Page 1

SPOKE

What’s Inside? Robotics students present their automated

clock assembly line

See page 2

Inside This Issue News

1-3

Commentary

4,5

Entertainment

7,8

^^Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

— No.31

28th Year

September

Kitchener, Ontario

Two Conestoga

9,

1996

instructors

create computerized assistant a lesson, including images, sound

By Jason Seads

and video

clips

No

one can deny that the role of computers in education has skyrocketed over the last decade. Walk around the A-wing on the Doon campus and all you will see of is computer rooms, about 1 them in fact. at Nearly every course Conestoga involves classroom computer time. However, the use of our computers as educational tools has been limited. 1

One reason

Windows

friendly

with user-

clips,

tools such as a

program

is

student

the

that the

PS

uses,

Reader, can evaluate the student’s

progress by In short,

ter.

them, and

testing

how

gives advice on

to study bet-

gets to

it

Visual C+-f code

know

the

“Teachers don’t like to change.

With

pare class material like they would

learning style.

have before.” With Norbrie and Tool Book,

While a teacher must teach

all

students in the class in the

the

computer-shy students to sit in front of the screen and learn some-

called

to

This information

is

presented in

graphic or text format, and can be

up any time throughout

the

of Conestoga’s own. Brad

PS Author, the file student opens under PS Reader

the lesson in

Nelson, who teaches mechanical and technology, engineering Nancy Nelson, who teaches electronic engineering technology, are making great headway in the area

is much like an old-fashioned textbook. The big difference is that it talks, shows videos and gives advice according to what it knows

of

training computer-based (CBT). The married couple have invest-

about the student. What’s more, a single program (or textbook) can be used by the

ed eight years of their lives into two programs, PS Author and PS

instructor to teach an infinite

under their company. Private School Interactive. The Windows-based programs allow the teacher to custom design Reader,

the

to

design a lesson for their

classes.

“Not too many teachers

have time to learn code,” said

While this program is not at all meant to replace teachers. Brad said

it

could be very useful for

alternative delivery teaching, dis-

study period. After the teacher has prepared

thing.

Two

must learn computer

instructors

Brad.

seems

program they can pre-

this

student and will adapt to his or her

or her.

instructor at the front,

programs,

Brad.

work fine. Another reason is that there is no software good enough to allow

conventional classroom, with an

CBT Book

ple, but

code

that the

is

for

for examnone as easy to use as the Private School programs, said

Norbrie and Tool

visually or spasame manner tially PS Reader can teach each student in a manner that suits him

for this

Nancy wrote

the student evaluation.

There are other

mouse. But the best feature

150 pages of

the approximately

num-

tance education in particular.

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and administration, saw a

demonstration of the program last June during the annual Employees for Excellence conference at Doon

campus. “This CBT program is unique because teachers are the ones pro-

gramming

it;

I

makes a

think that

big difference,” he said.

Tool Book, Norbrie and

ber of subjects.

Brad said PS Reader alone took about 350 pages of computer code, written in Visual Basic, to complete. And that’s not including

designed and written by computer programmers, who can easily

training

to

still

handle forms

assessing students

By Johanna Neufeld The school

By Kevin Hansen

a.m.

you didn’t know about security at Conestoga

Some

things

College.

new

Students

to the

college

to

1 1

open from 6

is

p.m. but special

arrangements can be made for students wishing to stay later. A pass from a teacher is required

for

staying

11

after

who

Students

applied

the

to

(OSAP)

Assistance Program

are

Ontario Student now picking up

along with life at Conestoga. Many of them won’t realize however lliat a lot of this information is available through the

school before that time. “Any exceptions to that students would have to clear with

Training.

worked until midnight like some students do if they work at bars or something,” Smith said.

their financial

office,

security

located

just

learning resource centre on the main floor of the

beside

the

“There

campus. Students night to

us, say if they

who come

in late at

work on assignments

be surprised to know that must have their student card on them to access the com-

doors

3,

is a buzzer system at 4 or 5 that students can

use in case they

come

in later

or

and have car

may

if

they

trouble, they can

puter labs.

Students must contact security and have their student card with

“That’s something we have to Have your student card

stress.

they’ve left at

them

1 1

come back

have computer rooms unlocked

in order to

labs or other

of the time,” said Janet Smith, a security guard at

after hours.

the college.

in

Without a student card, students will not be granted access

disks in and people don’t

on you

to the

all

computer

labs.

There the

said,

in.”

is

also a lost and found

security

“We

Smith of computer

office.

get a lot

looking for them.”

come

The money

documents

is

deducted when the

arrive.

Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) strike this April didn’t affect the processing of appli-

approximately 1,000 assessments that are still being processed by the Ministry of Education and

duty.

interest free.

financial aid office reported that 250 applicawere assessed on Aug. 26, the first day students could start picking up their documents. About 650 were assessed by that Friday. There is

The

tions

Students intending to stay after 11 p.m. must be in the

on

$500

their funds.

p.m. and must be shown to a security guard

If a student’s funds have not arrived, the individual can pay a $50 deferral on their tuition. Walsh said the College Emergency Fund will advance students up to

financial

year will be busy in September learning how to get around the school and all of the small bits of information that go

this

Brad Nelson \works on a computer-based program he and his wife Nancy are developing. (Photo by Jason Seads)

added

staff

OSAP

key to after hours

TEACHING TOOL

overlook students’ needs.

More

Security office

many

other programs of this style are

still

said things are as usual this year and the

Walsh

cations.

