Page 1

Feature Inside

A look

ji

at

local artists see pages 4

-

inside This Issue

5

C/ /v rL

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

— No. 29

28th Year

6-7

Rcvicws

8

~

Kitchener, Ontario

__

Commentary

August

1996

5,

Computer upgrading Conestoga

costly for By Jason Sends

This means $110,000 was taken from

,

operating expenses to cover capital expen-

Conestoga is spending more than ever on computer upgrades to keep up with industry and student needs, said Doon campus principal Grant McGregor.

“We

put

a

lot

of

money

into

lab

upgrades,” he said. 1995, three

In

installed,

and

new computer others

labs were

upgraded,

brought capital expenditures to a of $500,000. Capital expenditure ing

all

is

which

total cost

diture

grant to build the

the facilities of the college, includ-

computer labs, construction and any new equipment the technology courses

During the summer of

much of

1

bring

So

it

to $372,000.

year one computer lab has been upgraded with a faster motherboard and far this

much more

disk drives that hold

mation. There the school will

puter labs at the rate of 1995.

need.

costs

schools in this area and especially other colleges.

For 1995, the capital grant Conestoga received from the Ontario government was only $390,000.

One

infor-

no doubt, however, that not be able to upgrade comis

ing

McGregor said Conestoga has excellent computer services compared to other

the capital

new business wing, “D” new student lounge.

wing, and build a For 996, the Ontario government shaved $18,000 off Conestoga’s capital grant to

new

the cost of upgrad-

shortfall.

1995, Conestoga used

McGregor said helps with continuing education. Conestoga makes use of its computer labs at night by scheduling hundreds of classes. There are area that

is

33,000 people taking night classes, bringing in approximately $1 million to the school.

Of

course, the cost of instructors

and course material money.

covered by that

is

Special needs offers transitional

workshops

By Janet White

apply in a college situation.

Mainland said college

The two

special needs department

transitional

student success to help

new

is

offering

workshops as part of the workshop series designed

students adjust to college

life

smoothly.

The workshops, entitled Understanding Your Learning Disability and Making the Most of Your Re-training, will run Aug. 27 and 28. Marian Mainland, special needs co-ordinator, said the first workshop, Understanding Your Learning Disability, is a three-hour workshop designed for new students who feel they would benefit from an in-depth analysis of their disability. The workshop will focus on practical learning strategies which the student can

Colleges By

Judith

and

Hemming

a

is

big

step

towards independence for many new students, and that this workshop can help

them make the trasition with ease. She said the workshop will also include role-playing situations which will help students familiarize themselves with what they should expect during the first few weeks of school. Mainland said the second workshop, entitled Making the Most of Your Re-training, designed for mature students returning to school through a sponsorship such as is

Workers’ Compensation

or

Vocational

Rehabilitation Services.

The workshop

host counsellors

will

from various agencies, special needs staff and returning agency-sponsored students

will offer guidance.

who have agencies supporting education have an added stress,”

“Students their

Mainland

said.

“And these counsellors can offer advice and outline typical sources of frustration and confusion (such as required paperwork) which can ease some of this stress.” Mainland said the workshops are impor-

new

tant for

off

some

skipping tricks outside the

“In the past, because

new

we do

a personal ori-

student, not as

people sign up as we would like. But one of the most important reasons for

come

students to

to these

meet new people and Mainland said it is

to

workshops

make

is

to

friends.”

common

for students

with learning disabilities to feel isolated.

This type of workshop will help students realize they are not alone.

The workshops

are part of a series offered

through student services.

special needs students.

entation with each

many

A $15 fee allows unlimited entry workshops.

to all

submit proposals funded by

as reviewing joint program pro-

said he did not know who the Conestoga College representative for the consortium was. He said Conestoga currently has five or six programs that are in

posals, the consortium is also to review and

co-operation with universities, but they are

ments, students must meet the admissions

work

colleges and universities to

same

field

together,

of study

pus,

or the same regional area.”

update a colleges and universities credit

articulation

universities.

transfer guide.

grams.

As well

All proposals will be studied by the con-

wdthin

sortium, which has a representative from

Ministry of Education, said in an interview

each Ontario college and university. The consortium will make recommendations to the Ministry of Education. Those proposals chosen will be funded for the first 1 8 months to two years. The funding does not affect programs already in place, said Mahi, but a proposal to modify a current program would be con-

packages were mailed out towards the end of July. In mid-June, the Ministry of Education and Training announced the creation of a joint consortium of colleges and universities. It also announced a plan to spend $1 million to encourage the transfer of credits between Ontario colleges and universities. Successful program proposals will be funded by that $1 million. “The idea,” said Mahi, “is to encourage

shows

(Photo by Jennifer Broomhead)

who

Post-secondary institutions across Ontario have now received letters from the Ministry of Education calling for proposals for joint programs between colleges and

the

8,

recreation centre while she waits for her brother to finish playing hockey.

universities invited to especially those in the

Solange Mahi, senior policy advisor the universities branch of the

— Jessica Stead,

SKIP TO M’ LOU

sidered.

Proposals will have to be received by the

Doon cam-

titan joint pro-

programs, said McGregor, merely co-operation agreements between a college and a university that allow students to earn both a diploma and a Articulation

are

degree more quickly than

earn

each

separately.

would take to Joint programs it

new curricusome of which would be taught by the college involved and some of which would involve the development, of

lum,

be taught by the university. Articulation agreements cost the institutions involved nothing, but the develop-

ment of new courses

Ministry by September.

Grant McGregor, principal of

programs rather

costly. Articulation

for joint

agreements

programs will not

is

be

this $1 million.

Conestoga

has

articulation

agreements with

five or six

universities,

McGregor

For articulation agree-

currently

said.

standards of the university

in question.

For example, Conestoga has an articulation agreement with Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan for students in engineering technology. Students with a three-year diploma from Conestoga can complete a bachelor’s in engineering in about a year and a half at Saginaw Valley. McGregor said he was definitely interested in the possibility of creating joint programs with Ontario universities. “It’s a question of where and how,” he said.

“What they

require, of course, are partner-

you have work with on those.” ships and

to find

someone

to


1

— SPOKE, August

Page 2

5,

1996

Continuing education

new courses

offers

More than 100

choices for fall semester classes and communication cours-

By Tracy Huffman

es.

through the continuing education

Students can now register by mail or fax by completing the reg-

other

courses

have

been

The new

cours-

that

offered in the past.

many

es are to begin in September. With over 12 different locations

of study, continuing education will be holding evening and weekend courses on all of its campuses as well as in other places such as President John Tibbits,

in

the

payment information. Continuing education also has drop boxes on-campus where students can submit their completed registration form along with a

money

cheque,

order or credit

The

third registration option will

of Aug.

book, boasts that the college

Students can enrol for courses

is

in

effect

as

19. in

“the area’s largest adult education

person

provider” with enrolment over

the student client services build-

12,000 last fall. Adult education

ing during regular business hours. is

skills,

designed to to

increase to

a

diploma. Continuing education has added a number of courses for the fall

certificate or

including several

new computer

courses, cooking classes and busi-

ness courses. Also new to the course offerings is a number of Christmas-related classes, at City Hall

the continuing

in

be

improve job

employee cleans the fountain

form

istration

education booklet and providing

new continuing education course

employment opportunities and allow adults to work towards

of Kitchener

three options.

card information.

Elora, Clinton and Milton.

— A City

register for a course through

continuing education there are

department in addition to

CLEANING UP DOWNTOWN

To

Conestoga College is offering more than 100 new courses

dance

at the registrar’s office in

does not occur in enrolment will be con-

If registration

person,

firmed by mail or telephone. For more information about courses offered through continuing education, students can contact

the

continuing

education

by calling the Doon campus at 748-5220, in the Guelph area by calling 763-9525, and in the office

Stratford-New Hamburg area by calling 662-2530.

on

(Photo by Bruce Manion)

July 29.

University students demand greater role in decision making By Jason

The University of Waterloo

UW

board. on the 40 member has representation “Student always been important. Now, it is

sit

Witzell fed-

eration of students has joined stu-

dent associations from universities

Folley said. Students will be paying 20 per

vital,”

more

across the country in an effort to

cent

increase the role of students in

are not getting

university decision making.

services, Folley said.

The

UW federation

is

joined by

nine other student associations representing over 76,000 students. Kelly Folley, vice-president of education for the University of Waterloo federation of students said the federation will lobby to

double

its

representation.

Currently

three

undergraduates

in tuition fees

Other action the student associations are taking is lobbying their

MPPs. Changes would have

It’s

time for schools to take

and healthy, according to Canadian health experts after the release of the U.S surgeon general’s report on physical activity and health. Research shows that sedentary active

living (spending time sitting)

is

associated with a high incidence

of coronary heart disease and other chronic diseases such as cancer,

diabetes

and hyperten-

sion.

in the past

grown by

than 50 per cent in Canadian children aged six to years, and 40 per cent in those aged 12 to 17. Research also indi1

aged

“A

40 per cent of children

five to eight are obese. lot

Margaret

Good,

community

and Health Education

Association

(OPHEA),

said

the

pushing hard to raise awareness about the importance of daily physical education association

is

in schools.

According

to

the

Canadian

of Western

University

Ontario in London; University of

Brunswick and

St.

Thomas

New

Brunswick; Brandon University in Manitoba and the University of Alberta in

University

in

Calgary. national effort will be co-

by

ordinated

Canadian

the

Alliance of Student Associations

Matthew Hough,

the national

director.

of parents are not aware

ous activity as an essential part of a healthy school environment.”

The

government

provincial

students in Ontario from grades

The

report card

lists

most suband

on a daily basis. They just assume that because they’re kids they must be active enough,” Good said in a telephone interview from her Newmarket home. Currently, there is no legislation

health education.

makes physical education mandatory, despite recommendations made by the Ontario med-

children.

ical officer

of health and a report

report

Good

is

project

the

head of an OPHEA awareness

that, brings

about the benefits of physical education through community seminars aimed

“Some

at

parents

parents

and

and

teachers

aren’t aware of the importance of

physical activity.

They

still

consider physical edu-

cation as an extra or a fluff rather

learning.

The

1

to 9.

ject areas, but not physical

by the Royal Commission on

is

developing a report card, which is designed for parents, to monitor the progress of all currently

that their children are not active

that

health facilitator for the Ontario

Physical

made

other universities that are

the

are:

and, to

more

cates that

Some

involved in the national campaign

exercise, experts say

15 years obesity has

some responsibility for getting young people more physically

rent board, said Folley.

The

governors.

order to alter the cur-

cial level in

New

campaign, began after the University of Manitoba successfully lobbied to double its student representation on its board of

Medical Association,

Witzell

in

UW

The

Get serious about By Jason

but they

20 per cent back

through legislation on the provin-

recommends

“all ele-

mentary schools integrate a daily period of regular exercise of no less than 30 minutes of continu-

than recognizing

and

integral

overall health

said

Good.

it’s

an important

part of children's

and development,”

HARD AT WORK

Construction workers for Habitat for Humanity put the finishing touches on a house on Dundas Street in Cambridge on July 26. The house was scheduled to be completed On July 27 (Photo by Allison Dempsey) .


^

9

.

SPOKE, August

games are

Scottish

By Johanna Johan na Neufeld

ing.

No, they’re not moving out of Fergus. Mary-Jo Aitken, administration manager, said this year the 51st annual Fergus Scottish Festival and Bell’s Highland Fergus and

Street

last

filled

12:30 p.m.

