second-year robotics and automation

stu-

dent John Marinovic said he had been on the Internet before and would not use it if

he were given Student access here. “I wouldn’t have any use for it because it

The

Internet

would allow students to get on subjects that would

inside information

be beneficial to their assignmentsin their course said first-year business accounting student

Rob

Mark Wilson.

Weil, a second-year business man-

agement studies student, agrees

that

the

accounting student Margaret Porchaez also says that having the Internet here wouldn’t affect her at all because her

ty not having access to the Internet. “Not having student access to the Internet is a

course doesn’t use computers that much.

loss to all students.”

First-year

students will be missing a great opportuni-


Page 6

— SPOKE, September 30, 1996

STUDENT LIFE SPOKE

Cruisin’

S C;OUL» BE

YOU

Jason Smith, pus on

his

computer program analysis student,

first-year

zips through

mountain bike Sept. 19.

Doon cam-

(Photo by Ross McDermc®)

Doctor available for students By Doug Coxson

without the doctor needing to be present.

“TB

Many

people probably don’t

know

that the

Doon

health office exists, and provides ailing students with

that

making a big comeback,” Nelson

tacts

nurse Carol Nelson, of Conestoga’s health and safety

about

and

if

because they are potential conthey already have it, we have to know

it.”

most

common

rence in the health office, with blisters from new shoes requiring the most attention in the first few weeks of classes Nelson said. Non-prescription medications such as lyienol, antihistamines and decongestants are available free of charge to students and faculty. The health office offers a rest area for people who aren’t feeling well, who need some privacy, or who are generally having

Nelson said. “The doctor will even see you if you already have a doctor in the area,” Nelson said. “It’s more of a convenience thing for staff and students.” The health office also gives allergy and hepatitis B

a bad day. Nelson said.

want

to let is

in cash.

injections,

own

when

the doctor

is in,

to people with their

serums. Tuberculosis skin tests are provided

“We

give lots of advice and referrals to other agen-

cies in the area,”

Nelson

Prosram

occur-

people know that the doctor is such a shortage of doctors in the area,’’ Nelson said. Dr. Jodie Wang is available to staff and students on Tuesday and Friday mornings from 9:20 a.m. until 11:10 a.m. People wanting to see the doctor don’t always need an appointment, but they absolutely need to bring their health cards or they will have to pay their bills just

here because there

DSA Walk Safe

tests),

First aid treatments are the

office.

said. “It’s

ECE and health sciences people who need

(TB skin

health care and advice along with other services, said

“We

is

mostly the

Walk Safe Volunteers

said. Several referrals to the

Waterloo Health Unit are given to people coming in asking questions. Staff at the health unit offer several free medications, services

and information on every-

Needed

thing from sexually transmitted diseases to acne.

Graduation Photos by Jostens

Applications Available at the PSA Office

OSAP OFFICE

HOURS OCTOBER

IS - 18

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

OCTOBER

21 -

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

OCT. 28

-

25

NOV.

1

MONDAY TO THURSDAY 8:30am

-

4:30pm

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

NOVEMBER 4-8 SCHOOL OF APPLIED ARTS & COLLEGE ACCESS & PREP. STUDIES

Make your Grad

Portrait

appointment today at the

DSA Office

DISTRIBUTION OF

LOANS AND BURSARIES MONDAY TO THURSDAY 1:30pm

-

3:30pm


SPOKE, September 30,

1996

— Page 7

STUDENT LIFE Conestoga’s solar-car team looking for new “We would

By Jason Romanko Spectre, Conestoga’s solar-pow-

ered race-car team

few good people

is

looking for a

to help

them

fin-

ish building a solar car in time for

Sunrayce ’97. Sunrayce ’97 is a cross-country ^solar race sponsored by the United P>tates Department of Energy and

Renewable Energy

National

the

also

like

to

some business students join to help with the fund-raising and accounting side of the project.

“Team

members

needed

are

from various programs so

that all

of our bases are covered,” Huang said.

The hardest part of recruiting for team is keeping the new

the

on the team for the long out of two people stay

recruits

“One

Labs.

haul.

The team will travel 1,760 kilometres from Indianapolis, to Golden, Col., during a 10-day

with the project,”

hard for some people to stay enthusiastic over a two-year peri-

period.

od.

The Spectre racing team had

the

on exhibition at Doon campus’ main cafeteria in an effort to drum up new team members. Shin Huang, project manager, said he would like the team to increase to 30 members from its current level of close to 20 memsolar car’s frame

Huang

said

more team members

needed for the labor-intensive

are

building phase.

“We’re short on people to do mould making, right up to

Haung

“Some people

think

they sometimes forget the commitment involved and the not-soexciting aspects of designing and

building such a complex project.”

The Spectre team is a little behind its original schedule for having the car ready for testing. to

shooting for sometime in

rently

November, probably

the later part

of the month.”

By Sara Maxim

now

Since the school year has just

This year, along with the floor

Rodeway Suites hired a residence advisor to ook after the emotional wellleing of students. Ritu Pareek, a epresentatives, las

tudent herself, will be this year’s idviser for the residence.

responsible for taking care

who

are having stress,

oommate problems

or any other

motional problems,” Pareek said. ‘Even if someone is bored or just vants to chit-chat. I’m here.” Pareek, 22,

is

enrolled

in

the

x)st-diploma environmental engileering program at Conestoga.

While she has never lived at Rodeway Suites before, she did tiowever live in residence for five the attending while years

The Spectre team vers for the race.

needed

also needs dri-

A

G-licence

because they’re going to have to know the ins and outs of the car for trouble-shooting purposes dur-

is

to qualify for the position.

“We need

four drivers for the car,

would

part

of

like the drivers to

building

the

Huang

ing the race,”

with two drivers racing each day.

We

Spectre

be a

process

is

other,

management

designed to travel

at

through a number of interviews with the management at Rodeway Suites and with Jack Fletcher, the

She understands

the

PS •S’

said.

In dealing with

One week before school started, moved into residence and officially became the Rodeway Pareek

Suites adviser.

$650 $775

Pentium 100 Pentium 133

MODEL

lems, she will try to act as a mediator and find a compromise, she

ra-

256K

GENUINE INTEL PROCESSOR

32MB EDO RAM

with

extreme circumstances she

•S’

15”

SVGA

.28

installation

be approximately $85,

this will include

transportation. interested, please sign

up

at the

C

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inkjet

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..$649

FAX MODEM

KITS

...$139

MISCELLANEOUS 2 6n np

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8

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wfitt

For more information see Becky at the DSA Office or call 748-5131.

All

2).

$2459

Cfr^ Bring

in this

page

ordering a

CD titles.

$219 8X CD ROM, Kit 2 SB16

bit

sound card, 50

watt speakers, AC adaptor and 6 CD titles

$309 FREE!

$49

Office by October 10.

16 bit sound card,

speakers and 6

system and get

$65

sneakers

Limited quantites.

(Kit

8X CD ROM,

Kit 1

$2159

when

28.8/33.6 Voice

testing.

MULTIMEDIA

NI monitor

Model PS 133 Model PS 133 Multi media

680

and

512K cache

«’ 104 keyboard

Beast

Intel processor,

cache, mini tower case,

16MB EDO 72 Pin RAM, 1MB PCI video card,

w 28.8/33.6 voice fax modem

said.

price includes:

motherboard,

KT ATI Mach 64 SVGA PCI 2MB video card »* Windows ‘95/Logitech 3 button mouse

roommate prob-

\re you Beast musical? If there is enough interest, the DSA will organize a trip. The tickets

I

school’s chair of student services.

Upgrade

problems

HP PRINTERS

DSA

Suites

Upgrade your old computer to a new Pentium!

computer!

students may have while adjusting to living away from home, she

interested in seeing Beauty and the

you are

or

residence.

Beauty

If

can check out

Sunrayce.GMR.com

Rodeway

«’ 1.44MB floppy drive «’ medium tower case •s 2.6 GB hard drive

will

users

Conestoga.on.ca/spectre.htm.