The ministry had planned to change some OSAP but was unable to because of the

aspects of strike.

The Ontario Work Study Plan

Carol Walsh, financial aid that students

must

officer, said last

month

register first before trying to get

documents.

The ministry stipulates that students must bring with them a valid social insurance card, proof of summer income and proof of registration to obtain the funds, she said.

She expects about processed

1

in early to

,500 student assessments to be mid-September. “Everyone can

expect a small wait,” she said, but the registrar’s department will put on more staff to handle the traffic flow.

year. Students should

work program

is

also in effect this

have already applied for the

for this semester.

Applications for the winter semester are available in the Registration and Orientation Essentials 1996-

96 booklet. Walsh said about 50 students were hired last year in several departments on campus. Students work approximately six to 10 hours a week depending on the number of courses and upcoming assignments. The ministry pays about 75 per cent of their wages while the college pays 25 per cent. Most students work in the department for the

full

During the first two weeks of school, the registrar’s office will have OSAP funds available from 9; 30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. After those two weeks, students should come between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.,

year, said Walsh.

Monday

campuses

delayed and to correct any errors that could arise immediately. Students who attend Conestoga at the last minute

location.

may

to Thursday.

Students attending either the Waterloo or Guelph will receive their funds at their respective

More news department

Walsh

is

in

now

the

registrar’s

office

on-line, as of the

is

that

the

week of Aug.

5.

said the office will be able to check student

applications, to see

still

why

apply for funding.

financial

documents

are


Page 2

— SPOKE, September

1996

9,

Conestoga parking:

it

CORRECTION

does get better

In a

The only changes made

By Kevin Hansen

parking

at the

to the

college this year are

pass,

Last year. Smith said, students

to either with-

could use a doctor’s note to use the handicapped spaces, but that

someone buys a parking

If

and then decides

$ 1 1 7 a year for general parking and from $155 to $158 a year for

draw or trade their pass with someone else, the transfer must be communicated to the security

designated parking.

office

records accurate. Smith said.

year than they have in previous

Motorcycle passes remain the as last year at $26 if they are bought separately and $10 if they are bought in conjunction with a

years.

car decal, said Smith.

Every year about ing at Conestoga

this time,

becomes

park-

a valu-

able commodity.

Smith,

Janet

College

Conestoga

a

guard,

security

said

went more smoothly over the 1995-96 school

recently

that

things

Most people were able

to

a

from $115

increase

slight

to

same

Motorcycle parking

find

is

located

woodworking building

parking spots without any prob-

near the

lem.

people have parked on the grass

between lots 4 and 5. Also Lot 4 has been changed from daily parking to designated

and

parking.

In previous years.

Smith

said,

in fire zones.

in

order to keep school

Conestoga College has 12 parking lots with a combined capacity of 2,598 automobiles. Forty-one of these

parking

spaces are reserved as handicapped-parking spaces. People wishing to park

in these

must have an official government handicapped licence plate or sign on their cars. spaces, said Smith,

Assembly line class project earns workterm for students

will

no longer be the case as of

rectly reported that

Conestoga

President John Tibbits’s salary exceeds those of the presidents at the three universities

September.

“Usually the

first

two months are

bad because some kids have got their parents car and then after a while they’ll start riding with somebody, or start taking the bus because it’s too much hassle for parking, so it usually evens out eventually,” Smith said. “We have guards there the first two weeks to a month to tell people what lots they’re supposed to

go

in

with the

in Kitchener-Waterloo Guelph.

Tibbits’s

salary

is

in

and fact

$123,894. James Downey of the University of Waterloo earns

$179,770;

Loma

Marsden of Wilfrid Laurier earns $215,556 while the University

Mordecai

of Guelph’s Rozanski earns

$177,516.

Spoke

sticker they have.”

Ti/ceJi

column in the Sept. 3 Spoke it was incor-

issue of

regrets the error.

7(/clco4He '96

0^

Just For the Fun of It!

Sportsarama Come No

out and panticipatel ex^penience necessanyl

Prizes!

n£M CLOCKWISE ics

of

— This machinery

and automation

a clock onto a conveyer

By Jason

is

belt.

(pnoto by jason seaus)

was divided

students Students

from the mechanical

more than 100 employer

line to

commu-

on Aug. 21. The display and demonstration were designed and built by stu-

nity

the

six

for devising an idea

and plan for a

and automation program.

ing and assembling elements of

resources.

After the clock-assembly project six

teams began

work

rate

stations that

make up

Reilly

The Early Childhood Education Centre

come

is

each

from all the companies in the region, who were invited to the demonstration and reception, supported the pro-

gram by offering students co-op workt erm placements and by providing donated materials to the students for use in the assembly-

ready to wel-

back Sept. 3, Marie Roberts,

children

according to team leader at the centre. The centre was full through the summer and remains full for the

The ratio of workand depends on the age of the children, Roberts said.

quality

dren. All programs include cog-

The

“Enrolment has been stable over the past year,” Roberts said.

The centre is open year-round from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, and accommodates children four months to 10 years old.