MacDonald school

of the

of

a press conference July 24 to kick off the 51st annual Fergus Scottish Festival and Bell’s Highland Games, at

Aug. 9 tO 11.

the

much

the Fairview

at

One

Whitfield

48th

Highlanders,

78th

Frasiers Pipe Band, Fergus Pipe Band, Scottish Country Dancers,

Fergus Brass Band and the Rallying of the Clans. A fireworks display closes the evenings’ entertainment.

be the lieutenant governor. Mayor Richard Christie, and Kitchener Coun. Marc Yantzi.

MacMaster

On Aug.

10-kilometre run and also planned through

for the public.

Individuals can try their hand at

10, the traditional

day of competition, piping, dancing and heavy events as well as tugof-war championships will occur

A

of Kitchener’s parks will celebrate

its

centennial birthday Aug. 24 and 25. Victoria Park, which officially opened on

August 27, 1896, will host concerts, fireworks and more to mark its 100th anniversary. Rich Mills, who is writing a book about the park, said most people have a positive attitude about the

site.

bad reputation

This

despite an undeserved

is

because of a

in recent years,

and other

falsely alleged rape

false incidents,

he said. Before 1893, the land the park now occupies was farmland, a marsh and a creek; by the time it opened the park contained a five-acre man-made lake. Before Victoria Park existed, Woodside Park was the town park, but it was not very interesting, said Mills,

throughout the day. A massed highland fling with competing dancers and pipers will signal the opening of the games

sometime

in the afternoon.

More information the

Web

page

is

available

on

http://www.sen-

at

tex.net/Fergus.scot.

residents

will

Midway

rides, 19th century

games and

face

will also be perform-

ing, but that concert

is

second

pavilion called “Century of Memories” will be available for browsing. The bandstand stage will house 19th century music from local bands such as the Twin City Harmonizers, the Grand River Brass and the

continues on Sunday.

display

Kitchener Musical Society Band.

The clock-tower stage

will feature

modem

full

Historically, Scottish king, also

known

sold out.

A

day of competitions

painting will entertain the children, while a

as

11th-century

the

Malcolm Canmore, Malcolm of the Big

Head, is generally credited with organizing the first Highland

Games.

games were sim-

er at clan assemblies,

said

loon.

by chiefs for hunting and military

for

Lynda O’Krafka, celebrations co-ordinator, someone playing Queen Victoria will make her way by carriage in time for the

music from bands including Mary Anne Epp and Finnigan’s Tongue. There will be a display of lights by an illuminated boat procession on Saturday night, which will include an illuminated hot-air bal-

were spending

opening ceremonies at noon. Speaking during the opening ceremonies

box lunches and and fireworks.

who works

KOOL-FM. By 1 893 Kitchener

their time at Westside Park in Waterloo, now Waterloo Park. He said Kitchener residents petitioned for a better park, which resulted in the purchase of the land from Samuel Schneider and the creation of Victoria Park. Since its opening, the park has hosted many well-attended events, such as a visit by Wilfrid Laurier in support of William Lyon Mackenzie King’s budding political career. The park has also seen sporting events, including a fight in 1922 featuring legendary boxer Jack Dempsey. Celebrations for the birthday bash include a parade on Saturday, Aug. 24, which will begin at 10 a.m. at King and Francis streets and will

and

Golf

Kitchener’s Victoria Park turns 100 By Eric

America’s biggest Highland Games.

Thousands of people are expected to gather at the grounds of the Fergus recreation centre Friday night to the drone of the bagpipes. On Saturday, let the games begin. Traditional Highland games such as the caber toss, hammer throwing and tug-of-war competitions round out a day of Celtic music, dance and pipe band competitions, snacking on haggis, shortbread and plaid-and-peas and browsing through the 80-booth souvenir market. After the sun goes down, visitors are encouraged to kick up their heels at the ceilidh (pronounced cay-ley) or dance in the beer tent. Cape Breton fiddler Natalie

downtown Fergus and starts at about 9 a.m. Historical re-enactment demonstrations, as well as sheep shearing and a heritage tent are other

(Photo by Johanna Neufeld)

best’

In the evening. Tattoo ‘96 runs to 10:30 p.m. and features

more highland danc-

Sunday events

North

from 8

.

bagpipe competitions and heavy events are scheduled for

dance

of

Fergus, Out., on the banks of the Grand River celebrates its Scottish roots by playing host to

Club outside Fergus.

ing,

Scottish arts

town

and exhibits starts with the Tartan Golf Tournament Aug. 9 at about

John Allan Cameron, chieftain of the games for the past nine

LIGHTER THAN AIR - Members

picturesque

The remainder of the events are same as previous years. The weekend of highland games, food

was planned for Sunday, except the Kirkin’ O’ the Tartan, at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian church.

that day. relay is

the

the

more events scheduled for Aug. 1 The main competitions are usually held on

years, said

II,

festival passes.

also

Saturday. In the past, not

9 to

in

A limited number of spots be available at the complex and only to people with weekend-

downtown side streets. The complex has more space to better accommodate everyone, she said. 1

Fergus Scottish Festival and Bell s Highland Games. For three days, from Aug.

will

the

are

annual

Aitken.

visited the

year and thousands of cars

51st

.

weekends’ events, camping sites have also been provided, said

tions.

About 40,000 people games on St. David

1

midway and pony

For campers wishing to take

of people, vendors and competi-

There

through their veins to dust off their kilts, their sporrans and their wee tarns and head out to the

the

because Victoria Park, where the event was held for years, is too small a venue to hold the crowds

of the year again,

Harrison,

Christina

rides are planned.

move was necessary

that time

It’s

Cameron, Gopher Baroque and Cobbler s Apron will entertain with Celtic music Aug. For the kids, a small

Recreation complex on Belsyde Avenue. The event will still be held Aug. 9 to 1 1. said the

By Diana Love less lime tor all those with even a drop of Scottish blood coursing

Singers

District

She

nrp are rnllim calling

Scottish ancestry.

I

will be at the

— Pa

The pipes

tho oc the P^hpr caber fncc toss as well as i__ learn about historic costumes and weaponry. Also, the Avenue of the Clans is open all weekend and visitors are encouraged to trace their

The most popular highland games in North America are mov-

Games

move

set to

1996

5,

make

its

way

to the park.

Other entertainment includes an auction for gift certificates, canoe races

Originally the ply

impromptu

Highlanders

of physical

tests

and

strength, stamina

who

skill

among

gathered togeth-

summoned

exercises.

As

part of the English policy of

destroying the Scottish clan sys-

tem, the meetings were banned

Women’s temperance union By Bruce Manion Women’s

The

Christian

Temperance Union (WCTU) will hold a seminar on youth and violent

entertainment

at

Kitchener

City Hall on Sept. 10 at 7:30 p.m.

The main speaker

will

be Erica

am

tions,” she said.

“I’ve gathered a lot of material

shows a

should be a certain type of censor-

down

concerned with so many young people committing violent crimes,” Kubassek said.

on the subject and and

it

got to the point where

must come out

violence

WCTU.

Kubassek plans

The purpose of the seminar, Kubassek said, is to make the community aware of the haztainment.

it

steady increase in violent crimes

Kubassek, the Canadian superintendent on legislation to change violence in entertainment and a Christian counsellor for the

ardous effects of violence in enter-

on violence

programs which may have influence on small children. “I believe (violent programs) is affecting us seriously. There

“I

I

to hold talk

in public.

I felt

The

when

ship

pertains to evil,” said

it

Kubassek. Also, Kubassek said

make

it is

impor-

com-

society”

is

in the

because of a breakfamily value system

brutality on television and “children are copy cats.” However, Kubassek said she didn’t want to give away all her con-

mixed with

is

not just on television,

tant to

in

the music and video

nar to other cities to promote

munity aware of the problems, so teachers and educators will be able to guide youth into a less violent future and hopefully create solutions to the problem at an

refreshments will be offered after-

awareness.

early age.

wards.

but

it’s

games,” she said. After the Kitchener seminar, to take

her semi-

approach politicians and lobby for changes in the legislation banning violent

She

also

plans

to

the education

“Children see so that they its

become

effects

much

violence

desensitized to

and moral

implica-

tent,

leaving

some

“surprises” for

her seminar.

They were

uprising

of

revived, along

with the similarly abolished

kilt

40 years later. The Fergus Scottish Festival began its life in 1946 when Alexander Robertson, a Scot who had recently settled in Fergus, noticed there was little recognitartan,

tion of the town’s Scottish heritage.

He approached the newly formed chamber of commerce and several other Scottish descendants

Other guest speakers their observations

the

1745.

and

Among one of the reasons that Kubassek said we have a “loveless

Jacobite

after

on

About 80 people attend this seminar

will offer

the topic

and

in

town and made plans

town’s Celtic roots.

Over are expected to

which

will last

about two hours, said Kubassek.

to orga-

nize a one-day celebration of the

fifty

years

later,

the cele-

bration has expanded to span three

days and attracts Scots from over the world.

all


O

7

Abstract and figurative combined

Woman expresses passion m art Kovayashi,

By Diana Loveless

A

deeply rooted passion for visual

“She (Kovayashi) was an artist in own right. She always saw how special things were and tried to instill

her

Riddell’s career.

that

installation of her monoprints,

An

is

currently on

exhibit until Sept. 2 at the Guelph Civic Museum on Dublin Street in

Guelph. In a recent interview, Riddell dis-

remembered

tinctly

passion for

the

moment

her

expression was

artistic

ignited.

on the second floor of an old house on Queen Street (in Kitchener), which is a really idyllic neighborhood and visually very

“Our family

lived

remember

was looking around

I

and thinking everything looked beautiful ... I remember my first act of drawing was kneeling down scribbling and my parents were sitting on the couch. I really wanted them to see that what I was making was a beautiful thing. I knew then that that’s what to do,” Riddell said. wasn’t until high school that her artistic talents were nurtured and I

wanted

It

began

to

develop with the encourage-

ment of a few inspirational teachers at Eastwood collegiate in Kitchener.

One

that just relit a spark,” Riddell

said.

the from graduating After University of Guelph in 1985 with a

degree in fine arts and

history,

art

Riddell and a friend packed up their bicycles and sketch-books and toured the great

museums and

Europe for a

galleries of

year.

They travelled through England, Turkey, Greece, Italy, France, Yugoslavia, Austria, Germany and Switzerland.

“You

see them (great works of art)

on slides, in books and from what your teachers tell you and then you go over there you see and you see a Rembrandt the real thing and you see rooms and for the first time in depth

inspiring. “I

influenced

strongly

Riddell’s pursuit of art as a career.

images has been the driving force Carolyn artist Guelph behind

pastels and paintings

#

teacher

Tarry

particular,

in

.

rooms of them.

your own interest through this.”

school

is

all .

.

.

you

just driving

She particularly enjoyed seeing artists’ studios,

such as Matisse’s stu-

dio in Nice.

“You

get a chance to see the studios

where these great artists worked. You walk around and you’re in the space where they made their art, so the

painting

Reilly

like

.

over again but with no marking

Egg tempura By Linda

It’s

.

in

Cynthia Nicholls, a Guelph artist, come back stronger than ever after her double-lung transplant four years ago.

Before

her

Nicholls

transplant,

this

medium. Nicholls 1974 at

the University of Guelph, but in 1976 dropped out for health reasons. She continued to work at home on her own and her work evolved from black and white to color drawings.

painted at home.