Free yourself from your school work with a new pentium

Pareek said she experienced a lot of homesickness her first year in

Internet

hour.

idence advisor in early August.

up.”

from 2B17, or

either

She submitted a resume and went

Pareek applied for the job of res-

the office across

speeds up to 90 kilometres per

to

relocation for one

For more information on the race contact the Spectre race team in

room 2A68.

said.

roommate she said. “I think usually you can find a workable solution.”

said will turn to

work out

ing up, things will start picking

In

University of Toronto.

know each

just starting

Pareek said she has not had to deal with many problems. “So far it has not been that bad because people are having a lot of parties,” Pareek said. “But later on in the year when work starts buildto get to

POWER

SOLAR Shin Huang (left) and Jon Sterzik, third-year automated manufacturing students, stand behind the lightweight frame of Conestoga’s solar car. (Phoio Rick Kew)

available for students at

begun and people are

people

hoped

originally

have the car ready for testing by September, but obviously that is not going to happen. We are cur-

the

Counselling

)f

‘wow, a

solar car let’s get involved,’ but

the

machining.

“Tm

said.

“It’s

“We had

bers.

members

have

MS

Works 95

CFREip

prices subject to change, prices

Virus and

system checking have been discounted

for cash.

COMPUTER ONWARD TEL: Fax: 578-6933

578-6930

301 King

St. E.,

Kitchener


Page 8

— SPOKE, September 30, 1996

Day-care centre helps with recycling By Ross McDermott

through their

recycling

own

cre-

ative processes.

He

sits

on

the floor in the

middle

“The children

on

really catch

to

recycling because the recycling

of the activity room. His eyes sparkle with the innocence and

bins are part of their classrooms,

wonder

so they think about

only a child could

that

The

possess.

it.”

children’s parents contribute

and identify what’s inside.” The centre does have to be careful about what types of donations it accepts. “We have to be careful about the chemicals that might be in the materials,” Roberts said.

They do not accept

glass

made of

fibre-

by donating old catalogues, magazines, or old letterhead paper from their places of

products or items

chubby fingers grasp an empty paper towel roll, and with colorful

employment she said. “The kids use old magazines

infants

crayons he begins to transform it into a piece of art work. He could be any child at Doon campus’s day-care centre where

cut up and illustrate,” said Roberts.

The

air

around him

is

filled

with

the gleeful shouts .and unrestrained

laughter of his classmates.

His

the children actively contribute,

on

a daily basis, to the college’s recy-

to recycling

way

In this

the centre

is

saved the

expense of purchasing expensive picture

Children at this age are always putting things in their mouths, said

local

about how it uses materials that could be easily ingested. “There is

Roberts, so the centre

of the local businesses.

shoe company, sometimes donates leather that does not meet com-

“We

pany specifications. The children

well to using old materials. find the children thinking

at the

more

use this leather

when

creating craft

about what they can use the mate-

work.

and forcing us adults to think about how we can use materials. The kids pick up on our recycling efforts and they’re usually

purchase leather from a supplier,” Roberts said, “the activity would be too costly.” Another item used by the children are empty 35-mm film con-

rials for

the leaders

when

the process

is

“If

sizes.

some

centre gets donations from

centre, says the children respond

Marie Roberts, team leader

She said the day-care centre has and toddlers in its programs so they must be careful that the materials used in those programs meet specifications and

packages. The day-care

The Bonnie Stewart Co., a

cling program.

to

glass.

recycling

less

groups.

in

the

careful

is

younger

We can’t always be sure of

the quality or ingredients of mate-

rials.”

we were

to

tainers.

“We

put different things

inside

the

containers

Danielle Flannery, a first-year early childhood education student,

says

the

children

really

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE Danielle Flannery, a first-year ECE student, points out some recycled materials used by children day-care centre.

at the

(Photo by ross McDermott)

enjoy

using recycled materials. “They

contact Marie Roberts.

get excited,” she said, “lots of big

“The only problem,

quite hon-

we sometimes

run

smiles.”

estly, that

said Roberts, “is that people, in

because

so

of new ways to use old materials.

you can’t see inside. Then we poke holes in the lids of the containers and the kids

Flannery said the materials help to make her job a little easier

But the children do much of the

can use their sense of smell to

rial

done.’’

She

said the centre uses a variety

of items, from old fabric to computer paper, and

is

always thinking

black

they’re

because

try

it

their

entertains the children.

Anyone wishing

endeavor to help

much

that

we

and have no where

donate mateto the day-care centre should to

Most of

DSA

Whitfield

the events put

during the

were

school

DSA’s

first

on by the week of

successful

entertainment

says

manager.

Attendance of the Doonapalooza events were, for the most part,

and the class representatives were not in place yet. He said each department has a representative on the

DSA.

Attendance was better than it has been in the past, FitzPatrick said, because the events were held

week

the

said.

the past.

The

which drew the were the Ashley Macisaac concert, which drew about 400 people and the movie Twister, which drew about 250 events

people, FitzPatrick said.

One of

most poorly attended events was Sportsarama, which Krista Ogg, vice-president of operations, said drew low numbers because of the possibility of rain and lack of promotion. FitzPatrick said some of the events were not promoted as well as others because there were only certain

there

areas

to

place

before, as

it

was held

posters,

were not enough workers

The presentations were generally well received. They were for educational purposes so there should be no basis for complaint, he said. Despite the events being well received and enjoying good atten-

A

couple of the more controver-

sial

events people attended were

usually

make

requests

to

the parents or post notices on the

it.”

doors of the building.

DSA

success, says

dance, FitzPatrick said there will

Twister, can be held outside.

be some changes for next year. More volunteers will be recruited earlier and there will, hopefully, be better weather so the outdoor events, such as Macisaac and

also said the music and

Sex

with

piercing

Sue and

the

body-

demonstration.

Fitz-

com-

Patrick said there were no

He

SECTION: (CIRCLE

He

comedy

change but he recomJohanson come back because Sex with Sue is important acts will

mends

that

educationally.

anno u nce m ents

DSA

through people. ‘“We tried to

people

down

present

things

might not see walking

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ripe

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and presenters were careful how the topics were presented. People were warned before events such as the bodypiercing demonstration, where a graphic slide show was presented, and holes were being punctured said the

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When the centre needs materials, they

CLA5$mEDAD FORM

in

plaints.

the

all this stuff

used up quickly.”

during the school year, rather than

well attended, Gavin FitzPatrick

largest audiences

us, help us

Currently, the centre has lots of

Macisaac and Twister make Doonapalooza a By Eric

get

into,”

materials because the year has just begun, Roberts said, “but if it’s bright and colorful stuff it will be

Tnes. Wed. Thar, Oet. I Oet. 2 Oet. 3

10

AM

-

2 PM

Have something

Want

to

Advertise

to sell?

announce a meeting? in

Spoke’s

classifieds.

Pick up ad forms outside Spoke office

on

fourth floor.

$3

for

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Rings Available Daily in Bookstore

of less.


Student services offers variety of resources ^ Sara Maxim might

“It

be

talking about

you have never

If

estoga’s student services office,

you may be unaware of the

seriously depressed and contem-

variety of resources available to

plating suicide.”

you.

As

Jack Fletcher, chair of student services, can direct you to the

Whether

students

estoga.

is

someone

On

dent services has become increasingly busy in the past few

all

“We have here.

We

people

a service standard

to be able to get within two weeks of

Trish Jackson

Students

visit

Promotions for the 1996 Kumbaya Road Show for AIDS wrapped up in the main cafeteria Sept.

ses to either the St. Catharines,

tour artist. First prize is a Sony Discman plus a 10 CD Kumabaya library. Second prize awards 20

bet-

27.

Kumbaya

winners a 10 is

a national benefit

concert featuring Canada’s leading

“We’ll

and comedians, with all proceeds going towards helping people cope with AIDS and HIV, according to promotional

tions

bands,

artists

milk

be doing promo-

all

year.

think the

I

campaign

is next.”