The children enrolled

are

a

centre has a full-time staff

and two permanent parttime workers plus a part-time 1 1

“The employees at the centre work for the college but are supstaff,

not

They

development

ative

and cre-

skills.

are individualized, as

They

much

as

possible, to the children’s needs.

said

members of

the

Conestoga College Employees

is by There is an infant to 18 months program, a toddler program, a pre-school program, an

school.

placement basis, she

into practice philosophies taught

said Roberts.

said.

there

is

said.

and

a high need for placefor students,” she

Roberts said the centre has

Best

Ball

Golf Tournament Fuiday, Sept, 15 1.2:50 pm Tee Off Doon Valley Golf

CouRse

School-age children are bused and from the facility if they

Students from the early childhood education program work in the centre two days a week on a a teaching facility

"Hfeieome. '96

program and a

to

is

"WceJi

school-age program.

union.

“It

5:50 pm RecReafion Centne

age.

after kindergarten

are also

ment positions

a capacity of

faculty,”

Roberts.

combination of students’ and employees’ children, as well as children from the community,

The program has

nitive, social, physical

chil-

The program enrolment

cook.

port

fall.

programs for young

101 children.

ers varies

of

Sept. 11

station.

Representatives

pitter-patter of little feet

By Linda

Wed.

began build-

pleted, the students

the project.

The

many

Each team made formal presentations, after which the entire class voted on a project, based on available time and material

design and layout of the six sepa-

three-year co-op robotics

stages involved

I

Prizes!

hours on the computer using the design program autoCAD. Once the design phase was com-

class project.

was chosen,

dents, applying skills they learned in

into

teams, with each team responsible

robotics

and automation program presented an automated clock assembly representatives from the

The design

Earlier this year, the class of 27

Witzell

engineering technology

one on the assembly line of the third-year robotby the students, it feeds the base, motor and bushing

part of station

final project. Built entirely

^

Prizes!

live

within the vicinity of the

Roberts said the centre puts

program. There is a waiting list for the program but Roberts said she can’t predict if anyone on the list in the

will get in or not.

week

wckoroc

Entry Fee $25/person Sign up at the PSA Office

by Sept

11


SPOKE, September

9,

1996

— Page 3

International

Boon campus

Beijing English teachers tour By Linda

ded

Reilly

four

Twenty-six English language teachers from Beijing wound up their three-week tour of Ontario at Conestoga’s Doon campus on Aug. 17.

They came information

to

Ontario to get

about

English

that they

days

with

(Haieian) the People’s University

asked

taught

English it,

than in China.

how

the

without

teachers

having

Canadians.” Jing Hua, People's University of China

this visit they’ve

had good opporand

ed.

whom

Canadians.”

frankly.

tunities to talk to professors

people

other

they’ve

is

important for our

very

teachers to be here,”

Hua

They

are very

easy

is

to

open-minddeal

with

Over the cour.se of their threeweek tour, the teachers have had many lectures about the social and cultural aspects of Canada and

encountered. “It

It

said.

first

Cultural differences provided a

they think in Chinese, 'fhey rely

valuable learning experience for

various teaching methods used

on

many of

Canadian schools. In four days they had been on

she explained that

the use of the textbooks and

diagrams, emphasizing vocabu-

“Canadian people are so friendly and speak frankly. They are very open-minded. It is easy

who

and writing and listening

lary

Hua here

“When Chinese something

said that before they

they did

not

came

have enough

opportunity to speak English.

On

let

others

Niagara Falls, Niagara-on-the-Lake, St. Catharine’s and downtown Kitchener and attended a presentation at Brock University.

know

keep to them“Canadian people are so friendly and speak their

ideas;

in

tours of Toronto,

to do, they think care-

fully; they don’t

skills.

Hua. people have

the teachers, said

they

selves,” she said.

to deal with

in

English language pro-

When spoken

spent four years teaching English

China, along with Gong Yafm Naee, director of English Language Teachers Association in China, organized this pilot tour for teachers of secondary schools for

to speak well. “The teachers found everything hard to understand the first week but are doing fine now,” she said.

schools in Ontario arc different

lan-

Evelyn Scott of Belleville,

how

of China, said the culture and the

ation.

(Uic "'JtSTlT

StudcKt

.

According to Hua, there are 4050 students per class in Beijing high schools. The students spend

grams.

The

area

this

Conestoga’s team. Jing Hua, a researcher from

guage teaching in Ontario and take it back to Beijing. While here, they were to find out more about Canadian culture and recre-

cultural

would be .spending

in

first part

of their three-week

was spent in a wilderness camp, said Larry Rechsteiner, tour

six years in high school

who

ad-

three in

high school.

She said the

director of college planning and international education,

junior high and three in senior

trip

was a good

experience for the teachers on

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Considered by many

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Tickets $10 the DSA Office Available at Student ID Required

EXPERIENCING EDUCATION from Beijing visit for cultural

WWW

Secondary school teachers

Doon campus Aug. 17 as

English language programs.

part of a pilot project (Photo by unda Reiiiy)

TWOONIE TUESDAY OUTDOOR MOVIE

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www.doonsa.com

FEATURING

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Page 4

— SPOKE, September

1996

9,

COMMENTARY Diana Loveless

Editor

News

Scott

eaitor

Student

Sean

editor

life

S.

SPOKE

Nixon Finlay

Doug Coxson

Issues and activities editor

Peter Marval

Photo editor Production manager

Bruce Manion

Advertising manager

Eric Whitfield

Circulation

manager

Jason

published and produced weekly by journalism students of Conestoga

Advertisers in

DSA

tain the in

299 Doon Valley

Romanko

Dr.,

is

mainly funded from September

Kitchener, Ontario,

By

by the Doon Student

SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements conSPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

beyond

advertising

the

amount paid

for the space.

