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I remember the day I met Natalie Stoner, fifteen years ago. She was the then-girlfriend of a childhood friend. We were all headed out to dinner, and she felt it necessary to change into emerald green knee-highs with her skirt. I knew right then she was something more than a spectacular redhead, but it wasn’t until later that I discovered the startling scope and clarity of her relentless imagination. Natalie creates art using most every imaginable medium. While I first fell in love with her assemblages, her work of every sort from oil to photography and beyond resonates deeply with me. Recently, I asked Natalie to provide a few of her images and “sit-down” for a virtual interview with me. Your art seems to have evolved so profoundly over the years. Does this evolution reflect your life, and, can you draw parallels between the two?

I think art and life are absolutely linked, the paths are usually parallel, and at times, they feel as if they are braided together. For me, it is as important to live an artful life, as it is to make tangible works of art. The two are not only parallel, they are also usually entwined. Art is a way of meditating for many people. A way of finding harmony. If you cannot find balance and get grounded, your life suffers. If a person is called to make art, they will make it no matter what or they will become desperately uncomfortable. I think it  only follows that art, mine or any other artist’s, will evolve as we do. In terms of specific parallels, as a younger artist, I was inspired by literature. I did an entire series of Siamese twin paintings inspired by the Siamese twins in Katherine Dunn’s amazing novel Geek Love, for example.  The things that have obsessed and intrigued me in life have always come through in works of art. Some symbols, 9

Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

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