Donna Delahun

posters.

Concerts were held rate

locations

from

at St.

Nfld. to Victoria, B.C.

shift supervisor, cafeteria

17 sepaJohn’s,

between

The

Sept. 12 and Oct. 2.

Beaver Foods, along with other Canadian food service corporations, promoted Kumbaya at colleges and universities throughout the country.

Doon’s main cafeteria displayed posters, T-shirts, and hosted draws for Kumbaya tickets and T-shirts. Winners at Doon included Amy Vandenbreckel and first-year Law and Security Administration students Tammy Bacher and Mary

cafeteria’s shift supervisor,

Donna Delahunt,

said

winners

were drawn by the Doon Student Association.

The grand prize, as well as first and second prizes, will be drawn on Oct. 4. First a college or university will be randomly drawn by promotion officials, then a student from that instution will be drawn,

CD Kumbaya

libr-

from

How-

based on past years, the students who passed ranges around 80 per cent.. ever,

number of

to personal

- It can be fun! - It is rewarding! - It is useful on your

MCA

resume!

If you are a second or third year student and have 75% or better in the course (s) and you would like to tutor, you could qualify. Drop in to Student Services (2B02) for more in forma tion.

cafeteria promotions.

for

is

who don’t regto come in to

potential customers

ularly

enter a

buy food, draw and see what’s

avail-

Tutoring

able in the cafeteria.

IrrmnrTnirtinl

“We’ll be doing promotions

said Delahunt.

The grand prize is a Sony personal-component stereo system

they

not yet

EXTRA MONEY?

The concerts and prizes have been sponsored by Sony, Sam the Record Man, Muchmusic, Network Campus, Molson, and Concerts Canada. Artists performing at the Kumbaya concert include: Wild Strawberries, Bruce Cockbum, Tom Cochrane, Bass is Base, The Jeff Healy Band, Earthtones, and Jann Arden, among many others. Delahunt said Beaver Foods’ head office is responsible for all said,

in is

Would you like to earn some

ary.

The purpose, she

students

course

available from last year.

problems, Fletcher said.

CD library which includes CD from each 1996 Kumbaya

plus a

Hamilton or London shows ween Sept. 21 and 23.

passed the received tutoring

counsellors for a

variety of reasons ranging

Mullen. These students had their choice of two tickets and VIP pas-

one

The percentage of

who

making an appointment.”

academic problems

By

until we start getting into October. This year we’ve already got a number of requests.”

time,

want

in

stu-

“Usually we don’t get requests for our peer tutoring program

Some coun-

sellors work only part while some also teach.

program offered by

years, Fletcher said.

are available each

day, Fletcher said.

Kumbaya AIDS Road Show

peer

level, the

day.

vices not

College cafeteria promotes

an academic

tutoring

Although there are five counworking in student ser-

(Photo by Irish Jackson)

at ConWhile many of these

two counsellors available each

sellors

.

number of

dents to the support group that would be of the most help.

in

student services that can assist. Fletcher said, there are usually

a

is

groups have become independent from student services, counsellors can still direct stu-

need

counsel-ling, tutoring or a support group, there

well, there

support groups available

area that meets your needs.

PRIZE WINNERS Cafeteria shift-supervisor Donna Delahunt (left) presents draw winners Mary Mullen and Tammy Bacher (right) with Kumbaya concert tickets and T-shirts on Sept. 19

I

w nrirt n i

all

year,” said Delahunt. “I think the

milk campaign

is

next.”

CCMX CRKZ

DSA Walk Safe Pnognam 0**

Conestoga’s best mix Country, Rock, New music

*nej^

For Your Safety

11:30

~

O

(/5

Program Director

radio

O o

Weather

<D

O

Sports

CCMX

Program Director

Kathyrn Magee

tdc^Ucd ojit^idc tAc Sccanltcf

Laura

-

12:30

Dance for

for

-

CCMX

for

CRKZ

Julie Beitz

Music Director for CRKZ Regan Bowers Announcer for CRKZ

Rhonda Biener Announcer for CCMX -

Rock and 11:30

-

tf:30

Alternative,

on Fridays

U

12:30

Music Director

TKondcuf. -

News

bJ)

Dance -

7 :30

-

Conestoga’s rock

cd

Wednesdays

Auailable to Eoenyone!

as

tion — but it can be as serious as somebody who is feeling alone,

Con-

visited

simple

as

good communica-

-

McGugan

-

News and

Sports Director

-

Lisa

Schmuck - Wendy Haennel

Promotions, Sales and Creative Production Production

-

Oliver Esteves

Trevor PlielTer

'


— SPOKE, September 30, 1996

Page 10

STUDENT LIFE Biz Bash date set

Health and safety everyone’s concern, says safety co-ordinator

Safety continues to improve at Conestoga By Peggy Sue

By Sean Some

S.

'

say business can’t be

Association has refuted that old saying.

Biz Bash of the year goes into full swing Oct. 3 at Stages Night Club on King Street in Kitch-

The

Ironside

Finlay

mixed with pleasure, but the Conestoga Business Students

first

school

ener.

This will be the

time a

first

bash has been held

at the

night

club.

Many improvements for campus safety have been achieved since receiving the Women’s Safety on Campus Grant in 1991. The grant comes from the Ministry of Education and Training. making It is to be used toward physical changes around all of the campuses to increase safety. Kim Radigan, health, safety and environment co-ordinator of Conestoga, said a safety audit group was formed when the college first received the grant.

The Biz Bash is an organized party put on by the

CBS A

as a

fund-raiser and fun event for

business

students

other students

and

who would

The

safety audit group had 33

volunteers consisting of students

and

who toured specific areas Doon campus with a safety

staff

changes

These

accom-

were

salaries to

“There

was

a

suggestion

enclose the treed area

at

to

Doon

with a fence to stop any possibility

of attack by people hiding there,” said Radigan.

“But

it

would have been very

were identified. Then any trees and bushes in these areas were trimmed back. A lot of work has been done to improve the lighting systems at all the campuses, Radigan said. Some lampheads were replaced.

puses.

always up to standard,” she said. “But many people felt it was still

for changes.

In

other

“The

areas,

flood

new

lights,

were

lights,

lighting in the past

was

too dark.”

An

money

CBSA,

tion

The Doon Student Association ran a pilot escort project. Walk

“It’s just great the

this

on,” Radigan

DSA has taken said.

“There

have been a lot of requests for it and it’s something really nice to have use of.” In 1991, a personal push buzzer was installed at the Waterloo campus. The purpose of the buzzer was so staff working alone late at night could alert security if they were needed.

money from

the grant

purchased two radios for

Doon

said the business

association has basically boo-" at Stages,

maximum

The bash will be closed to the public.

capacity of 800.

Any

Con$6 in advance from the for the Thursday night from

students

estoga tickets

CBSA

may purchase

CAREER FAIR

the

bash or at the door for $8. Babbit said the CBSA will j.-

print

700

tickets to be sold. ^ funds generated from

All

ticket sales is

CBSA At the

for future, use.

by

may be

there

Any

^b^h^ are

Stages.

first

bash of the year, a prize wheel set

offers

10:00

am - 3:30 pm

(Bingeman (Par^ "KitcHener, Ontario

up, said Babic.

Stages

OctoSer 2, 1996

banked by the

other^ sales at the

taken in

Vi^ecfnescCay

prizes ,^irom^

sums of money to%ips,^ on certain nights. Babic said he would like to use the wheel large

CBSA

but didn’t think the would offer prizes as expensive as the

Over 100 employers attending

ones Stages usually

offers.

"

There are traditionally four Biz Bashes each school year. The last one always takes

Tree transportation avaUkSfe

place on the night of the business awards banquet in April.

Last year the CBSA raised nearly $50,000 from bashes

and almond sales. This year, almonds will be sold starting the first week of October. Babic said he is going to try to have the almonds available throughout the entire school and not just limited to the cafeteria.