Monday. Submissions are subject

at the

to acceptance or rejection

photograph).

Phone; 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

44 ..

NASA

.Scientists RtfeRi

That while exAWAiibNl

0 FTHEA\E!EoR Has YiEwsEb Sb/AE eVIDEA/CE OF Rybl/V\04TApY

Moore

Patrick

Life" RxvAs, Is still a/o

good education seems to be can no longer afford to

price of a

May

logo.

Canada

for

to

above address by 9:30 a.m. and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect 5.0 file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

Room 4B15 N2G 4M4

Liberal education a necessity The

SPOKE

Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

Dick Scott

Faculty advisor

is

College.

Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA.

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

Jerry Frank

Faculty supervisor

SPOKE

There

rising daily. Students

coast through their post-secondary education,

picking up a course here and there and eventu-

Proof of iktfll/(t^

completing their degrees. The however, is a liberal education.

Life: oH/ViFS.,,'”

ally

With

real cost,

the cost of education increasing expo-

nentially,

and with Conestoga College being a

job-oriented school, the value of a liberal education seems insignificant at best. This

sim-

is

ply not so. is one who is and preferred answers, not because he is obstinate but because he knows others worthy of consideration,” said Allan Bloom, American author and educator. A liberal education is not just something needed to complete a degree or course requirement. Education by its very nature opens the mind to new horizons and experiences. Eveiy lesson learned opens new avenues to explore

“The

liberally

educated person

able to resist the easy

outside the conventional classroom.

American author James Baldwin

“The

said,

paradox of education is precisely this that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being

Foregoing a liberal education denies a student what he or she needs most the ability and desire to question all things not immedi-

Without individuals willing to question, the civil rights and women’s movements would have stalled before ever ately acceptable.

leaving the starting gate.

“What

sculpture

essayist Joseph

is

to a block

human

to the

is

By Tracy Hujfman

of marble, edu-

soul,” said English

As

greater than can be imagined.

Knowledge of ancient Japan, information on American Civil War and a thorough knowledge of insanity in the movie industry the

student’s lifetime.

appeared nothing elders

a Scottish politician, said,

“Education makes a people easy to lead, but difficult to drive; easy to govern, but impossible to enslave.” typical excuse for not pursuing a liberal

institute.

that is

it.

was

I

me

to

but

who

much

one

that at

may

parents,

much

like

many

not have explained their rea-

soning in a manner that pleased me, their actions were indeed for my own good.

as

nasty

It

scorned wrongdoings and

got worse as

time

when

enforce.

my percep-

different. In actuality, I

spoiled rotten.

my

Although

Looking back on childhood, is

now

I

others,

denied privileges.

was

However, when I did it rarely went unno-

which

I

became a is more

I

teenager, a

discipline

difficult to

It is an age of rebellion, one always thought my parents never

really understood.

But as

I

become an

adult

I

realize that

my parents did understand. The

scoldings

ticed.

were not to harm, but merely and to teach.

to protect

remember thinking that my parents’ punishments were incredibly harsh. Once I couldn’t play with a friend down

parents are

the street for the day, and another time

They both got

I

wasn’t allowed to go shopping with

I

my

mom.

As an

adult

in “their

whatever

I

that

Conestoga

is

a job-training

Students are here to train for jobs and A liberal education can be found at a

am

also learning that

more human than

I

my

thought.

into their share of trouble

day” and they both dealt with the punishment or conse-

questioned as identity By Paul Tuns

evidence he wrote

it

is

with political moti-

vations.

week’s

The second and more important ques-

star

columnist,

political

tion is about Klein’s integrity. If he denied he was “anonymous” can we believe him about other things. He knew he would be asked, a confession he made in the July 29 issue of

has

been

exposed as the author of Primary Colors. Nearly six months ago this best-selling novel, a political thriller

Newsweek. But he

many commentators

He had obligations to his pubRandom House, that stipulated he was to remain anonymous. He said in the

likened to the

life

the

said he could justify

lies.

didates as authors, but denied that he was the author. The question of ethics arises.

journalist.

Or more properly, questions. The first question asked by media critics

ma. Once a journalist, always a journalist,

at

to

A

will provide

in the learning

eral

education

education

However,

is

in the

much more.

resource centre

an ample reward.

The most common excuse in a liberal

was given opportunities

that

many

peo-

my

age have yet to experience. More and more each day I begin to

sound like my parents. I scold the neighborhood children for their use of profanity and their lack of respect. I

use phrases I tell

that of It is

I

thought only old people

my friends to zip up their jack-

on a warmer

et or put

my

shirt.

The echo

is

parents’ voices.

frightening

my

how much I am becomI am

parents. But, for once,

not even trying to rebel. If I

am

able to carry on

my

parents

morals and beliefs with the same strength they have, I will be happy. In fact, I wouldn’t want it any other way.

is

for not investing

lack of money.

A

lib-

expensive.

long run, ignorance will cost

is probably the least consequential: How does this book, with undertones of

Clintonism,

affect

Klein’s

objectivity?

Very little. Klein is not a reporter but a commentator, for which objectivity is less important. Furthermore, there is no

lisher,

column

that

he denied he was the author

when asked because

his

novelist outweighed his

To many journalists,

commitment commitment

as a as a

that idea is anathe-

they say.

The reason he wanted anonymously, he says, work to be judged on its a

uncovered important than what was written.