Nicholls has been drawing as long as

She started pencil drawings and

she can remember.

doing

realist

Carolyn Riddell framed by two monoprints that are

part of her exhibition at the show runs until Sept. 2.

it.”

past eight years.

ent media.

fluff of

“The trip is like a piece of art itself; you just keep feeding off it.” Since 1983, Riddell has had over 30 solo and group exhibitions. In addi-

is

.

November, In Newfoundland

Nicholls said.

finished,

When

she

had the pleasure of meeting Mary Pratt, a famous painter. She hopes to go back to the residence sometime next winter. She has not entered much of her work in shows but has won awards at a couple of juried shows. “It’s always there, Nicholls

painful

little

when

you’re rejected

Sisters organization

used a

her paintings because the

in

work

is

time-consuming.

very

Similar to egg tempura, she builds up the colors in her pencil drawings in

An Cynthia Nicholls. (Photo by Linda

Reilly)

she hopes to continue

average pencil drawing takes

about 75 hours and an average egg tempura painting takes about 100

am working towards finishing my degree now at the University of

hours. “I don’t do landscapes because

Guelph, one course

type of work, unless

said.

“It’s

a

writing

like

comes out

but

story,

She thinks she

at is in

a time,” she the

first

half

of her third year.

they tend to be too general for ticular aspect

of

it,”

I

my

focus on a par-

she said.

Nicholls has a membership in

the

artists

who

discuss cre-

ative ideas.

Presently Nicholls strictly local artist

a full-time,

is

and does not do

shows.

The reason, Nicholls said, was that she has sold a lot of her work out of The Guelph Artisans store

arts

and her inventory

is

and

crafts

low.

“As my health improves, I have more energy so I’m able to do what I couldn’t do before,” she said. Presently she is doing a lot of commissioned work which also takes away from her inventory. The average commissioned portrait, depending on the

detail

involved,

costs

between

$300 and $400. Her long-range plans include illustrating children’s books and painting things

other than people, possibly

animals or objects. In the future, Nicholls plans to show her work. She said she would like to do the Toronto Outdoors Art Show or

weekend in Nathan Phillips Square because she has never done that a

before.

,

Scott Nixon

According to a

economy

is

local artist, today’s

the toughest he’s ever

seen. It’s

not a necessity to

ing, says

own

a paint-

Michael Roth, so

economic times

in

hard

artists suffer.

Despite this, Roth considers Kitchener to be one of the hottest artistic spots in Canada and says there are

many

artists

in

the area

doing excellent work.

A

professional artist for over 30

Roth has

and impressionist paintings, but said he years,

tried

abstract

it

pictorally,” she said.

Today’s economy tough says local painter By

it

mingling of

While

to Artist’s

Nicholls uses photographic refer-

“I

the University of Guelph.

teaches you.

Residence, located in Pouch Cove,

ence

artist

the that

tried to “depart

just outside St. John’s.

the

1996 calender.

Local

from

everyday and create work a part of a universal story

She has

Guelph Creative Arts Association and is part of the Guelph Artisans cooperative, where there’s a good inter-

went

she to

small strokes.

Nicholls is now doing an independent study course of egg tempura at

is

.

colored pencil drawing of a child climbing, drawn by Nicholls, in its

There are thin layers of paint, which

in,”

.

The images created for her current show, Dancing the Plat Form, rely on references to classical mythology, dance and motion, she said.

The Big

five to six hairs.

back-lit.

.

Although she was not heavily influenced by one particular artist, she said she learned a- lot by studying the works of great artists, observing the use of different techniques and differ-

for a juried show,” she said.

make the subject look “The look comes from with-

Dublin Street.The (Photo by Diana Loveless)

alive

Now she likes to spend her time doing egg tempura paintings. She said these paintings of egg yolk and powdered pigment are an enduring very old, time-consuming form of painting, and are said to last thousands of years. The art form was used by realist painters because of the fine detail they could do with the small brush of

built up,

Museum on

tion to her studio work, she has been working as an art instructor for the

comes

it

a

when

Guelph Civic

that’s about as close as you can get to

whole process of

gradually evolved into color.

.

-".'i

EXHIBIT

destined to last a lifetime

started to study Fine Arts in

has

ON

always comes back to painting the Northern Ontario landscape. Roth finds his major artistic inspirations in the Muskokas and the area surrounding his cottage near Huntsville.

Roth acquires

satisfaction

landscape. “It’s peaceful,

from it’s

this

quiet,

and it’s got a rugged beauty,” he said. Roth said he took his first art lesson at 19 with local artist Mathew Kousal, and credits Kousal as being an influence. Roth said he hasn’t really been influenced by famous painters, although he enjoys the Group of

Seven.

get anxious to get back at it

“They have a

totally different style

than

I do,” said Roth, “but I can see where they were coming from much

more now than when I was younger. I appreciate their work a lot more now.”

I still

think I’m learning and improving.”

Roth said one

result of aging

inability to paint for

is his

more than two

or three hours without taking a break, although he said he can paint more in a couple of hours now than

When he was younger, Roth said he didn’t appreciate different styles of art, but as he gets older he has

he could paint

learned to respect other artists for

and said he has probably taught

their talent.

Despite

when he was

•Roth also gives painting lessons,

thousands of

being

painter since for' painting

a

professional

1964, Roth’s passion remains strong. “If I

don’t paint for a

week

or so

I

really

in eight or nine hours

younger.

artists in the

Kitchener

area.

gallery

in

Kitchener, Roth has galleries Bracebridge and Huntsville.

in

In

addition

to

his


« SPOKE, JOURN ALISM

SUPPLEMENT,

2

New city hall overcomes By Aaron Stewart

we

town core. “City Hall

said Laurier Proulx, project

director at City

ment

Hall’s

manager and facilities manage-

understand that until we began this project. It mirrors the people, and we have achieved that here.” Proulx was referring to the beginning of “All

“My

“The problem was

on the

issue

torn

to

and they did. It remain on budget.”

became

Overall, the intention to build an interior square, a public place to gather, was achieved, Proulx said. The building has

“Architects are interested fomi, while engineers want function.

my

engineering background

I

can see

original budget of

“We

struction. !

it,

in

$70 million, committee managed to stay within or even under budget during con-

do was decide what the people wanted. With our German past and the manufacturing background of the city, they wanted a solid box that was functional and pretty to

at

Proulx said.

was easy money

it

project as well.

With an

we had

political,”

council thought

begin nibbling

gained

the building

to

look

thoroughfare.

several areas that could change.”

“I didn’t

the City Hall project in 1989.

very close financially.

was an

— Page 1A

even after setting money aside for contingencies, completion of the project became

line.”

is to connect City Hall with the park, perhaps by making Gaukel Street a pedestrian

With

division, in a recent interview.

1996

5,

negativity

for the future, he said,

Practical accessibility

a reflection of your people,”

is

angled the walls to keep that

The proposed plan

Despite the public negativity of a few years ago, Kitchener’s City Hall has become an accepted fixture of the down-

August

identified the

and included them

front

The

project could not have at

come

notoriety

for

its

“The long and short of it,” Proulx said, “was that we were able to move in on time and on budget. It was a very exciting project, but we were so busy we didn’t have time to stop and smell the roses until it was

It’s

easier that way,” Proulx said.

marketplace

international

design.

problems up

in the plan.

a challenge to

into the

a better time, he said, but

done.”

at.

“That’s

why

this

What’s in store for

building caused a bit of

This was very avantgarde architecture, and there was difficulty accepting that,” said Proulx. negative reaction.

The negative feedback came from

the pubconcern that the new building would raise their taxes, Proulx said. But the people of Kitchener were told that it would be lic’s

paid for by the time the building was operational.

While

the full $65.1 million wasn’t actually paid off until this February, as promised taxes did not increase, and the outcry against the building began to recede.

The

building, Bruce a national contest over 151

of the

architect

Kuwabara, won

WINNING DESIGN welcome

addition

downtown..

City Hall

to

the face

downtown Kitchener?

a

is

By Craig Vallbacka

of

He

other entries to get the job. won the Governor General’s

Award

r

.

for his

design.

for the future.

In July 1 995 a mayor’s task force on the revitalization of downtown submitted its final report to city council. The report outlined a plan which dealt with encouraging new busi-

people to be able to see King and Duke streets, so it’s a very open conce pt. He (Kuwabara) achieved that quite well,” Proulx said. “We also wanted access Street, so to Victoria Park through Gaukel

“We wanted

increasing housing, improving the physical envi-

ness,

fly

Allison Smith

were Stray cows roaming King downof years early the in ommonplace own Kitchener. They were known to were a serious safetttack pedestrians and Street

y concern in Prostitution

mid- 1800s. loosely regulated, but

was was irofanity and insulting language strictly

What

prohibited. is

known

as

downtown Kitchener

Berlin in the was founded as the Village of Waterloo the to 1850s. According

became known as World War Kitchener during the First animosity worldwide was when there Berlin towards Germany. The name business. became bad for Historical Society,

chneider

who

it

sold off sections for as

lit-

which started the development if downtown. spot for urbanization It was an unlikely was selling lecause at the time Schneider no navand railroad land, there was no as $250,

le

lis

local histogable water route. Kitchener’s •y

librarian

ronment and bringing more people downtown. an Whitestone, Bruce economist with 29 years of

services, tom'snd the need for secondary serv tern and the. surrounding such as barrel makers, for the

...

attributes the

Susan Hoffman

sysievelopment to the quality of the road

in

of the Grand Trunk Railroad secured the area as a centre of

1856

commerce and boomed when the Berlin.

industry.

number

0.

said

utable and vibrant.

He

centre of

down-

downtown needs more people suggested there. The task force said

could occur

if

A

were clustered around the railroad.” Entertainment in early downtown

,

,

task force survey conducted by the was a major factor people

found that safety people means were concerned with. “More less crime,” said Whitestone.

was

gram

to

provide free bicycles

downtown would be very

feasi-

ble and add to the whole atmosservice phere of the downtown core. “The

would add

to the homeliness,”

we

a large grocery store and

stores.

Whitestone said he feels a pro-

liv-

in the area. A people could of accommodating more above apartments of be a European style

Berlinl, said could be transported out [of factories many so why “That’s Hoffman.

of transporting people downtown such as shuttle buses.

this

way

as furniture

task force also suggested means the city explore alternate

The

people could see what

hardware store were located

credits the town’s development. Hoffman such industries, railroad for the success of manufacturers, breweries and

|(j

Whole new lease on

have

Whitestone said he thinks right if the city does the more repthings, downtown can become

ing the

wou

Whitestone

and goods made

was

;+ ’

force.

train meant that of specialized’ trades. The available more sophisticated goods were in Berlin could be export-

Street

able.”

*

life,’

business

Whitestone said he feels this is the largest beneficial change for downtown. “The main thing is to don’t use the free spaces avail-

cultural

bers of the five-person task

conducting

and

lots

monitor shopkeepers so they

an entertain-

stopped in

the increased significantly, as did

ing

into

Downtown

train finally

people

were made

ment

parking

in

garages.

and the investment commumemnity, was one of the

The number of merchants and pro-

fessional

Canadian government

the

arrival

and reduced rates

(downtown)

‘If it

experience in the affairs of

agricultural area.

The

said an increase in will create a night

population enhancing the safety of downtown. The survey also showed that parking was cited as a major deterrent in maintaining and attracting business downtown. The city has implemented suggestions made by the task force such as free parking on streets

There are no moving sidewalks or holographic displays but downtown Kitchener is experiencing changes to help improve it

has since

Downtown grows up „

The task force report number of people

the

(Photo by Aaron Stewart)

a

he

said,

"so

good community

have.”