He

said he hopes to use this

year’s funds to purchase pre-

sentation

equipment

to

be

available free of charge

on a sign-out basis for business students.

“We

can’t charge students to

use any equipment

we

provide

for them,” said Babic. “Technically students have paid for equipment already by sup-

porting the

CBSA.”

Student LT>. Ccird required

Tor more information

contact:

The Student Tmpibyment Office

Toom

fac-

co-ordinator.

raised.

ked a private party where there is a

and

staff in non-violent crisis interven-

Stefan Babic, president of the

staff

phone system.

computer equipment used in the CBS A office was bought with

The radios enabled

ulty to contact the guards using the

was felt that such a service would need a paid staff member as It

In 1994,

escort service had been rec-

security guards.

Radigan.

The DSA received $500 in start up funds from the grant for the Walk Safe program.

Instead, possible areas of assault

installed.

business computer labs and

said

Safe, last semester.

1992, a similar audit was done at Conestoga’s other cam-

The results of the inspection developed into recommendations

it,

fered with the wildlife.”

including

body. All the equipment in the

be paid through

expensive, and would have inter-

audit checklist.

A

the past, but the

resource division.

like

TTie CBS organizes these bashes to raise money for the benefit of the business student

in

grant does not allow for the use of

of the In

ommended

plished by the college’s physical

any

to join in.

si:

mm

2(B04

Last year, a pilot project to train

was held. The one-day training session happened during the Employees for Excellence Conference. The materials needed for the training

session were purchased through the grant.

A buzzer system was installed in the

women’s locker room

at the

Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre in

1

996.

The grant also supplied the money to purchase security mirrors for the new business wing. “Health and safety has to be everyone’s concern on campus,”

Radigan said. If people have a good suggestion, Radigan wants them to feel they can come forward and share it.


STUDENT LIFE Doon recreation

leadership

a student-initiated program By Jason Seads “We make

the frame and they

the painting,”

is

do

how Greg Bums,

one of only two recreation leadership teachers, defines the twoyear program. Denis Kuhl, the co-ordinator and second teacher for recreation leadership, says the difference

is

in the delivery.

“Our program is student-motivated and student-initiated. The student doesn’t have all the answers, and neither do I. They

leadership

are in control. “It

Bums.

Sanctuary during a nooner on Sept 20.

in

the

Canada, drug abuse, Brett Hull and the World Cup of Hockey. Bronson also made fun ofg. magic by performing card

Audience members

in

the

Sanctuary were the target of comedian Rick Bronson’s jokes during a nooner Sept. 20. Bronson, who hails from Montreal and is now based in

tricks.

He made the secrets of the tricks known to the audience while trying to trick people on stage.

Edmonton, made fun of audi-

Bronson said he became a stand-up comedian after

ence members such as Lisa Melo, a first-year constructionengineering technology student, when he placed a plunger on her head without her knowing. Bronson, who has performed on the television show Just for Laughs, also made fun of topics such as the possibility of Quebec separating from

to

watching a fiiend perform in a club. He thought he could do better and has been a comedian for 12 years.

During his years as a comedian he has toured North

Doon

Bums

(Photo by Erie whitiieid)

targets students in jokes Whitfield

we

are

it.”

The recreation leadership program began in 1980 out of a YMCA building in downtown Kitchener. From there it moved to the Waterloo campus and finally

Comedian Rick Bronson By Eric

not a student-

program,

directing

— Comedian Rick Bronson performs

is

last year.

said his students will get

student

is

24,

said

from 400-450 applicants. This Burns and Kuhl decided they could let in 37 and still keep

summer campgrounds and

a United Way fund-raising drive to be held Oct. 15.

first is

“The course is based on adult learning instead of pedagogy,” said Kuhl.

“What

is

important

is

lege

that is important is that faculty

place in early education,

The average age of a

recreation

& Recipes This book features DIETS from:

is

not always the purveyor.” Second-year recreation leadership students, Monica Stubgen

-

-

-

and Kari Brook, enjoy the program and how it is set up. “It is a lot of work, but it’s like camping work mostly fun,”

-

The two chose the Conestoga program because it has the

its

Beauty Secrets

looking at our teaching methods,” said Kuhl. “One thing is

sibility for learning.”

but these students are adults.”

city

Hollywood Diets,

is

said Stubgen.

has

manage

parks and recreation departments.

The students do much of their work on their own. They even decide when and for how long to

that the student takes the respon-

Kuhl said the whole educational process seems to wait on the teacher. “That style of teaching

tional facilities as well as

the quality of education.

cost-effective, the rest of the col-

The

running

year.

he said. “Now our second- year students are familiar with the campus and its students.” Recreation leadership students are planning activities this year for all students to take part in.

work

exercise programs in retirement homes and correc-

have group meetings. “Because our way of teaching

us,”

After graduation, the students said they are hoping to find

more involved at Doon this year. “Last year was a transition year for

Kim

Usually 26 students are admitted to the program, chosen

Brooke Shields Courtney Cox

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Brook said Hamilton’s Mohawk College has a first-year class of 350

The

Cybill

recreation leadership.

100% OF ALL PROCEEDS DONATED TO CHARITY

students.

Career Fair

America.

Bronson

First-year recreation leadership students

MacMullen, Tracy Carmicheal, Brigette Ruthernel, and Quina Nguyen work in groups to complete their units. (Photo by jason seads)

can go and find some of the answers on their own,” he said. But Kuhl insists he and Burns directed

GOOFBALL

GROUP WORK —

is

currently

on a

BUS SCHEDULE

four-month tour of universities and colleges across Canada.

October 10:00 a.m.

2, -

1

996

3:30 p.m.

Camilla Scott Conestoga College to Bingeman Park (round

trip)

Show Do you want

a part of the Studio Audience at a taping of the Camilla Scott

to be

Show?

Bus departs Door #4 Conestoga College 9:30

am

Bus leaves Bingeman Park :45

1 1

am I

Thursday, October 10 bus departs at 3 pm $5/person Sign up at the DSA Office by Oct 7

:00

am

1:15

pm

2:30

pm

2:45

pm

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pm

1 1

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5


.

Page 12

— SPOKE, September

30, 1996

^TTIPhtPATT T JL LJ JLfJtliiyi JL

t3

OSAP are taught successful budgeting

Students receiving By Sara Maxim Investment

planning and counselling were

all

money-management sem-

part of a

estimates

for

expenses,”

Wunder

inar organized at the college for

*

He

OSAP.

students receiving

Four guest speakers were invited

to

talk

Wunder, a

with

students:

Tom

credit counsellor at the

Family

Counselling Centre in Kitchener; Anita Bosagri and Brenda Beke, representatives from Royal Trust in Waterloo and Peggy Sue Ironside, a second-year journalism student at Conestoga. Catholic

Wunder, a credit counsellor for more than 27 years, described a

list

of expenses.

I’m not just including those regular expenses that I know are going to happen, but I’m including

budget

strategies,

making a

“In

said

occasional

those

step

after

making a list of the student’s income and expenses was to balance the two figures. If the figures do not balance, Wunder suggests

Wunder

said.

“You

on a continuing basis, spend more money than you have

cannot,

that

follow.

students should break

down

the

is

and

it’s

a plan, list

it is

a

list

of expenses

a plan for spending your

money now

or

it’s

a

money

spending your

plan for at

some

Wunder. He explained the two types of expenses a student will have. ^There are the regular expenses such as rent and utilities, or the occasional expenses such car future time,” said

repairs or gift giving.

sum of money

OSAP

guest speaker to talk with the stu-

first option open was to start a savings account. The student would always have access to their money and would earn interest from it as well. However, Bosagri warned, the interest rate on a savings

Bosagri said the

watch out

a

little

amount each

down further to a certain amount

charges

service

had expected a better turnout.

to

and

rates of interest

17 Gazes fixedly

19 "Baked

Money Market Funds,

She explained

bills or

23 Folded a page 25 City 28

that students could

money

into a

Money

how you and make your money

I’ve pointed out

said.

