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SPLITZ Support Service

Equality Report 2016-2017 Louise Wilson FCMI Company Secretary July 2017


At Splitz we take our responsibility to people very seriously. This applies equally to our team as well as to our beneficiaries. This year we invested over ÂŁ35,000 in developing our team. All staff and volunteers are given the opportunity to attend a range of training opportunities as well as achieving nationally recognised qualifications. Excellence in how we manage both paid staff and volunteers is demonstrated by our commitment to retaining PQASSO and Investing in Volunteers accreditation.

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Contents Summary

4

The Team Recruitment Retention Targets

6 8 10 11

Beneficiaries Devon Gloucestershire Wiltshire Targets

12 14 16 18 20

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SUMMARY

• 113 paid staff and 40 volunteers • £35,000 spent on training • 15,901 referrals to 9 service types in 3 counties

Introduction The purpose of this report is to examine whether our HR policies and procedures are delivering equality of opportunity in fulfilment of our duties under various equality and discrimination legislation. This report sets out the results of monitoring between 1 April 2015 and 31 March 2016. Age and age group is determined at the end of the reporting period. We have sub-divided the report to reflect data for each of the counties we work in and each of the service types we deliver (eg outreach, perpetrator programmes).

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Staff There has been a high turnover of paid staff (30%) this year. This is expected given the number of changes to funding streams and services. Retention for paid staff remains high (78%) indicating a higher turnover of temporary or short term staff this year. We have reshaped services in Devon and Wiltshire in line with funder requirements. Our other services remained steady with minimal change in staffing levels. We have fewer volulteers as our volunteer programmes in Devon and Gloucestershire did not develop as expected, mainly due to other more pressing demands.

Beneficiaries The range of data collected on our management systems allows us to provide useful demographic information about our beneficiaries. This year we analysed our data to identify gaps in our services. Our services are delivered in rural shire counties with high concentrations of white British residents, each with a main town or city with a more diverse population. We have used our analysis to map our beneficiaries against the expected diversity for each county.

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THE TEAM • • • •

88 paid staff Devon 31; Glos 23; Wiltshire 34 80 female; 8 male 33 full-time; 55 part-time

Age: 40-59 yo Disability: disabled Ethnicity: BME Gender: male Working pattern: full-time Age Group The majority of our team are between 40 and 59 years old (60%). This is a reduction on last year (2015-16: 62%), and reflects a larger proportion of staff between 20-39 years (35%) (2015-16: 29%) Disability The number of staff reporting a disability also rose to 5% (201516: 3%).

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2017 60% 5% 1% 9% 37%

Change from 2016 Þ down from 62% Ý up from 3% Þ down from 3% Þ down from 14% Ý up from 28%


Ethnicity The ethnic mix of our team fell to 1% BME (2015-16: 3%). We have seen a steady number of applications from BME candidates for all vacancies and are content we have reached a wide range of the local population. Gender We have 9% male employees (2015-16: 14%). We continue to employ female workers for our DV outreach services in accordance with exemptions in the Equality Act. Males are welcome in all our other roles, including volunteers and trustees. Working Pattern We count anyone employed 35 hrs or more per week as full-time. There was a slight reduction in the number of fulltime staff, this year we had 33 full-time staff (37%) (2015-16: 28%).

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RECRUITMENT • 22 vacancies • 338 applicants: 92 people interviewed • 22 appointments

In 2016-17 we recruited for 22 vacancies and made 22 appointments. We advertise locally and aims to have employee representation that reflects the communities where we work. Adverts for vacancies are also placed on a number of websites specific to our sector and the type of work we are recruiting for. We collect monitoring data at the application stage and the interview stage. Although completing a monitoring form is not compulsory at the application stage it is encouraged at the interview stage. This is analysed to help ensure there is no conscious or subconscious bias in our recruitment processes. Recruitment data currently only includes data for paid staff. Recruitment data in 2017-18 will also include data for volunteers.

Age Group There is a fair mix of ages at all stages of the recruitment process. This year we appointed more staff aged 20-29 (27%) (2015-16: 23%) and significantly fewer staff aged 50-59 (14%) (2015-16: 31%).

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Disability Almost 6% of applicants declared a disability at the application stage (2015-16: 0%). Only 2% of those interviewed declared a disability (2015-16: 3%). 5% of those appointed considered they had a disability (2015-16: 0%)

Ethnicity 6% of applicant declared a BME ethnicity (2015-16: 4%). 2% of interviewees and 5% of appointees were from a BME background (2015-16: 16%, 13%).

Gender Male applicants represented 5% of all applicants, 7% of interviewees and 5% of appointees (2015-16: 6%, 11%, 0%).