While

News-

Klein,

resources at Conestoga are ideally suited for the pursuit of extra-curricular knowledge.

digging

I

ple

Journalist’s ethics are improperly

pursue a liberal an institute of learning. The

good university. There is no place greater

little

I

ing like

and career of Bill Clinton, was released with one catch: the author was anonymous. Klein had been on the short list of can-

education than

may have been. thought I grew up in a strict household. Rules were rules, and they weren’t made to be broken. Yet, I realize now that quences

used.

something wrong

Joe

Lord Brougham,

is

child,

silly

thought such punishments were cruel and inhumane.

never able to quite understand my parents. Often my parents

have a payback that will echo throughout a

A

a

seems pretty

Maddison.

Education that covers thoughts and ideas beyond the scope of regular course work changes and shapes the student in ways far

education

It

time

tion

educated.”

cation

Parental authority seen as a blessing in a retrospective glance

work of Joe Klein.

ly the intrigue

of

It

who

to write the

book

he wanted the own merit, not as was, but eventualis

wrote

it

was more

Klein

Newsweek tions left

did

nothing

itself is guilty

and

wrong,

of ethical viola-

right.

The magazine had an obligation to cover the news in a forthright fashion. Despite

the

fact

Newsweek

editor

Maynard Parker knew Klein was

the

he allowed stories to be run hypothesizing who might have written it. He allowed the magazine to follow the rest of the media guessing who inside the Clinton campaign/White House knew enough about it to write the book. If Newsweek did not want to expose Klein, it should not have covered the author,

story at

all.

Meanwhile, the movie rights have been sold and Tom Hanks, Emma Thompson, Jack Nicholson and John Mal'KOvich are starring. And Klein is enjoying his new $900,000 home.

The lesson is in

in all

of

this;

the real

writing fiction, not news.

money


SPOKE, September

9,

— Page 5

1996

COMMENTARY Feeling slightly inspired, bnt sorely nnathletic By Allison Dempsey when

thought world was getting fatter and Just

everyone

I

the

in

unfit,

Pnre Iattend

had

I

to

that athletic event

Waterloo.

in

plump

After observing pleasantly

to terrif-

bodies squeezed into tiny bathing Sauble Beach on the holiday weekseemed there were very few toned

end,

it

people

Lo and

hiding,

in

ly

left.

Not

duathlon.

we saw

gurgle).

was of

It would have been bad enough had these people been single and vainly childless, but

suits

athletic clones clung to their parhands and waists, toned tots sporting $300 running shoes and bike shorts. There was a lot of posing going on that day, as you might imagine. These people knew there were interlopers in their midst, ones who would never dream of pounding just for fun! the pavement and sweating These athletes kept a watchful eye, and

The more revealing the better, and even some of the men indulged with tiny bikini shorts and midriff-baring tank tops. It was

1

little

ents’

behold, they were mere-

waiting to pounce at the a very soothing place to be

when one of

and men aging from 2 to 65 were stretching and bending, manipulating their sinewy muscles in preparation for a sevenkilometre run (gasp, wheeze) followed by a 30-some-odd-kilometre bike ride (choke,

no,

ically fat suits at

square inch of the start-finish compound.

Women

if

you’re feeling a tad out of shape and unsure

of your physical attributes. Tanned, lean and cut bodies filled every

Moving can be catastrophic with her. “Oh,”

By Johanna Neufeld

I

time again.

It’s

move and the

Time

button.

Who

worldly belong-

and transporting them any great distance? Even the idea is

that

starting again is depressing.

is a terrible thing, mainly have no control over it. I am at its mercy and whether I like it or not, it’s a part I

think change

because of

I

life.

sister

for

and only sibling

is

velour track

with matching headbands for these

people.

all

Who

looked after the children? With prize

U-S

5

^'sooN

Set-oTto/v

-n

fie

A

of

gym

ripples in the

abdomen

just thinking about

All in

mirrors,

lifting

gawking

at

all

it

was

area.

I

got winded

it.

a rather enlightening expe-

imagined, for just a moment, that I too could be a contender. If 1 worked hard enough and long enough, I could enter I

the next duathlon,

(Iron

But all I could think about as I stumbled around was the time these people must put into their training and physical upkeep. Didn’t any of them have full-time jobs?

envisioned hours of

flexed muscles hour after hour and counting

rience, as

a veritable feast for the eyes.

1

in front

Woman,

ing glory,

down

I

and then the

triathlon

of course). And, the crown-

could be a competitor four years

the road in Sydney.

Then

I

started to sweat, so

I

got in

and drove home, stopping for

ice

my

car

cream on

the way.

foti

Pfi.cFict£AiC^' A>/t

HifctJL’i

K>Ay)

panicked and pressed the red

The sparks

flew.

Mom

said not to

and then she’s too far to strangle. Another issue was the living room furniture. I have an old coffee table for which she expressed a sudden desire. “Is that so?” I

said.

then saw her eyeing up

my $10

garage-

Brigitta,

but I quickly changed the conversation. There won’t be a stick of furniture left by the time she leaves. Oh well, my new roommate says she has a couch, so I’m keeping

University of

Zealand and will be moving there

my

greedy intentions,

fingers crossed.

thing Brigitta decided not to take with her was her mountain bike. I don’t know why because it’s the one thing I was count-

One

ing on her taking.