Across 1 Stooge name 4 Secure 8

Rock plants

12 Legal

-

Society

13 Individuals

A Great Lake weather

17 Strike

Capture

18 19 20 22 24

Leave Wearied

26

Roomy

Made amends

Two peas

I

learned in the

course

Morris said when he was first hired at A.G. Simpson they placed him in the spot-welding department because that was something

employment has left Conestoga’s Cambridge campus. Set up for students with a Grade 10 education or those eligible for

front of him.

campus’ Welding program left eight years ago, the program was sponsored by the Ontario government. A Now the program is no longer in existence. Due mainly to government cutbacks, the program that helped three Cambridge men find bridge

unemployment, the course ran nine months, five days a week, six hours a day and offered 10 more weeks of paid unemployment. Bill Shannon, a former instructor program, said that some stuwere honest enough to admit they had only taken the program to keep their unemployment insurance coming in. in the

“When

wanted to keep alive,” he said. I

of people realized that they liked it once they got in lot

just

Drew

it

my insurance

the college should keep the course

going.

“Without that course, A.G. Simpson wouldn’t have hired me,”

Aids Awareness Sept 30 •

-

49 Distinguish 50 Headed

32 Marls of TV's

in -

51

Papas

52 Swiss peaks

33 Toward 34 Kind of gin 35 Transmits

53 Affermative

37 Caeser and chicken 39 "The - Tattoo" 40 True

Down

42 Soil 44 Byron, Shelley,

2

answer

37 Spirited horse 38 Decrease 40 Mocked 41 Soft drink

43 1

Personel

3

Apple

Lube Newspaper

49

Sullivan

5

Drench Payed the pot

6

Service charge

7

Plural ending

A continent (abbr)

officials

4

Bullfight cheers

(Spanish)

45 Friend 46 Golf item 47 Bradley and

computer by

Keats, etc.

45 Beat 48 "Waiting for the Robert-_"(2

in oil

36 Time spans

29 Pacino and

wds.)

Answers to follow next week .

admit, however, that at

he had just taken the course to see if he’d like it.

Ya hYaihYdh!

first

“I

wasn’t going to

take

any

Oaober

llth-19th, 1996

chances,” he said. “But the course

me how to be responsible. me ambition. Stamina it taught me to start some-

taught It

taught

thing and finish

Goddard

it.”

said he enjoyed the pro-

gram. “I thought the teachers were

They taught us a lot.” Goddard admits the real learning

excellent.

started

Morris, robotic welding

technician at A.G. Simpson, feels

Safe Hat Day

He does

point

use.”

he’d learned at college.

wise,

took the program

was because my unemployment insurance was going to run out. I didn’t think I would like welding.

» dents

“A

I first

I still

- in

.

“Things

Rui Monteiro, a former student in the program who now works at Babcock and Wilcox said he’s always been interested in welding. “I don’t have any regrets taking the course,” he said. “I needed a job and it got me a job.” Michael Goddard, also a student in the program, now working at Babcock and Wilcox, said that with the course he learned enough to go out and understand the job in

CamCITC Mig

the students of the

Capone 30 Accede

"Nurses"

15 Characteristic

everybody.”

When

A

32 Irregularity 34 Cooks quickly

27 Air Conditioner

he

Texas

31 Objective

this

Course leaves lasting impression on working Cambridge graduates for

in

27 Does sums

during that time.

can invest

corner

govern-

week, then take out that money next week, plus whatever interest was earned on it

hope

-

Horseback

game

Bosagri

were short-term holdings

such as treasury ment bonds.

in

20 Blind as 21

memorable program

was not

Fabric design

16 Constructed

safe.”

“I

Remembrance

11 Origin

also very

it’s

8 9

10 Place

poses,” she said. “It’s very acces-

Market Fund

“You can much better stand to be broke for one day a week then you can for five days at the end of the month,” Wunder said. Bosagri, an investment officer.

Student services

counsellor Joan Magazine said she

sense, budgeting

would suggest a Money Market Fund for student pur-

the budget.

there,” he said. “It

,

four students.

could be done.

14

By Wendy Cummins

The seminar, which was held on 1 1 was attended by only

Sept.

for.

invest their

to

to talk one-on-one with the speakers and get their individual questions answered.

“I

said,

fin-

attended

low and there could be a

each week because the smaller the unit of time, the more manageable

Cutbacks bring an end

common

who

had a chance

She explained some ways in which she had learned to budget while attending Conestoga and let the students know that everyone was in the same situation, but with

sible to you. It’s earning higher

month. Students should then break it

is

ished, the students

the last

dents.

they are given by

into a certain

After the guest speakers had

Bosagri said.

Peggy Sue Ironside was

dents.

account

“Your income and expenses must

last longer,”

short term investment

choices that were ideal for stu-

number of

budgeting format for students to

“Your budget

some

as entertainment or clothing.

balance,”

She de-

the next to speak.

tailed

cutting the flexible expenses such

coming in.” The last point he made was

of income and a

was

to a student

said.

next

the

TTPJ7 mh

when he

entered the work-

force. “I learned in that course and succeeded in it. I followed it through and my attendance was great,” Morris said. “Now it’s no longer

there.”

Week

Oct 4

Information Displays Red Ribbon Campaign Guest Speaker • Prizes & More

KITCHENER-WATERLOO

||

qkhiberfesTo For tickets and information (

519 ) 570-4267

w^vw.oktoberfest.ca

call:

t


.

SPOKE,

September, 30 1996

— Page 13

OFF CAMPUS Student educational forum '*

1

f

r

'

*

mw

wants loan payment changes By Diana Loveless

Conestoga

that she will represent

students at the panel consultation

Concern for post-secondary eduwas at the heart of a student forum at the University of Waterloo on Sept. 20 - 22. Universities and colleges across cation

TRY SOME ALTITUDE

Shakedown Street employee Derek Wildphong says laws concerning hemp licensing are impeding (Photo by Dave Luymes) what could be a profitable industry.

Senate standing committee advocates drug law review down

By Dave Luymes

Street does not encourage

the use of marijuana or any other

A small store

nestled obscurely

illegal substances, but

hemp

between businesses in downtown Kitchener is part of an industry hoping the government will change its mind about cur-

port the use of

rent marijuana laws.

to adults over the

Shakedown

products.

Wildphong

said he restricts the

sale of marijuana paraphernalia

Another sign

about one

Street,

does supand hemp

in the store reads:

block away from Kitchener City

4.1 acres of trees equals

Hall on King Street, sells an

of hemp.

unusual

Some

variety

are

of

clothing.

made from hemp,

others display a marijuana leaf.

The

store also sells literature

that explains

how

to

grow mari-

juana, as well as paraphernalia

used to smoke pot - all legal. Hemp products are made from the stalk of the marijuana plant, tetrahydrocannibinol where (THC), the active ingredient of scarcely found. is producers grow a brand of pot that is low in THC and has a stronger stalk. It can be the

plant,

Hemp

used to make such things as rope, clothing, luggage and paper, to

Derek

name

a few.

Wildphong,

an

em-

ployee at the store for two years, calls the current law, the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, “illogical and irrational.” Wildphong pointed out a sign in the store that read:

Shake-

hemp that

is

1

acre

A problem with selling

products, it is

Wildphong

said,

very expensive. Since

Department of Agriculture, not the Department of Health. “That’s like the Department of

the

Health telling us

how

com,” Wildphong

said.

The

Controlled

to

grow

Drugs

and

groups

to

responses to the provincial gov-

ernment’s White Paper, a discussion paper on the future of post-secondary education in Ontario, published in July. Between Sept. 25 and Oct. 31, the government-appointed Advisory Panel on Post-Secondary

Education was to hold consultations with representatives of colleges and universities in Thunder Bay, Sept. 25; Sudbury, Sept. 26; Ottawa, Oct. 10; Hamilton, Oct. Oct.

