Page 1

s

Whafs

'

SPOKE

Inside

Navels and nipples pierced in Sanctuary.

See page 8

Where

— No. 32

it

News

1-3

Commentary

4-5

Sports

10

Entertainment

^^Keeping Conestoga College Connected'^

28th Year

to find

Kitchener, Ontario

11-12

September

23, 1996

Macisaac strikes

musical

chord By Linda

Reilly

Cape Bretoner Ashley Macisaac brought his Celtic rock,

Conestoga’s

Dressed

in

a T-shirt,

hip-hop blend of music to

Doon campus army

boots,

Sept. 12.

combat pants and

21 -year-old

the

supercharged

Macisaac played his down-east fiddle music to a largely female audience of over 400.

who

Macisaac,

he has a healthy

said

respect for fiddle music, adds step dancing

and floor stomping to the traditional music. He said he plays the fiddle the same way he learned. “It’s only the presentation that’s different.’’

Macisaac has been playing the time-honored Cape Breton sound since he was eight

and a half years old.

He grew up in Creignish in Inverness County on the east-coast island and became a legend there.

Macisaac

STOMPIN’ GOOD TIME to students at

Cape Bretoner Ashley Macisaac fiddled the afternoon away bringing his Celtic rock hip-hop music Conestoga’s Doon campus Sept. 12 (Photo by Linda Reiiiy) .

began taking step-dancing and started playing the fiddle

.

first

lessons at six,

The Net comes

to

Conestoga

shortly after.

He says he was tom between his allegiance to traditional music and his desire to gain a new audience for fiddle music.

School lacks capacity for

“I had to create my own music and that music had to stand by itself,” said

Macisaac.

The

been on the road for

4 1/2 years but will be taking some time off ends in October.

enough money

“I’ve finally saved

to start

house,” he said.

Macisaac, who’s very money conscious, he shops a lot at Salvation Army stores.

said

$40

“You can buy a Ann.” Macisaac also said he hopes to take a vacation in Mexico after he plays a show in lot for

at the Sally

San Diego in December. “Nothing is finalized yet,” he said, “but Mexico would be my first choice.” Macisaac will finish his Canadian tour in British Colombia next month when he plays the duMaurier Festival. Asked in an interview before the concert about his plans for the future, Macisaac said he had no idea. “Things just happen.” Macisaac has a

lot

of interests, including

doing a talk show, becoming a perhaps writing a book.

He

Ironside

Student access to the Internet will be

fiddle player has

after his tour

my

By Peggy Sue

also said he

is

TV host and

looking forward to get-

ting a digital Sharp camera with Avid Editor and making videos. “Even I could do that. It’s simpler than pounding my body for an

available within the next month, says the

Doon campus. how we manage the

principal of Conestoga’s “It’s

a question of

and the money to do it,” said Grant McGregor. “We’ve got to get it for you. There’s no doubt.” McGregor said he thinks parts

guitarist.

Internet for illegal purposes, there has to

be a way of coding the access, and the college still doesn’t have the software to do it. “It’s a fairly complex thing and will prob-

the first things that most people deny access to anyone who violates the Criminal Code, which is absolutely logical and something you have to do.” “We’re not saying you can’t look at it. We simply can’t provide the band width because the space to transmit that data it’s plugging up legitimate research.” is

McGregor problem

to

said

future

a

be considered

is

bility to give its students

will

some

basic training on the

Internet because

the

of the tools students will

have

to learn

“We may provide that are

all

how

Internet,

don’t have, the tele-

phone capacity to do it.”

of the things

we

the

at this point

Technically, the school

sim-

ply don’t have the money,

operating a

the server space, or

line,

all

gain

system as a personal

“We

not be able to

because

to

activity.

to use.

coming out on

able

other students are using

if

one

it is

not be

access for research purposes

the

56K

is

telephone

which has a limited

things to

capacity for carrying infor-

ble,”

make it accessihe said. “And that’s

mation.

where we will have to start to make some hard

On the other end of the spectrum, the University of Waterloo has a T-1 line: an

choices.”

An

Internet lab

is

McGregor

said,

expense of $70,000 yearly.

being

up beside the learning resource centre (LRC), set

but not

NET ACCESS COMING — Grant McGregor, principal pus, says an Internet lab

students will have access right away.

have asked the chairs of each program to identify what would be high priority access for students,” said McGregor. Although a number of problems have “I

Ashley Macisaac’

mail and other controversial subjects. McGregor said if someone is using the

“One of

do

the possibility that students

all

for profile on

of electronic publishing medium, it is open to people who put out pornography, hate

use

the college has a responsi-

hour and a half a night.”

See back page

full Internet

been dealt with, there are still issues that need to be looked after, said McGregor. “Internet protocol demands that we must be able to identify who is logged on and using the service.”

Because the Internet has become a type

being set up.

is

of

said.

McGregor

who

is

said a roster system will prob-

inital

setup for keeping track of

accessing the Internet service.

McGregor

said the Univer-

of Waterloo, which is probably as advanced as any sity

(Photo by Peggy

ably cost more than $ 1 00,000 to set up,” he

ably be the

Doon camsue

ironside)

institution in Canada with computer equipment and facilities, is looking at limiting certain news groups because it is having

trouble pulling

onto

its

all

the requested data

down

servers.

he researched between 30 and 40 different college and university

The university has so many bits of information coming through that administration has had to analyze the type of Internet usage being employed, and has had to discuss what kind of information is academi-

policies regarding Internet access.

cally essential for the university.

After the required software the

program

identification

McGregor

is

installed,

will record Internet use with

numbers.

said


— SPOKE, September 23, 1996

Page 2

CORRECTION

Run-off goes underground

In the story on Sue Johanson on page 3 in the Sept. 16 issue of Spoke, it was incorrectly report-

ed

that

doctor.

Johanson is a medical She is a registered nurse.

Spoke

regrets the error.

By Bryce Wilson

Wrong book

September has been unseasonwet. Environment Canada reported more than 100 millimeably

of rainfall

tres

in parts

of Lambton

bookstore mix-up

and Kent counties because of the passing of Hurricane Fran’s tail

By Jennifer Dougall

end. All the rain

may seem just

drance to students, but

should be in

Many

overflow water.

According

Dave

to

Putt, director

of physical resources, the problem

with

the rain

all

that

is

it

college can’t just put

down

it

lots

was

The book, which

return

how

it

two-semester

The

between 1992 and 1995

melting.

pond

When

water.

enough

then filled

the water gets high

reach

to

First, the area

of

that controls the level

the

drain,

bly go to the learning resource

It

pumped

lots

and

is

out to the east end of the

school property. There’s a pond on

Lot 3

the far side of

new

that acts as a

there’s a flood control

gate that

stormwater retention pond, which can’t be seen because it’s underground. The underground pond was built leads

a

to

down and

pipes

have

lot,

the

to

be

reviewed and, according to Putt, they’re reaching their capacity. Retaining the stormwater is no problem, but the pipes that bring it

pond gets too high,

that

with large boulders.

building or parking

stormwater

reservoir for the water.

When

be dug out,

A filter cloth was placed on top and the whole area was covered over with sod. Today, all that can be seen is the control gate. Every time the school puts in a

joins the rest of the stormwa-

from the parking

to

to the retention

pond

being used to their

The school has

diverters

are already

Once the water down, the water

floods the area.

pressure

dies

New

buildings couldn’t use the

existing pipes, says Putt.

would have

A

new

be dug to carry the water to the retention pond. And if the college ever decided to build across the road, where it owns property, a new stormwater retention system would have to be line

to

The

S.

Conestoga

Canadian students

By Shawn Leonard

member of

,,,

,,

a benefit

and

Franklin says the machines still have to be checked over to make

around five compati-

sure they’re in perfect running

to both the students

the teaching staff.

“Even though

it is

years old, they are

order.

still

we have Don Frankhn, a new

Safety of the students, he says,

ble with the machines

built there.

is

line

Web

looks.

Gobbo, vice-president of the CBSA, created the home page over a three-week period, putting in about 40 hours of work to provide business students everything from e-mail connections with faculty to a Guest

Month

CBSA

The president of the CBSA, Stephan Babic, said one part of the site has a business card section where students who have their

The

the

concept,

but

the

Gobbo

said

the

He

site

is

ical look,

could

with issues discussed and prob-

because

if

it is

Gobbo

PLUGGED

IN

Jeff

Gobbo,

vice-presi(jent of

Association, displays the association’s

win a

Conestoga Business Stuidents

new Web

CBSA’s Web

a student or faculty

member

an to

site.

classified as a charitable orga-

said he wants to see students get

Sean

and enter the draw to on the Internet

MGL.

“In the

first

three

weeks of

beef of the month, he would buy him lunch. Beefs could range from the cost of student life to the

said he

general learning atmosphere.

would give

resolve the issue.

it

He

a fair shot to try to

“If students think a small or big

would help if I

their education,

can,” said

He

I

change them

will help

Gobbo.

we

his focus

and

in ‘hits’,” said

Gobbo.