She said something about not enough

shortly.

hadn’t found this job in Quebec, she’d be moving Down Under. Montreal is far enough. Right now she is busy packing and if I’m not careful, Brigitta will take everything in

space in her new apartment. “I’ll come back for it,” she said. “All the way from Montreal for a bike?” I said. There is lots of room in the rented van and when she’s not looking, my secret mission

sight.

is

If

No

place,

The next day

moving.

the

of her classmates accepted a position

New

the highest quality.

first

couldn’t find a

sale television set with

well.

One

weights

.

younger

that

Waterloo this May, is moving to Montreal because she has a teaching job. Yes, it’s a real job and a teaching one at that. She’s lucky to have it and I wish her

in

competition.

The equipment wasn’t bad, either. Hightech was the name of the game, and every bicycle, helmet, running shoe and leotard

about $20 for

totalling

they certainly weren’t making a living in

their perfect pecs.

THE

my

my rant is

who graduated from

money

der,

I

The reason

I

sure

Brigitta has taken until she’s over the bor-

ings

school

said quietly.

made

worry as she calmly reassured me she had lots of spare crockery. probably won’t find out how much I

enjoys packing up

their

I

make lunch and

single pot.

to

get ready for

fall.

all

tried to

us passed by, they

their rippling abs, their solid pipes,

Brigitta

second summer

in a

row, she and

to get it on board. Wish me luck. After several weeks of constant turmoil,

For the have lived in a two-bedroom apartment. We get along alright but we’ve had our ups and

life will

downs

best and

I

as all siblings do.

She informed me the other day that she would be taking most of the pots and pans

When

hopefully settle into a routine. said and done, I wish her the

all is I

guess

I’ll

miss her too. Just please

don’t take everything, Brigitta.

Maybe

hid-

ing things will help.

Students unhappy, but coping with increase in tuition By Linda Students surveyed at ly

seemed

to

Reilly

Doon campus

recent-

be resigned to coping with

this

year’s increases in tuition.

be $20,000 in debt before I’ve finBen Fox, a Conestoga student in the robotics and automation course. Fox, in his final semester of his second “I’ll

ished,” said

year of a three-year program, said he’s not pleased with

the

increase

in

H^ontreal.

Hazen, also of the robotics and automation program, said he would just have to work more. Tuition increases this year appear lo be

Weff

larger than in the past.

According to Carol Walsh, a financial aid officer at the registrar’s office, tuition has $1,295 in

Jason

from $1,109 in 1995-96, to 1996-97. This amounts to about a

Jeff

15 per cent increase.

Karen StumpI,

in her sixth semester of the

registered nursing program, is not happy about the raise in tuition for the upcoming

She said she will cope with the increase by cutting back on the things she enjoys. She also said she can no longer afford the place where she lives. Another burden for StumpI is the cost of parking both at the college and at the hospital.

As

part of Stumpl’s course requirements.

at the college.

she has wondered the course at

At times, StumpI

why

said,

she bothered with

all.

Hal Meister of the machine/ tool set-up operation program, a 52-week semestered program, along with classmates Randy Chabot, Glenn Girvan and Bob Hentges, said the

increase

in

tuition

Lisa

McChesney

she works two days a week at a hospital over the 16 weeks of her semester. The cost of the parking there is $3.50 a day or $7 a week, in addition to her yearly pass

year.

Hal Meister

Karen StumpI

Hazen

Wadel

tuition but

would have to pay “a hell of a lot more tuition if I were in the U.S.” Classmate Jason Wadel, said he would just have to get a bigger loan at the Bank of

increased

Ben Fox

didn’t affect

them because they were sponsored by unemployment insurance. They said they took the program because they were told at an orientation course there was a 90 per cent placement rate. Lisa McChesney, of the robotics and

automation program, was asked how she would cope with the rising cost of tuition in the next semester.

With a big smile on her face she said, “I school on Aug. 21 so I won’t have

am done

to cope”.

,


Page 6

— SPOKE, September

1996

9,

Panel to address future of post-secondary education

Shootin’ hoops

By Eric

Whitfield

With recent cuts

to

Ontario’s

is

ges are needed to ensure excel-

author

lence from universities and col-

Academic Question: University, Government and Public Policy in Canada (1991), on universities and government policy. Other members are Frederick W.

of Education and Training, John Snobelen.

The minister appointed on July 16 on future

a panel

directions

for

The

members

are to

recommendations,

after

five panel

consulting

with the public and

stakeholders, on the most appropriate

way of sharing

costs of edu-

cation between the government,

(left)

Conestoga

1

and Tony

was a

Piotto discuss strategy

0 years ago.

the students and the private sector. •Conestoga College’s 1996-97 budget has students paying $9,860,940 or 21 per cent of the $46,284,973 needed to operate the school. The government provides $30,468,596 and the private sector adds $5,955,437 to the

on the

management graduate

tools

of

(photobyA.weber)

More

of.

is

the

Than

an

States) of Manulife Financial in

Toronto, Catherine Henderson, president of Centennial College of Applied Arts and Technof.^(^^ in

Scarborough, and Bette

Stephenson, the former Ontario minister of education and of colleges and universities.

the

tion.

make

also a

Gorbet, senior vice-president of operational services (United

to advise the ministry

province’s post-secondary educa-

next shot. Piotto

member. Cameron

post-secondary education, chan-

leges in the future, said Minister

John Pelkey

David M. Cameron, chair of the department of political science at Dalhousie University in Halifax,

Kitchener

Transit Passes on Sale Mon. Sept. 9 10 am - 2 pm,Door 3

operational funds.

