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less interesting without that candy-appled crown resting on the top of her head. It makes a person think it is the crown of a circus elephant that somehow had forgot to put it on before hitting the street in the queen’s parade. What queen - don’t know in the slightest! What parade - does it matter? The answer is: not completely. The place in which that crown ends up sitting is either on your heart or perched upon a wrinkle of your mind. It becomes impressed and will stay there interminably. What becomes even more surprising are that the details that compose the rest of the work will be equally engendered. It can make one feel like they could potentially, given the right amount of time and tools, recreate a sketch of the entire piece like some sort of autist. To erase the “things Vania” from you would mean having to either nuzzle up to a cold bony cheek or lie in wait against it in a staring competition over tea until you simply perish. Saying that the niche Vania is carving out for himself is a rhetorical and divine one, and then attributing that that niche is “timeless” is as idiotic as wondering if people will be talking about Rembrandt in the next three hundred years. Rembrandt Zouravliov is not, but it would be wrong to think that composition is only bound up with technique, subject, or color, especially when the simplicity of Zouravliov’s tonality is a strikingly powerful one. Big, intricate, florid, gothic, abundant and follicle are the ways in which the frame is filled up with what Zouravliov is talking about. The real estate of the canvas looks to be bugged up with black ink and a ball of debt from two-million for-closures on one aristocratic swamp cottage that has taken place over its four hundred year period - it is dense, but with the ambition of a house vine and less like the hairball from an old 169

Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

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