17;

London,

Oct. 30 and North York, Oct. 3 1

The executive head of each

col-

lege and university has been asked

develop a response

EducaJohn Snobelen says

In the discussion paper. tion Minister

“There

is

aid program,” she “But governments should not

use that (increasing student debt load) as an argument to increase tuition.”

Instead,

more equitable determination of

“excellence,

eligibility.

of programs

and institutions that meets our needs, accountability and respon-

Income-contingent student loan repayment has been promised by the Tory government, but has yet

siveness.”

to be

its

five

objectives:

accessibility, a range

The paper

also addresses issues

such as the balance between student, private sector and provincial shares of post-secondary funding and how costs can be reduced by

implemented.

As of September,

further 10 per cent to establish a trust

The

opportunities

among

the

public

vice-president of education

for the

University of Waterloo

Federation of Students (FEDS), Kelly Foley, has been chosen to join with other representatives in addressing the panel discussion in Hamilton on Oct. 16. “I see this as a unique opportunity to have a voice and have an impact on future policy,” she said

UW

an interview Sept. 22.

DS A

president

April-Dawn 18

a

Blackwell said Sept. meeting of class representatives

a joint review between Senate and the House of Commons Committee, to review

at

The

fund to help students

Conestoga raised per cent this

educational institutions. cost of education to students

and the resulting debt load were key concerns raised by participants in the FEDS discussion group, including guest speaker Jane Pak, Federation of Students’

1995-96 president.

Annual Lakehead University

of Canada’s drug laws.

at

Thurs*

7

“At the end of the day, students have to pay a greater share of cur-> post-secondary education rently they pay about 19 per cent of the actual cost,” said Bonnie Patterson, president of the Council of Ontario Universities.

Conestoga College

visit to

Friday, October 4,

1

996

Queensmount Arena

Oct 17

pm - 1 am $3^

or ticket

editor.

by 20

Learning Resource Centre, Group Viewing Room 5 Accounting, Management Studies, Marketing, CP/A, 9:30 - 10:30 Civil, Construction, 10:30 - 1 1:30 Social Services, Nursing. Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology.

Admission

Write the

tuition

will

featuring Walter Ostanek

want YOUR opinion.

its

in finan-

fall.

Conestoga College Oktoberfest Night

the

YOU!

We

universities

and colleges were forced to raise tuition fees by 10 per cent, with an option to implement increases of a

cial need.

and

re-

secondary sector while achieving

and promoting greater transfer

faculty

recommends

develop public policy on the post-

available

students,

she

forms to the existing Ontario and Canada student loan programs to include an income-contingent loan repayment plan and a fairer and

he has asked the panel to use this series of consultations to advise him on how his government can

eliminating program duplication

names of individuals to meet with the panel,

a problem with the cur-

student

to suggest

mended

all

said.

that will

in

Substances Act, also known as Bill C-8, was made law in the spring of 1996, but the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs recom-

students to be part of a focus

White Paper.

including

with

rent

to the

staff.

hemp laws belong

co-ordinator, will be calling on

group

to refine

believe

dents to fund their educations.

develop

there are

no facilities in Canada hemp, it is grown in Canada and shipped to China, where it is made into cloth and sent back at a much higher price, Wildphong said. He and others in the industry

London.

Blackwell and Cheryl Jack, DSA education and communications

the province are leading similar

discussion

16;' Toronto,

age of 19.

in

She told the group she has grave concerns about the ability of present and future generations of stu-

& t-shirt $1S

Tickets Available at the Age of Majom'Cy Requmed

DSA Office


.

Page 14

— SPOKE, September 30, 1996

Women’s

SPORTS soccer team

varsity

wins opener against By Rick Kew The women’s varsity soccer team had the visiting St. Clair Lady Saints “marching in” to Condor music as they defeated Windsor 3-0 Sept. 21

Goalkeeper,

was

value

Kesselring,

the

shutout

St. Clair tested

her only

full

although

Amanda for

once during the game. student, could have been better

maestro as she directed traffic for her team telling her defenders how to handle the ball as unseen attackers approached from behind. Coach Geoff Johnstone said. as

1

dme

by

on

a

goal

some Monica

-0 for

Stubgen, a first-year recreational leadership student, the team did

become

not

frustrated at their lack

of scoring. Conestoga’s second goal came after

good

ball

zone

Clair’s

control

in

allowed

St.

Jodi

Brezinski, a second-year law and

a

from close range assistant

Alviano said

fitness

side that surprised the St. Clair

keeper. all players had which would give the

Johnstone said field time,

new

players valuable experience.

coach Vince

was a

scoring chances.

that the

Lady

Saint keeper couldn’t handle.

Condor

The Condors’ final goal, scored by Sacha Rochons, a first-year mechanical engineering student, came on a long ball from the left

However, he placed his strongest 1 1 on the field for the final 20 minutes and they executed threeway passing-plays and give-andgoes flawlessly, resulting in solid

security student, to blast a shot

Kesselring, a first-year business classified

though the score was

Clair

St.

priority

with his team and that was

why

Clair to do anything constructive

with the

on Oct.

Condors

rarely

allowed

St.

ball.

fights for the

close

Conestoga, comes

Kirk Lyon, for

in.

5.

at

home

ball control in the mid-field area.

The Saints on the other hand were blessed as they intercepted Conestoga passes throughout the game, while their own passing game succeeded with pinpoint

to the St. Clair Saints.

Goalkeeper

Larry

accuracy.

Taylor,

A

studying in the electrical apprendors in the Fanshawe

game with

foot of an attacking Saint who passed to the right comer. A returning pass was sent up in front of the Condor net and a charging Steve Peto headed the ball behind the Conestoga

After a slow start against the Falcons, the Condors earned a 2-0 lead on goals by Andre Lyn, a first-semester environmental engineering student and Roberto

keeper.

Condor coach Geoff Johnstone team was not

Dimatteo, a second-year construction engineering student. Taylor, named outstanding player of the game, frustrated the

Fanshawe forwards on with

many

said the play of the

an indication of the player’s level of talent. He said that because 50 men tried out for the team, he has had to use the exhibition games and practices to evaluate the technical skills of the players. With the roster down to a more manageable size, he said he and his coaching staff can now concentrate on teamwork and fit-

several

shots

going wide of the goal. Late in the second half, with the Falcons pressing, the Condors were unable to clear the ball and Fanshawe tied the score with goals by

Dave Kohek and Nick

D’Oria.

Despite nine strikeouts by Conestoga player of the

game Fawn

Day, the softball Condors lost to the visiting Seneca Scouts 4-2, Sept. 18.

Seneca opened the scoring in the bottom of the second inning and added two more in the fourth to take a 3-0 lead.

Conestoga scored the fourth first- year

in their half

of

when Amanda White,

a

law and security student,

drove in two runs.

Seneca pitcher Debbie Wadsworth helped their pursuit of victory by walking eight batters during the game. Wadsworth helped her own cause by striking out seven Condors and batting in a run. With shadows creeping across the third baseline toward the pitcher’s mound, the Condors found themselves needing to score in their half of the seventh to win the game. It looked as though they would

The Seneca coaches positioned outfielders

their

normal

to

deeper

defend against a longcould result in an

like

it

would

fall in

base. First

baseman

Jill

Kuntz, a

first-

However, a game-saving, sliding

ended

the

Although the game was never

at the plate.

numerous defensive

Day, a third-year business student, slapped the ball into right field advancing Remmert to third

the deciding factor in losing the

errors

be played Sept. 22 at Belleville and the Condors were to visit Canadore College in North Bay on

a

Sept. 28.

causing

it

to glance

The Condors were unable

to pro-

duce another run, even though

hit.

Next home game:

The Condors, who out-hit Seneca 8-6, are 1-1 for the season.

With Day stealing second base and Remmert holding at third, the stage was set for rookie White, who represented the winning run, to win or at least tie the game with

in the glare,

Program: Management studies Year: 3 softball

Wednesday, Oct.