The

CBSA Web

cbsa(®mgl.ca.

said any suggestions that are given to

him can help him increase

the site,

Finlay)

have had over 400 logged

could convince him the issue was worth the

MGL,

$200 a year

costs

year’s subscription

through

site. (Photo by

Students and faculty could send in their problems and, if the issue cannot be resolved, the issue becomes the beef. said

It

interested in the site

section.

Gobbo

going through

nization.

lem-solving ideas with the VP’s Beef of the

Month

is

A special discount was given to the CBSA

not graphically

graphics

CBSA

maintain the

slow down the process of down-loading information and simplicity is better for speed than using up time with non-essential pictures. The CBSA said they gave the site a politsaid

business can swap jobs with other

Internet service.

executive wrote the content.

enhanced.

own

students.

section.

Gobbo designed

site

better the school, the better the graduate

Jeff

of the

a priority.

on the site and as vice-president. Gobbo’s idea for the site is to enhance the image of the school of business. He said the

Students

(CBSA) has now gone on own home page.

its

the support staff for

woodworking centre. poon campus has received sev-) The equipinent will help the feral new pieces of woodworking si students by decreasing the backequipment from the Guelph camlog on most of the machines. ^ ^ The equipment arrived in pus. The 13 pieces of shop equip- ^ August because the woodworking program will no longer be ment that have arrived at the woodworking centre are seen as offered at the Guelph campus. the

^

creativity

Association with

it

New equipment a benefit

Finlay

Business

He

retailing. But if more had marked up their books, the American text would have been used.

name of

estimated

Business student association creates By Sean

their

books, but not every student.

could not easily be applied to

here,” said

maximum.

willing to reimburse a

few students the cost of

and ordered the wrong book. Finlay contacted the bookstore and found out it would take the books back and return them to

-

drains away.

Finlay said the business depart-

ment was

the

built

chance to handle the water. Behind the student client services building in Lot 8, there is a diverter. During a heavy downpour, water comes out the sewer and

centre, Finlay said.

book. They went back too far

into the line to give the pipes a

covered with clean gravel.

the school past

ter

had

Next, pipes were laid

it’s

pumped underneath Door 5.

automatically

at a cost

of $87,417, said Putt.

west end of

the stu-

would have cost about $5,700 to do so. The book was American and

semester to find the

'

books and reimburse

retailing

book on their and decided to go back a

lists

'

because I Stephanie

dents. ITiose copies will proba-

college.

stands by the drain that controls the level of the pond and leads to an (Photo by Bryce wnson) underground water retention system.

my book my disk,’’

a

nor-

find the retailing

the

the

the

to

do with it?” One answer might be to pump the water into the pond behind the

Putt, director of physical resources,

me

ness department decided to take

got there.

densed into pne. A newer Canadian textbook was chosen to accommodate the change. The bookstore could not

OVERFLOW — David

some week to

were

there

For the few students who had marked up their books, the busi-

course had recently been con-

water absorption rate so that it can’t handle all the run-off. In fact, the pond has to be pumped out during heavy periods of rain or

is

Proulx said.

mally

But according to Putt, since the pond was built (in 1967), silt, dead plant growth and leaves have sunk to the bottom and slowed the

the seal

you don’t

was shown on the bookstore’s list. But nobody is

course,” said Finlay.

What do you

at the

opened

cost $82.95

“There was a change

“probably we’re collecting, during a major storm, thousands

matter

before taxes and has a computer

sure

Putt,

There’s a drain

However,

if

if

problems. “It took

mar-

disc included,

you look at all the parking and all the buildings,” says

of gallons of water.

McKean said. “Even

comedy of

a

just

out that we’d

what,” marketing student Nancy

keting program co-ordinator.

off the property.

it

money back no

have a receipt.”

the

because bylaws restrict mixing sewage and rainwater, and the college isn’t allowed to dump “If

get our

ing course. errors,” said Steve Finlay,

sewer,

it

were

broken, and even

“It

on parking lots and buildings because it can’t be absorbed. The

week.

shocked this September to find out from their teacher they had purchased the wrong text book for their retail-

just set-

tles

The proper books

this

“Finlay worked

second-year marketing

students

problems and Conestoga has a complicated system set up to control

the publisher.

a hin-

can cause

it

listed in

site

Gobbo

said

is it

available

at

wouldn’t be

useful to students outside the business pro-

grams because of the content.


SPOKE, September

23, 1996

— Page 3

Business students to pay for unmarked computer paper By Sean

Finlay

S.

C

to deter students

viding business students their

Conestoga

Students

ing events.

school use.

Throughout the computer labs the school, the letter

C

will print

before to stop

personal use of the printers by

three-hole-punched paper,

which didn’t look presentable for resumes. But some students began bringing their

own paper

printers in those

to print

items like resumes, using the toner

Despite students providing their

provide their

own paper

own paper

assignments.

“We’re

to print resumes, the

Internet-related jobs likely to By

Peter Marval

maintenance of information flowing through the Internet will likely cause the Web-page designing field to blossom, according to a part-time

Web

in

every

expand

the

computer labs having no C-scoring equipment would get out,

events like almond sales and Biz

despite round-the-clock monitor-

party at selected bars throughout

ing

done by security and

student’s

who

checked. Those

who

are not busi-

have to look after our own,” “Funds are generated

said Babic.

by business students.

want

to think

don’t even

I

programming

Deb Kunsch, communications

other way,” he said. “Even the best pro-

dent body in the law-and-security adminis-

interactive

While the Internet industry may be blossoming, the goldmine was about a year ago. “We used to charge over $1,000 a page. Now, pages go for around $100,

The two The

television sets will

fastest available link to the Internet.”

may sound expensive, competition among Internet

While Kolenko said providers would bring costs down.

As well, newer software allows for improved ease of Web page creations. However, as the Internet becomes more

Conesto^ CoCkge

was

gram

welcome them and

to

call all

150

accepted into the pro-

them

invite

to

funds gen-

towards presentation equipment, like PowerPoint, a computer component designed to be used with

overhead projectors, dents are

He

if

the

said the

equipment would be on a sign-

out basis.

students own

booklet in their

own

the

new

students get along, the

each teacher

in

LASA.

“They described our personalities to a tee,” Hays said. Chairman of student services. Jack Fletcher, said Conestoga needs more of this student involvement and initiative. “If the student has a contact they can approach, everything will get better, "rhe idea of senior students helping out firstyear students is very beneficial.” One of the first-year students Camp and Duffy helped was Steve Perry. “They made me feel very welcome. 'They took the pressure off the first day of

school.” Perry said the tour, which consisted of one second-year student to five first-year students, helped with finding classrooms,

the faculty-produced handbook.

a small but thorny problem.

teachers.

about the social aspect.” What Hays said he found most interesting was that if faculty had asked the students to

‘Boof^tore

“'The faculty’s hands are tied

— they have

own tasks. Even if we failed, I still think we tried hard and I am proud of what we did.” their

The welcoming team planned a Canada’s Wonderland Day for Sept. 15, which is another switch from last year when the LASA student body did almost nothing together as a group.

THERE AND BACK AND THERE AND BACK AND THERE

AND BACK AND THERE AND BACK AND THERE AND

B(

CUSTOM CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS

CUSTOM CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS •

DUBLIN APPAREL

stu-

in favor.

The next thing the second-year students did was make up their own student handbook, which was completely different from

“I couldn’t be more pleased. I have been here a long time, and it’s tough enough to run the academic part without worrying

everyone can “In four to five afford to have the technology to have the

pages.

thing they did

who were

day one.

come with

this

and

Bob Hays, program co-ordinator for LASA, thought the idea was great from

years,

all

first

students

— no

Internet availability.

to create highly graphical

recruited about 25 students

a tour of the school on registration day. The important thing about the tour, said Camp, was that it was student-to-student

slow, will eventually return,” said He added that since the cost of

new

To help

got their idea rolling.

computers can sometimes deter people from getting on line, within three to four years

this year’s

booklet include a personality profile of

school.

Kolenko.

Systems Inc. That may change again. Kolenko said the basic knowledge of designing a Web page could be learned quickly. Artists and graphic designers have taken advantage of

Babic said

erated from fund-raising might go

idea. “It’s their

Camp., “'There were too many questions and not enough people to answer them.” Another problem Camp and Duffy found was that their class of about 150 broke off into little cliques within the first month of

are

was too

because everyone knows how to do it,” said Kolenko, who operates his own business in Kitchener called Solution Tech

The funds went mainly to the business computer

words.”

“Registration day last year sucked,” said

C-programming, UNIX, shell and Java. He said these skills would better prepare Web designers for the big changes the Internet will go through when Rogers Cable will introduce cable attachments to the Internet. Cable will increase’ receiving speeds up to -1 0 times what they are now. In addition. Bell Canada is also working on its existing system to increase speeds that may exceed those of Rogers. “Things are changing so rapidly that people who gave up on it before because it

available at people’s fingertips, and the need for more people to place information on the Net is growing,” Kolenko said.

fund-raising

do this, they wouldn’t have. “This came from the students.” Hays said the booklet was also a good

program (LASA).

tration

will not give

scripting

is

through

free to business students

By Jason Seads

skills will also

industry for 13 years, said the best behind-

“Information from anywhere in the world

said

year raised close to

labs.