Whitestone said people mainly go down(downtown) for entertainment. “If it

town were made

cultural into an entertainment

centre,” he

said, “it

new

lease

on

Only time

will tell

will create a

would have a whole

life.” if

the task force s plans

new and improved downtown,

if you see more peoor riding bikes. bags grocery carrying ple

but don’t be alarmed

and live music limited. Taverns, eateries A stage was 1870s. the by were available the Walper Hotel built behind what is now and Queen streets. at the corner of King and German festivals singing Opera, early years. music were all popular in the organized in was Berlin in band The first

1855.

The

first

theatre

built in the

was

1920s. .

There

are

few

,

,

of

traces

physical

The

downtown. Kitchener’s history left that are left are buildings historic few obscured by the new. One of the oldest buildings

is

the

Dolan

comer of King and the mid 1800s. in built Ontario streets, support for maintaining down-

Shoe building,

HOTEL

-

Home

to VALPER early the in entertainment nusical (Photo by Allison Smith)

at the

There is strong interest town’s history. “There is a said buildings, historic preserving in as such benefits, “There are

Hoffman.

tourism, that

come from

preservation.’

new businesses The Kinq Street Trio is one ot many Kitchener o, future the downtov^coreThat is keeping Craig Vallbacka)

_

Irfihe

(Photo by


.

Page

— SPOKE, JOURNALISM 2 SUPPLEMENT,

2A

Improving downtown

August

1996

5,

activities

Arcades take action to earn respect By Greg Bisch

arcades that were the problem.

background

downtown by some to be

Kitchener’s

arcades, once con-

a plague on King have finally found their niche in the core’s business community. “They have improved a lot,” said Karen

sidered

It

was

the

activity.”

Also, the congregation of teenagers was

“When anyone

is

walking down the

often difficult to identify the

it’s

unprofessionally,”

Dibatista said.

“The poor management

takes drugs.”

prevents kids

“One of the main reasons for the problem was that new arcades came into the area and

games from hanging around. “Now, we only get the serious

Redman.

intimidating to other people, said

Street,

ran

from the bad,” she said. “For example, just because every high school has a drug problem doesn’t mean every high school student

street,

good kids

it

everyone

let

in.”

Also, he said that the anti-loitering bylaw

who

don’t play the video players,”

said Dibatista.

pressure from city council, the arcades were

Other bylaws brought in to control downtown arcades include a zoning bylaw allowing an arcade to open only in the interior of

Redman,

city councillor for the

downtown

centre ward, in a recent interview. “With

has a

minimum

forced to take action in order to maintain

a building

business in the community.”

metres in floor area. Also,

is more respect for the place now,” Tony Dibatista, owner of Zapper I and II on King Street, in an telephone interview. The arcades are the only two left in the

dants are to have a licence.

The

would prevent anyone with

a

downtown

porate citizen”

“There

said

Redman

core.

1980s and early 1990s, it was a much different story, however. At that time, Kitchener residents often read in the Kitchener- Waterloo Record about teen gangs, swarmings, and drug problems in

As a consequence, known for their teenage customers, became a hot target for

opened

has

wasn’t necessarily the

sufficient

in

1979 with games

like

Space

since pinball machines.

At that time his customers ranged from young to old. “I used to get a lot of businessmen,” said Dibatista.

He

“It

made

PacMan the first color video game. The new technology was the only entertainment of its kind to come out

in the core.

When

who

Invaders and then

In an article in the Kitchener- Waterloo Record on May 3, 1991, Bryan Stortz, the chairman of city council’s downtown action committee, said that revoking arcade licences may be one way of curbing “antisocial behaviors” displayed by some youths

Redman.

considers Dibatista “a good cor-

business took place shortly after Zappers

local politicians.

said

licence

criminal

improve the situation. Dibatista has been working with nearby high schools to ensure that teenagers 1 6 and under are in school rather than spending their day playing video games. Dibatista said that the peak of the arcade

arcades,

"The main problems were that kids were bagging school and it was a place for teenagers to congregate in large numbers which made it easy for drugs to be sold,”

of 10,000

arcade atten-

efforts to

Kitchener’s downtown.

amusement

all

record from working at a video arcade.

In the late

the

if it

said that his business reputation has

benefited from the

With systems

CRUISING

Resurrection high school student, Chris Pluecks, plays of the newest games at Zappers. (Photo by Gre g Bisch)

Daytona USA, one

you’re hungry and you

know

it

.

.

games kids play

at

home.

Nintendo, older generations are getting more exposure to video like

games and have become more accepting of them.

.

Getting a bit to eat and a bite of life By James Cleaver

smoked salmon on a bagel, the “iced mocha,” and his new line of cakes. The decor is a mixture of blues and yel-

the

caffe

For people spending a day downtown, looking for something new, Kitchener

lows and reds, with a somewhat ultra-modsetting. The back wall has jars of coffee beans showing the types served by the

offers several interesting places to try for lunch or dinner.

em

they prefer a quick but well-prepared lunch. Especially Coffee might have what

restaurant.

If

they want. If they like a place with a different atmosphere and a pint of ale to wash their meal down when dining out, The Strand might suit their tastes. Especially Coffee, located at 10 King St. E„ has been in the downtown core for four

years and

is

the sole creation of

who

Vanlersel,

has worked

business for 10 years. Vanlersel said he

owner Peter the coffee

in

chose

downtown

“Waterloo has lots of these kinds of specialty shops and I considered there,” said Vanlersel, “but I

didn’t

I

was

want

certain this

to flood the

would be

the

best location.”

Especially Coffee, as the name suggests, offers a wide selection of coffee, but also a fairly extensive menu consisting of salads, cakes, sandwiches and coffees. Vanlersel

recommended many of the items

on the menu, but

servative, but

in particular

he suggested

we geared

up for our

it

clien-

When customers first enter the restaurant, they notice the mural that covers the entire wall behind the counter or bar area.

An

said the mural

tele,” said Vanlersel.

He

said

most of

was done by

his archi-

tect

and

It

said,

is based on a Picasso painting. represents the joy of life, I guess,” he

“and no one else has anything

He said his clientele are also the professional people in the area, but in the evening, the ages vary. “In the evening older and younger people in, said An, “and everyone likes it in here.”

come

his clientele falls into the

because of his downtown location, but added that all different types of people

come

in.

do have some younger people who

regulars that

no trouble

come

at all,

in often

and

I

are

and they cause

appreciate their busi-

ness,” said Vanlersel.

The Strand, located at 185 King St. W., is owned by Bruce An, who lives in the London area and has worked in the hospitality industry for many years.

An

said he chose Kitchener because he

liked the kind of city that Kitchener also agreed that Waterloo was

is and overcrowded

with “unique places.”

"Kitchener has a population that big and not too small,” said An.

is

not too

The Strand has a full menu, serving for lunch and dinner and a wide choice of

Semester Two DIE Editor.

Copy

Editor.

Photo Editor. Photo Editor. Production Manager. Production Assistant.

Aaron Stewart Trina Moses ..Jessica Whitmore Greg Bisch Allison Smith

Craig Vallbacka

Production Assistant.

Nicole Guitard

Production Assistant.

James Cleaver

Production Assistant.. Production Assistant..

Natalie Schneider

Production Assistant..

Peter Cross

Staff Supervisor

Dave Henry Jim Hagarty

.

rant,

ri_t

The Strand,

in

a Picasso paintinq.

irauy

like this

interior.”

professional class in the 25 to 45 age range,

"I

Kitchener due to the availability of space at the time and because. there wasn’t anything else of its kind in the area.

market and

wanted a decor that was somewhat different and we started with something con“I

meals such as Japanese dumplings and the with different foreign and domestic draft beer on tap. “I wanted this place to represent a pubstyle atmosphere,” said An, “with points from restaurants, like the menu.” Strand salad,

uonnson manages the new restau The mural behind her is a basec

Kitchener.

(Photo by James C


City Hall sets the stage

Second-hand stores

Tuesdays breathe

downtown

into

By Jessica Whitmore

Tuesday nights Tuesdays on the Town!

From June

18 to

summer

this

Aug. 27,

Waterloo.

Upshaw and

in Civic

1995. Ladds joined the group eight months ago and Erhart has only played with them three times.

Square

in front

of City Hall, there are live entertainbuskers and sometimes activities

ers,

There were also two magicians performing

for

kids. Also, businesses like the store. Just Between Us,

new

in

clothing

not

many allow

you

to

busk

front

of the fountains.

Grand River

and William’s

Coffee Pub are open “There’s lots of places to play in Kitchener, but

Irschick have been playing

Civic every

Square Tuesday

They

har-

are

self-taught

monica player for group Yeah,

the

perform

Whatever, said in an interview

tricks,

tricks

playing

one

of walking

Tuesday live

dark

perform

any

people by.

tive,”

Silkston

money is why they

MAGIC

I

people would

Bob Barlen

and

(left)

to the

used sec-

part

C e

per cent of what

we

waiting

sit

and

get

Barlen performed

listen

at the

Conversations

with customers who use these stores indicate they attribute the rising trend in the economy. Some

later,

peo-

ple need

began to buy used records and cassettes from people and would sell them for less than what a new album would cost. “The fact that people wanted to sell them (albums) to us is what made us go to used stuff. At that point, CDs were sort of on their way in,” said Logan. Kristine Wendell,

and moved

of 54 Queen

them

So they

sell

to a store.

Others

may want

don’t have the

certain

money

items but

pay the

to

full

price.

Therefore they go to the used stores and can usually find whatever it is they need or want for a much more reasonable price.

As “Oh

his

for the trend continuing,

yeah.

Logan

said,

The only

thing that would cause used CDs to stop would be if record companies were to step in like they tried to in the (United) States a couple of years back. Because in some cases, we’re selling the used stuff for half the price of the new.” So, as for downtown Kitchener, used definitely seems to be what’s in.

bought the

to the present location

it

things they

don’t want or need any more.

the store

About eight years ago, Logan and

money and have

St. S.

Logan

said the used section of the store started off very small, but when asked if the section had grown at all since, he replied, “Oh God, yeah.”

section does very well for the

Busker’s Festival

year.

to

made up of

is

into

the

in

four men:

The City of Kitchener gives

Greg Upshaw, who writes, sings and plays guitar, is from Cambridge; Mark Irschick, who sings and plays guitar and recorder, is

By Dave Henry

the performers

from the trom tne Tuesday night shows T-shirts l-shirts that say Tuesday on the Town! so people can see them and enjoy the entertainment.

The Garage offers

The Rec Room

entertainment.

Sammy’s Garage

newest bar

the

is

competitive

in

Garage

downtown bar

is

simply

scene.

is filled.

As customers sight they see

Facing competition from Stages,

The

Saloon,

Metropolis,

Lyric,

Howl

the at

likes

the

of

Moon

and Club Abstract,

sets

itself

apart

with

is

enter the Garage the

first

the front half of a 18-wheel

truck which doubles as a DJ The two DJs are perched in the seats

transport

booth. as they

pump

out the tunes and take turns

blasting the rig’s horn.

unique styling and an upbeat atmosphere.