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RETENTION

• Overall retention: 76% (target: 80%) • Overall turnover: 31% (target: 20%) Retention Retention is measured as the number of staff with more than 1 year of service at the year end divided by the total number of staff 1 year ago. Retention for paid staff: 78% Retention for volunteers: 63% Retention for trustees: 82% Overall retention: 76% (target: 80%) Overall retention is slightly below target, but low retention of volunteers contributed to the lower than expected overall rate. Turnover Turnover is measured as the number of posts vacated in the year divided by the average number of posts during the year. Turnover for paid staff: 30% Turnover for volunteers: 42% Turnover for trustees: 19% Overall turnover: 31% (target: 20%) Overall turnover is much higher than our target. Again, the higher turnover of volunteers contributed to the higher than expected rate. The high turnover in part-time posts and a restructure contributed to the higher than avarage staff turnover. Most of the volunteer turnover was due to volunteers being sought for projects that, in the end, we were unable to fund. 10


TARGETS Recruitment Volunteers %

Paid Trustees staff % %

Overall %

Male applicants

>10

>25

>33

20-25

BME applicants

>10

>10

>15

5-15

Disabled applicants

>10

>10

>15

5-15

Paid Trustees staff % %

Overall %

Staff mix Volunteers % Male

>10

>12

>33

20-25

BME

>5

>5

>5

8-12

>10

>5

>5

8-15

Disabled

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BENEFICIARIES • • • •

12,175 adult referrals 3,771 child referrals 9 service types: 7 adult and 2 CYP services 3 counties

Referrals The figures used in this section are for referrals to our services. While it is possible to provide data on those who take up a service with us, we still have work to do for every referral and feel this gives a better indication of the amount of work undertaken by each service. The total number of referrals this year was 15,901, representing a 36% increase over last year (11,655). Service Types This year we operated services across 3 counties, delivering 9 service types: • • • • • • • • •

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Domestic abuse helpdesk Adult domestic abuse outreach Independent domestic violence advisers (IDVA) Workshops for women affected by domestic abuse Domestic abuse support to children and young people (CYP) Workshops for young people Male voluntary perpetrator programme Women’s safety service Mentoring/befriending service


Counties Our services were delivered in Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Devon. In all cases our services are provided in the local authority areas of Wiltshire Council, Gloucestershire County Council and Devon County Council, and not the whole ceremonial county area. Demographics The majority of our services are for adults; however, demand for our services for children and young people has increased, and looks set to increase again next year. We are able to provide a range of demographic data about the people who use our services. This year we have included data on religion. County data shows the change in demand in all areas has increased.

Devon Gloucestershire Wiltshire

2015-16 3320 6608* 1727

2016-17 3920 9521 2505

Change Ý up 18% Ý up 44% Ý up 45%

* figure restated

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DEVON

Local authority area demographic data Age/Gender

Gender

Ethnicity

Disability

14

Religion


BENEFICIARIES • • • •

3,920 referrals: 3,047 adult; 873 CYP 31 staff Area of benefit: 6,564 km2 Population density: 1,100/km2

Gender

Age

Ethnicity

Religion

Disability 15


GLOUCESTERSHIRE Local authority area demographic data

Age/Gender Gender

Ethnicity

Disability

16

Religion


BENEFICIARIES • • • •

9,521 referrals: 6,943 adult; 2,578 CYP 23 staff Area of benefit: 2,653 km2 Population density: 2,300/km2

Gender

Age

Ethnicity

Religion

Disability 17


WILTSHIRE Local authority area demographic data

Age/Gender

Gender

Ethnicity

Disability

18

Religion


BENEFICIARIES • • • •

2,505 referrals: 2,185 adult; 320 CYP 34 staff (includes 9 HQ staff) Area of benefit: 3,255 km2 Population density: 1,400/km2

Gender

Age

Ethnicity

Religion

Disability 19


TARGETS Service user mix 2017-2018 Disability %

BME %

Gender % male

Devon

15-25

5-15

5-15

Gloucestershire

15-25

10-15

5-15

Wiltshire

15-25

5-15

10-20

15-25

5-15

5-20

Disability %

BME %

Gender %

< 10

< 10

< 10

<5

<5

<5

< 15

< 10

< 10

< 10

< 10

< 10

Total

‘Not known’ data 2017-2018 Devon Gloucestershire Wiltshire Total

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Profile for Splitz Support Service

Equality Monitoring Report 2016-2017  

Report on our team and the people we work with

Equality Monitoring Report 2016-2017  

Report on our team and the people we work with

Profile for splitz
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