LASA welcomes new

the-scenes Internet programming skills to

pers and magazines.

the year.

about the rest of the

school.”

Ryan Camp and Nicole Duffy decided something needed to be done about the stu-

learn

last

Bashes, basically an organized

uses the labs has a

student card out in the open to be

“We

$50,000

support

required that every business

It is

student

CBSA

more complex,

infor-

CBSA

executive.

ness students, are asked to leave.

even a business student’s, a percentage of tuition goes towards paying for computer and preequipment, toners punched paper, all available for

you the ability to query names on the Net that requires programming skills.” Kolenko, who has been in the computer

mation by replacing encyclopedias and becoming valuable additions to newspa-

how

Somewhere

a database for people’s

about a year and a half, is teaching a six-week night course on the basic fundamentals of preparing documents for browsing on the Net. He said the Internet is reducing many of

this to learn

they expect us

co-ordinator for the

Babic said he was concerned that information about the business

back the

gram

has been designing

methods of gathering

“Now

the dishes as well.”

tuition,

“Programming databases and

sites for

the traditional

do

facilities are tipping the scales

instructor at the college.

who

said

(the school) a free lunch,”

said Babic. to

for school providing

CBSA,

student and faculty use.

be required.

for better

Ignac Kolenko,

them

refined and people’s needs

Kolenko

The demand

too.

infamous letter C would still leave its mark. Stephan Babic, president of CBSA, found out later that this was going on and asked computer services to remove the engraved rollers from the printers the business students bought and owned. Babic said he feels the CBSA is

labs. tried

The

ended up being scored

labs

in

up on anything except those printed in the business and journalism

Conestoga

(CBSA)

their own computer tabs money from their fund-rais-

with

own

computer labs to alleviate the stress on the other computer labs open to the rest of the school. The C may have been removed from the business labs, but the school is expecting them now to

Business

Association

bought

from using

the paper the school provides for

using

doing the school a favor by pro-

school.

The

Last year, Conestoga began scoring the printer rollers with the letter

and equipment provided by the

large cafeteria

-

DOON campus

10:30AM

-

2;00PM

'

DUBLIN

APPARa

THERE AND BACK AND THERE AND BACK AND THERE

and Orders Taken on SEPTEMBER 24 & 25

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Additional cresting, options •

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CUSTOMIZED TO YOUR PROGRAM COURSE

CAN

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THE BOOKSTORE!

London $20 Sudbury $91 Ottawa $85

Other discounted destinations available.

Base Price includes the base jacket nylon lined with the Conestoga College

i

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to;

IN

Price does not include G.S.T.

Surf to http://www.greyhound.ca/ •

Ereyhound CANADIAN MADE

Deposit of 60% due

when

orderitig.

15 Charles Street West, Kitchener 741-2600


Page 4

— SPOKE, September

23, 1996

COMMENTARY Diana Loveless

Editor

News

Scott

editor

Student

Sean

editor

life

S. Finlay

Doug Coxson

Issues and activities editor

Advertising manager

Jason

Faculty supervisors

Jerry Frank

What

role does

&

SPOKE

published and produced weekly by journalism students of Conestoga is

mainly funded from September to

May by

the

Doon

Student

views of Conestoga College or the DSA.

SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements conDSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

Advertisers in tain the

in advertising

beyond the amount paid

for the space.

Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor at the above address by 9:30 a.m.

299 Doon Valley

Eric Whitfield

manager

is

essarily reflect the

Bruce Manion

Production manager

SPOKE College.

Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not nec-

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

Peter Marval

Photo editor

Circulation

SPOKE

Nixon

Dr.,

Kitchener, Ontario,

Romanko

Room 4B15

Monday. Submissions

N2G 4M4

tain

file

may

any libellous statements and

would be

helpful.

and should be

clearly

Submissions must not con-

be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

photograph).

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

Dick Scott

are subject to acceptance or rejection

written or typed; a WordPerfect 5.0

Conestoga play your

in

life?

By Jason Sends Is

there anything to

do

at

Conestoga other than

a desk?

sit at

Surely, as students pour from the front doors

seconds after classes end, some must wish something had happened worth telling your roommates about. Some must wish there was

something

school worth staying

at

for.

Well, one of the best kept secrets at Conestoga is

that there are a lot of activities

going on that

are worth staying for.

Although

seems

it

Conestoga’s

that

spirit flies

from the pond, the

every

ounce of

south with the ducks

truth is that school spirit

lurks in every student.

Students should ask themselves, ‘Am I part of something here? Am I part of a community at the college or am I a single entity, completely separate from those around me?’ The college is whatever students want it to be, and it seems many are choosing a lifeless structure of concrete and cafeteria food. Take note of what’s out there; read the posters in the halls.

The DSA’s nooners have been a success, and the movie night Sept. 9, where alcohol was served, was sold out. DSA president April-Dawn Blackwell says school spirit is growing. She says students are sick of doing nothing.

But being a commuter college, and one that draws from every age group, a unified and consistent student body, which is essential for event planning and advertising, is hard to establish. If previous years are any indication, Blackwell has a tough year ahead of her. School spirit goes beyond the DSA, however. There is not much they can do about abysmal sports event turnouts one of Cone-stoga’s most pitiful examples of school spirit. There is absolutely no reason for empty stands when any of the Condors’ teams are playing.

Perhaps the

DSA

should be involved

promotion because the stands look

American hockey presence a By Jason Romanko

A

strange twist of events unfolded during

game

a

featuring

Americans have

the

The U.S team became public enemy a spot usually reserved for the longtime rivals, the Russians. 1,

The

Canadians.

The bad being that the Americans always seem to take everything they want without asking. Taking without asking is very impolite to a nation that is known for

its

manners.

The Americans’ nasty in

winger Brett Hull with vicious screams

Network took over

of

“traitor, traitor,” at

Hull

who

has dual

Everytime Hull touched the puck, the crowd booed. Apparently fans are still hurt by Hull’s

game. The

Americans have also found a new passion for hockey, which is good and bad for

8,500 sell-out crowd at the Ottawa Corel Centre focused attention on left1

become

in recent years

the biggest threat to Canada’s

United States against the Russians. It wasn’t the outcome, which was a 5-2 win by the U.S, but whom the Ottawa fans were cheering for.

No.

and

neighbor.

last

year’s

trait

playoffs

was evident the Fox

when

the

Cup

Stanley

schedule, which held Canadian hockey

citizenship.

fans prisoner to horrific timetables.

decision not to play in the 1991 Canada

migrating south, to what seems a neverending market, leaving a feeling of

Cup

resentment throughout Canada.

for Canada; he instead chose the

Plus,

real reason, after considering all

for cheering for the Russians instead of the Americans, is the fact that the Americans are playing good hockey. the

possibilities

Nothing hurts more than the truth, and don’t want to face the idea of the Americans getting to be as good as we at

many

our sport. It was only a matter of time before the Americans figured out what a great game hockey is. The more Americans interested in hockey means the more people playing, the more people playing means more talent

being developed.

The sheer populations numbers can make you start to sweat. Canada can produce an abundance of talent with a popu30 million. But how ^any talented hockey players can be produced from a population close to 280 lation of close to

Canadian franchises have been

million?

My

advice? Try not to think about

it.

to be

empty

Students should have Internet access

students

One long

bright spot bn the sports horizon

is

By Peggy Sue

snowfall of the year in your area

mal and rather boring event, but

Ironside

As

of Cone-

stoga College, students

play, intramurals are a lot of fun,

pay tuition for an edu-

list

do,

it

As

for

is

and while a

lot

more students don’t sign up. activities, nobody can say there

lot to

should

surprising

catictfi

DSA

include Internet access on campus.

aren’t enough.

Between

the

movie

nights, nooners

and winter and pub nights, the DSA has an event planned nearly every week. And don’t forget the Biz Bashes. And if students don’t want to participate in

events, they are

DSA may

welcome

to start a club,

which

help finance.

no reason to leave this school at end of the day without having done someis

that

Internet access links students with other

carnival, bus trips, Octoberfest

There

clients

really

people across the country, across the street, and around the world. TTie value of

It

includes working with

others and seeing what they do.

With the Internet everyone learns from

What you have

thing other than stare at a chalkboard and duti-

as important as

them. It

is

the

to offer to others

is

just

what you may get from

interconnected

Internet that gives learning its

nature

of

on the Internet

active, participatory quality.

For example, you

may

a nor-

you are

them.

think the

first

how

learn

to

the Internet, ple

on

We

use the tools for exploring information and the peo-

its

it.

are an information economy, and

The learning experience students gain on the Internet provides them with the

new information technologies are changing the way business is done. You encounter two kinds of things on

opportunity to be taken seriously.

the

They have

instant access to

hundreds of educational databases, newspapers, maps and photographs. They can quiz experts, take part in discussion groups and use handy Internet search tools.