BARGAIN HUNTING - Jennifer

Eatwell glances at a used CD while Encore Records. The store carries thousands of CDs and cassettes including a large used section. (Photo by Nicoie Guitard)

shopping

at

variety to Kitchener bar scene

there as an option in case the showcase

Another feature decorating

the

Garage

is

1996 Harley two glittering chrome Davidson Fat Boys that are mounted over the bar. The words, “It ain’t over till the fat boys sing,” are displayed above them. The rest of the Garage is loaded with automotive and mechanical memorabilia, along with the waitresses and bartenders also dressed in mechanic’s garb. The Garage features two bars, a big screen television, four other televisions, a dance

Sammy’s has taken over a building that in the past was home to Duffers bar and the Keg restaurant, but with in mid-April,

Sammy’s

service at the bar

is

and friendly

fast

mechanics fixing some of Sammy’s house specialty shooters, such as the Flying Monkey Wrench, the Spark Plug, the Snow Tire, and the Fender Bender. The Garage attracts a widely mixed crowd from bikers to university students, and most with

is

as they are

by a vintage tow-truck, and inside the front door by a variety of oldstyle gas pumps. Sammy’s is divided into two levels with the smaller downstairs being named the Rec Room and the crowded upstairs as the Garage. The Rec Room is a quarter of the size of the Garage and is mostly reserved for quieter conversation and pool on a string of tables. There is music and a dance floor, a large-size bar and two televisions for

well-ventilated.

The

renovations

phere upon arrival at

floor and a walk-out patio. The music is mainly upbeat dance, but there is the odd hard-edged rock tune thrown in. The patio gives customers the option of stepping outside for a breath of fresh air or a chance to take a break from the music. It has eight tables and a small food section where you can dine on natchos and hot dogs. The biggest benefit of the patio is the way it adds fresh air to the garage and keeps it

and creative styling something totally different. Customers can feel the garage-like atmos-

the

in the downtown area are a couple of surplus stores and used clothing stores.

sell

began working at Encore Records about 10 years ago, when the store was still located at its old address on King Street East.

A couple of years

Street.

,

movies; others would take their coffee from

Sammy’s

Queen

for the i

William’s over.

Opening

Look on Both stores sell used books. Dr. Disc on King Street sells used records, cassettes and CDs. Also located

owner

I

Waterloo last year and he and Silkston plan on going as a team to the Festival this

Sammy’s Garage

and go

in

Silkston said.

while they were

Kitchener’s

really developed with such stores as Casablanca Bookshop on Ontario Street and A Second

that much. Don’tt get me JJOn wrong, the money’s nice but

%

their

Yeah, Whatever

good for them. The trend has

make

w

j

Some

The

don’t

when some j 0 hn Silkston perform tricks and “portable people would IIIV*«JI 1 illusions” VI IV for V VCAVVVI passers-by every Tuesday night 1 come leave, Others in others nf Uloll r a c t n frnnt f ron t 0 f Qjty Hall, (Photo by Jessica Whitmore) P

L

core.

used.”

The used

“We

but

place.

are

there.

were not big. For Yeah, Whatever there ineic were only umy gud about 30 people, TUESDAY

would take

not

This

Logan

store

for their act, but the

downtown

Mark Logan,

said

stuff. Fifty

ignore us.”

The two take

crowds

new

have no problem with busi-

has been reflected in other stores located around the city where all they sell is used items, and business has been

of Encore Records, during a phone interview July 15. “Then, if they can’t find what they're looking for, they go to the

partner,

donations

discs,

it.

“They just walk by and said.

longer.

The

the

aren’t that recep-

The buskers play to

illu-

“Some people

enter-

tainment usually starts about 6:30 p.m. and continues until about 8:30 or 9 p.m. until it’s too

magic and minor

aid

night.

The

and card

“portable sions” with

before the group started

both

unwanted compact

“People come

is

night.

said

CDs we’d

items are then put on sale at reduced prices to customers, and they seem to

first,

we could buy 10 times more we do, we would sell them all,” Logan. “If we could go to all used than

ness.”

certain stores in the

tion

full

downtown

store. “If

books, videos and clothes can be sold to

and has been rated the seventh best close-up magician in Canada, are at

student,

like

the

Barlen, a

All of those

trend

CDs

is new again. That seems to be the growing trend for downtown Kitchener.

love

collegiate

who works

Duncan

this,”

Erhart,

Bob

Guitard

Everything old

and John time as a magician

Silkston,

later.

By Nicole

May

together since

new

in Kitchener’s

nights

from Kitchener; John Ladds, who plays rhythm guitar and does the backup vocals, is from Caledonia; Erhart is from

The City of Kitchener has a new way to keep citizens of Kitchener- Waterloo entertained

beginning

life

greeted outside

the

customers said they are very optimistic about its future. “It’s a

good time,

I

really like the set-up,”

said college student Julie Virtue. “It’s original

»

L_

UNIQUE ATMOSPHERE of

Sammy’s Garage and

ment.

— A tow truck greets customers is

one

of

many unique designs

different,

and the patio

is

great.”

music, and there’s lots of room to move,” said first-time patron Tina Tulk.

— at the front

and

“I love the

door

at the establish(Photo by David Henry)

“I

would

definitely

come

Sammy’s Garage St.

W., in Kitchener.

is

back.”

located

at

400 King


— SPOKE, JOURNALISM 2 SUPPLEMENT, Youth keeping Kitchener alive Page

4A

-

August

5,

1996

Hanging out downtown, fun and economical By

Trina

“There have been a few complaints about loitering but City Hall is a people place and we encourage people of all ages to come and enjoy themselves,” he said. Some damage has been caused to the fountain area by skateboarders and bicycles but no extensive damage has been done by any-

Moses

undue

With all the activities available for young people to take part in in downtown Kitchener, it seems many of them would much rather just sit around with their and most people do not mind at all. “There are always people here you know,” said Lisa Plank of Kitchener, as she sat in front of Williams Coffee Pub on King Street recently with three of her friends. friends,

“We

one

who

gathers there,

McBride added.

City Hall security has asked people to leave the area on different occasions but it not just restricted to the younger genera-

is

around and hang out.” Stacey Lafrasze, 17, agreed with Plank. “I’d rather hang out here than be alone at home or with my parents. We like the fact that we can sit here all day and not get has-

tion.

sled by anyone,” she said.

Naudi, 22, are employees at the new clothing store, Just Between Us, located in the

just, sit

“We

Mary Kay Smola,

On

any given day, a person can walk Street and see anywhere from 10 to 50 young people playing music, skateboarding, having a game of hacky sack, or even a friendly game of chess. The manager of Williams Coffee Pub,

NICE

MOVE

game

of

there.

“I

my

come

said

“They

at the east

about loitering in front of the building.

16-year-old Janelle

Belton. She said she has been harassed by the police and said

it

will get worse.

should spend more time

down

year with the proposal to open

hasn’t been met.”

McGregor, who has been skate-

Redman was

said

really sup-

ing on city property.

portive of the idea from the begin-

Skateboarding seems to have been overlooked while other

ning and that

such as hockey, baseball and soccer have benefited from having a place in an arena, they

in place.

the idea really

say.

because

sports

Shawn McGregor,

19,

who

is

pushing for the arena, said in an interview that he approached centre

ward Coun. Karen Redman

that we’re not serving really well,”

handling and insurance costs,”

McGregor.

if it

was up

to her

they would already have the arena

boarding for six years, said he decided to approach city council because he was fed up with getting fines.

In the last year he has received

Redman

said in an interview that

it

appealed to her

came from

the

kids

themselves.

“Kitchener is a very sparts-orL ented town but I sense that these kids are a pocket and an age group

eight tickets for trespassing run-

recently

attended

a

meeting about the proposed park and said a decision was made that if the arena does open it will most likely be an out-of-doors arena with wooden ramps. “We were kind of hoping for an outdoor concrete park,” said McGregor. “Concrete is more expensive - it costs anywhere between $65,000 to $100,000 but renovations

are

inexpensive

McGregor

said council

con-

is

Memorial

the

away from McGregor. “As

they’re trying to get us

After lobbying council

McGregor

don’t

for an

said things

look more positive than they ever have.

“I’m willing to do anything to help the arena get built. I’ll do car washes or get donations,” he said.

would like to try and someone to sponsor the arena Coca-Cola or something.” “I

find like

City council will be voting on

proposed skateboarding arena Aug. 6. the

REALLY BOARD

Adam,

shows

14, a off his balancing skills on his

Street

downtown.

Kitchener student, skateboard on King (Photo by Peter Cross)

about

himself down a Kitchener sidewalk on his skateboard. A Yankees’ cap covers most of his face, and his tom Tshirt barely hangs on to his wirey frame. Every few seconds he tugs

pushes

his pants

up by the

belt loop, but

expose his brightly colored boxer shorts. Is he an out-of-luck street kid, they

still

who

can’t afford

new

clothes?

No, he’s a 17-year-old high

who

parents

in

with his

lives

a wealthy Waterloo

subdivision.

The

outfit,

hardly a

handout, cost close to $300 while the skateboard cost another $400. Every night, skateboarders of all ages fill downtown Kitchener streets

and parking

Some

lots.

on the streets, some their own, and some still live

live

on

live at

home

with their parents. The one thing that all of them have in

common, however, revolve

is

that then-

around multi-col-

ored fibreglass boards.

Danny Drew

is

a

Until then, McGregor and other skateboarders have no choice but to skateboard on city property and risk being harassed

and

fined.

the

being

by

harassed

the

whose current

priority in life is

wood and

“That guy,” said Sheldon, another skater, while pointing to a man in a Chinese restaurant, “chased me off his front steps with a broom once.”

Some

police

stop and

bug

officers the

always

skaters about

and the color of their one skater who wished to remain nameless for fear of retaliation by the police. He also complained that the police gave their clothes hair, said

them

“silly” tickets, like littering

and jay walking. Often times they are the ones to get questioned

if

first

a crime

committed in the downtown he said. For some skateboarders, it is just

is

area,

a

way

it is

a

to get around, but to others,

way of life. From

the

music

they play to the clothes they wear,

everything they -do around their “deck.”

revolves

“I just started, so I’m not really that I

I

member of the

finding a “wicked curve” or building a makeshift “half pipe” with

won’t be downtown because

entire year,

good

to

come from

location sites for the arena.

I

a

is

and they bring business whole downtown,” said Smola.

rapidly growing group of youths

downtown,” said long as it’s on the bus route think anyone cares.”

young

quality,

Auditorium, Kaufman Park or Queensmount Arena as possible “It

Naudi.

that

not afraid to takes risks, which

dirt-covered youth scowls as

lives

and simple.” sidering

A he

school student

ning as high as $100.

McGregor

to earth,” said

police and store owners.

“I brought in a pamphlet with estimates on lumber prices, building costs, ramp ideas, equipment

He

and Roseanne

customers are their best customers. “They love our products and they love us. They’re

By Peter Cross

said Redman. “There is a lot of things that the city of Kitchener and parks and recreation does well but I feel this is a need that

up a skate park.

receiving tickets for skateboard-

new

walks of life

all

said

23,

Smola and Naudi both agreed

Skaters

to ride their skateboards

down

they’re really

hardly ever see any (drugs) right

downtown,” Belton said. John McBride, the manager of traffic and parking whose office is located in City Hall, said there has been some concern expressed

here everyday and spend most of

time here,”

I

Fighting for the right

Kitchener Skateboarders in decided recently to approach city council with a proposal to open up a skateboard arena in downtown Kitchener. They are tired of

gives

They both said they think it is young generation are allowed to hang out downtown. “We have no problems with it at all. They look like the weirdest, funkiest, most rebellious kids but

lively.

said he feels there are a lot of

last

It

great that the

John Pinperton, 21, (left) and Rob Pelletier, 17, play a chess in front of Williams Coffee Pub in the civic square as Stacey Lafrasze, 17, Erda Scnarr and a friend look on. (Photo by Trina Moses) end of King. There’s more drugs down eration is keeping downtown Kitchener

good teens but the older generation are sometimes intimidated by them. He also said the blend of adults and the young gen-

By Natalie Schneider

here.

civic centre.

who asked that his name not be used, said he has no problem with youth as long as they are clean and not abusive to his cusHe

good

people,” said Erda Schnarr, 18.

downtown on King

tomers.

get treated pretty

us something to do and a place to meet

good

yet,” said Sheldon.