The panel

Business lectures offered By Bruce Manion

better use of the lecture hall will

be

The data-processing micro-con-

made with

this

higher-volume

Clow pointed out

lecture style, similar to universi-

benefits will be the

for first-year business stu-

dents for the

semester. The class will be a lecture of one hour a week taught by business fall

The panel

that the chief

more

efficient

will also suggest

post-secondary schools can meet

use of a teacher, plus the consis-

levels of education

demanded by

tency of the material taught. “Different teachers favor certain aspects of the course content. This allows an individual to teach com-

students

and future and public.

at

existing

institutions, private

Snobelen said in a press release, “The government is committed to

puting consistency to his students

achieving a post-secondary edu-

by having

cation

school of business.

at the lecture,”

“Afterwards the students will

move

Another

students be present

all

Clow

benefit,

he

said, is the

ability.

course will be more “financially

advantageous, while the quality

quality of our current post-sec-

with the prac-

of education will not be compro-

ondary system be strengthened and tied to reforms at the secondary level.” This comes after a cut in government funds to post-secondary education of $10,318,723 in one

to train the students

applications,” said Clow.

tical

He for

mised.”

An

said that first-year students

from

all

business programs except

computer-programmer anaoffice-system administration

lyst,

and microcomputer-software plications will be scheduled this weekly lecture. The two-hour lab portion of course will then be divided into three classes of

ap-

up

30 students,

the students believe this format

working “It

Bill

Easdale, vice-president of

the school of business, said that

efficiently,

Clow

is

“It

is

also

important that the

The panel members

has the potential for courses

mat. With the provincial cutbacks

the panel. Smith, principal emeri-

it

could be an effec-

The

lecturer,

was unavailable

David Jackson, for

comment

tus of

at

the time this story was written as he was on holidays.

Queen’s University, is a the Order of Canada

P

Office

(519) 748-5131

fax

(519) 748-6726

hotline

(519) 748-5220 ext.8DSA listen@doonsa.com

WWW

www.doonsa.com

.20

Information available at

The Sanctuary

universities.

DSA RaiRbeps

e-mail

-

Campus Club Start Your Own

or

and has served on several comHe holds degrees from Harvard, Oxford and McMaster

oO** "(to,

the

10

Join a

mittees.

TOttfi

impopkaRt

Week

will chair

member of

option to lower expenses.”

tive

Sept.

will include

David C. Smith, who

to education,

Club

year.

said.

in the future to shift into this for-

with one of the two technologists instructing the classes.

midway through

the course to determine whether

for

the

evaluation by the students

will take place

Campus

system based on exceland account-

lence, accessibility,

said.

computer labs where two technologists have been hired to the

CASH ONLY

how

David Jackson and will be made up of about 90 students, said Andy Clow, a chair for the instructor

$164 Plus $4 Photo ID Student ID Required

sion for students.

teaching course.

cepts course will be changed to a

ties,

will also advise the

government on ways to promote and support co-operation between universities, colleges and secondary schools to ease the confu-

0^ 7ifUco*Hc

'96

mm. amtmm

vmmmm Johnny

Gardhouse

He*s Hip, Hot, Happening

Wed. Sept 11 12 noon The Sanctuary

& Hilarious!


SPOKE, September

9,

1996

— Page 7

E A D &ro.0!lK;E

W

7 •5'f

m

757

I

W

Sr//

'M

757 '3}

w

FllEli:

TALOG Adobe Pnmicfr

KEEP ON ROCKIN’

— The Rock and

extensive collection of rock and

roll

Academically priced software for Roll Hall of

Fame and Museum

in

Cleveland, Ohio has an

memorabilia.

students, faculty and staff.

(Photo by Doug coxson)

Call today for your free catalogue

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a music lover’s dream By Doug Coxson

A majestic six-storey glass struclooms

ture

waterfront.

over

Its

Cleveland’s

architecture, a

mix

of angles, pyramidal points and

curving ellipses, is both aweinspiring and baffling to the firsttime observer. For within this seemingly immaculate building lies,

not

some

pretentious collec-

nor an assembly of smug businessmen settled behind their desks in an array of offices, but a huge collection of some of tion of art,

the

most valued treasures from the

renegade world of rock It’s

‘n’ roll.

not until you enter the pyra-

mid through

the revolving doors

and are blasted by the sounds of rock’s past that you realize you are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Wildly painted cars from U2’s ZOO-TV Tour hang from the glass ceiling over the box office. In the opposite comer, the 10-metre high “teacher” from Pink Floyd’s The Wall raises an oppressive hand your way, and the huge amps from Neil Young’s

Ragged Glory Tour rafters

— and

stretch to the

this is just the lobby.

Paying the $12.95 ticket price allows you to enter the starting at the

the

basement

Ahmet M. Ertegun

70ec4.

Hall.

This winding maze of a

room

offers visitors a glimpse into

past.

purple shafts to the invisible ceil-

theatres

ing above. At eye-level along the

contained in the hall and there are also videos, interactive touch-

containing the etched signatures

screens and endless displays con-

of the hall’s inductees.

taining authentic pieces of rock

Beside the signatures of greats such as Buddy Holly, James Brown, Chuck Berry, The Doors, and Led Zeppelin, are hand-sized video screens that fade in images of the artists along with quotes from their peers. Floating above Neil Young’s image is the quote, “A great poet, songwriter, and Canadian,” from Pearl Jam’s

in

history.