The advantage of

studies incorporated Internet-based experiences is the outcome of the work.

The online forum provides a way, or set of ways, in which to see things differently than we do now. With the recent surge in interest by business and government, the Internet net-

work will be of major importance tomorrow’s world.

As

a citizen of tomorrow,

Internet: people and information. Both can help you progress in an academic career.

The people on more than eager

the Internet are often to help out, providing

answers to questions and engaging

in

thoughtful discussion.

with

their experiences with others.

fully take notes.

Conestoga has something for everybody, students just need to make the small effort to see the community around them.

much

the Internet goes

farther than simply accessing resources

of information.

is

if

connected to people who have never seen snow, what you have to say will mean a

the

of sports students can sign up for at the intramural level. No matter what your level of

the

Russians over our longtime ally

World Cup of Hockey division final in Ottawa on Sept. 8, in the

would only go to one game, they may enjoy themselves enough to go again, but even one game seems too much to ask.

the

But the

believe there are some underlying reasons for the sudden support of the I

in sports

for another year. If

American squad.

reality

you need

to

There are clusters of resources or tools on the Internet that serve much the same purpose as their traditional library counterparts.

There are access:

room

five different

rooms a user can

the card catalog, the reference

the reading room, the media room, and the electronic stacks. ,

Almost

all

the Internet sites that you’ll

encounter have information available to

free public access.

for


SPOKE, September

— Page 5

23, 1996

COMMENTARY Discrimination on any level not acceptable By Linda

workplace there

Reilly

job discrimination; they

is

are often not hired even though their cre-

There is discrimination on all levels that’s a very

who

than co-workers doing the

for

tolerance

little

people

Overweight people get passed over for promotions at work and make less money

but society has

They often

over-

are

weight.

of them

people appear to be out of control.

overcharged.

to be that

if

can’t control his weight, he can’t

a person

manage

a

who experience daily basis.

dainful.

intestinal

life,

Some

In short,

Children find

Who

fat

New

is it

they need

eat in a restaurant

too soft a

is

— those

time ago, there was a series

York Times on obesity.

What

word

say they are tortured on a

taken on formerly obese

people funny. In the

A

in the

survey was

women who had

really stood out

Bourassa gave into cries

Journal, read the .series and had a

pound

Canadian

was

that

over 50 per

port

Canada

within

rights of French-

is

common-

becoming

nightmare.

being

Many

may

be surprised to learn that in 1991, the United Nations ruled that Canada was violating Article 19 of

people

Covenant on Civil and Rights, which guarantees free-

the International Political

dom

of expression.

The

UN

funeral

ruled on the case of a

Quebec

home owner charged under

Quebec’s

Bill

refusing to

101

language law with

remove English from a

busi-

In the early

1960s, Quebec

nationalists,

committed to a sovereign Quebec, demanded from the federal government more recognition for the French language Canada.

in

Then prime minister Lester Pearson created a commission on bilingualism and biculturalism (B and B) and, as an olive branch to nationalists in Quebec, appoint-

ed Andre Laurendeau as chairman. Laurendeau wanted to create a French nation within Canada, equal or superior to the rest of Canada.

In

decried the value of the act saying

failure

’70s,

the

Quebec premier Robert

did

for

more

The conclusion people and

it

is

our society hates

that

feels entitled to participate

prejudice that, as Lampert puts

in a

it,

par-

racism and religious bigotry.

Canada

is

a country that prides itself on

handicapped and

.sensitive to the

to

the homeless, but the overweight continue to

be targets of cultural abuse.

who

can see that a lane

is

closed and

Ontario

I

aware

lengths ahead of everyone else, saving them

despise

about 10 seconds.

car,

trapped

Don’t get

the

in

climate

stifling

my only

attention to

supposed to be the industrial backbone of Canada. So why is the highway such a pain

miles.

to

is Ontario’s marketplace suprebound when the main means of

transport operates so poorly.

There are two main problems with the highway that need serious improvement; the road itself and the drivers who use it. Drivers can be categorized into several groups: First, there are the day-dreamers, who drive along in the passing lane (more

federal spending with-

in the province.

This response only increased the credibility of the separatists with Quebec voters and they became increasingly bold in

often than not with a turn signal flashing), but who insist on driving more slowly than

oppressing English within Quebec. The world now reads of Howard

the flow of traffic.

Galgonov, appealing to U.S. representatives for support to use English within how embarrassing for Canada

they force everyone else to swerve over and

Canadians. Isn’t it time Canadian politicians started standing up for values that serve all one of which should be the Canadians right to use the language of your choice?

passing each other only

These drivers should be charged because pass using the right lane.

Second, are the truckers hill.

The problem

who

when

insist

on

driving up a

trucks

lose

their

And

If

anything, their

At

maximum.

maximum

speed limit is hard to reach when construction has the highway closed down to one lane and backed up for a

It’s understandable that highways need maintenance, but why can’t the construction be done overnight, when there are fewer drivers?

And, when you finally get up to where the supposed construction is, what you usually find is workers standing around watching the cars going by. Highway 401 was built for one purpose: to act as a high-speed conduit for travel and

commerce. The problem is, it isn’t working. Especially where it’s needed most. Near metropolitan Toronto, the 401 is earning a reputation as one of the worst highways

around and justifiably so. Perhaps once all the construction, including the addition of Highway 407, is completed, the 401 will once again be a viable

means

for transportation.

now however, I find myself travelon smaller highways whenever possiNot for the better scenery but, ironical-

Right ling

pass ends up being more like a crawl. Most annoying of all however, are the dri-

ble.

travelling

have no problem

1

least they pay what they’re doing, and keep

the flow of traffic to a

up a slope and the

momentum

is,

wrong,

efforts deserve respect.

wish was to any highway. be on a different highway Highway 401 is supposed to be the backbone of Ontario, shipping goods with ease to all nearby major markets. And Ontario is as a traffic jam,

me

with aggressive drivers.

And how

Ottawa Quebec’s

to

never have to suffer.

have to merge, but pass everyone by and wait until the last possible second before cutting in. This gets them a few car

fully

how much

posed

separatists,

favorably

responded

Overweight people endure the kind of openly contemptuous behavior most people

vers

to use?

proved Canada wanted to

oppress Quebec. To appease the

became

known

In an attempt to show nationalists that works, Brian Mulroney federalism appointed Lucien Bouchard Canadian ambassador to France. After the failure of the Meech Lake Accord, Bouchard said its

eastern

to 1

ing

later it

People

it.

Highway 401. As I sat in my unmov-

nothing to further French in Quebec.

demands

ness sign.

Quebec

in

was during a recent

of

issue.

in

commented on

her cart and

It

and English-speaking

forces

they disap-

that they

as hoped, the act led to acrimo-

Nationalist

know

her

overweight person expects to be treatbecause they are more than, but they are every day.

allels

By Bryce Wilson

people. Rather than a unifying force in

language

let

No

She said she was alternately treated as People snorted. She said grocery .shopping was a

the

nious civic and political debate over the

to

her.

invisible or regarded as a spectacle.

that

Canadian politicians have caused this curious state by following a policy of appeasement when dealing with Quebec nationalists over the past 35 years.

entitled

felt

proved of

fat

the

Canada

people snick-

ered and passed comments. 'I’hese people

expect to be hated.

trip

place.

her from their cars.

Many reasons to hate the 401

offi-

The B and B commission resulted in Official Languages Act, guaranteeing

bodies for supto use English

tional

at

In a restaurant, well-dres.sed

ed- less than

was

that English

passed legislation making French the cial language of Quebec.

citizens

interna-

to

150-

constructed as an experi-

suit

fat

hurled insults

She lived in the suit for one week. Lampert said nothing could have prepared her for the shame and disrespect imposed upon the overweight. She said she had expected to be embarras.sed and to feel ashamed but she didn’t

a threat to the survival of the province and

appealing

Home

People actually watched what she put

bypass surgery.

speaks for Canadian values?

By Rick Kew

again.

fat

ment.

job.

overweight people often get

Discrimination

be a good boss, etc. overweight people lack credibility. They become targets of ridicule and the people around them become blatantly dis-

job, a

same

when

scrutinized and salespeople take advantage

about control, and ostensively, overweight

The thinking appears

get ignored

what they

service;

our society has a thing

Unfortunately

rather be deaf, blind,

or have a limb amputated than be

Leslie Lampert, editor of Ladies

dentials are good.

given

would

cent said they

ly,

for

more speed.

cafeteria food appeals to different tastes

Campus

by Trish Jackson Students surveyed during the second week satisof classes showed they are generally fied with

Doon campus’s main

cafeteria,

although they did provide some suggestions.

social “I think it’s great,” said first-year

are services student Jennifer Fenton. There and reaa lot of healthy choices. It’s fresh

Jennifer

Shane

sonably priced.”