“But

think the clothes are real cool, so

always wear them.”

Some

skaters take the sport very

Many spend hours and honing their skills for upcoming competitions and tourseriously.

hours

naments.

To some of the other youths who hang out downtown, they are simply

United States,” said Drew. “But

known

getting

scrap

bricks.

as “skaters,” but to

restaurant and store

King

many

owners along an unwanted

Street, they are

hassle.

not as big here as in the

“It’s

now

that

downtown

for hours at a time.

nization,

walk,” said the owner of a restaurant near Kitchener City Hall.

“Nobody wants

to

walk past

them. They’re disgusting.”

Many

skateboarders complain

members of

North American Skateboarding Association (NASA) and are trying to put pressure on local recreation centies.

“They hang around outside my shop and spit all over the side-

skaters are

the

streets, store owners annoyed when some skateboarders loiter around their shops

get

local arenas are

tests.”

Some

Although the police say skateboarding is a legal form of transportation along Kitchener’s

more

skateboarding facilities hopefully we’ll have some con-

tres

to get skateboarding facili-

NASA

is

a non-profit orga-

headquartered in San Bernardino, Calif. It is committed to standardizing competition

and establishing the criteria for judging tournaments. “Some day,” said Drew, “all this practice will pay off and I’ll be in the Extreme Games on TSN.”


Guelph printmaker makes By Allison Dempsey

mark

his

he sold numerous works, includ$200 and bigger ones for $700. In the past, he has sold July,

ing small prints for

For Guelph-bom printmaker Steven art was always more than just

White,

a large print for $3,000.

another subject in school: it was what he was best at when he was little, and

995 he won best of the show at on the Green exhibit in Guelph. Because of that award, he was invited back as guest exhibitor this In

it is his now his livelihood, a vehicle with which to express and support himself, he hopes, for years to come.

with

started

all

It

He has also had two shows in Nathan Phillips Square, which provided a lot of connections for up-andcoming artists such as White. “The shows attract gallery owners from all over,” he said. “One in Toronto and one in British Columbia showed some interest. You can make a year.

drawings

of Garfield the cat when he was younger, and by Grade 1 he knew art was what he wanted to do for life. He also knew he wanted to go to university, and after winning the Best Artist Award in 1

Grade 13 from the University of Guelph arts council. White decided to attend Queen’s University in Kingston

White’s next exhibit is in the warehouse area of Toronto, and he is participating in the Third Rail Show at the end of September. Although showing

wanted more than the hands-on “And Queen’s

approach,” he said. offered that.”

his art

In his third year he “clicked” with

“I

is

have

important, selling to sell,”

I want combi-

nation.”

various techniques. Before graduating, he won the Best Artist at Queen’s

friends “all over the board.” His

to gain recognition, too. It’s a

White mate

Toronto and

in

treats his art like a full-time job. “I put in more than 40 hours a week, but I work at my own pace,” he said. “I put

my

all

effort

into

it.

I

another job right now, but the extra income, I will.”

White has worked

in

I

need

show

the

at

“I

a gallery

in

commercial

Delbello Gallery in Toronto. At the Toronto Outdoor

Homer Watson’s

Show

in

an

illustrator,

had a mentor

helped

Toronto for a couple of months, and has had several shows, including a recent solo

is

university art professor, a move he considers to be a “natural development.”

don’t have

when

also a musician, and has

is

roomand he has friends who are artists and engineers. White eventually would like to be a

award. lives

W

crucial.

is

he said. “But

printmaking, a two-dimensional procedure which involves the fusing of

White now

>

of connections.”

lot

for a bachelor of fine arts degree. “I

1

the Painting

me

at

H

Queen’s, and he

out, steered

me

direction,” said White. “I that effect on others.

in the right

want

have

to

“I’m still very new, but people have bought a couple of my prints and told their friends about me. It’s slow-

NEW ARRIVAL

going, but worthwhile.”

as a mixed-media

tradition lives

University,

small

the

In

stone

structure

Albert Handell. Her parents, both that

sits

behind the Homer Watson House and Gallery on Old Mill Road in Krtchener’s south end, artist Laura Urquhart paints ?nd teaches within the tranquil surroundings

have inspired

that

artists

for

over

100

years.

Urquhart sticks mainly to watercolor to create familiar local landscapes and porof individuals

traits

whom

know while growing up Urquhart

she’s gotten to

in the area.

Urquhart incorporates several mediums her instruction,

paint can lead to something. “They don’t quite grasp the concept of

someone

sitting

scapes

this,

says

Her major color

play

the

in

office

on

nurse in

dis-

in

ill,

of the gallery

and

in

some of her ings

caring for

maintain a sense of

Most of her work has been put on dis-

humor and

Ramada

Inn in London, Ont.,

and a gallery in Amherst, N.Y., after it was shown in the Homer Watson Gallery in “I sold over a third of my work from the show, which is good in this economy,” says Urquhart. Urquhart studied art at the University of

February.

Guelph, the Ontario College of Art and Mohawk College, as well as with artists

John Pike and

caring

about others while they were very sick themselves,” says Urquhart. Her experiences with terminally ill patients have led to her spiritual growth as an

artist,

and she

is

currently taking

a

course on the study of miracles. Urquhart is the artist in residence at the

Homer Watson to

Gallery and she continues

work and teach

there

throughout the summer.

art,

Patrick

Moore

of differing interests.”

when he was young,

Boutilier learned to play the guitar

never pursued

it

never really started

until later in life. “I

ously working with Citing Leonard

my

but

seri-

guitar until university.”

Cohen and

Neil

Young

as

two of

influences, Boutilier says he tries to keep his

own

his

major

style in his

music. Currently, he plays sets at the Olde English Parlour and the Fox and the Pheasant in Waterloo. “I play mostly covers, but I try and throw a few of my own songs whenever I get the chance.” When not playing his guitar, Boutilier says he enjoys painting. “I’ve always liked to sketch, so

move

into painting. I’ve

it

found that

seems a natural extension

to

Sketching

is

I

really like

it.

just as fulfilling as painting, but in a different way.”

describes his style as a cross between avant garde and do the sketch as close to real as possible,” he

photo-realistic. “I

up a little. I try and change it ways in unexpected ways around which kind of challenge the way you think.” Boutilier says he finds no contradictions in being a psycholosame time. “Studying human gy student and an artist at the nature through science and expressing my nature through painting and playing the guitar seem a natural enough progression, I says.

“Then

I

try

so that

it

and spruce

comes

at

it

you

guess.”

“Sometimes there would be people who would still

the

Woodstock, N.Y.,

in

for paint-

her patients.

gallery.

play in the

Urquhart found

inspiration

Coach House

studio

care

with the terminally

front

is

her

specializing

balances

Clay Boutilier is a man of contradictions. A psychology major at the University of Waterloo studying reaction theory in humans, he is also a painter and guitarist. “I’m not a renaissance man,” he says. “I just have a good deal

He

palliative

(Photo by Janet white)

By

are

Also a registered

one of the few watercolor works that can be seen and purchased and

artist.

music and school

Pike.

paint-

ing of local farmer, Tilt, is

artist

Monet and her former teacher, John

by people want- ing to purchase art for their homes.

Mr.

influ-

ences as a water-

more

portrait

says

Urquhart.

landare

painting for a

living,”

readily sought after

A

in a building like

around

of people,

although

drawing,

including

mixed media and watercolor. “I also do illustrations for puzzles to pay the rent, and I like to show them to the kids so they can see how learning to draw and

she prefers to paint portraits

artists,

were also fundamental influences in her formative development as an artist. Now teaching children and adults herself, into

Steven White, a graduate of Queen’s one year ago to pursue a career

to Toronto

Man

on

Painter finds local inspiration By Doug Coxson

moved

on most weekends

He

says he uses his psychological training for his music and sometimes just ride the bus and watch people, or go to

his art. “I

and see how people react to things that pass by. It’s a we live in, and each person is a microcosm full of inspiration to draw from. I try and tap into some of that in my work.” Boutilier says he If given only one pursuit to choose from, would choose his music. he says. “I “I guess it’s because I started painting later in life,” than music with greater myself express can now I right that find the park

fascinating world

can with paint. That could change, though. anothBoutilier says he could see himself possibly picking up couldn t er avocation some time in the future. “I don’t see why I kind of full right start something else,” he says. “My plate is I

now, but

I

always have time

to

do something

creative.”


— SPOKE, August

Page 6

5,

1996

COMMENTARY Editor

News

editor

Student

Allison

Dempsey

Judith

Hemming

Janet White

Issues and activities editor

Features editor

Jennifer

Sean

Photo editors

S. Finlay

Broomhead

Peter Marval

Advertising manager

manager

Faculty supervisor Faculty advisor

is

published and produced weekly by journalism students

of Conestoga

mainly funded from September to May by the Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. College.

SPOKE

Advertisers in

“Keeping Conestoga College Connected”

tain the in

Deborah Everest-Hill Tracy Huffman Paul Tuns Jim Hagarty Bob Reid

Production manager.

Circulation

&

SPOKE

SPOKE

Diana Loveless

editor

life

DSA

is

SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements conSPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

logo.

advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the space.

Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor of the above address by 9:30 a.m.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Kitchener, Ontario,

Room 4B15

Monday. Submissions

are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly

written or typed; a WordPerfect 5.0

N2G 4M4

tain any libellous statements and

file

may

would be

helpful.

Submissions must not con-

be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

photograph).

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

Co-op needs reforming What’s going on at Conestoga’s co-op office? There is a serious lack of communication between coop students and the co-op office staff that can only be blamed on the staff. While no one can doubt that co-op is a valuable experience and Conestoga’s co-op students are learning a great deal, the preparation of placements leaves much to

be desired.

Each student pays $250 per year to the co-op office for his or her placement which will take place in one of the three following semesters.

For this $250, the students get on-site visits from coop advisor, mailing and telephone promotion, and a career development course. The most serious problem robotics students find is that the office is not aware of the courses they are taking, which means the marketing by co-op staff is full of holes.

Some

students find themselves at their second place-

ment doing what they did

in their first.

market limitations. Not every company needs programmable logic controllers and many need AutoCAD detailers. But the students pay a co-op fee in order to get those hard-to-find placements. There is no sense in taking coop if all the students do is something they know like the back of their hand already. No matter what the market conditions are, second and third year students must have placements using their There

new

are, of course,

skills.

Another inexcusable problem students face in all coop programs, especially woodworking, is old lists of companies. These lists, compiled by co-op staff, are the co-op student’s bible. It is essential these lists are up to date. Woodworking students have called companies only to find they have been out of business for four years. Robotics students call companies only to find the president has passed on and the company no longer exists. While co-op is no doubt an excellent learning tool, it could be a lot better if the connection between the students and the companies was improved.