Elvis’s leather stage outfit and

guitar

from the 1968 “Comeback”

special, Pete Townshend’s guitar on which he composed the rock opera. Tommy,

television

along with John Lennon’s Sgt. Pepper’s jacket are just some of the highlights of this floor.

Thickly encased behind protective glass are the

museum’s most

unique items, such as Jimi Hendrix’s original handwritten lyrics for Purple Haze, originally entitled Purple Haze, Jesus Saves, and Jim Morrison’s death certifi-

walls

back-lit

glass

panels

all

of

whom

are

successful year!

rock artists. Concert promoter and band manager Bill Graham and producer Phil Spector have been

ences of rock such as blues legend

Lead Belly. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, any rock music lover’s dream destination, is open all week from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and for computer users, more information is available on

levels of the

tribute to Cleveland’s

disc jockey,

Alan Freed, who was

with

term “rock

influential

‘n’

popularizing the roll”,

to

photo-

museum level in

lower levels and following a dimly circular staircase to the sixth

their

extensive

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week itf welcome


Page 8

— SPOKE, September

9,

1996

Theatre Review

CD Review

Tom Petty

Through the Looking

are at

Glass treats the senses

By

Scott

and the Heartbreakers their best on She’s the One equates his love with religion: “I

Nixon

With his latest album, She’s the One, Tom Petty shows that, at musical talents aren’t eroding. In fact, this soundtrack to the film of the same name 44.

rates

his

among

Petty’s best.

His first studio album with the Heartbreakers since 1991 ’s Into the Great Wide Open, She’s the

One

sports a tougher

mellow

but

excellent

1994’s

sound than

Wildflowers.

The album’s (Circus),

first single.

Lindsey

featuring

Buckingham on backing

One

gets She’s the start

Walls

vocals,

off to a strong

with an up-tempo sound

Petty delivers effortlessly.

Petty

really

his

hits

though, with Zero

stride,

From Outer

Space, a humorous rocker featur-

I

too late.”

meaning, however, on Hope You Never, a deceiving song whose mellow sound covers up a harsh message. Petty smugly sneers, “I hope you never meet no one, hope you treasure your inde-

Love has

a different

pendence.” And on Supernatural Radio, Petty

expresses

how

love

can

also be a dangerous thing:

don’t

wanna

get

“I

my heart broken

One

two cover songs which seem to be strange choices for Petty but, on closer listening, fit Petty’s sound She’s the

Moon

Fever’s

Zombie Zoo. There’s also no shortage of songs on She’s the One, although on different songs, love love

different things.

On Angel Dream softest

(No.

4), the

track.

Petty

don’t

album ends with one of

stronger tracks.

Overdue, on which Petty does John Lennon imitation.

sound complete, Ringo Starr guests on drums and Heartbreaker Mike Campbell like George sounds eerily the

Harrison on slide guitar.

With She’s the One, Petty remains one of rock’s most important voices and joins Lou Reed and Neil Young as rockers who refuse to go gently into that good night.

Review Guide

is

influenced by Roger McGuinn’s work with the Byrds. This sound is evident on California, a light, up-tempo chorus, with the song “California’s been good to me.

Although perhaps not as well-

known

hhh

Good

Good

heavily

hh

Poor

h

Turkey

^

Stratford Festival audience with

Tweedledum and Tweedledee,

poems and young Alice

exasperatingly the stubborn “twins” whom Alice encounters while on her way home from behind the looking glass. Although not billed as a musical, Through the Looking Glass boasts numerous high-energy

familiar characters,

predicaments, as travels through the mirror to a world where everything is back-

ward, and the comforts of home seem far away. The title character is played 12-year-old competently by Ashley Taylor, and although she is

outclassed by her seasoned

co-stars, she handles a difficult

and vastly entertaining songs where the entire cast frolics with “flowers,” “horses,” and a lifesize Jabberwocky which loses

and demanding role with charm, professionalism and spirited

its

youthfulness.

the intricate and elaborate set

Her speaking voice is a bit and unpolished, but her It’s

is

always a

for the audience to

hear in the production. Mervyn Blake, Barbara Byrne,

William Needles and Michelle Fisk as the kings and queens add humor and strength to the production, and veteran Douglas Rain brings down the house with his hilarious nonsensical

portraying

the

rhymes

character

Humpty Dumpty.

October (ytk

head.

The

real stars of the play are

and costume designs, which add endless realism to a surrealistic play.

treat.

unfortunate there aren’t

more songs

Very

ama^C

Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass reunites the

predecessor, Alice

its

In

singing

Excellent

penter to the audience’s

ment. Bernard Hopkins and Keith Dinicol are also entertaining as

as

stilted

well.

played on his earlier albums. As always, Petty’s sound

its

Hung Up And

his best at a

To make

Rain also plays the Walrus to Douglas Chamberlain’s Car-

By Allison Dempsey

fall into the sea.”

also features

while Beck’s Asshole echoes the irreverent attitude Petty dis-

set

Ifie

it

like lovers do.”

here

Full

album’s

fate,

was not

Lucinda Williams’s Change The Locks rocks along quickly,

you kick that blew off your wig.” The goofy mood

means

my it

saw dog when the wind

ing such bizarre lines as “I

recalls

saw an angel, I saw can only thank God

hope

of

Although there were numerous children in the audience, and the story

is

dren’s

thought of as a chiltale,

frightening

there

scenes

are

and

some loud

noises.

Alice Through the Looking Glass plays at the Avon Theatre in Stratford until Nov. 2.

1

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