2, 5

p.m.

game.

looking directly into the late after-

off her glove.

Kitchener

were

base.

to lose the ball

Home town:

Condors’ attempted

year recreation leadership student,

noon sun, appeared

#36

catch by the Scouts’ left-fielder

out of their reach, the Condors’

at first

softball

Position; pitcher

for a

dent, singled to put the tying run

error on what looked

Women’s

hit.

in

Condor

Fawn Day

missing two more, poked a fly ball into shallow left-field that

appeared

A

rained-out

game

against

Belleville’s Loyalist College to

was

Larry Taylor Men’s soccer

visit

week

hit.

the fifth inning taking advantage

be a routine throw out

Athletes of the

White, after looking at a couple of pitches and swinging-away but

base

to

Oct. 5.

fly ball that

extra-base

are

and Lambton,

than

rally.

to

Condors

St.Clair, Oct. 2,

in fastball action

it off as Shelley Remmert, a second-year law and security stu-

of a

The

Condors did not mount a serious attack throughout the game,

pull

The Scouts scored another run

ness.

In the 3-0 loss to St. Clair, the

testbali

late in

the second half found itself at the

several acrobatic saves.

occasions,

Conestoga goal kick

Con-

ticeship program, kept the

By Rick Kew

9’s

game Andre Lyn showed good their

not as fortunate Sept. 21, losing

Seneca

1

although Conestoga player of the

season opener, the men’s varsity soccer team salvaged a tie against visiting Fanshawe Falcons Sept. 18, but was

fall to

as two No.

to help while Ivan (Photo by Rick Kew)

By Rick Kew In

Condors

ball

Men’s soccer team ties, loses first two games

Pitcher Perfect

Fawn Day, pitcher for the Lady Condors, throws an underarmed Seneca Saints on Sept. 18.

soccer

VrkiC of St. Clair tries to block.

The women’s soccer team was scheduled to host Lambton on Sept. 24 and are visiting St. Clair

the

Condor John Callaghan

#1

Position: goal keeper

Program: Electrical Apprentiship Year:

1


SPOKE,

September, 30 1996

— Page 15

REVIEWS mwmw GUmE

Restaurant Review

Elm Hurst Inn

^ h b

the belly

fills

^

Excellent

Very Good

k>

Good

but will empty out the wallet ommended

By Ross McDermott

maine

If

somewhere someone spe-

you’re looking for

special to take that

fine-dining experience,

cial for a

consider the

The

Elm Hurst

Inn.

1868 displays a traditional Gothic extension with the integration of an Italinate tower, pointed window arches, circular panels and brackets, and projecting comer brick Inn, constructed in

work.

was

interior

exudes elegance.

There are nine separate dining rooms each boasting large fireplaces, high sculpted ceilings and

hardwood blan-

floors of polished

keted by plush, yet conservative,

fine choice for the

King

size

main course.

The service was excellent. The food seemed to appear magically exact

at the

way

only

the

is

moment

the previous

course was complete, delivered by

well-groomed young

men wearing

was cooked medium-well

salad

is

highly rec-

It

to per-

and coated

with a slightly-sweet sauce. It

was accompanied by Yorkshire

Pudding. is

Why

called pudding

it’s

unexplainable.

It

was more

like

a puff of dry pastry inflated with sliced

and bmssel sprouts - exploded with flavor broccoli

carrots,

andcompensated

for

the

disap-

a belly

full

of beef

is

is

basted with

a dark, sweet sauce, smothered

with an Asian strain of mushrooms and accompanied by a serving of rice. Both the mushrooms and the rice were rather bland, but the fish was surprisingly light in flavor and could bring a smile to any “land lubber’s” face.

not desiris

an appropriate choice. This gen-

off the meal and satisfy sweet tooth, the HoneyCmmb Cheesecake is a heavenly dessert. Deliciously sweet, smooth and creamy, it has a flavor unsurpassed by any other cheesecake. The Elm Hurst Inn is a wonderful restaurant. Its elegant setting

and

price,

story.

one

fine

food

is

sure to please.

however,

is

a different

For an evening such as the

just

described

the

cost

is

approximately $100.

But

if

you don’t mind leaving

and considerably lighter in the wallet, the Elm Hurst Inn is highly

recommended.

Is

^

Mahones’ new release Rise Again focuses on boozing and partying By Eric

Whitfield

you’re a drinker, then you

If

might be able to

relate to Rise

Again, the Mahones’ new album. The Kingston band, whose Celtic-rock sound

is

similar to that

band the Pogues, focuses of most lyrics on alcohol and parIrish

tying, in

songs such as Paint the the Boozer and

Town Red, Down

Down

Finny

singer.

“I’m the

what

mood

I

to

paint the f to

Town Red,

lead

McConnell

says

mood

in the

that’s

to hit the streets,

I’m in hit the streets, and ers red. We’re going bloody

go out nuts tonight, chasing

ing town.” Lyrics like these

continue throughout the album.

Most of

about British prisoners shipped off to Australia.

is

being

lyrics

alcohol.

The

title

song. Rise Again, and Away are about

the slower Far

women

and relationships. also like to sing

about the United States and

York

City.

On

their

same

New

album

draggin’ the days, which sounds

is

about drinking. suit on Rise Again

and are

about travelling to the United States and drinking (What a surprise!).

dance to Celtic music. Rise Again is great. However, if you just want to sit back, relax and listen, the sound of the whole album gets tiring after If

you

Guys,

who

played

at

club Tuesday, Sept.

1

Stages night7, the

band

who

hailed as “two guys

is

write

cleverly crafted side-splitting popfolk songs.”

Well, they’re partially right.

John

Flemming

and

Rusty Berther are definitely guys, and there are two of them. But the rest is

questionable.

Their second album. Scared,

fol-

lows their debut entitled Bloody Jeff and starts off promisingly enough. The opening song. When Love was New, has a light melody and funny lyrics like “I liked your Bart Simpson tattoo,

I

kissed you

when you had

/

When

the flu

love

the sixth song, called Trash the Planet, is really quite funny.

They follow

Down the Boozer New York, which

package for the Ausband Scared Weird Little

In a press tralian

And

as Rise Again, they have

with songs Streets of

lyrics yes, but

was new.”

a song called Across the U.S.A.,

which

describe the lucky prisoners as the ones who don’t survive the journey. It’s one of the few songs on the album not about

The

the

what do two men from Australia know about Bill

By Jennifer Dougall

like to

the first five songs.

The song has a live feel to it, with people cheering in the background as the Scared Weird Little Guys sing, “Bum more coal, spray more aerosol

The ozone hole

/

is

getting bigger and brighter and

wider and stronger.” But it all goes down

hill

from

there.

The Scared Weird Little Guys’ second song is entitled Bloody Bill, and claims U.S. President Bill

Clinton

is

responsible for

Michael Jackson’s nose, the Beatles splitting up and Canadians winning the World Series. Clever

Clinton?

Nothing, unless they are pursell albums in the by bashing its president. Something else becomes apparent about the band in the fifth

posely trying to States

song, called the

Mad

Bastardo.

The Scared Weird

Little

Guys

the drinking songs are

rhythmical, fast-paced and feature

mandolin and accordion. Even some of the slower songs, like Down To The Wire, concern

accents, just so they can say the

word “bastardo.” They use the word 8 times in just under two 1

minutes and 20 seconds. The Scared Weird Little Guys try very hard to take stand-up comedy out of the nightclub and onto the big stage.

And maybe

five years

could have done

ago they

it.

The band might have had a following in Canada if bands like the Barenaked Ladies and Moxy Fruvus hadn’t already done it and done it much, much better. Because not only are the Scared Weird Little Guys not very funny, but Flemming and Berther, who sing the same melodies at the same time, also have the gall to be out of sync on most of their songs. Flemming and Berther race through the spectrum of music, playing everything from folk to

country to metal,

all

not very well.