By Johanna Neufeld just

It’s

The

Excuse me. She’s just won a silver and put in the performance of her life. She should be commended for her effort and dedication whether she wins or

appalling.

age

of

What about Kurt Browning? No one

26th

the

winning performance July 27. Ron MacLean, CBC reporter, hardly gave

can forget his unsuccessful program at Lillehammer in 1994. Afterwards, in just wanted to hug his mother but the CBC camera kept zooming in on his distraught and tearful face. My immediate thought was this man is in pain, leave him alone.

her time to catch her breath before

Yes, they are public figures but the

Olympiad has been with

terrible

its

approach.

Poor Silken Laumann.

She

was

absolutely exhausted after her award-

shoving a microphone

good

news

to get the

at her.

as

Yes,

soon as

it

it’s

hap-

is

a

mess

He

what went wrong because she didn’t win a gold medal. also asked her

human and do make

mistakes.

As

the

average Joe, we have the luxury of licking our wounds in private, far from prying eyes.

The pressure

not.

television cover-

pens, but not to that extent.

Auto-insurance

a media Olympic event

Insensitivity:

camera and the people behind those cameras need to learn and to practise compassion. iEveryone has bad days, but letics,

it’s

scrutiny

the

makes

even more

it

not allowed. Athletes are

difficult. Billions

of people around the world will see

your

which is also recorded for I’m surprised how good natured and polite the athletes are. Ironically, the CBC is no match for error,

posterity.

American

television.

times to talk to

he

won

It

tried

Donovan Bailey

three after

a gold medal but the major

U.S. networks monopolized his time. Until the

in ath-

to win is enormous and of a television camera

letes

and

CBC

learns to respect ath-

their feelings.

I’ll

turn off the

television.

No-fault insurance was supposed to be a good thing.

The

was

idea

to

keep premiums

an affordable

at

level,

but the plan failed miserably.

Since

the existence of no-fault insurance, insured

drivers have found a constant rise in their

premiums.

The

final blow was Bob Rae’s new insurance rules, which took effect last May. Under the new rules, pre-

miums

skyrocketed.

Now many

driving without insurance.

Many dependent on

MP

their local

or

Ontario residents are

What choice do

they have?

Everest-Hill

would

This year’s centen-

premiums beyond

Olympiad will go down in history as the most

things

but the issue of

the affordability of the average citizen remains the

same. offer affordable insurance.

Then

to

the federal govern-

ment stepped

in and made an issue of the banks being insurance and decided banks should not be allowed to sell insurance.

involved

What

in

is

the Harris govemifient

doing about insur-

A while back Tories took a crash course insurance but nothing has been done yet. ance?

in

car

In the United States,

no state has adopted no-fault insurance since 1976 and many states with it have rescinded it. They have found the states that still have it also have the highest premiums. An American study found no-fault insurance encouraged reckless driving. It found drivers operate vehicles recklessly

responsibility.

when

they are relieved of personal

The study concluded

that no-fault insur-

ance was an “absolute failure.” The Tories have a great deal of work to do on auto insurance to make it affordable and workable again.

newspaper said the city deserves a gold medal for being the most unor-

be having more than

ganized.

The Olympic Games got off to a devastating start with the tragic crash

Brian Williams,

CBC

anchor, said

nial

relaying the results usually takes a

likely

couple hours, but this year as long as eight hours.

The Games

in

Atlanta have been

plagued by extreme heat, intense congestion and questionable officiating.

To make matters worse,

there has also

been violence.

weeks before

Olympics we heard rumors of homeless people being given one-way tickets out of town and of high-powered sprinklers intended to keep bums off Olympic In the

the

Runners usually accustomed to warming up on a nearby field, were inconvenienced and bussed, on air-

cidence nor was tine July 27 detonation of a homemade pipe-bomb, containing nails and screws, that killed one person and injured around 100.

conditioned buses, to another field and bussed back.

While the Games symbolize peace and unity to many, they are nothing

Female runners arrived at an event which is not surprising, since

but a farce to others. Sadly, these ter-

been

has taken

problems.

late,

organizers admitted that

bus

drivers

haven’t

some of

driven

the

buses

Despite the high price, the stadium

was

break

the

Games

sy continued.

began, the controver-

Anyone

interested

in

attending the opening ceremonies had to pay an exorbitant $650 a ticket. filled to capacity.

Atlanta has had

its

share of prob-

lems with organization.

A

European

Any

down

rorist-like

acts

mark

another

Olympics with the brand of violence, and remind us that there are cruel, vicious people out there.

There have also been problems with officials and crowds. Coaches have complained about inconsistencies, and the noise resulting from a lack of crowd control has caused gymnasts to

As

share o f bad

transportation

have

it

before.

grounds and out of parks.

its

luck.

of Trans World Airlines Flight 800 over New York just days before the games began. The timing of the crash was no coin-

There

unorganized and controversial.

There was a breath of hope when banks started

more

By Deborah

a car for their livelihood went to

MPP, who promised

change.

Change they did

Violence, disorganization and controversy plague Atlanta’s centennial Olympic Games

in tears.

event this size

is

going to expe-

rience problems, but Atlanta seems to

It is

hard to get past the violence of

two weeks despite amazing performances by many athletes. A few world records have been set, but the emotion and patriotism associated with winning gold medals and setting the past

records can’t that

have been

make up lost.

for the lives


SPOKE, August

Context By

Judith

everything

is

Hemm ing

(even more so

we In

Margaret Atwood’s

book

The Handmaid’s the main character

Tale,

as if she

means

arrived at their conclusions. After

it.

life

before

women

were designated as breeders, realizes his request wouldn’t have seemed so odd back then. She notes, “Context is all.” Context is indeed everything. Without context, words and information can be misinterpreted and misunderstood. Journalists have a responsibility each time they pick up a pen or place their fingers on a keyboard. Putting information in context is

reporting

that, is

their

transgressions in

actions.

possible. to be generalists

STATS

— who dominate — achieve and maintain

the

in

1990,

they produced “What’s Wrong with

libel after

McDonald’s.” The sheet criticizes the corporation’s treatment of animals, promotion of unhealthy food, effects on the

the

environment and exploitative employ-

ment practices. As no legal aid

is available in libel cases, Steel and Morris were forced to defend

is

themselves funded entirely by donations from the public, while on the other side of

all

the court sat some of the country’s most expensive lawyers. This caused Marcel Berlins, a leading

about

it.

commentator, to remark, “I cannot think of a case in which the legal cards have been so spectacularly stacked against one party.” In 1991, the defendants unsuccessfully took the British government to the European Court of Human Rights, legal

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Edward Oakley, chief purchasing officer McDonald’s U.K., admits that the polystyrene packaging, which was to be recycled, accumulated over several years and was simply “dumped.” He also said, “I can see (the dumping of waste) to be a benefit, otherwise lots

a fact sheet entitled

the

above scrutiny of its will announce this year’s January 1997. I’m looking

forward to reading

multina-

power.

Greenpeace, for

It is appropriate that the body of the media, often considered society’s watch dog, has a watch dog itself. No group, least

terpretation

how

when McDonald’s sued Helen Steel and Dave Morris, two activists involved with London

Mountains-from-Molehills Prize, and the Thank You, Professor Award for Outstanding Statement of the Obvious.

the media,

British history, provides a

vital insight into

economy

Next,

the

Lobstein,

court

A

friend

Spoke

and fellow

was The

reporter

married.

recently

event gave

and cents, always at liberty to discontinue payments. If, however, a woman’s premium is a husband, she pays for it with her name, her privacy, her

me

it

in dollars

self respect, her very life, ‘until death doth

Emma Goldman.

heard of

co-director

over the

from

Tim Food McDonald’s the

Commission, who said Restaurant’s concept of a balanced diet is “meaningless.” “You could eat a roll of cellotape as part of a balanced diet” he told the court.

In October 1995, the first of five former employees from the Colchester branch of McDonald’s (from crew members up to the store manager) gave evidence. The Colchester branch was made “store of the * year” by McDonald’s in 1987. The ex-employees told of unethical, illegal and oppressive working practices:

watering down of products, working amid sewage, illegal hours worked by young staff and the fiddling of time cards.

By fighting the case, Steel and Morris have turned the tables on the $24-billion a year corporation, often by proving the

Judgment

its.

for the case

Sympathy for the pays for

all

country.”

early 1997.

hearing, the court ruled

full

defendants were putting up a “tenacious defence,” they could not say

Moore

end up with

they were being denied access to justice.

Without a

Patrick

will

that, as the

the right to legal aid or the simplification of libel procedures.

By

you

of vast, empty gravel pits

obvious. They have, through diligence and sacrifice, made the public aware of the multinational corporations’ agendas: to make people, animals and the environment the means for a minority to make their prof-

demanding

Marriage more than a celebration

June 1994, com-

for

which has become the longest

started

It

International

all

world’s

tional corporations

world’s

in

as plant pots and coat hangers.”

Restaurant,

in

pre-trial hearings, the case

underway

how a recycling scheme advertised in the Nottingham branches of McDonald’s, was billed as “recycling into such things,

involving

case,

trial

unique and

an FBI study, a beaten up every 12 seconds.

of

Because journalists tend

The civil

to

The group’s other dishonors include Too Bad To Be True Award,

as yellow

newspaper

largest fast-food chain.

Department for announc-

according

many

mencing with environmental effects of McDonald’s packaging. The court heard

interesting

Britain

in

This was quite inaccurate. The figure was actually an FBI estimate of how often a violent crime of any kind took place.

fair.

an

McDonald’s

Though journalists today are trained to account objectively so as to avoid the problems of yellow reporting, objective misinis still

across

article in the

how

Assessment Service (STATS), is lighting this battle in its own way. Each year the group gives out Dubious Data awards to media outlets which unintentionally skew scientific and statistical information. For 1995, the award for Serious Topics Undermined by Preposterous Claims went

woman

sensational and entertaining at the expense

known

all,

concerning a court case currently being fought

ing

was unduly

that

of accuracy and facts was journalism.

After

came

I

can you explain something lucidly if you yourself don’t understand it? A Washington-based research group, the

to the U.S. Justice

and quotes

merely part of being

Historically,

Mary a l

Peter

Recently,

Statistical

assigned to him for breeding purposes. In the Republic of Gilead, breeders are intended to be a means for having children only.

who remembers

McGoliath finally got

must ask questions until we grasp a subject completely and ask how our sources

Offred, the heroine of the story, finds the man’s wish bizarre because she has been

Offred,

By

We

startled

him

vs.

“facts” unquestioningly.

because a man wants to play scrabble with her and have her kiss is

David

these days of downsizing), must actively guard against accepting in

1996

5,

B y Sean

S.

Finlay

killers

is

expected

in

devil

of today and yesterday keep that

sense alive.

For

years,

possibly

for

and

For people like Jack the Ripper and the Zodiac Killer, the mystery of their identity continues. For people like Bundy, Gacy, and the Bernardos, the mystery may be over, but for years people will continue to wonder how they eluded police and society

quite

centuries,

people have loved vam-

and the vamPeople have

pire stories pire

itself.

fallen

love

in

with

the

The question

why

tunity to

ponder different views on the institution

one side of the fence, marriage is simply a social institution that allows two peo-

mysticism of the dark side. Today, Hollywood is always trying to create new dark tales about grisly killers

known

ple to gain tax advantages, hopefully reside

searching for young blood. They shouldn’t

criminals? This

peace and allow the couple to announce world that they are committed to each

create but simply bring out the real ‘90s

highly intelligent and crafty players.

Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy, and Jeffrey Dahmer, to name a few. These mass murderers have a dirty job, but someone has to do it.