Fenton

Plante

Fenton,

who

usually

chooses from the

refilled salad bar, suggests the salad bar be through the lunch period. On days when she scheduled at 12:30, she often

has lunch choices finds the salad bar empty and the

Shane Plante, ics

in his first

year of electron-

engineering technology,

is

impressed by

the cafeteria’s variety.

“You can get what you want,” he said. “I so it’s good that there s

like to eat healthy,

more than Jill

just Harvey’s.”

McClintock, a first-year law-and-secu-

McClintock

administration student, usually buys muffins or salad, but because she’s a vege-

rity

tarian, she feels there is not “It’s limited for

limited.

Jill

enough

variety.

me,” said McClintock.

“It

Mike

Qerime

Venning

Brandt

Alievski

Dooners, however, will prepare vegetarian pizza if it is ordered first thing in the mornRenate ing, said Dooners shift supervisor Rath well. There are also vegetarian subs available, she said.

needs more vegetarian cuisine.”

John Kast, district manager of Beaver Foods, said though he recognizes students’ for speneeds, there is not enough demand dishes. cialty items such as vegetarian

Matt

The

not make extra time and cost involved does it feasible, he said.

Third-year nursing student Matt Venning, the satisfied with the food and selection in main cafeteria, but said, “It is too expensive first-year

favors the cafeteria’s

Taco

is

also prices.

“I think with the

amount of

traffc here

they could price coffee lower,” Brandt said. Qerime Alievski, a visitor from Waterloo

LASA

student,

Bell,

because

selection.”

buy every day.”

Mike Brandt,

complaint

campus’s food-and-beverage management program, who was dining at Harvey’s, said “Waterloo cafeteria sucks.” She said of Doon’s cafeteria, “It’s alright. There’s more

is

to

they are easy to sneak into class.” He feels there is enough selection, but his biggest


0

.

— SPOKE, September

Page 6

Project provides

23, 1996

Recreation leadership student wins concert tickets By

Scott

didn’t have a chance of winning.

Nixon

12 was a lucky day for

Sept.

Conestoga student Marsha Rudy.

industry training

The

first-year recreation leader-

won two tickets to the Smashing Pumpkins con-

ship student Sept. 14

By Wendy Cummins will begin

velopment program

campus

Stratford

was

really surprised,”

Rudy

winning the contest. it

was

iron-

won because when

she

filling

she

out the ballot for the

contest her friends told her she

undertak-

Sept.

14,

was impressed with how wellaudience was. behaved the “Nothing got out of hand.” The Smashing Pumpkins have been plagued by controversy on their current tour.

On May

1

1, at

a

Smashing Pumpkins concert in Dublin, a 17-year-old girl was crushed to death in the mosh

pit.

FAG

en by Conestoga with

Bearings

was

ic that

Technical training for industry is a pilot project

i

concert as amazing and said she

She said she thought

the

at

concert

Rudy also won a copy of the latest Smashing Pumpkins CD, Mellon Collie and the Infinite

said, of

Sept. 27.

in

described the

before

“I

attending a training and de-

Smashing Pumpkins

cert in Toronto.

Sadness.

Ten new students

Kast said the contest was held in colleges in Ontario but only some colleges were selected to award concert tickets. Rudy, who had never seen the several

Taken

in Stratford.

over a 16- week period, the course will be a combination

of theory and practice, said John Anderson, program coordinator.

“They can see why they need the theory and apply it,” he said. The program also offers students an opportunity to work in the industiy in a co-op will Students placement. and FAG Bearings. For four weeks students will have in-class studies. The remaining 12 weeks will be in industry, although students

be

in class

once a week

during that time.

The

students sent to

1

Bearings will be

split

company

weeks they

will

Blackwell and John Kast, district manager for Beaver Foods, draw the winning ballot for the Smashing Pumpkins concert. (Photo by scott Nixon)

Tell us!

Tutoring

Cenlrfeu^ by Ooon StudM AMOcWion

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A TUTOR?

.

.

rotate

to

STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS

co-op,” said Anderson.

“It’s

a great improvement.”

program was introduced between Conestoga and Linamar Corp. in Guelph last year, although it was on a much larger scale. Stacey McSadzen, training similar

A PEER TUTOR IS A 2"^ OR 3’^'^ YEAR STUDENT WHO IS TRAINED TO HELP OTHER STUDENTS EXPERIENCING ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES. TUTORING OFFERS EXCELLENT JOB EXPERIENCE AND EXTRA INCOME.

ple

farther

come

street.”

Anderson said there are more lay-offs in Stratford than in recent years, which

why

is

program will do approached the Stratford Training Network to see if the program would be well.

He

“It is the

to

do

kind of thing

we

students will receive formal tho.se

processes

have been set up. “They won’t do production; it is training,” Anderson said. A lot of people have been calling about the program. "People have great work histories but they don’t have current skills,” he said. “We get quite a few students from the mid-life bracket with 10 to 15 years

work experience.”

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Conestoga Shiners you raised

$1275 for CF Research

to stay current in

workplace and the industry,” he said. While at FAG Bearings the as

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the

training

FROM

AND WARRANTY FEES

the

of benefit.

need

•DAILY WEAR

out

ahead than peo-

we’d get off the

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and development co-ordinator of Linamar, said that the program has worked out well

much

CONTACT

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“We’ve done a lot of programs in the past, but without the

^ REPLACEMENT NATIONAL BRAND

ENTHUSIASM

80% OR BETTER IN THE COURSE (S) YOU ARE INTERESTED IN TUTORING

for them. “Students

beef with

Spoke?

another department.

A

Got a

— DSA President April-Dawn

FAG

among

departments within the and every two

five

A WINNER

between the college

rotate

will

WE HAVE

The sun didn't shine but you did! Thank you for enduring the weather! Your support is appreciated!

S

u d e

t

Food Fall

t

Bank

Food Drive

Sept.

25 -27

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We need your support to replenish our cupboards.

Ponations of non-perishable foods are needed. Prop off at

PSA or Student Services Office.

I


SPOKE, September

— Page 7

23, 1996

STUDENT LIFE As unpredictable The

3 Canadians By Linda

— he

do anything!”

That was one of the lines the 3 Canadians shouted as they read the free nooner sign above the stage in the Sanctuary while entertaining students Sept. 9.

Their infectious youth and ener-

gy

finally stirred a rather sedate

crowd.

Amber, Derek Flores and North Darling do improvised comedy, or in the words of Amber Eric

“we make

When

the shit up!”

mance, what happened

Ray

to

member

of the

group, Flores said he only tours

with them in Australia. There

with

fun

four-man

a

Australia’s

it’s

as

trio,

Herald Sun labelled

them.

The group five-month

NOONER FUN

— The

and

Flores, North Darling

Sanctuary Sept.

New

1 1

3 Canadians, from Eric

Amber

Derek

to right,

entertained students (Photo

.

in

Unda

the

Reilly)

years ago, said the college dis-

you see new faces around the college this fall, you might want some of to take a second look those faces have come from farther than you would imagine. This September, 35 students from around the globe began their studies at Conestoga, due to the the of efforts recruitment hitemational Education Office. The largest group of students has come from Hong Kong, Thailand and Pakistan. There are others from Botswana, Brazil, the If

Islands, China,

Germany, South Macao,

bia,

ColomJapan,

India,

Korea

and

tiguishes itself

by the

vice

its

it

gives to

level of ser-

students,

which

includes everything from picking them up from the airport to helping them find housing. The idea to recruit international students to Conestoga was created with two goals in mind. One was to give Canadian students the

opportunity to study alongside international

students

because

probably in their lifetime, be doing a lot of work with international contacts,” they “are going

to,

Rechsteiner said.

The other was

to introduce inter-

national students into the nity financially.

“The

commu-

internation-

students do not receive any the from subsidy

Trinidad.

al

Larry Rechsteiner, the director of the International Education

financial

began acc-

government,” Rech“They pay full fees. They also pay for accommodation and recreation.” Conestoga offers special courses for new students who may need

epting international students five

help with their English. They

Office,

anticipates

more new

least

at

20

international students

beginning classes in January. Rechsteiner, who has run the office since the college

Canadian

steinner said.

He shoots

in

from a

Australia

^

group

they

said

tried

Flores said.

“personality

According to Flores, the trio has been together three years now but has been doing improv for six. Originally from the Loose Moose Theatre Company in Calgary,

it

wasn’t until the

trio

went to Australia in 1993 and was dubbed the 3 Canadians, that they decided to team up. “We needed a van to get around Flores

“so

said,

we

decided to form a group.”

comedy when

Improvisation everyone’s

isn’t

taste, but

these

comic improvisers joined forces, they combined 20 years experience at the Loose Moose Theatre Company. Amber, according to Elisabeth Lopez’s

article

magazine,

is

in

the

the

Age

happy victim of

He

told

came

as a

attention deficit disorder.

huge

relief,

EG

but not soon enough to

him from being expelled

nooner

from school and feeling

spend five months a year there “to escape the Canadian winters,”

stop

The

he medication for a week but then decided to go back to the

The

God gave

him.”