The Scared Weird

Little

Guys

should promote their music solely as a

comedy

act

and leave the big

stage to the musicians.

jmammis

hh

m vm

iLmiam

Kitchener Rangers Family Day

Mon* Ocober 15

alcohol.

One song

like

songs that make no sense and they sing in bad Spanish to write

said.

down the browns. We’re going to go down to the pubs, and take this f

Holloway Jack, which

The Mahones

to the Wire.

Paint the

In

is

Scared Weird Little Guys more comedy than music

To top

CD Review

album

CD Review

that

considerably heavy in the waist

pointing Yorkshire pudding. If

erous portion of fish

The

air.

able, perhaps the grilled Marlin

stiff-starched white shirts.

The caesar

to

describe the huge chunk of beef.

The steamed vegetables -

area mgs.

ro-

and fresh - lightly sprinkled with bacon bits and flavored with an invisible, yet noticeable, tangy dressing. The croutons were a bit large, but overall, it was an excellent salad. The King-Size Prime Rib is a crisp

fection, lightly spiced,

The

The

appetizer.

lettuce

Poor Turkey

that sticks out

on the

This could

be your ad

The Cable Guy on the big screen

Wed.

Oct.

FREE tickets at the DSA Office

9

12:30 pm The Sanctuary

First

Come First Serve!

Limit 2 tickets per student


— SPOKE, September 30, 1996

Page 16

ENTERTAINMENT Trainspotting injects reality of drugs into veins Funeral, successfully gets across the surreality of being in a junkie’s head.

By Peter Marval In a year of pitifully drab movies, the

us the brilliant dark

team

that

comedy Shallow Grave

One scene has Renton disappearing

gave

filthiest

’with Trainspotting, a delightfully disturbing film

Most of

about heroin addiction. In the opening scenes of Trainspotting (the title refers to the British pastime of counting trains - a

metaphor for indulging one’s

McKidd), who

starts

are

BUZZED

From left to right, Spud (Ewen Bremner), Mark Renton (Ewen McGregor), and Begbie (Robert Carlyle) star in Trsinspotting. in;

(Alliance Releasing)

and Begbie (Robert Carlyle), who boasts

that

he doesn’t need, to use

drugs, but gets a kick out of beating the hell out of people.

The movie, which

becarrie a

huge phenomenon

in

New

Order

sion to scenes - for example, the ironic Perfect Day by Lou Reed, during an overdose by Renton. Hilariously funny one moment and graphically tragic the next. Trainspotting is exciting, energetic

England, where

it is

Four Weddings and a

the second highest grossing British film after

Diverse musical talents from Elastica to

contribute to the film’s soundtrack, adding dimen-

and thought-provoking, but defmetly not for the timid.

Movie review

writing’s

By Linda

party to the ghastly accidental death of an

caught by the law, and the nightmare-like hallucinations of withdrawl.

CD release

The

made

addict’s neglected infant, the consequences of being

Tommy

(Kevin off clean, but eventually caves

Miller), an off-the-mark philosopher;

Trainspotting does a superb job of

drug use. “Take the best orgasm you ever had, multiply by 1,000 and you’re still nowhere near it,” Renton assures us about heroin use. There are no worries about the problems and concerns of everyday life, just where the next hit is going to come from. At the same time, the film does not cheat us of the horror and anguish of real-life drug addiction. We

is intro-

duced to the film’s anti-hero, Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor), who rejects material possessions and a culture he views as sick and stifling. Renton escapes through drugs - primarily heroin. “I choose not to choose life, I chose something else,” he declares, as he and his friends shoot up in an Edinburgh flat. “And the reasons? There are no reasons. Who needs reasons when you’ve got heroin?” The fdm, based on a novel by Irvine Welsh, focuses on Renton and his buddies, a group of crooks, liars and psychos. There’s Spud (Ewen Bremner), who partakes in the funniest scene in the film when he confronts a job interview panel while on speed; Sick Boy (Johny Lee

all.

illustrating the realities of

in a useless activity that gives

a sense of purpose), the audience

life

into Scotland’s

public toilet into a deep blue pool while trying to rescue two opium suppositories.

returns

on the wall

First

wives

By Linda Reilly

Peilly

first rate

Goldie Hawn plays an aging preoccupied with her youth and her lips. Bette Midler plays a good Jewish wife who gives her all to her family. Diane Keaton plays a woman who gave up her career to raise a daughter, who has announced star

&

Thomas

James

Refreshing and entertaining. The First Wives Club opened this weekend with a blockbuster cast. It was also tops at the box office, grossing $19 million, according

Gambler’s

CD

Cross

released their first Sept. 21 at the 1996 Haldimand-

Norfolk

International

Match and Country

Plowing

Festival

in

to entertainment reports.

Selkirk.

Thomas, borough,

originally

is

Goldie Hawn, Bette Midler and

from Peter-

a well-seasoned

Diane

new

press release.

He

has been playing guitar since age 15 when he got his start with Frank Leahy, Canadian fiddle

champion.

He went on to join Family Brown and played throughout Ontario and Quebec with them.

Other

Thomas

notables

Keaton

portray

three

middle-aged women, old college friends, brought together again by a mutual friend’s, suicide. These three funny ladies have a common bond: their spouses have left them for younger women and want to take the family fortunes with them. After the shock wears off and

country musician, according to his

their tears dry, they decide not to

has

get

played with include Ronnie Hawkins and Terry Sumsion. Being a family man, he stopped

mad

The make

but to get even.

trio

hatches a scheme to

she’s a lesbian.

It is

with her help

that the trio puts its get-even plan

to work.

Ivana Trump makes a cameo appearance with the one liner, “Don’t get mad, get everything.” If

you’re expecting rolling-in-

the-aisles funny stuff, you’ll be

disappointed.

This movie is a must for anyone who has ever been dumped. For those who haven’t, you’ll

still

enjoy the film.

their ex-spouses pay.

marry (Cathy) and to raise a son Matthew, 17, and daughters Chrystal, 12, and Leslie, to

family:

0

Friend Terry Sumsion, according to his publicity pieces,

iiRpopfeaRt DSA RsiiRbeps

encouraged

the singer to return to the enter-

tainment scene.

That is just what Thomas has done, but recently he has decided to go it on his own, according to his

°>*

,

II.

agent

publicity

Sharon

office

(S19) 74S-5151

fax

(519)

748-6727

hotline

(519)

748-S220 exfcSPSA

e-mail

listen@doonsa.com

WWW

www.doonsa.com

Herman.

Herman

new band Ron Weber from

said he got a

together with

and singing. Bobby Boisclair from Quebec plays lead guitar and also sings. According to Herman, he was labelled “The King” in Montreal and is billed as one of the most Sarnia playing

notable

lead

ba.ss

guitarists

the

in

province.

Robert Barry of Port Dover

is

the

band’s drummer.

About

six

months ago, Thomas

decided to independently produce his

own CD.

The night before recording was Herman, they were one song short for the album so to begin, said

Thomas began

writing the song.

THAT’S COUNTRY

— James Thomas entertains the crowd

at

the 1996 Haldimand-Norfolk International Plowing Match and Country Festival in Selkirk on Sept. 21 (Photo by unda Reiiiy) .

The Writing’s on

turned out to be the the

which song for

the Wall, title

CD.

According to Herman, Thomas is also an accomplished songwriter and wrote most of the music for the disc himself “Also very much a family man, James wrote Mirror of her Eyes on the CD for his wife Cathy and Let the Eagle Fly for his son Matthew,” said Herman. The group will be playing the Calgary Stampede in 1997 and are

planning a 12-week western tour early in the

new

year.

The

tour

was

originally planned for later this

year but they have had so local

many

bookings the tour has been

delayed.

The

tour

was

originally to

go

to

Saskatchewan, Alberta and British

Columbia but they were booked on the spot at the International Plowing match to play a week in Montana, so they will be incorporating that into their western tour,

Herman

said.

We want to hear from you!

Digital Edition - September 30, 1996  
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