Society loves serial killers, their ways and means, their mind and their skill. Its not murder that’s accepted, but, the killers. These killers get movie-star status, and a

Society can’t accept murder, but in the

guaranteed movie and/or book after their

an oppor-

part,”’ said U.S. anarchist

On

as marriage.

“Therefore shall a man leave his father and mother and cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh,” said the

Most

Bible, Genesis 2:24.

marriage a

is

religions

tell

us

sanctified under a divine power;

man and woman

fulfil their

Hebrew

enter into marriage to

holy duties and to prevent the

couple from entering into a sinful relationship.

The American Heritage dictionary defines

man and Any form of

marriage as “the legal union of a

woman legal

under

as husband and wife.” union would be considered marriage this definition.

Andrea Dworkin, noted U.S. feminist, said “marriage is an institution developed from rape as a practice. Rape, originally defined as abduction, became marriage by

in

to the

other.

Noted feminists and others take a dimmer view of marriage. They say marriage is simply a form of institutionalized sexism that permits acts upon females that would not be tolerated in any other section of society. Religious leaders and others take a different view of marriage. They see marriage as a union of two souls, of two people so much in love, they have no other way of expressing it than joining themselves together permanently.

Quite possibly, both these views of marSome people will marry

of caveman politics.

like our diverse culture, our views on mar-

In this case, the

man

hits the

woman over

the head with a marriage proposal, instead of a tyrannosaur bone.

“In taking out an insurance policy, one

riage as valid.

The only conclusion

available then,

is

that

riage are just as diverse.

To borrow

a line from

my

friend’s

wed-

ding-day chant, “Take it one step at a time, and maybe nothing will go wrong.”

these

outside

world without capture longer than ordinary game of death calls for

killing as

of Andy Warhol’s term, 15 minutes of fame, serial killers have 45 minutes. Their story

serial killer.

lives on.

I

bet a lot of people could

name more

true

society didn’t buy this stuff, serial

we know it would be finished. Bundy don’t have the true sens#*

Killers like

On

the other hand, aside

from the mone-

or fictional murderers than the country’s

tary gains, psychologists say that

past and present prime ministers.

ial killers

even more popular than Think for a moment what would

Serial killers are

gross

the

in the

trial. If

and some for love. Some will whole marriage institution, accepting neither interpretations of mar-

reject

is

made from the terror people like Bundy, Dahmer and the like caused, thus showing that we have accepted these killers. People must admit they all have their own favorite are

Jesus.

for security

evil-doers:

long.

extraordinary killers survive

end, highly successful books and movies

riage are correct.

Marriage meant the taking was to extend in time, to be not only use of possession of, or ownership.” For Dworkin, marriage is simply an institutionalized form capture.

superstar

for so

more

at the

movies, Jesus coming to

some deranged psychopath stalking a university dorm. Today’s serial killers get more publicity than wars in Europe. CNN gave more coverage to the trial of Dahmer than coverage of the war in Bosnia. This was also true of save us

all

or a movie about

CBC’s Bernardo

trial

coverage.

Everyone likes a good murder mystery and the carnage of real life. Infamous

If

God

some

ser~t

claim they do God’s work. existed, then He has His own twist-

ed ways of controlling over-population with floods, disease, starvation and bad milk. Serial killers feed on the fate of being put here for a reason. Just another twisted way

to

control

the

world’s population, the

homeless, prostitution and long bank

line

ups.

When ety’s

it

comes

to

world justice and socicould serial killers

entertainment,

actually be doing

some good?


Page 8

— SPOKE, August

5,

1996

Procrastination has By Bruce my

All

doned

my

those

people

has

ways or have a nervous breakdown. The college offered a continuing education course on over-

convert

is

not

coming

procrastinator.

intended

Although I always was

workaholics into procrastinators,

told

as

my

ally lead to

I

wish

to point out to the

who can never be anything but, that their lives have downfall,

I

somewhat benefited from

have

idle

assignments till the very last minute was just in my nature. Not only have I come to accept

suffer

it

diligent

procrastinators,

since realized leaving important

as a character trait, but also

not

to

would rather be the former.

I

Merely,

pro-

that

crastination would eventu,,

become one of

who always

done on time. However, this column

a

;

I

quest to

things

life

been

I’ve

Manion

ashamed of being an

dawdler any longer. In

fact,

I

I

have

since seen the benefits, and aban-

didn’t sign up in time.

I

This semester,

tried

I

projects early

to

but found that

I

to

could not think

enough

realized that

I

to get

needed the

thing

all

procrastinators

project.

semester that the stress was too much for me to handle, and I felt I would have to change my

feel

last

me

to motivate

from is severe self-induced stress caused by leaving things to the night before. There was a time

I

stress

into completing a

lived for

I

deep-

lies

I

that

Moses parting the Red Sea, that would always come after the assignment was finished. like

the deadline

till

so

habitual,

know

I

became

me

transformed

it

into an incredibly efficient

work-

Accept that stress is not your enemy, but a friend who will motivate you when the time comes and reward you with an afterwards. If

you find too often

for those of

who

you out there

are worried you’ll never out-

grow your delaying ways, don’t be upset than likely you’ve per-

fected a technique that’s properly suited to

you

to get the

may mean

It

nights, every

job done.

few sleepless

a

once

while, but

in a

that

you

are

not getting your assignments in

on time, then

er.

More needed

it

extraordinary surge of adrenalin

Stalling

So

amazing rush of empowerment, which made me Plus,

know

procrastinate because

I

the assignment accomplished. I

I

er than that.

start

avoid anxiety,

clearly or quickly

mother would say

can.

of a rapidly approaching deadline

ways.

One

am

eternal

their

usual

My

that high, but

but as

procrastination,

advantages

its

that

is

is

it

your system

failing you.

Although you have learned to work efficiently and under pressure, you must adapt your system to allow ‘enough time to accomplish the work, even if it’s completed at the very last minute, just

before deadline. Well,

time to conclude

it’s

deadline in three minutes.

those are the sacrifices.

CD Review

Sarah McLachlan’s new album a jewel By Jennifer Broomhead widespread rumors of of writer’s block, singer-songwriter Vancouver extraordinaire Sarah McLachlan has given her fans another jewel with Rarities B-Sides & Other In spite of

bad

a

case

,

Stuff.

Touch, Solace and Fumbling Towards Ecstasy, as well as some live tracks and cover songs. New music includes Dear God, I Will Remember You and Full of Grace. McLachlan’s voice is as powerful and haunting as ever. In Dear God, she goes from sounding timid to being accusatory and

The album is quite similar to 1994’s The Freedom Sessions, an

angry

compilation of songs from Fumbling Towards Ecstasy, her third and most successful endeavor. However, it has enough new and different material to prove to. skeptics she has still got

of the world. Her rich, textured

acoustic

in less

she questions

than four minutes as

God

about the state

harmonies are equalled by none, especially on tracks like Full of Grace and Blue (a Joni Mitchell cover).

it.

Song for a Winter’s Night, a Gordon Lightfoot cover, stands

Rarities contains remixes from McLachlan ’s first three albums.

out as one of the most beautiful tracks on the album. McLachlan’s

extensive musical training dent, as

evi-

is

her talent for musical

is

arrangement. Along with singing lead vocals and playing acoustic guitar,

McLachlan sang

the back-

ing harmonies and arranged piece.

The

result

is

the

outstanding

and romantic.

On

a less positive note, a

few of

the remixes are a bit too close to

dance music, relying too heavily on campy drum beats and not enough on McLachlan’s true talents. They are out of place on such a textured album. Fans of Sarah McLachlan will be hoping for more new material with her next endeavor, but until then, Rarities should not be missed.

CD Review Black Crowes keep dat southern charm By Sean Grab a set

Finlay

S.

bottle of Jack Daniel’s,

yerself

down

in

yer rockin’

good South and turn up dat dare new Black Crowes album Three Snakes and One Charm. Da boys from

chair facing the

Georgia are back. I reckon it’s about time those there good ol’ boys return. The Black Crowes have not recorded an album since back about '94 with their last album Amorica. Three Snakes and One Charm holds the traditional blues sound of the South, a sound the Crowes acquired in their second album

Southern Harmony and Musical Companion in 1992. The new

album

is

great for blues sound, but

if you liked the Black Crowes’ rock sound from way back when they first arrived on the scene with Shake Your Money Maker in 1990, with the hit Hard

not so hot

to

ence.

Within the CD, there is a very cheaply produced booklet. The Crowes use to have a fair sized booklet with lyrics and photos. Three Snakes and One Charm 12

contains

which has

Handle.

The CD, which was recorded at Chateau de le Crowe in Atlanta,

tracks

One

starting

with

Under a Mountain,

the first song

possibilities for a hit.

Let

song,

Me

Share

the

Ride, sounds a bit like the old

their

blues of Led Zepplin. Not bad, but

other albums with only 50 minutes

no chance for a hit. All the songs were written by the lead singer Chris brothers, Robinson and lead guitarist Rich Robinson. The band is backed up by Steve Gorman on drums,

Georgia,

is

shorter than

of music. Also, the

CD

all

doesn’t

contain their traditional non-studio recorded hidden track at the

end of the album, a song that is usually recorded under the influ-

GOOD

BERRY Scott Furness buys “Faye” on Kossuths Road, July 22. Johnny Colt with bass, guitarist Marc Ford and Eddie Harsch on keyboard. Overall, the for a

band

album

that

is

is good, but plagued with

some

strawberries from (P hoto by Janet white)

band members always in rehab and the brothers threatening to walk out, I’m surprised they actually came out with a CD as good as this one.

Book Review End of Science: a sobering discovery for By Paul Tuns

plays in

It

is

the great conceit of every

generation

to

think

that

it

has

impossible. In the past few years

ence, such as Einstein’s theory of

seen a number of books

Now comes

HIGH

— Devon Kennedy, Waterloo Park.

5,

spent July 29 afternoon play(Photo by Tracy Huffman)

end of science.

He says all new discoveries are to made incrementally, that there will be

we have

FLYIN’

order to be so brave to declare

the

reached the mountain-top of knowledge, that further progress is

declaring the end of this or that.

ing with his kite at

some semantic gymnastics

John Horgan and The End of Science: Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the Twilight of the Scientific Age. Based on interviews he did with the scientific giants of our age (Stephen Jay Gould, Stephen Hawking, Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, E.O. Wilson, for example) for Scientific American, Horgan concludes that no major discoveries are left to be made. But Horgan

no more giant leaps of

relativity

evolution. the

new

sci-

or Darwin’s theory of

Furthermore, he discoveries will

says

not be

Surely,

he says, more will

known about how

the

be

mind works,

or about dark matter.

It

done incrementally and

seem significant. So Horgan is arguing less

will will

al tool.

Horgan begins by quoting Albert Michelson, who said all major scientific discovery is near complete,

human knowledge and few

made

earth-shattering or life-altering.

be not

seems, end of science than for the end of sciit

for the

all

mology, neuroscience, even social science) through two or three emblematic scientists. It is effective and useful as an organization-

if

is at its

any discoveries the

in

next

zenith, will

be

century.

Michelson said that in 1894. The century has clearly stood Michelson on his head. It is sobering to think that past

mankind has reached tual limits;

it

we have

its

intellec-

goes against the

faith

cusses the end of various branches

Horgan writes a provocative book that clearly will not win him many

of science (physics, biology, cos-

friends.

entific

appreciation.

Horgan

dis-

that

in progress.

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