3 Canadians have quickly

gained

reputation

a

for

shows and pulling off

doing

incredible

stunts according to the article.

Comfortable on both an indoor and outdoor stage, the 3 Canadians have toured many street festivals in Canada, Australia and the US. Most recently they wrote and performed their own version of the 1959 Cecil B. Demille film Ben Hur. According to their press release, the “epic” is performed on stage in 75 minutes with bad puppets and even worse costumes. It

was a

sell-out

at

the

level course called special

Eng-

Shinerama

’96

Melbourne

Comedy

International

Festival,

both

studies course at Conestoga, an international student

must have a

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 400. To enter the language option course, a score of

480

For admittance

into a regular

is

required.

course, the student must have a

score of 500 or more. “It

is

somewhat

unique

Ontario,” Rechsteiner said.

in

“We

have students attending the [language option] program that go to Conestoga College and to the University of Waterloo and some go to the University of Guelph. It accepted by

tions

as

all

three institu-

meeting their English

requirements.”

...

1

As

unpredictable as Canadian

Canadians will condo uni-gigs until their

politics, the 3

tinue

to

return to Australia in ’97.

*96

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Go Inc. - Internet Cafe. Home Health Care Depot Larry's Sunoco

O'Tooles Roadhouse

Rodeway Suites Shell Canada Sports World The Condor Roost Tilden Rent a Car Winks on Pioneer Drive Winks on Doon Village Road

Thank you

for your

support! arena Sept. 13. He and other Bordcondfer attempts to stop the puck at the rec centre (Photo by Bryce wiison) Friday. every hockey intramural play employees Allen-Bradley

in

Australia.

studies and a two-semester

advanced-English course called general arts and science (language option). The courses prepare international students for the regular stream at school. To enter the special English

’96

Adelaide Fringe Festival and the

Yuk Yuk's

Rolf

like a ter-

article said

welcomed

include an upper-intermediate-

is

love

at free

rible person.

to return in February ’97.

lish

lounge

Australia and plan to continue to

her that the diagnosis

i

f

in student

where they appeared at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. They already have plans

international students

By Jennifer Dougall

Cayman

left

just returned stint

up

Australia,”

asked, after the perfor-

Gurrie, the fourth

it

The

Reilly

“Free Nooner, free Nooner didn’t

ham

as politics


6

)

— SPOKE, September 23, 1996

Page 8

STUDENT LIFE Ouch! Navels and nipples pierced By Eric

placing small metal balls under

Whitfield

the foreskin of the penis.

A man

in

Sage

Nnuba

with an iodine-based solution and then marks the spot with a surgical pen.

Sage said he has taken Tai Chi and uses his training to help the customers relax. He tells the customer to take deep breaths and gives them a

is

with the help of many types of

performed throughout world and in our society. One of the examples showed was the Okee Pa ceremony, which was done by Sioux Indians. It involves a person being suspended piercings

warning breath. When the customer exhales his final breath, he through the a needle sticks

the

his flesh for

by

one

marked area. Sage only uses disposable needles,

to five hours.

The pain supposedly puts son

a

ceremony

in

The most

which

for

painful piercings are of

the nipple, any cartilage, the nos-

septum and the genital Sage said. “The more you know what to expect, the harder it is to sit down in the chair.” Sage the

tril,

area.

our society include nipple

piercing

because people can

said,

used.

per-

formed in India, involves a man suspended by hooks in his flesh until the hooks rip out of his body. Sage said. Piercings which are more com-

mon

he

get infected with viruses such as Hepatitis B when stud guns are

the per-

in a trance.

The Sadhu,

men and women,

optimum time

said, the

ond piercing

increases sensitivity in that

is

for a sec-

right after the first,

right after endorphin

area.

is

released

into the body.

Other types of piercing include; navel piercing

the

piercing, he first cleans the area

students in the Sanctuary what involved in body piercing. illustrated,

when he does

said,

any fash-

Mike Sage, owner of Body Piercing in London, showed

Sage

like

a sex toy built in.”

ion.”

a slide show, the

It is

said. “Ifs

condom. Sage

a ribbed

with 10 extra holes in his body told Conestoga students on Sept. 10, “It’s cool to be able to

manipulate your body

The crowd saw what a piercing was like first hand when he

- usually done on

females - cheek piercing, tongue

which Sage said gives the person something to play with in their mouth, nose-bridge piercing and septum piercing, where

demonstrated two nipple piercings on his friend Corey, who didn’t wish to have his last name used.

the ring sits under the bone.

for a fee.

piercing,

He

Two

of the slides, which caused moans in the audience, were of a penis piercing, called the Prince

and a clitoris piercing, which went through the hood and Albert,

is

called a triangle piercing.

Another example of a piercing, which he talked about involved

then did piercings for students

Vicki Kane, a second-year recreation-leadership student, had her navel pierced. Kane said she did not know why she had it done but

^ Mike Sage, pierces the nipple

PAINFUL!

withheld, during a demonstration

in

of his friend Corey, the Sanctuary on Sept. 1 0.

Professional

Body

it is was cheaper than usual and Sage seemed like he knew what he

was doing. Sage said he has been a profes-

navels.

PERSONALS RIDE

SERVICES

BOARD

LOST/FOUND HOUSINC A/AILABLE/WANTED AD WORDNC: FIRST TWO WORDS WILL APPEAR BOLD (PLEASE

PRWT)

will

Board

NAME: TELEPHONE NUMBER^

Taes5Qy, Sept. 3.A

LESS

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DEADUhC: BY THURSDAY AT NOON. 10 DAYS PRIOR TO

Want

to

Advertise

Spoke’s

on

words; $1

Aids Awareness

Week qON

5;^^

^

classifieds.

fourth floor.

$3

for additional

or less.

Be Confirmed

the

Pick up ad forms outside office

to

PUBLICATION.

announce a meeting? in

of

Meetins

DATE TO RUN:. PAW> AMT.:

WORDS OR

to sell?

1

Spoke for

30

0 words

name

Directors

UP TO 30 WORDS»$3, FOR EACH ADPmONALIO

Have something

his last

(Photo by Eric whittieid

only pierce ears, noses or

COST:

SMALL pwrr SPOKE RESERVES THE R»CHT TO EDfT OK REJECT MATUUALWHKH tS PEIMED TO K RACIST, XXtST, LBELOOS OR OEKMSIVE. SPOKE ACCOOS NO UABRJTY FOR MCORRECT PtSEKTIOH BEYOND TE* St»Va OCOUPSA

have

Piercing.

His clientele has ranged from 1 to 68 years of age. Sage said. For customers 16 and under he said there must be parental consent, the parent must be present and he

HELP WANTED

to

body piercer for two years and previously graduated from the of School Musafar Fakir

SECTION: (CIRCLE ONE)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

who asked .

sional

CLASSmEDAP FORM FOR SALE

in Sanctuary

Sept* 30 Safe Hat Day

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Information Displays Red Ribbon Campaign Guest Speaker * Prizes & More

VtO


SPOKE, September

23, 1996

— Page 9

STUDENT LIFE Poor promotion and threat of rain hurts Sportsarama By Eric

Whitfield

Conestoga students were getting heads bashed by clubs

their

Sept.

1

Tlie

1.

DSA set up the Joust and the

Bungee Run outside centre

as

the recreation

of Sportsarama,

part

bungee cord making running to the end difficult. Softball was another scheduled which was cancelled event because of the possibility of rain. The only other scheduled event

was

which Ladouceur

volleyball,

said he didn’t even

Krista Ogg,

which involved two other sports-

know

about.

vice-president of

DSA,

related activities.

operations for the

The Joust involved two people beating each other with padded clubs in an attempt to knock their

were not as many people as hoped. “The weather scared peo-

opponents off their air mattress

was provided

to soften

blows to

the head.

Justin Ladouceur, a second-year

recreation leadership student, said “it

was enjoyable;

tact

I

ple away.”

Chris Kroeker,

onto an

pillar

below. Protective gear

liked the con-

and the competition.”

The Bungee Run consisted of two lanes on an air mattress.

Two

people raced to the end of the mattress to grab a piece of with velcro wrapped plastic

around it. They were tied to the back of the air mattress with a

said there

DSA

promotions

ON THE RUN

Chris Kroeker, left, DSA promotions assistant, races against Todd Mclver, a second-year recreational leadership student and a member of the student athletic committee, on the

bungee run during Sportsarama on Sept.

1 1

(Photo by Eric whitiieid)

.

assistant, said another reason peo-

away was because there was not enough promotion. More promotion went towards the movie Twister and the Ashley Macisaac concert. Kroeker and Ogg recommended ple stayed

Toronto Blue

the event be held earlier in the day

next year. People were driving by and leaving school when they saw the

two

,vs

air mattresses.

Despite the few people, Ogg said, they were still having fun with those

who

Baltimore

attended.

FRIDAY. SEPT. 27

GAME TIME

7:35

BUS DEPARTS AT 5:00 PM

NOW ONLY $25 Conestoga Qay

Si

includes transportation

lesbian p^sociation

Come Out and

DSA Office

Tickets available at the

Celebrate!

On Wednesday, September 25*, in room 2B02 (Student Services contact Joan Magazine at 4:30 p.m. For more information

Office)

in the

Student Services Office

(All positive attitudes

welcome)

CCMX CRKZ

Thank you Volunteers CtAOutcC

ilAc

Conestoga’s best mix Country, Rock, New music

0^

to^

t(y

^WeictMtC.

-

News

bf)

2 c/2

c o

U

12:30

radio Alternative,

o o

Weather

0)

Wednesdays 11:30

Conestoga’s rock

cd

pr

Sports

Rock and on Fridays 11:30

Dance

tAc dicccc^ 0^

Program Director

(f^ Mc!

-

for

CCMX

Program Director

Kathyrn Magee

Music Director

for

-

Laura

McGugan

-

News and

nut>sA

12:30 for

CRKZ

Julie Beitz

Music Director for CRKZ - Regan Bowers Announcer for CRKZ

CCMX

Rhonda Biener Announcer for CCMX

-

-

-

Dance

Sports Director

-

Lisa

Schmuck - Wendy Haennel

Promotions, Sales and Creative Production

Production

-

Oliver Esteves

Trevor Pheffer


.

— SPOKE, September 23, 1996

Page 10

SPORTS

Condors By Ross McDermott

Woodstock Navy Vets

battle

hop off of the boards behind the Condor’s net and bounced onto the stick of Drew Campbell who slammed it in for the go-ahead goal. With less than two minutes remaining in the second period,

scored on another powerplay.

strange

The Navy Vets would not be The Conestoga Condors came from behind twice to tie the Junior C Woodstock Navy Vets 5-5 in exhibition hockey Sept. 15 at the Woodstock Community Complex. Condor Chris Punlabeski opened the scoring with a power-play goal

however, they silenced as answered with three quick goals to take a one goal lead at the end of the first period.

The second period was quiet until the 10-minute mark when

a loose puck in front of the

Jason Cartier fired a point shot that slipped through the sprawling Navy Vet goaltender’s legs, tying

Navy Vet’s net. The Condors jumped ahead by two goals mid-way through the first period when Rich Duench

game at 3-3. The Navy Vets answered at the 15-minute mark of the second period when the puck took a

early in the first period, chipping in

Navy

the

Vets scored again on a

tight-passing two-on-one play that

with the puck Condor’s net. The Condors dominated in the third period. Rich scored his second goal

ended

the

game

to bring

the

in

the play

net-minder. It was the second time these two teams met in exhibition play. On Sept. 14 the Condors came back from a three-goal deficit to defeat

Navy Vets 6-5. Condor coach Tony Martindale said he was generally pleased with

the team’s performance, but said he thinks the players need to focus more on team playing. “We didn’t play a total team game. There was stuff going on after

the

whistle that

too pleased about.

game

playing a team

I

that

He in

did concede

the

season,

sometimes get

it was still early and teams can

distracted.

of the

qON

to

DSA organizes golf tournament The term, Texas Scramble, also known as a best-ball tournament

casting student, said they use this

involves a team of four golfers.

format

assistant

stuff

shouldn’t be happening.”

the

By Jason Romanko

wasn’tjL

When you’re^

Duench

Condors

the

within one, and just passed the 10minute mark of the period Dale Henery scored on a floating point shot that handcuffed the Navy Vet

the

draw

to a

and second-year broad-

impopfeant DSA naiabeps

^

'

|

i

Forty-four Conestoga students

and faculty turned out for the annual Doon Student Association’s Texas Scramble golf tournament on Sept. 13 at the Doon Valley Golf Club.

Each golfer

used because it speeds the game up and lowers the score. Chris Krocker, promotions assistant, along with Harris organized the tournament.

team shoots and the best shot out of the four is used by the team for the next shot, and so on for all 1 8 holes. Steve Harris, DSA promotions in the

is

tournament went to the team of Wayne Hussey, executive director of colplace

First

lege

the

in

community

relations.

The

team included: Chris Anderson, accounting; Brennen Smith, mechanical engineering technician and Jeremy Vanl-aecke, accounting.

was a

“It

of fun,

lot

was very

I

pleased about meeting three great

Hussey

guys,”

The

said.

I

office

(S19) 74S-S131

fax

(519)

7^S-6727

hotline

(519)

748-5220 extgPSA

e-mail

listen@doonsa.com

WWW

www.doonsa.com

rain

proved to be a bit much, but Hussey said he still had a great

They

time.

finished

We want to

tourna-

the

ment with a score of 6-under-par.

hear from you!

Jason Lane, engineering; "rodd

Brandon Flood, business and Aaron Fitzgerald, Strauss, business;

business,

came

in

second with a

score of 5-under-par.

Yah Yah Yah!

The team of Ian Read, marketJeremy Snider and Scott McGwen, both of woodworking ing;

and John Tarantello, accounting, in third with a score of 4-

came

Oaober

llth-19th, 1996

under-par.

TEED OFF

— Steve

Harris, organizer of the golf tournament, Doon Valley. (Photo by sean s. Finiay)

drives the ball to the third hole at

Women’s having their league-games rained

women’s

Snider, business.

softball record first victory

By Rick Kew After

The longest shot of the tournament went to Dan 'Thornhill and closest to the tee went to Jeremy

first

two

out,

the

inning, with the score tied 3-3,

the Kitchener under- 19s, 5-0, in

Remmert

an exhibition

forced the sun to shine

game

Sept.

1 1

on the Condors as she drove in the winning run with a stand-up

for the

team

double.

they

victory of the edging out the

Condor coach Yvonne Broome game was a repeat of last year, when many games were

Fleming Auks and host team, the

said the

decided by clutch seventh-inning

Tournament. The men’s soccer team was not

varsity

softball

recorded their

first

season. Sept.

15,

Canadore Panthers 4-3. The Condors opened the scoring in the bottom of the second inning on a run by Jill Kuntz, a first-year visiting

hitting.

Remmert, a second-year law and on

This was the third win

this

year

women’s soccer team

defeated

the

Durham College Lady

as

Sanford

Sir

Lords, to

win the Kick-off Extravaganza

as

fortunate

losing

their

games

recreation leadership student.

security student, three-for-three

against

The North Bay Panthers fought back and scored twice in the third

the day, with a homer, a double, and a single, was named player of the game.

Fleming Colleges by 3-0 scores. The men’s soccer team was to host Fanshawe Sept. 18 St. Clair Sept. 21 and plays Seneca Sept. 28 in an exhibition game. The women’s soccer team was to

inning and once in the fourth, taking a two-run lead into the fifth inning.

With the dark skies threatening with rain, the Condors held the visitors scoreless in the top of the fifth.

As some

spectators pulled their right-

Shelley Remmert took advantage of the wind, blasting a drive to deep right-centre, notchfielder

home

run of the season for the Condors. ing the

In

the

first

bottom of the seventh

Sir Sanford

,

The women’s

softball

team was

to play Seneca College Sept. 18 and is scheduled to host Mohawk College Oct. 2.

Broome Sept.

hoods up for protection,

Durham and

13,

said rained-out

against

the

games

Durham

College Lady Lords and Sept. 14 against the Loyalist College Lancers, will likely be rescheduled as doubleheaders when

Conestoga hosts those teams in the

the

week,

women’s soccer team defeated

action

at

home

against St.

and on Sept. 24 they host Lambton. The hockey team opened their Clair,

Navy

Vets, a Jr

C

Greg Nichol, a

team. first-year

com-

puter student, turned a hat trick including the winning goal with 1

KITCHENER-WATERLOO

Sept. 21

exhibition season Sept. 14, with a 6-5 victory over the Woodstock

later

season.

In other varsity action last

see

:02 remaining in the

game.

^

QK1DBERFESr» For

tickets (

and information

519 ) 570-4267

www.oktoberfest.ca

call:

^


SPOKE,

September, 23 1996

— Page 11

ENTERTAINMENT New Adventures

Writer’s Festival overcomes rain with author’s words

propels R.E.M.

By Linda

Nevertheless,

to excellence

Eden

Mills

annual

eighth

Writer’s Festival drew 2,000 peo-

By Doug Coxson

ple fewer than last year Sept. 8.

Except for a

little

author of more than 25 books of

rain held off.

Reilly

the

drizzle,

moved

to

the

festival

nearby Edgewood

was

Camp

where stages were erected in a hall and under two large canopies. Margaret Atwood, Canadian

to

read excerpts from her

novel which

is

based on the 1834 double murder of a Richmond his

meeting

— hard

man and

Hill

a drunken haze,

form a rock band

to

housekeep-

40

this year.

success by releasing album album of masterful pop,

ly 16

after

complex and

and an obligatory but collection of videos.

16,

brilliant

was

why

obvious

is

After the read-

willing to bid as high as they

did

to

ing,

keep

band under contract. New Adventures In Hi-Fi is a stunning return for the band which, while on a world tour for Monster, was plagued by ill-

drummer

Bill

Atwood

was on hand

the

ness:

not

read.

company was

— $80 million —

It

easy being quiet and good,” Atwood

somewhat disappointing Monit

skilled at

overhearing.

up to 1994’s over-hyped and

R.E.M.’s record

Grace “be-

came

After listening to the follow-

ster,

years old.

In prison since

rock songs

lyrical

READING

IN

THE RAIN

Writer’s Festival

in

which was launched

at

Margaret Atwood was on hand at the 8th annual copies of her latest book, Alias Grace, (Photo by unda Reiiiy) the Festival Sept. 9

Eden

Mills to sign

but hauntingly-beautiful Auto-

matic For The People, terpiece to rival

is

a

m^-

copies

of

her

book.

From

the opening track,

How

The West Was Won And Where It Got Us, with Mills’ catchy piano

CAREER FAIR Wednesefay OctoSer 2, 1996

any of their

previous releases.

10:00

am - 3:30pm

(Bingeman (Par^

accenting

interlude

Stipe’s halting narrative, to the

%itcfLener, Ontario

The Wake-Up Bomb, in which Stipe rails against the excesses of fame

jarring rocker,

threw up when I done,” New Adventures propels R.E.M. into new territory while mainand

states, “I

what

saw

I’d

taining a hold on the familiar sound of their past. In the song Leave, the best on the album, powered by Buck’s grinding guitar and Berry’s driving beat over a whirling synthesizer. Stipe has to, “Suffer dreams of a world gone mad,” to understand “that’s what keeps me down.”

The

first single,

Letter,

is

sciousness rant that seems to

pop

the conflict

reflect

have with their

thing,

I

don’t get

This star while Smith, one it,”

of Stipe’s heroes, croons, “I’ll take

you over

there.”

any of the five albums in their new contract are only half as good as this one, then fans If

of the

Student Ld). Card required

dor more information

contact:

dUe Student dmpCoyment Office

fame

it.

don’t get

guest vocalist Patti I

dree transportation avadaSCe

stars

own fame.

Stipe questions, “This thing, I

Over 100 empfoyers attending

E-Bpw The

stream-of-con-

a

band have several years

of great music to look forward

dpom 2d04

a professor of English

did a short reading from his latest

Brown

Girl.

There was also a mystery tent at the festival under the direction of Jon Oram, curator of Coilway Theatre, a community-oriented theatre project in England. The mystery tent was part of the Sept. 7.

intesti-

It was during the exhausting Monster tour though that all the songs on New Adventures were written and recorded. Its sound, pieced together from of discordant grunge the Monster and 1992’s subdued,

him a Cape Breton

University of Wind.sor, also

festival

surgery

record.

McLeod, at the

to

Berry suf-

and lead singer Michael Stipe had a hernia. There won’t be a tour for this nal

“the

writer.”

autograph

fered a brain aneurysm; bassist

Mike Mills underwent

as

Also at the festival was author Marilyn Dumont. A young Metis woman, Dumont has written a moving and powerful book on the emotions and reality of growing up and surviving with native culture in a white-dominated society. She read excerpts from her new book entitled, A Really Good

the

Marks, the man’s maid.servant, was bare-

turns

reputation

book-in-progress.

of

They’ve forged their path to

Buck

collec-

One

accused, Grace

guitarist

McLeod, whose two

tions of short stories earned

er-mistress.

Peter

lead

believe

interviewer

tair

at the festival.

Atwood

has been 16 years and the of several classic albums since the members of after

CBC

Grace,

It

at university in

first,

Shelagh Rogers conducted a live interview with storyteller Allis-

fiction

release

R.E.M. decided,

A festival

and non-fiction, launched her latest book. Alias

poetry,

which was rained out

Organizers

said

they

pleased, poor weather aside.

were


Page 12

— SPOKE, September 23, 1996

Kansas City flaps wings but fails to

Lounge music never sounded so good

its

By Bruce Manion

fly

a completely serious production of 11 of the jazziest tra, is

In this age of compilation

greed,

Corruption,

murder and ately to find

kidnapping,

true love try desper-

common

1992 film The Player, doesn’t seem to know where he’s going with this film. claimed

By Diana Loveless

ground

in

Robert Altman’s Kansas City, but

Though brings

all

the end,

it

the

plot

predictably

the players together in

follows an annoyingly

kidnaps the opium-addicted wife (Miranda Richardson) of Henry Stilton (Michael Murphy), one of

repetitive pattern guided by the overdone sounds of Dixieland jazz greats Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. It becomes clear that Blondie has no desire or will to harm Red as the story switches back and forth between their burgeoning friendship and the belabored scenes with Seldom Seen and Johnny at

Roosevelt’s political hacks.

the

Blondie promises to kill Stilton’s if he doesn’t use his political clout to help rescue her small-time

Altman’s American saga is grounded by mediocre performances by all the players

hood husband, Johnny O’Hara (Dermot Mulroney), who has crossed gangster Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte), a who has him

including Belafonte doing his very best impression of Marlon Brando and Leigh with a tough-

leaving

miserably,

fail

the

film

hopelessly fragmented. Set on the eve of the 1934 presiin the United Altman’s tale dances around Blondie (Jennifer Jason

election

dential States,

Leigh), a desperate

woman who

wife

holed up

at the

Hey Hey

Club, a

seedy Kansas City jazz club. Altman, who directed the hugely successful

television

MASH

the

and

series

critically

ac-

Hey Hey

Club.

4)

4i

talkin’, hard-bitten repeat perfor-

4.

4

4-

CD

to hit the

cocktail songs and at the

time

is

However

market with a

same

quite funny. it

the

classified,

is

it

is

mixture of some of the newer popular hits along with a variety

definitely novel in

of the past classics.

You Oughta Know, Crash Test Dummies’ Superman’s Song and

With

try to

this stated, is

Cocktail: Shakin’

it

and

Steppenwolf’s

Bom

to be Wild,

Sunglasses at Night are more

and mellow renditions with the tempos slowed down to a Frank Sinatra level. Spaceship Superstar and Closer to the Heart defy description and

reflective

is

at all.

The CD, presented by Jaymz Bee and the Royal Jelly Orches-

perfectly

ments

matched

instru-

to create the overall eccen-

of each song. All of the album’s weird and demented sounds soon grew to resemble tricity

meant to be campy. While others, like Turn Me Loose, American Woman, Takin’ Cars of Business, Run to You and

selling out at record stores every-

where? Not

approach.

are

surprising

Stirred

its

Songs, like Alanis Morrisette’s

imagine a CD with all these great songs converted to cocktail music where the high-pitched notes of the xylophone rule. In fact, this CD reeks of somebody’s warped idea of a Las Vegas lounge act.

However,

mance of her

Spotlight stage

brutally rebuff the original songs.

their originals.

At

the risk of committing musiblasphemy, it should be mentioned that some of these cocktail songs required more talent to produce than the rock versions. cal

Originally, though,

I

intended to

buy this CD for the review only and then return it afterwards. Only now have I seen its lasting value and been converted. So grab me a cocktail, would you?

roles in Last Exit to

The Dorothy Parker Story

— and

a plot line which unfolds with excrutiating monotony.

4s

Excellent

4>

4^

Very Good

Good Poor Turkey

h

left:

A view of guitarist Stuart Cameron By Jason Seads

Brooklyn, Hudsucker Proxy and

^ 4)

er

CDs,

not hard to imagine yet anoth-

REVIEW GUIDE 4^

it’s

Regardless of the comic value of this CD, it is evident each band took care and precision to find

Stuart

Cameron, now touring

with Ashley

Macisaac, hasn’t been home since June, and that was only for five days. Before that, he guessed it was April or May when he was home last. The lead guitarist for the band said he doesn’t like travelling or being away from home very much, but performing makes up for everything. “I

love

performing

where the most enjoyment is for me.” Although he doesn’t like travelling,

Cameron

said Ireland

“The fans in Ireland are went to Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Glasgow and the were always packed.” bars Cameron’s favorite beer was Caffrey’s Cream Ale, which he tried great.

cool.

We

“not to drink too

“Once

I

much

of.”

arrive at a destination

enjoy myself but that’s

was

I

I

hate getting

there.”

The Halifax

native said the band

also played a Celtic festival in

Denmark that was incredible. Cameron said one of his darkest moments was in Toronto only two weeks ago. The morning of the Rita McNeil show, Cameron’s only two guitars were stolen outside their hotel, including a cus-

tom-made Song guitar. “I would love to meet the pricks who stole my stuff. They are going to have a hard time selling my Song, because there is only one.”

IMRez join

(and

your friends

moke a

iot

of

new ones)

Rodeway SUITES 55

New Dundee

Rd, Kitchener, Ontario

1-519-895-2272

its

a lot easier... and more fun with

over 200 other students it

could make the difference

^

^

Digital Edition - September 23, 1996  
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